MBBS Medicine With a Foundation Year

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RORY MORRIS BUTLER, (GRADUATE 2015)

Walk out into the world as a highly competent, empathic and confident doctor, with a course that gives you hands-on experience and rigorous training in modern practices from the very start.

Medicine at UEA is supportive and inclusive. We want everyone who has the passion and potential to succeed to have the chance to study here. So, if you don’t yet meet the academic requirements of our medical degree, our MB BS degree in Medicine with a Foundation Year is the perfect first step. We’re more interested in your potential to succeed rather than your grades, so as well as looking at your results, we’ll look at the school you studied at, your family income, your area of residence, and whether you live in the East Anglian region.

Overview

The Foundation Year of this course will equip you with the academic skills and knowledge you’ll need to progress onto our five-year MB BS Medicine course. Complete it successfully and you’ll be well on your way to your career as a qualified doctor.

At Norwich Medical School we put patients at the heart of everything we do. With a curriculum approved by the General Medical Council (GMC), and developed in accordance with their standards, our MB BS degree in Medicine will see you embarking on placements almost immediately. So you’ll gain early exposure to the clinical practices essential to addressing the complex needs of patients in the 21st century. And you’ll graduate ready to use your skills and knowledge in your chosen field to improve the health of patients in your care.

Our rigorous training ensures we develop doctors who are knowledgeable scholars and scientists. And we pride ourselves in providing the highest possible quality of learning, in a supportive, nurturing and student-centred environment where you can reach your potential.

Highlights of Medicine at UEA

  • Learning with and from real patients from the first month of your course
  • Exploring anatomy linked to clinical practice in our anatomy facility, including dissection
  • Access to a varied range of clinical placements on acute hospital wards, specialist units and in general practice
  • Linking theory with practice across the course, including during small-group teaching sessions and within primary care placements
  • Developing your clinical skills with access to the world-class and architecture-award winning Bob Champion Research and Education Building, with its state-of-the-art facilities and purpose-built clinical resource centre
  • Developing the art of communication through our excellent consultation skills programme, supported by dedicated tutors and role-players
  • A team of respected, highly experienced teaching and research academics, who’ll support your learning in our friendly, student-centred School.
  • Strong networks for student support, including a dedicated and experienced team of senior advisors

Course Structure

What to expect in your Foundation Year

During your Foundation Year you’ll gain the academic skills and knowledge you need to progress to our five-year medical degree, and you’ll feel like a medical student from day one. As well as focusing on sciences and study skills, you’ll start developing your medical and clinical skills with dedicated healthcare modules delivered by Norwich Medical School.

Our MB BS Medicine degree programme

Upon successful completion of the Foundation Year, you’ll continue onto our five-year MB BS Medicine degree programme, which is organised into modules based on body systems. We aim to produce fully-rounded medical graduates, so you’ll study the underpinning biological, social and clinical sciences of medicine, and then put theory into practice while on placements in hospitals and general practices.

Working in small groups, you’ll use problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to apply your learning to virtual scenarios and real patients. And you’ll undertake dissections on specimens and models to truly understand the structure and function of the human body. This is a practical, hands-on way to hone your knowledge and approach to medicine, allowing you to develop the relevant practical and communication skills in both simulated and real healthcare environments.

Your learning will be supported by a weekly programme of lectures and seminars, and complemented by month-long attachments in secondary care hospitals, some of which may be residential.

Teaching and Learning

We’ve developed a wide range of teaching methods to support your learning and to ensure you graduate with the essential skills required to become a competent doctor. These include:

  • Keynote lectures, seminars and anatomy practical classes, delivered by expert academics and clinical educators
  • Small group working using PBL techniques and extending into general practice based teaching
  • Consultation skills tutorials with tutors and actors to cultivate excellent communication skills
  • Clinical skills training throughout the course, including practical skills and simulated scenarios to ensure you are well prepared for practice when you graduate
  • Clinical placements, allowing you to integrate theory with practice, with patient contact on most weeks of your course from the start
  • Shadowing in your final year. You’ll spend five weeks each in both medicine and surgery, working one-to-one with a recently qualified junior doctor. It will give you the chance to integrate the knowledge and skills you’ve accumulated over the previous four years of degree study, and a real insight into what’s expected of you as a qualified doctor.
  • Developing professionalism. You’ll be given guidance throughout your primary and secondary care placements, to help you develop the values and behaviours that will enable you to become a safe, respected and trustworthy doctor.

Assessment

We’ll assess your progress on a regular basis throughout the course, to support your learning and development, and to keep you on track to become a qualified medical practitioner.

In your Foundation Year this will include written exams at the end of each science module, and practical write-ups of laboratory experiments. In your Medicine module you’ll be assessed through presentations to your fellow students and written examinations in both ‘short answer’ and ‘single best answer’ formats.

Assessments in later years will include Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) at the end of each module and year. These are practical tests to assess your knowledge and clinical ability.

You’ll also have annual written examinations in both ‘short answer’ and ‘single best answer’ formats, research method assignments, and an audit project on the ‘Student Selected Study’ component of your course.


During your time with us you’ll build a working portfolio and write a short essay each year, reflecting on your own personal and professional development.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

Study with us and you’ll have the option to extend your knowledge by arranging a self-funded, elective four-week placement overseas, or elsewhere in the UK, at the end of your fourth year. This is a great chance to broaden your horizons while experiencing medicine in another culture or in a specialist unit, making you an even more well-rounded and resilient doctor.

You’ll also have the opportunity to undertake an intercalated postgraduate (Master’s level) degree course after year three or four. Currently our students have the option to take a Masters in Clinical Research (MRes), in Clinical Education (MClinEd), in Molecular Medicine or in Health Economics (both MSc).

After the course

Once you’ve successfully completed your MB BS, as long as there are no concerns regarding your fitness to practice, you’ll be entitled to provisional registration with the General Medical Council. You will then be able to practise in approved Foundation Year One posts.

If you’d like our support during this year, you can apply to work in our local Foundation Programme. Complete a satisfactory year as a Foundation Programme doctor and you’ll gain full registration with the GMC.

The majority of our graduates work in the NHS and many go into general practice, but you’ll have many other options available to you.

Career destinations

  • General practice
  • Psychiatry
  • Hospital based specialties including Medicine, Surgery, Anaesthetics, Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Emergency medicine, Radiology or Pathology.

Course related costs

You can find information regarding additional costs associated here

http://www.uea.ac.uk/about/legalstatements/finance-and-fees/additional-course-fees

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 151 credits:

Name Code Credits

FITNESS TO PRACTICE - YEAR 1

All MB BS students must be confirmed as 'Fit to Practise' by the end of year meeting of the School's Professionalism Committee. Progression to the next year, or graduation in Year 5, can only occur once the Professionalism Committee has confirmed a student as being Fit to Practise. If the Professionalism Committee does not believe that a student is Fit to Practise, it will inform the relevant Examination Board and recommend relevant remediation. Further details of Professionalism / Fitness to Practise are available within the 'Professionalism and Fitness to Practise (FtP)' section of the MB BS General Information Black Board site.

MEDF4004Y

1

INTEGRATIVE PERIOD YEAR 1

To consolidate and integrate what has been learned in the first year of the MB BS degree programme.

MEDB4003B

30

LOCOMOTION

You will examine the underlying science behind the system, as a basis for exploring the examination, diagnosis and treatment of patients with locomotory impairments.

MEDA4001B

60

THE HUMAN LIFECYCLE - A HOLISTIC APPROACH

You will be introduced to a broad range of skills: topics include the human life-course, biological and behavioural sciences, consultation skills, and research methods. The science and behavioural science material will often relate to your week's PBL case.

MEDA4002A

60

Students must study the following modules for 151 credits:

Name Code Credits

BLOOD AND SKIN

This module is about teaching Haematology and Dermatology, or more concisely "Blood and Skin". This is one module covering two specialties. This is divided into four weeks of Haematology lectures and seminars with two week secondary care placement of Haematology at the end of the teaching. Dermatology lectures and seminars are at the end of the module, after two weeks of placement- There is also one week of PBL and GP before dermatology placement teaching starts. At the end of each week there is a clinical relevance session to consolidate that week's teaching.

MEDB6002Y

40

CIRCULATION

You will study basic science, pathophysiology and clinical aspects of adult cardiology, vascular surgery and stroke medicine. The focus of the teaching is to enable you to understand and manage patients with circulatory disorders.

MEDB6003Y

40

FITNESS TO PRACTICE - YEAR 2

All MB BS students must be confirmed as 'Fit to Practise' by the end of year meeting of the School's Professionalism Committee. Progression to the next year, or graduation in Year 5, can only occur once the Professionalism Committee has confirmed a student as being Fit to Practise. If the Professionalism Committee does not believe that a student is Fit to Practise, it will inform the relevant Examination Board and recommend relevant remediation. Further details of Professionalism / Fitness to Practise are available within the 'Professionalism and Fitness to Practise (FtP)' section of the MB BS General Information Black Board site.

MEDF5001Y

1

INTEGRATIVE PERIOD YEAR 2

The learning objectives are : to assimilate and integrate the learning outcomes from all prior units, to demonstrate an holistic approach in relation to presentations encountered to date.

MEDB6001B

30

RESPIRATION

You will learn how to take a history and examine a patient with lung disease; to understand the pathophysiology, presentation; the management and psychosocial impact of common lung diseases, and gain experience of respiratory related clinical skills.

MEDB6004Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 151 credits:

Name Code Credits

DIGESTION/NUTRITION

You will learn about digestive diseases in all settings, over all ages. This encompasses both medical and surgical disease of the gastrointestinal tract. This is a key opportunity for you to gain general surgical experience as well as developing your gastroenterological knowledge.

MEDC6008Y

40

FITNESS TO PRACTICE - YEAR 3

All MB BS students must be confirmed as 'Fit to Practise' by the end of year meeting of the School's Professionalism Committee. Progression to the next year, or graduation in Year 5, can only occur once the Professionalism Committee has confirmed a student as being Fit to Practise. If the Professionalism Committee does not believe that a student is Fit to Practise, it will inform the relevant Examination Board and recommend relevant remediation. Further details of Professionalism / Fitness to Practise are available within the 'Professionalism and Fitness to Practise (FtP)' section of the MB BS General Information Black Board site.

MEDF6018Y

1

HOMEOSTATIS AND HORMONES

You will study the concept of hormone regulation on growth and metabolism and recognise features of hormone overproduction and deficiency and their management.

MEDC6006Y

40

INTEGRATIVE PERIOD YEAR 3

The integrative period comprises 3 sections. Research protocol Portfolio report SSS (student selected Study) presentation Research protocol: during this part of the course you will write a research protocol aided by lectures and workshops. (This is separate from the clinical audit project in year 4) The assessment marking sheet is provided to students before they start their work to ensure they are aware of the standards of work expected. Portfolio report A portfolio is a journal or a private collection of thoughts and ideas based on personal experiences which you are encouraged to collect during this course. It is an important component of professional development forming the basis for self-directed learning and reflective practice. Developing skills in reflective practice during the course is an important part of a students professional development and will be useful to a future medical career since this is the model used both in the Foundation Programme (Year 1-2 after you have qualified) and the GMC's Revalidation process. creating a written record of memorable experiences. These experiences may be derived from any part of the course but clinical placements provide a particularly rich source of appropriate material. Students should also write some commentary on the contents of their student held record of assessments and any other feedback received from various sources such as tutors, patients, actors and student colleagues. Student Selected Studies Compulsory Student Selected Studies (SSS) is the part of our course where students develop academic skills such as literature review and critical thinking; presenting and teaching; and developing a clinical or research question. In year 3, students will be asked to choose 4 SSS themes of interest and will be allocated one of the 4. It is our aim to offer the majority of students their first choice topic. They will then be introduced to the tutor for the year. The topics available for the year Anatomy Biochemistry Clinical Biochemistry (yr. 2 and 3), Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Colorectal Surgery, Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Nutrition (Includes research option in years 2and3), Pathology, Physiology, Research in clinical, laboratory or population medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health (Includes research option in years 3), Ethics, Health Economics, Law, Medical Education, Psychology Health (Includes research option in years 3),, Sociology Health (Includes research option in years 3), At the end of their third year, students of most themes will have to prepare an abstract and a conference-style poster for their SSS. On the assessment days, students will not be giving a formal 10 minute presentation, instead posters will be displayed and each student will give a short oral summary of their poster (for approximately 5 minutes) and will then discuss it with the assessors and the other students. Students studying ethics in year 3 the assessment will be in the form of a 2000 word essay

MEDC6005B

30

THE SENSES

You'll examine three linked but separate specialities: neurology, ophthalmology and ear, nose and throat (ENT). These specialities are all centred round the physiological receptors and processes that allow us to sense the environment in which we live. In more detail.. Module 7: The Senses. (ENT, Neurology and Ophthalmology) ENT:- ENT deals with all aspects of disease relating to the ear, nose and throat. This specialty evolved due to the close interconnection between these areas in terms of anatomy, physiology and functions and the disease processes that can result. Though primarily a surgical specialty we are also physicians looking after this unique area of a patient. The specialty is subdivided into Otology, Rhinology, Laryngology/Head and Neck and Paediatric ENT Otology includes hearing loss and balance disorders which are very common and involve a close liaison with Audiology. Rhinology includes nose and sinus problems which affect large numbers of the general population and are a common complaint in primary care. The senses of smell and taste also fall to ENT and disorders of smell, whilst very common, often go unrecognized. Laryngology/Head and Neck surgery covers voice disorders as well as benign and malignant tumours of the head and neck. There are also many paediatric cases which will give you an insight in to the care and management of children that you may not have experienced so far. Like other departments we rely on teamwork and you will begin to understand the role of audiologists, audiological scientists, physiotherapists, specialist nurses and speech and language therapists in the provision of care to our patients. The ears, nose and throat together with surrounding structures are frequently involved in both local and systemic disease. Our specialty works closely with the following departments: Maxillo-facial surgery, neurology, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, ophthalmology, oncology, haematology, respiratory medicine and paediatrics to name but a few. In your second year you will have covered some aspects of the specialty (nose and throat conditions) when doing respiration and this will be revisited during your time with us. For ENT it would help if you looked back at Year 2 Module 5 week 1 seminars on laryngeal pathology and hoarseness. Neurology:- Neurology deals with diseases of the brain, spinal cord, nerve roots, peripheral nerve and muscle. Neurological symptoms and problems are common in primary and secondary care so a good understanding of neurology is important for most branches of medicine. Historically, neurology had a reputation for being one of the more difficult medical specialties, with comments like "rare," "intimidating" and "there are no treatments." We hope to dispel some of these myths during your time with us. During the module you will begin to master a number of skills required for neurology including being able to recognize when a patient has a neurological problem, evaluation of the common neurological presentations, performing a neurological examination and communicating the important aspects of the history and examination to other medical staff. You will also learn the principles of making a neurological diagnosis and how to recognize neurological emergencies and initiate treatment. The teaching will look at the common neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as the underlying neuroanatomy and physiology. This will include the main motor and sensory pathways, the concept of upper and lower motor neurons and the function of the basal ganglia, cerebellum and cranial nerves, and the effects various conditions have on them. During the primary and secondary care attachments you will have the opportunity to see a range of patients with common, and less common, conditions through structured patient teaching, booked sessions, ward teaching and on call shifts. Please use this time to see as many patients as possible, and practice your history taking, examination and case presentation skills. Ophthalmology:- Ophthalmology is unique amongst medical specialties. The eye, its surrounding structures and the visual pathway may be affected by a variety of clinical conditions. One of the fundamental properties of the eye is that many of its components are transparent, enabling details of its structure and any abnormalities to be observed directly. Disorders of the eye and visual system commonly cause reduction in vision and one of the major rewards of the profession is to be able to restore or improve sight. There are around two million people in the UK with a sight problem with around one million of these registered, or eligible to be registered as blind or partially sighted. Some people are born with sight problems whilst others inherit an eye condition that deteriorates with age such as retinitis pigmentosa. Others lose their sight as the result of an accident or conditions elsewhere in the body such as diabetes. In the UK, some form of glaucoma affects about two percent of people over the age of 40, and five percent over the age of 75. With screening and regular eye tests the condition can be detected early allowing treatment to reduce further sight loss. Age related eye conditions are the most common cause of sight loss in the UK and eighty percent of people with sight problems are over 65. Their eyesight is affected by conditions such as macular degeneration or cataracts. In recent years, ophthalmology has rapidly incorporated new technologies; developments in optical instruments have improved the clarity and magnification with which the components of the eye can be observed and imaged, and the use of lasers allows procedures that used to require admission to hospital to be performed on an outpatient basis

MEDC6007Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 151 credits:

Name Code Credits

FITNESS TO PRACTICE - YEAR 4

All MB BS students must be confirmed as 'Fit to Practise' by the end of year meeting of the School's Professionalism Committee. Progression to the next year, or graduation in Year 5, can only occur once the Professionalism Committee has confirmed a student as being Fit to Practise. If the Professionalism Committee does not believe that a student is Fit to Practise, it will inform the relevant Examination Board and recommend relevant remediation. Further details of Professionalism / Fitness to Practise are available within the 'Professionalism and Fitness to Practise (FtP)' section of the MB BS General Information Black Board site.

MEDF6022Y

1

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

You will develop a broad understanding of child health and consider the wider issues of children's place in our society, and the value society places on childhood.

MEDD6025Y

40

INTEGRATIVE PERIOD YEAR 4

The learning objectives are: to assimilate and integrate the learning outcomes from all prior units and to demonstrate an holistic approach in relation to presentations encountered to date.

MEDD6028B

20

MODULE 11 - THE MIND AND BODY

This module will cover the following elements: #The Mind #Palliative Care #Medicine for the Elderly #Oncology The Mind addresses biological and psycho-social aspects of mental health and illness. It aims to equip students' with knowledge and clinical skills to recognise mental health problems and identify evidence-based methods for their management. The Mind Module places emphasis on transferable skills and professional attitudes, such as working within a multidisciplinary team, respecting patient individuality and reducing stigma, that are prominent in mental health care but also relate to all other areas of clinical practice.

MEDD6026Y

40

MODULE 12 - ELECTIVE (AWAY)

The main objective of this elective is to provide an additional and more autonomous opportunity for the student to undertake a placement that fits with their own interests and professional development; to do something different; and to take responsibility for the planning and delivery of this experience. During this period, you are expected to engage in self- directed learning, reflect on your professional development, and experience medical practice in a context that is different from that provided by the Norwich Medical School and its teaching hospitals. It can be undertaken anywhere in the world as long as your choice does not incur excessive risk - assessing this is part of the learning process, and the tutors will help you with this aspect. There will be lectures and seminars on how to prepare for an elective, how to stay healthy during the placement, and related topics of global public health and mental resilience. Many students use the elective as a chance to experience medicine in a different setting, often overseas, with all the new cultural and clinical challenges that this involves. Others use it to deepen their understanding of a particular area of knowledge, or to develop new academic and technical skills. The main domains that students can consider are: Clinical - a new speciality, or further in-depth experience of a known speciality but in a different service, geographical or cultural context Research - a placement in an environment with an academic focus - for example, undertaking a community project, an epidemiological survey, or a lab-based study Service development and delivery - an internship or similar attachment to a unit offering management input, educational, strategic or technical development to the health system. Involvement with publishing, community projects, and exchanges can also be considered under this heading. The generic aims are that the elective will assist the student to:- #develop greater ownership of the learning process #challenge and improve your organisational skills, including risk appraisal #facilitate further development of attitudes appropriate to the practice of medicine #broaden your minds and refresh you as you approach the final year of MB BS!

MEDD6027B

10

REPRODUCTION

Your focus will be on reproduction and female health. Human reproduction is a fascinating subject; obstetrics is the branch of medicine and surgery concerned with childbirth and midwifery; gynaecology is the science of the physiological functions and diseases of women. It is essential you have a good grasp of knowledge in basic anatomy and physiology concerning human reproduction to understand childbirth and its complications and manage diseases in women at different stages of their life.

MEDD6024Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 121 credits:

Name Code Credits

EMERGENCY CARE

How do we deal with seriously ill patients that need emergency medical care? What are the fundamental ways of managing airways, giving anaesthetics, and delivering critical care? Module 13 is an opportunity for you to apply skills and knowledge developed over the previous 4 years and build upon them in an emergency setting. Though different from the apprenticeship module, you will be taking on some responsibility in helping the team assess and treat patients in a hands-on manner. During placement you will get to experience a variety of environments where emergency medicine is used. From primary care and the AandE department to the intensive care unit and theatres, you will have opportunities to learn from a variety of specialists. The Module will equip you to manage with patients who are seriously ill, and to recognize who and when to seek help from. It will enable you to perform practical procedures and gain other skills that are relevant to the role of a foundation doctor.

MED-7151Y

30

FINAL INTEGRATIVE PERIOD

M13 is emergency medicine, M14 is student assistantship M15 an internal (home elective)

MED-7154B

40

FITNESS TO PRACTICE - YEAR 5

All MB BS students must be confirmed as 'Fit to Practise' by the end of year meeting of the School's Professionalism Committee. Progression to the next year, or graduation in Year 5, can only occur once the Professionalism Committee has confirmed a student as being Fit to Practise. If the Professionalism Committee does not believe that a student is Fit to Practise, it will inform the relevant Examination Board and recommend relevant remediation. Further details of Professionalism / Fitness to Practise are available within the 'Professionalism and Fitness to Practise (FtP)' section of the MB BS General Information Black Board site.

MED-7155Y

1

MB/BS: INTRODUCTION TO YEAR 5

MED-7150A

10

MODULE 15 - ELECTIVE (HOME) / CLINICAL REMEDIATION

Module 15 - UK Elective / Clinical Remediation Module 15 has been developed to give students the opportunity to explore or further develop an aspect of their future medical career. It is six weeks long and will consist of experience in one or more of the following: #clinical placement #research #management #patient safety and effectiveness #Public Health For students needing to resit finals, M15 will consist of a placement at the NNUH/JPUH hospitals together with revision tutorials organised by MED. These students will need to inform their intended placement supervisor that their planned elective will no longer be taking place.

MED-7153B

10

PREPARATION FOR F1

MED-7152Y

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Doctors for a Decade

    Norwich Medical School is celebrating its 10th anniversary, read our MED graduates’ stories.

    Read it Doctors for a Decade
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • GRADUATE STORIES

    Read stories from our graduates and discover where they are now.

    Read it GRADUATE STORIES
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award
  • So, you want to be a doctor?

    Join the Royal Society of Medicine at UEA on 12 May to gain tips on work experience, how to choose the right medical school, and much more. Aimed at year 11/12 students.

    Read it So, you want to be a doctor?

Entry Requirements

  • A Level BBB excluding General Studies and Critical Thinking. Science A levels must include a pass in the practical element
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including 3 subjects at Higher Level in any subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC
  • BTEC DDM

Entry Requirement

This Widening Participation programme is only available to UK applicants who are currently studying A Levels in year 13 of their education or have left within the last three years prior to the start of the course and who also fulfil our Widening Access, Contextual and Social Criteria.

We do not accept applications from A level resit applicants, Graduates, Access to Higher Education Programmes, Pre Medical Programmes, Foundation Degrees, Foundation Years or Nursing Diplomas or those who have already commenced a degree. A levels must be taken over a consecutive two year period. International and EU applicants are not eligible for this course. 

Please read the information below along with our Frequently Asked Questions. Frequently Asked Questions FAQs

GCSE Requirements

Applicants must have a minimum of six GCSEs at Grade B or above including English Language, Mathematics and a Single Science subject (Biology, Chemistry or Physics) or grades BB in GCSE Science Double Award.  We are not able to accept GCSE Short courses.

The school at which you studied GCSEs must be listed on the Department of Education School Performance web site. Please see Contextual Criteria detailed below in Special Entry Requirements section.

A level Requirements

A levels must be taken over a consecutive two year period.  All science A levels must include a pass in the practical element.  Critical Thinking and General Studies are not accepted. 

Interviews

Each interview lasts approximately 50 minutes. Selected applicants are invited to take part in an OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) style interview, also known as a Multiple Mini Interview (MMI). During the interview, each applicant rotates through a series of rooms, known as 'stations', They will spend 5 minutes at each of the 7 stations, with a 1 and a half minute changeover/preparation time between each. Please note that we do not disclose interview questions.

We will individually email invitations to applicants who are selected for interview from January.  Interviews usually take place in late February/early March.  If you are invited to interview you are required to bring with you this completed Work Experience Form.

Special Entry Requirements

UKCAT

ALL applicants need to take the UKCAT Medical Admissions Test prior to submitting their application: see www.ukcat.ac.uk for full details. We do not have a cut off value.

Contextual Criteria

Applicants MUST meet the following criteria:

  • Your Secondary School (GCSE level education) had 60% or less students achieving 5+ grade A*-C GCSEs (or equivalent) including English and Maths in the year you sat your GCSEs - Data from Department of Education website: www.education.gov.uk/schools/performance/

IN ADDITION, applicants MUST also meet ONE of the criteria below:

  • Your household income is less than £35,000 per year excluding Government benefits. (proof will be requested)
  • You have been in Local Authority Care.
  • You live in the East Anglia Region (Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Lincolnshire, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire)

In addition to meeting these criteria, local applicants (East Anglia) and those whose parents (legal guardians) have no Higher Education qualifications (in UK or abroad) will be given particular consideration.

If you are an applicant who meets the Academic Criteria for the course you may be asked to complete and return, by post, a form detailing which of the above criteria you meet and this should be returned with accompanying original evidence (where appropriate). Please note we may use contextual criteria when ranking applications for offer.

All successful applicants will be required to complete a satisfactory enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Police check and a satisfactory occupational health check.  As part of the selection process, all applicants who accept an offer of a place at Norwich Medical School are checked against the Medical Schools Council (MSC) excluded student database.  Details of these requirements will be provided within the offer information.  Further information regarding requirements for medical students in relation to blood born infectious diseases can be found here, and information on Medical Students Fitness Standards here.

Intakes

The school's annual intake is September.

Course Open To

This course is not open to EU or International applicants.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Applications for 2018 entry are now closed.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515