MPhys Physics


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Master of Physics



UCAS Course Code
F303
A-Level typical
AAB (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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Physics is the most fundamental science, answering the most far-reaching and fascinating questions we can pose. Study with us and question everything – from the physics of our planet to the quantum universe.

- Study in a multidisciplinary faculty with a thriving research community, specialising in geophysics, fluid mechanics, chemical physics and quantum physics.
- Gain transferable skills highly sought after by employers – from problem-solving and project work, to communication and technical expertise.
- Take advantage of top-class facilities, including spectroscopy and ultrafast laser equipment, high-tech geophysics apparatus and experimental wave tanks.
- Tailor your degree with a huge range of optional modules.

Overview

Physics is concerned with the most fundamental questions about nature and reality. It’s an inspiring subject that teaches both abstract, creative reasoning and practical, applied knowledge – you can investigate the nature of matter and the origins of the Universe, while researching the movement of ocean waves and learning about the mechanics of sound.

The MPhys course gives you an extra year of study over the BSc Physics, so you’ll graduate with a Masters qualification at the end of a single, integrated degree.

Thanks to the diversity and fundamental importance of physics, it’s not only a fascinating discipline but a highly regarded qualification. You’ll learn a huge range of transferable skills – in maths, communication and teamwork – and get the chance to develop practical professional skills in areas like academic research, engineering and computing.

By studying physics at UEA you’ll develop a deep curiosity about the workings of our Universe, gain powerful scientific skills to employ in a huge range of areas, and leave as one of the most employable graduates in the country.

Recognised by the Institute of Physics

The Institute of Physics has granted recognition status to our BSc Physics and MPhys Physics degrees starting 2017.  Recognition status can be awarded by the Institute to degrees which are too new to meet all the criteria for accreditation, but which satisfy the majority of criteria and contain at least 120 credits of core physics content.  Students graduating from a recognised physics degree are eligible to become members of the Institute later in their careers.

Dr Martin Loftus, the Physics Course Director, said “It is great to get such recognition of our new Physics degrees in place just as we embark on this new and exciting venture. We are looking forward to our first cohort of physics students in 2017”.

What you’ll learn

This MPhys combines a fundamental grounding in core physics topics with a range of optional modules in applied fields, culminating in a Masters-level project that will really strengthen your skills as a physicist. The final year will deepen your knowledge of the subject, give you more opportunities to engage in independent research and give you an advanced qualification that can differentiate you in the job market or lead into a research post.

We’ve got a particularly strong research current in environmental sciences and physics, giving you the chance to study modules in solid earth geophysics, meteorology and oceanography at the same time as more pure physics topics like relativity, astrophysics and quantum mechanics.

You can also focus on areas connected to computing and mathematics like electronics, mathematical modelling, fluid dynamics or statistical mechanics, as well as chemistry-based topics like thermodynamics, spectroscopy or chemical physics.

Course Structure

This four-year degree introduces you to many of the major themes in physics in your first year, before delivering more advanced teaching in the second and third years that will allow you to specialise in a particular field. The course culminates in a Masters-level research project that gives you the chance to study a specific topic of your choice in real depth.

First Year

Your first year will consist of six compulsory modules that give you a strong grounding in a wide range of topics. You’ll be introduced to key physics concepts, start developing crucial mathematical skills, and learn about some of the scientific fields that these skills can be applied to. Modules cover topics including light, atoms, molecules, spectroscopy, the dynamic planet and astrophysics.

Second Year

The second year enables you to start selecting compulsory modules that suit your interests. You’ll build on what you’ve learnt in the previous year with teaching in intermediate physics topics, mathematics for scientists, quantum mechanics and molecular structure. You’ll also be introduced to physical chemistry and pick from optional modules that cover electronics, oceanography, meteorology, geophysics, special relativity and renewable energy.

Third Year

Your third year is hugely customisable, with a huge range of modules to choose from, although dominated by an independent research project that will enable you to work on a real problem in physics with an expert supervisor. You’ll also receive training in advanced physics topics and laboratory skills.

Fourth Year

The fourth year enables you to complete an advanced individual project that will further develop your independent research skills. Also incorporating a range of advanced taught modules, this year provides you with Masters-level training that will hone your expertise in a specific field and prepare you for a research post or physics-based career.

Course Modules

Modules are subject to approval. A list of example modules is shown below:

Year 1 – Compulsory (120 credits)

  • Electromagnetism, Special Relativity, Optics and Quantum Mechanics
  • Light, Atoms and Molecules
  • Mathematics for Scientists A
  • Dynamic Planet: Properties and Processes
  • Astrophysics and Acoustics
  • Probability and Mechanics

Year 2 – Compulsory (100 credits)

  • Intermediate Topics and Laboratory in Physics
  • Mathematics for Scientists B
  • Mathematics for Scientists C
  • Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry
  • Heat, Atoms and Molecules

Year 2 – Optional (20 credits)

  • Analogue and Digital Electronics
  • Renewable Energy
  • Ocean Circulation
  • Shelf Sea Dynamics and Coastal Processes
  • Global Tectonics
  • Meteorology I

Year 3 – Compulsory (80 credits)

  • Advanced Topics in Physics
  • Research Project
  • Advanced Physics Laboratory

Year 3 – Optional (40 credits)

  • Chemical Physics - Physical Chemistry
  • Analogue and Digital Electronics
  • Renewable Energy
  • Solid Earth Geophysics
  • Solid Earth Geophysics with Field Course
  • Ocean Circulation
  • Shelf Sea Dynamics and Coastal Processes
  • Geodynamics: Earth's Engine
  • Meteorology I
  • Meteorology II
  • Meteorology II (with Field Course)
  • Topics in Mathematics
  • Science Communications
  • Physical Chemistry II
  • Electrical Generation and Distribution
  • Geophysical Hazards
  • Modelling Environmental Process
  • Climate Systems
  • Geosciences Field Course: Greece
  • Dynamical Meteorology
  • Fluid Dynamics
  • Dynamical Oceanography
  • Statistical Mechanics
  • Electricity and Magnetism

Year 4 – Compulsory (80 credits)

  • Masters Level Project
  • Advanced Topics in Physics (Masters Level)

Year 4 Optional (40 credits)

  • Modern Embedded Technology
  • Ocean Observing Systems
  • Modelling Environmental Processes
  • Climate Change: Physical Science Basis
  • Research Topics in Earth Science
  • Geosciences Fieldcourse: Ireland / Greece
  • Dynamical Meteorology with Advanced Topics
  • Fluid Dynamics with Advanced Topics
  • Advanced Mathematical Techniques with Advanced Topics
  • Quantum Fluids
  • Free Surface Flows with Advanced Topics
  • Dynamical Oceanography with Advanced Topics
  • Slow Viscous Flow
  • Statistical Mechanics with Advanced Topics
  • Electricity and Magnetism with Advanced Topics
  • Fluid Structure Interaction

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAB including Mathematics and Physics
  • International Baccalaureate 33 points including HL 6 in Mathematics and HL 6 in Physics
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAB including Mathematics and Physics
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAABB or 4 subjects at H1, 2 at H2 including Mathematics and Physics
  • Access Course Pass Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 9 credits at Level 3 and Distinction in 36 credits at Level 3 to include 12 credits of Mathematics and 12 credits of Physics
  • European Baccalaureate 80% overall including 80% in Mathematics and Physics

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

All applicants are required to have A level Mathematics and Physics, or equivalent

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you. The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit 

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Engineering)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk 

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515