MSc Economics and International Relations

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“The practical nature of the courses, where theoretical models were discussed and evaluated using real-life industrial examples, was superb preparation for using economics in the real world.”

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Shaun Day, Economics Graduate

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Part of our Applied Training Programme which is designed to provide training in new and vocationally attractive skills in Economics, this Master's provides a platform to understand international economics and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course will allow you to develop skill highly desired by employers; an ability to understand international institutions and geopolitics, as well as the analytical skills of economics.

You will study compulsory modules in economic concepts and econometric methods, international relations theory and international political economy. Optional modules may be taken from with the School of Economics and the School of Political, Social and International Studies.

Overview

MSc Economics and International Relations provides a platform to understand international economics and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The course gives you considerable flexibility to choose an area of geographical specialisation. It will allow you to develop skill highly desired by employers; an ability to understand international institutions and geopolitics, as well as the analytical skills of economics. It is taught in collaboration with staff and students from Political, Social and International Studies, which also has a strong tradition of interdisciplinary research and teaching.

This course fits into our Applied Training Programme which is designed to provide training in new and vocationally attractive skills in Economics. It is appropriate either for graduates with no economics background who wish to understand how markets work and to develop the analytical skills of an economist, or for graduates in economics who wish to develop specialist expertise without committing to full research training.  This course provides training that places specialist areas in a wider economic context and shows how the insight from economics can improve workplace performance.

The programme should appeal to those who wish to pursue a career in the areas of international business or international relations.

Course Structure

You will study compulsory modules in economic concepts and econometric methods, international relations theory and international political economy.

You will also have the option to select from a range of modules offered within Political, Social and International Studies and the School of Economics. For further details of the modules currently on offer, please see the Course Profile tab.

Assessment

Assessment will be carried out through combinations of coursework and exams. You will also write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, supervised individually by an academic from the School.

Additional Support offered by the School of Economics

In order to prepare you for your Master’s degree the School of Economics runs an introductory course in Mathematics and Statistics for Economists in the fortnight preceding the Master’s programme. While this course is not compulsory, it is recommended that you attend. The course will run from 10th September 2018 - 21st September 2018.

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 140 credits:

Name Code Credits

ECONOMETRIC METHODS

Are you interested in working with data? Would you like to be able to make economics forecasts or predictions, or test an economic theory? If so, this module will introduce you the empirical techniques you need to satisfy these interests. This module will introduce you to econometrics, which is a combination of economic theory, mathematical economics, economic statistics and mathematical statistics. You'll learn some basic econometric techniques that will enable you to obtain numerical estimates of, for example, the relationship between expenditure on a good and income, or the relationship between years of education and pay. In addition, as your seminars will take place in the computer labs, you'll gain skills in analysing data using the econometric computer package STATA. In the first part of the module, you'll be shown how to estimate a simple regression model, interpret your findings and test the relationships between variables. As you progress, you'll learn how to identify problems with your model and how to address these problems. In lectures you'll learn about the techniques; in seminars you'll apply these techniques to a variety of economic problems and estimate models with the help of STATA. In the later part of the module you'll consider a more advanced style of modelling, which is appropriate for dealing with data on the choices made by individuals. For example, owning your own home rather than renting, or going to university instead of entering the labour market. By the end of the module you'll be able to estimate appropriate regression models, identify problems which may arise and know how to address them. In addition, you'll be able use STATA and understand some of the methods, models and techniques that may be useful in the workplace.

ECO-7000A

20

ECONOMIC CONCEPTS

Introducing micro and macro economic analysis, this module will familiarise you with a wide range of economic tools which can be applied to issues relating to your Applied Training Programme. It covers, in particular, consumer and producer choice, market equilibrium, market structure, externalities and public goods, the macroeconomics of inflation, unemployment and growth and macroeconomic policy.

ECO-7011A

20

ECONOMICS DISSERTATION (60 CREDITS)

Economics Dissertation is the "icing on the cake" of an Economics MSc. It is your opportunity to spend a period of 2 or 3 months working exclusively on a topic of your own choice, at your own pace, with guidance from a supervisor. The module commences with a sequence of "dissertation training" lectures during the Spring Semester, including such themes as choosing a topic, accessing data, searching the literature, referencing, and qualitative data analysis. There are further dissertation training lectures during late June and early July, held in computer labs, with the objective of providing the types of econometric skills often required in dissertation research. The Econometric software STATA is used, the same as used in taught modules in Econometrics. At the end of the Spring semester you'll submit a research proposal stating the research question you would like to address and proposing a suitable methodology. On the basis of the Proposal, a suitable supervisor is allocated. At least three meetings with the supervisor take place between May - July. At the first meeting, the research proposal is discussed. By the time of the third and final meeting, you should ideally have supplied a first draft of the dissertation for your supervisor to provide feedback on. The deadline for the dissertation is at the end of August and the word limit for dissertations is either 8,000 or 12,000, depending on which MSc you are taking.

ECO-7023X

60

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

The main objective of this course is to introduce you to the academic study of International Relations theory. You'll investigate leading theoretical approaches and become familiar with important concepts and debates in International Relations theory. You'll be introduced to the nature of knowledge claims (epistemology) and fundamental assumptions about social/international reality (ontology) in International Relations.

PPLI7005A

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE

In this module you will develop your understanding of the international economy, specifically international trade. You'll examine patterns in the global flows of goods using models of international trade theory and ask who benefits from trade and who it can harm, relating your insights to the current debate about globalisation. This module also deals with controversial issues like the effect of trade on the environment and strategic trade policy.

ECO-7016B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS

Gain a thorough grounding in the key issues in environmental and resource economics. This module provides an overview of the economic and econometric principles that serve as pivotal tools in ensuring that natural resources are sustainably valued and managed in a global economic environment. The applied nature of the module is complemented by technical papers that form the subject of the discussions in seminar sessions. Open to postgraduate students enrolled on both ATP and APP programmes, this module will enhance the econometric principles taught in the Autumn Semester by applying analytical and statistical methods to the field of environmental economics so as to emphasise the empirical relevance of these theories.

ECO-7020B

20

FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS

This technical finance module is suited to students who wish to pursue a career in the financial sector. The focus is on valuation and risk analysis of financial products, and the module is highly analytical, with weekly exercise sessions in computer labs. Topics covered include: continuous-time stochastic processes, stochastic models for security prices, bonds, term structure of interest rates, futures and forwards, options, swaps, hedging and credit risk.

ECO-7013B

20

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

Are foreign exchange rates predictable? How can a firm hedge foreign exchange risk? What effect do interest rates have on currency values? Why are exchange rates so volatile? Are exchange rates based on macroeconomic fundamentals, or determined by speculative activity? These are the types of questions you will explore on this module. International Finance lies at the intersection of finance and macroeconomics. You'll begin by learning the general finance tools of option pricing and risk management, before focusing on how to apply these tools to look, in particular, at exchange rates. This will involve understanding the structure of the foreign exchange market, examining theories of exchange rate determination, and looking at the foreign exchange futures and options markets. You'll learn through a mixture of lectures, which have regular intervals for team or individual work, as well as seminars and self-study. Assessment comprises of technical and essay questions. These questions will be set during a class test (20%), as part of an essay (20%) and during a summer exam (60%). By the end of the module you'll be equipped for further study in financial economics or a career in the finance industry, particularly in roles related to foreign exchange.

ECO-7015B

20

MULTINATIONAL FIRMS

This module is structured around three main questions: why do multi-nationals exist? What are their beneficial effects? Why might they sometimes be a cause for concern? In answering these questions we confront a variety of theoretical and empirical methodologies (eg, oligopoly theory, transactions costs, econometric, case studies in corporate strategy) and draw upon various branches of Economics (international, industrial, labour, financial and political economy).

ECO-7010B

20

THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF CHINA AND JAPAN IN THE MODERN WORLD

The module looks at the history of China and Japan from the mid-19th century to the present day. You'll cover the attempts at modernisation, conflict between the two nations, their relationships with the Asian region and the United States. You'll also investigate their contrasting attempts to develop in the postwar period. In addition, you'll assess their current policies and the issues of importance to China and Japan in the 21st century, and explore whether they can move beyond the legacy of this difficult history.

PPLI7007B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

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Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject Any Subject
  • Degree Classification 2.2 or equivalent

Entry Requirement

Applicants should normally have a good first degree from a recognised higher education institution. The University will also take into account the employment experience of applicants where relevant.

It is normal for undergraduate students to apply for entry to postgraduate programmes in their final year of study. Applicants who have not yet been awarded a degree may be offered a place conditional on them attaining a particular class of degree.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic requirements for this course, you may be able to study one of the International Graduate Diploma programmes offered by our partner INTO UEA. These programmes guarantee progression to selected Master's degrees if students achieve the appropriate grade. For more details please click here: International Graduate Diploma in Economics.

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Fees and Funding

Fees for the academic year 2018/19 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £7,765
  • International Students: £16,000

Fees listed are inclusive of the optional 2-week pre-sessional Mathematics and Statistics for Economists course.

International applicants from outside the EU may need to pay a deposit.

Living Expenses

Approximately £9,135 living expenses will be needed to adequately support yourself.

Scholarships and Funding

A variety of Scholarships may be offered to UK/EU and International students. Scholarships are normally awarded to students on the basis of academic merit and are usually for the duration of the period of study. Please click here for more detailed information about funding for prospective Economics students.

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

 

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515