LLB Law with American Law


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UEA Law Society won the prize for 'Best Pro Bono Activities' at the LawCareers.Net Student Law Society Awards 2018

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“The year I spent in the USA has often been a talking point in job interviews and no doubt helped me get where I am today – in one of the world’s largest law firms.”

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Richard Pike, Associate Solicitor, Dispute Resolution Department (London Office), Baker & McKenzie

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UEA Law School is a vibrant community of expert academics and ambitious students with strong and meaningful links to the wider community, supported by our highly successful alumni.

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Key facts

(THE World University Rankings 2019)

Join a top Law School that offers an intimate and engaging, student-focused law degree experience. Gain the skills and confidence you need to excel within or beyond the legal profession.

You will study in the superb, collegiate environment of Earlham Hall, where you will benefit from the expertise of teachers conducting influential research in a wide range of fields including commercial law, competition law, the law of public protest, internet and media law, law and medicine, and the law of government commerce. You will also be able to help the local community by offering pro bono legal advice.

Overview

The LLB (Hons) in Law with American Law offers an exciting opportunity to combine a qualifying law degree with a broader educational and cultural experience.

Although the US legal system originates from the English common law it has developed in markedly different ways.Its study provides a comparative element to your legal education and an insight into the politics, history and culture of the United States. As well as taking two American Law modules at UEA, you will spend your third year at one of our partner law schools in the US. At the end of this four year course, you will obtain an English qualifying law degree and have a good understanding of the US legal system, making this course an attractive prospect for those intending to enter the legal profession.

You will start your degree by establishing the building blocks of legal knowledge. At the same time, you will begin to cultivate important skills, such as reasoning, research and writing, formulating convincing arguments, negotiating and working as part of a team.

The point of legal study is not simply to memorise the law, but to be able to engage with it skillfully. As such, many of the skills you will develop are transferrable and will be valuable to you within or beyond a career in law.

In your second year, alongside your English law modules, you will study the US legal system and US Constitutional Law in preparation for the year abroad. You will spend your third year at one of our partner US law schools, where you will take classes alongside American students. Currently, students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama) or South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas).

Beginning in the second year, you will have the opportunity to tailor your degree to suit your interests. Our semesterised modular system means that core modules are a semester long, not year long, allowing you to study more broadly.

You will be free to choose one optional module at UEA in your second year and five in your fourth year. You will have a wide choice of options including Criminology, Family Law, Law and Business, British Human Rights Law, Company Law, Competition Law, Crime and Sentencing, Intellectual Property Law, Internet Law, International Humanitarian Law and Media Law.

During your degree you will also have many opportunities to build your skills, confidence and professional CV through extra-curricular activities. You could, for example, complete an internship at a law firm. Or you could ‘marshal’, spending a day on the bench with a judge during a trial. You could benefit from the alumni-mentoring scheme, where UEA Law School graduates offer career mentoring to individual students. Or you could make a difference in the local community, working for the public good (pro bono). In less than five years, our students have recovered no less than £2.5 million for welfare claimants wrongly denied payments. In 2014 we won the prestigious national award ‘LawWorks Pro Bono Partnership Award’.

You can also have fun, build your profile and hone valuable skills by joining in UEA Law Society activities. As well as social events, these include junior and senior mooting contests where a point of law is debated in a simulated court hearing. Finals are held in real courts where they are judged by real judges or barristers. The Law Society also holds negotiation, client interviewing, mediation and legal triathlon competitions, the finals of which are hosted by law firms. In 2016 the UEA Law Society won LawCareers.Net award for ‘Best Pro Bono’ activities.

Course Structure

Year 1

In your first year you will establish a solid grounding in the subjects necessary to qualify for legal practice. These include Constitutional and Administrative Law, Criminal Law, and Contract Law. You will also attend the Law School’s Skills Development workshops. You will develop important legal skills such as legal reasoning, research and writing, as well as career management skills.

Year 2

Alongside your English law subjects, you will study the US legal system and learn about US Constitutional Law in preparation for the year abroad. You will also have the opportunity to begin tailoring your degree by choosing an optional module that suits your interests. At the same time, you’ll continue to attend the Skills Development Workshops.

Year 3

You will spend your third year at a US law school, where you will select classes from the broad range offered on the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree programme. Currently, students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama) or South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas).

In your fourth year you will choose from a wide range of optional modules. These currently include Criminology, Family Law, Law and Business, British Human Rights Law, Company Law, Competition Law, Crime and Sentencing, Intellectual Property Law, Internet Law, International Humanitarian Law and Media Law.

Teaching and Learning

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. Lectures provide overviews of key legal issues while seminars allow further, focused study in small groups. The rest of your working hours will be spent developing your understanding and skills through independent study and activities such as law clinic and student competitions.

This course will give you an excellent balance of independent thinking and study skills, helping you grow into a self-motivated learner and researcher, as well as an analytical thinker. You will develop accuracy and precision in your written work, be versed in time management, becoming highly organised and confident in self-directed study. Throughout your degree, you will be given guidance on your work and constructive feedback to help you improve. You can undertake your independent studies in UEA’s state-of-the-art library or our wood-paneled law student common room.

Assessment

You will be assessed by a mixture of examinations and coursework. Some optional modules are assessed entirely by coursework while others include seen, pre-release or open book exams. You will also be required to submit non-assessed coursework regularly throughout the year, providing an opportunity for written feedback from your lecturers.

Study abroad or Placement Year

Please note that the universities to which UEA is able to send students may vary from year to year. Places may be dependent on certain criteria, such as academic performance. Please visit www.uea.ac.uk/studyabroad for more information.

After the course

You will graduate ready to begin your professional training and continue the process of qualifying as a barrister or solicitor. Alternatively, you can use your transferable skills in other careers such as business, banking, accountancy, the civil or diplomatic service, the charitable sector, management and human resources, teaching, journalism or academia.

Many of our graduates have gone on to build careers in leading firms in London and internationally, such as Clifford Chance, Linklaters, Freshfields, Clyde & Co, Herbert Smith Freehills, Baker McKenzie and Eversheds Sutherland, and at a wide variety of other firms of all sizes and types. Others work as in-house counsel in limited companies, public authorities and the Government Legal Service. We also have a significant number of alumni who are barristers, including several Queen’s Counsel.

Career destinations

Career destinations related to your degree include:

  • Legal Practice (solicitor, barrister, paralegal)
  • Other law related careers (NGOs, international organisations, in-house compliance, legal researchers, police)
  • Public Sector (Civil Service Fast Stream, local government, politics, education)
  • Financial Services (tax, banking, insurance, investment, accountancy)
  • Management and human resources (typically through graduate recruitment schemes)
  • Media / journalism

Course related costs

You are eligible for reduced fees during your year abroad. Further details are available on our Tuition Fee webpage. 

There will be extra costs related to items such as your travel and accommodation during your year abroad, which will vary depending on location.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Accreditation

Further information on the study of law

A Law degree allows students to develop a strong set of transferable skills that can be applied to a wide variety of law and non-law related professions. For students beginning their degrees in September 2019/20, a qualifying law degree is also required for those wishing to enter legal practice as either a solicitor or a barrister. All three of our LLB programmes are qualifying law degrees for these purposes.

At present, entry into the legal profession also requires a postgraduate qualification (the Legal Practice Course for solicitors and the Bar Professional Training Course for barristers) and a period of training (training contract for solicitors or a pupillage for barristers).

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has announced that the pathway for qualifying as a solicitor will change for students beginning their studies on or after September 2020. The new system will centre on a Solicitors Qualifying Exam and its full details are not yet known.

Course Modules 2020/1

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module covers Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and aspects of Human Rights - collectively these (intertwined) subjects are described as 'Public Law'. Public Law involves the study of rules, principles and practices relating to the way in which we are governed; this module explores the law that provides the framework for the UK's constitutional (and/or political) structure. We will consider the main principles of the United Kingdom's constitution, the key institutions of government and the relationship they have with each other. We will also look at the relationship between individuals and the state, notably when we cover judicial review and rights-protection under the UK's Human Rights Act. The underlying themes of the module are 'power and accountability' - both political and legal. It also is important to be aware that Public Law does not exist in a vacuum, rather both the historical and political context and recent developments and current affairs, are of particular relevance to this module.

LAW-4003A

20

CONTRACT LAW

During this module, you will consider the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides you with an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

On this module, you will examine the key actors, institutions and processes of the English legal system. You will explore how a criminal case progresses from the commission of a crime through to trial, including the role of the police, the judiciary and the jury. You will also study aspects of the civil justice system, including alternative forms of dispute resolution. As a result, you will gain an understanding of the procedural framework in which substantive law operates.

LAW-4004A

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module will look at some of the main ways in which the law is applied in practice. It will focus on how the law plays such an important part in the lives of people, and in the work of businesses, the public sector and other organisations. The module will introduce students to some of the main areas of legal practice. The module will also focus on the role of lawyers in applying the law to meet the needs that people/organisations have, and to resolve problems which people/organisations face. The module will consider how the legal profession might evolve over time, considering for instance the increasing use of technology in the provision of legal services. Seminar teaching will encourage problem solving. Students will be encouraged to practice the skills which are so important for practising lawyers, and are also very useful transferable skills for those students who choose not to practise law.

LAW-4001B

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module will introduce you to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

You'll be introduced to the core principles of English criminal law and given the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. You'll examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case studies. Topics will include: homicide, causation, non-fatal offences against the person, property offences, defences, inchoate liability and complicity.

LAW-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

On this module you will be introduced to the study of US Law. You will explore the history and origins of the US legal system, the federal system of government, and the court structure, including the role of the US Supreme Court. You will then consider issues of civil and criminal justice, including capital punishment. As well as learning about the legal system, you will gain an understanding of US legal education in preparation for your year abroad at a US law school.

LAW-5011A

20

LAND LAW

What does it mean to say "I own this land"? This module addresses this question and offers a number of surprising answers. You will consider the myriad of ways in which ownership of land can be affected by the interests of third parties. You will learn when these interests will bind an owner, and whether there are any mechanisms to remove those interests (thus making the land more valuable!). In addition, you will learn how ownership of land may carry with it rights over neighbouring land. You will begin your studies in Land Law by addressing the legal foundations of ownership. You will consider and offer opinions as to why there is no stringent statutory definition for 'land'. You will then engage with an analysis of a key distinction in Land Law; the difference between registered and unregistered land. For each, there are a variety of mechanisms for proving ownership of the land, protecting third party interests (e.g. rites of passage or an 'easement'), and you will consider if any of those third-party interests may be removed. You will then consider how we use land; specifically, how cohabiting couples receive acknowledgement of their interests through a 'trust of land', and how mortgages have developed a market for land. Land Law is taught through lectures, seminars, and self-guided study. In particular, you will benefit from an approach to teaching (the 'socio-legal' approach) which places the law within its broader social context.

LAW-5008A

20

THE LAW OF TORT

This module introduces the English Law of Tort. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines that govern liability for wrongful acts and omissions. We will look at the duties that individuals owe to one another for tortious wrongs and the remedies that are available if a tortious act has been committed. The Law of Tort examines both case law and statutory law on specific torts such as negligence, torts against the person, nuisance, defamation and product liability.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

In this module you'll consider the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. You'll explore the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts.

LAW-5007A

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This module offers an in depth analysis of select topics of US Constitutional law focusing on the method of resolving new issues arising long after the Constitution and its amendments were drafted, employed by the US Supreme Court. Topics include Checks and Balances, Judicial Review, Equal Protection, Privacy, Global Jurisdiction and Global reach of US Constitutional law. Teaching is in the form of weekly seminars, using the Socratic method. This module is only available to students on LLB Law with American Law.

LAW-5010B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CRIMINOLOGY

This module considers key theoretical perspectives in criminology, drawing upon this foundational knowledge to understand and explain different kinds of criminal behaviour, and society's response to them. It considers how crime is defined and researched, situating the criminal law in social context. The aim of the module is to introduce students to the study of criminology, and to engage students in critical discussions of how crime is defined and by whom; why criminal behaviour is an enduring feature of contemporary liberal societies and society's response to crime. The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of: #Key theoretical and empirical issues in criminology; #The value of theory in explaining patterns of crime and criminalisation. #The nexus between criminological theory and criminal justice policy in relation to specific case study examples.

LAW-5032B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

In this module you will learn about individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? And the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society and could we think differently about it or change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

In this module, you will build on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and explore new topics. It is an ideal complement to your degree pathway whether you wish to choose a consumer or commercial-oriented option within your law degree course. You will focus on doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. You will balance theoretical analysis and practical application in this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. It also interrogates the cohesiveness of this body, or bodies, of law. Particular focus is placed on human rights, self-determination, use of force, international criminal law, environmental and trade law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

THE LAW OF PROTEST AND DISSENT

This module will explore the legal challenges arising from different forms of protest and dissent around the world - from temporary encampments to 'occupations', from Pride parades to far-right rallies, from direct action campaigns and 'Critical Mass' bicycle rides to funeral pickets and anti-abortion protests. You will discuss and explore what kinds of dissent and protest are (or ought to be) legally protected, and what kind of regulation might legitimately be permitted. You will also examine the State's legal obligations to protect and facilitate peaceful protest and the implications of these for protest policing. The challenge of how law ought to deal with those who resist or reject the exclusivity of orthodox modes of political participation (party politics, periodic elections) is one that confronts all democratic systems governed by the rule of law. Yet, in some circumstances, even the argument that law might properly govern or manage political dissent is something of a contradiction in terms: how can law attempt to govern those that oppose or fundamentally reject its very authority? In responding to this underlying challenge, the module seeks to provide you with a thorough grounding in the core legal standards relating to the legal protection of dissent and the right to protest.

LAW-5033B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

You will spend the year abroad at one of our partner law schools in the US where you will take classes offered by the host institution. Your programme of study must be approved by the course director.

LAW-5003Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

EU LAW

This module will examine the relations between the UK and the European Union. The content of the module will depend on the outcomes of the negotiations between the two parties and resulting domestic legislation which, cannot be predicted with any certainty at the time of writing (October 2018).

LAW-6005A

20

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. Consideration is given, among others, to the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. The course aims to give a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on those aspects which are of practical importance and relevance not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those who have no such aspirations, as a knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

This modules will consider the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of the substantive and procedural rules of competition law as well as the core economic concepts of competition. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines sentencing law and penal policy in England and Wales. We look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation, and restoration. We then explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements and informal sources. We'll examine recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. We explore the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. We will analyse the use of imprisonment asking, 'What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?' You'll also examine the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called 'three strikes and you're out' laws). We'll also consider the role of victims in sentencing proceedings. Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime.

LAWZ6023B

20

DISSERTATION

An opportunity to offer a dissertation of between 9,000 and 11,000 words. Students undertake a study in an area of law of particular interest to them under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which must normally be consecutive autumn and spring semesters.

LAW-6002Y

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 2

This is a follow on module from Employment Law 1 (LAW-5015B). It takes some of the concepts introduced in the first module and considers these in particular areas of difficulty (for example, unfair dismissal in respect of personal social media use) and also looks at automatically unfair dismissals. New topics are addressed in the form of TUPE, Whistleblowing and Working Time.

LAW-6017A

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Adult Relationships Law is a socio-legal study of marriage (the formation of marriage, the purposes and status of marriage, claims to equal marriage), divorce (the ground of divorce, how the process works, whether the process should be reformed), financial settlements on divorce (what settlement can be expected, should prenups be enforceable), cohabitation without marriage (remedies on breakdown of the relationship, should cohabitants have divorce-style rights) and domestic violence. This module reflects both the practical application of family law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills as well as transferable skills.

LAW-6013A

20

FORCED MIGRATION AND REFUGEE LAW

This module will examine the international law and practice of refugee protection. The module approach will be socio-legal and contextual, encouraging in-depth critical investigation of law and the legal management of refugees and forced migrants. It will take a wide-ranging geographical approach, considering case studies from global north and global south. Topics covered in the module will include the origins of international refugee protection and the development of a legal category of 'the refugee'; the criteria for recognition of/exclusion from refugee status and processes of refugee status determination; the principle of non-refoulement (and the challenges presented by e.g. interdiction of boats at sea and extraterritorial processing of asylum claims); durable solutions to refugee situations; the intersections between refugee law and policy and 'post-conflict' processes of transitional justice and peacebuilding: 1.The origins of international refugee protection 2.UNHCR's responsibility for refugee protection 3.Who is a refugee? The 1951 Convention inclusion criteria 4.Who is a refugee part II: exclusion and cessation criteria 5.Refugee Status Determination and the process of claiming asylum 6.Non-refoulement: rights v realities 7.Securitisation and the criminalisation of migration 8.Camps and containment of refugees 9.Durable solutions: resettlement, repatriation and local integration 10.Displacement and accountability: refugees and transitional justice

LAW-6031B

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. You will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby you will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. You will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trademarks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL AND EU ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

"What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?" (Henry David Thoreau, a letter to H.G.O. Blake, May 20, 1860). Our planet is being plundered, degraded and polluted at an unprecedented rate. This pattern of human activity compromises not only the right of future generations to a healthy environment, but also their ability to fulfil their most basic needs. The biggest environmental challenges of our time, such as climate change, trans-boundary pollution and the loss of biodiversity, require a common action by the international community as a whole. International Environmental Law represents the set of legal rules and principles that guide the international community in its collective effort to meet these challenges. This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the context, foundations and the complexities of international environmental law, and its application through EU law. It will review the historical background and the developments that shaped the evolution of this field of law. It will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the unique legal principles and regulatory approaches that guide environmental law-making, as well as with some knowledge of specific subject-areas, such as climate change law, biodiversity law, and water law. This module will be taught through the use of a "dual-themed" approach; each part will be covered by two lectures; the first seminar will present the international regulatory framework (i.e. 'international environmental law'), while the following seminar will include a more concrete discussion on the manner in which international law was adopted into, and refined through, the EU framework. Such a teaching methodology will provide the students with a wider understanding of the topic; notably the students will grasp the relevance of international law to our everyday life, the challenge of balancing environmental goals with other policy objectives, and the manner in which general international law principles can be, and have been, concretised via EU law.

LAW-6014A

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module will introduce you to the standards and mechanisms of International Human Rights Law. Lectures will lay a foundation for focused seminar discussions on the content and scope of selected rights (such as the right to life, freedom from torture and freedom of expression and assembly). A Civil Society Advocacy Project will run alongside the seminars to ensure that you become familiar with the regional (European, Inter-American and African) and international (UN treaty-bodies, Universal Periodic Review, the UN Human Rights Council and its 'Special Procedures') mechanisms of human rights implementation and enforcement. Through this Civil Society Advocacy Project, you will be encouraged to reflect critically on the adequacy of rights-based solutions to real-world problems.

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module will introduce you to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. You'll look at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. You will also look at why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. You will cover topics including data protection and privacy, cybercrime, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. You will explore the application of law across traditional categories and you will be encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars.

LAW-6001A

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This module is delivered via seminars.

LAW-6018B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

This module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. It will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: #To introduce students to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. #To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. #To consider the regulation of the media markets. #To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. #To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE

This module considers how the criminal justice system deals with errors. Using Packer's model as a conceptual framework, we will critically analyse current and previous arrangements for correcting miscarriages of justice. Defining and quantifying miscarriages of justice (and considering what level of error is "acceptable") will be considered. The causes of miscarriages of justice will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of forensic science and the issues with evidence such as DNA, fingerprints, fibre and hair analysis will be examined. Inter-disciplinary (drawing on psychological research) issues will be considered. The roles of the Court of Appeal and Criminal Cases Review Commission will be critically examined. Arrangements for compensating those who were wrongly convicted will be examined. You will be encouraged to challenge existing arrangements and critically consider proposals for change. A number of case studies will be used during the course and you will be encouraged to consider whether some were really miscarriages of justice.

LAW-6027B

20

THE CRIMINAL PROCESS

The Criminal Process examines key issues in contemporary English criminal justice. You'll explore principles and concepts that underpin the criminal justice system. You'll look at a series of case-studies that illustrate tensions and conflicts between those principles including: the 'right to silence' in police interviews and at trial; the treatment of rape complainants in the criminal process, including how such complainants are treated at court and the questions about their 'sexual history' that they can be asked at trial; key issues in evidence law, such as the admissibility of evidence of previous convictions at trial; the admissibility of 'unfairly' obtained evidence; and the jury system (we will examine whether trial by jury is the most effective way of organising trials).

LAW-6015A

20

THE ECONOMIC APPROACH TO LAW

The economic approach to law is an innovative approach to legal scholarship that offers exciting opportunities for understanding the law. It applies economic theory, principles and methods to rationalize legal rules and to understand their effect, often with reference to concepts of social welfare and efficiency. This approach to legal study has been useful in understanding and critiquing a growing number of legal fields that have no or little connection to economic activity and it has also become increasingly utilized in specialized fields of study such as competition law. Students will find it particularly helpful in explaining policy decisions taken by courts in departure from past principles. This introductory module provides an overview of the use of the economic approach in legal analysis and reviews the insights provided by this approach to core areas of the law such as property, contract, tort and crime. It draws together diverse areas of substantive law and provides a coherent and unified approach to them. It offers the students the opportunity to look across the substance of these core subjects and to revisit and review their understanding of them in the light of an alternative approach. The module will also provide students with an introduction to interesting concepts and ideas such as game-theory and the potential contribution of economics to less-obvious areas of study such as international criminal law. The goal of this introductory module is to equip students with useful tools to critically assess areas of law with which they are already familiar. The understanding of economic theories and concepts will allow students to reflect more critically on specific rules and legal doctrines in order to ascertain whether they contribute to the achievement of the stated goals of the legislator or otherwise to the realization of social welfare more generally. Where appropriate, use will be made of empirical studies to justify assumptions or to test predictions, thereby enhancing students' numeracy skills. Students' knowledge about the economic approach to law can enrich their ability to make informed decisions about the law whether as future practitioners, academics or law-makers. This 'outside the box' thinking will also help students develop their critical analysis and interdisciplinary skills which are transferable beyond the remit of legal practice and research. Students should have a solid understanding of contract, tort and criminal law as the material will examine English cases in all these areas. A willingness to engage with abstract thinking and some symbolic notation is also necessary. No prior knowledge of economics is required.

LAW-6028B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? Why has it been, and continues to be, involved in every corner of the globe? You will be offered a critical introduction to understanding the history of U.S. foreign relations. You will explore the key themes and traditions that have informed America's approach to international affairs, from foundational ideas in the 18th and 19th centuries to increasing influence in the 20th and 21st centuries. In addition to analysing traditional political and diplomatic issues, you will consider the link between foreign and domestic policies, and the role of various state and non-state actors that have shaped America's actions abroad. You will work with original primary sources, the latest secondary literature, and a range of cultural and political texts including speeches, newspapers, and editorial cartoons. This broader consideration of foreign relations history engages important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, and the "international" and "cultural" turns - and connects them to emerging trends in the fields of American history and international relations. As a result, you will gain a detailed understanding of the history of U.S. foreign relations and the legacies that continue to shape debates about America's role in the world today.

AMAH5051B

20

BETWEEN EAST AND WEST: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY SINCE 1890

The beginning of the twentieth century witnessed a period of immense instability and change with the emergence of the United States as an international actor in the West and the Japanese break from the Chinese sphere of influence in the East. This was underpinned by technological developments, the expansion of global empires, extreme economic dislocation and two global wars. You will examine the conduct and content of the foreign policies of the major powers from the 1890s, with the Sino-Japanese War and the Spanish-American War, to the Japanese occupation of Asia. This will include assessing the interplay of the political, military, economic, strategic and cultural forces that shaped the beginning of the twentieth century and which continue to resonate in the contemporary world.

HIS-5065A

20

BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLES: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

The African American freedom struggle did not begin or end with the civil rights protests of the 1950s -1960s. Since the demise of slavery, black activists have been forcefully demanding racial equality. From 1865 to the present day, African Americans have not only asserted their rights as citizens, but have demanded an end to economic injustice, while questioning the actions of the U.S. government both at home and abroad. This module examines black political and cultural protest in the United States over the course of the 'long' civil rights movement. Covering the period from the first years of black freedom following the Civil War to the emergence of Black Lives Matter, you will learn about the breadth and diversity of African American activism. You will challenge popular narratives of the civil rights movement and uncover the radical impulses that have animated the freedom dreams of black America. You will cover how African Americans responded to disenfranchisement, racial violence and economic inequality. You will also learn about the lives of key figures in the black freedom struggle such as Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Marcus Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune, Stokely Carmichael and Angela Davis. Ultimately, through the study of primary sources and secondary texts, you will grapple with the complexity of black political thought and develop a detailed understanding of how African Americans counteracted white supremacy. On successful completion of this module you will have a broad understanding of the major trends in African American political and cultural history from the nineteenth century to the present day. You will able be able to clearly articulate how African Americans have shaped our understanding of the American nation, democracy and the meaning of human rights. Finally, through the close study of a range of cultural and political texts including autobiographies, speeches, newspapers and film, you will develop key analytical skills that are vital to the interdisciplinary study of history and politics.

AMAH5050B

20

Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865

Race is central to the history of the United States. The conversations about race in 21st century America have their origins in a system of slavery that developed from the early colonial period. This module excavates these roots and thereby enables you to look to current conversations and understand where these began. You will follow a chronological sequence on the module, allowing us to trace the course of racial slavery in North America from its inception in 1619 through to its abolition in 1865. You will consider the roots of racism in the colonial era that strengthened during the antebellum years and beyond and consider their relationship with racial slavery. You will engage with the developing historical scholarship of slavery in the United States, gaining a deeper understanding of contemporary (then and now) debates concerning race and racial identity. Employing a range of resources including written and visual primary sources, oral histories, cinematic depictions, and nineteenth century novels, will allow you to see the networks of power articulated though race and ideas of "otherness". You'll learn through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study, often working with artefacts or source materials in seminars to enable you to think collectively about their meanings. Assessment will be entirely through coursework. The study of slavery in the United States will make you a better historian, whatever your area of interest. Concepts of race and ideas of "otherness" are so central to the study of history in the 21st century that the techniques and strategies of analysis employed on this module will enable you to think about the arguments of others more effectively and also position yourself within those debates.

AMAH5043A

20

BREAKING NEWS! AMERICAN JOURNALISM: HISTORY AND PRACTICE

How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to "the news"#but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. "The news" has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media#looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5049B

20

CONTEMPORARY FICTION

What is the state of the art of the novel at present? And what are some of the distinguishing preoccupations and characteristics of the contemporary novel? This module seeks to consider these questions with a view to developing an understanding of the condition of the novel today. The module focuses on fiction published in the UK and Ireland in the last ten years, with a particular focus on more inventive writing. We'll read a small set of contemporary novels, the content and form of each of which will exemplify some of the possibilities for fiction in the present day. We'll consider the relation between the contemporary novel and the contemporary moment - for example, our concerns regarding the environment, identity, nationhood, and history - and think also about what it might mean to be or to call oneself contemporary: to be together with one's own time. The list of authors chosen for the module changes regularly, as you would expect. Recently, it has included the likes of Ali Smith, Anne Enright, Zadie Smith and Mohsin Hamid. You'll consider a range of ways of conceiving and interpreting the contemporary novel, and discuss these ways with your peers. There is no consensus about what does or should constitute a canon of contemporary fiction, although there is a growing critical literature on the subject, some of which we'll read. It will be our job, in lectures and in seminars, to think carefully about what novels published in the last ten years offer the best argument for the continued viability of the novel itself as a contemporary art form.

LDCL5069B

20

CRIMINOLOGY

This module considers key theoretical perspectives in criminology, drawing upon this foundational knowledge to understand and explain different kinds of criminal behaviour, and society's response to them. It considers how crime is defined and researched, situating the criminal law in social context. The aim of the module is to introduce students to the study of criminology, and to engage students in critical discussions of how crime is defined and by whom; why criminal behaviour is an enduring feature of contemporary liberal societies and society's response to crime. The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of: #Key theoretical and empirical issues in criminology; #The value of theory in explaining patterns of crime and criminalisation. #The nexus between criminological theory and criminal justice policy in relation to specific case study examples.

LAW-5032B

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

This is a module which you will find helpful throughout your degree, informing and perhaps changing the way you read and analyse literature, film and other cultural forms. Across the twelve weeks, you'll not only engage with the rich, complex and provocative work of literary critics and theorists - including deconstructive, feminist, post-colonial and queer theorists - but also of some of the thinkers and writers who have influenced them: such as Marx, Freud and Saussure. You will therefore encounter some of the most important and exciting thinkers of the modern period, acquiring an understanding of developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, and tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary and cultural study.

LDCL5031A

20

DIGITAL MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide you with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

PPLM5053A

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING (pre-1789)

The eighteenth century was a time of great literary experimentation in which many new genres emerged, including the periodical essay, the mock-epic, the ballad opera, and the novel. These genres took shape within a commercial revolution that transformed both what it meant to be an author and what it meant to be a reader. In this module you will see how writers such as Joseph Addison, Alexander Pope and John Gay created works that both participated in and criticized the culture of commerce. You will explore the fictions created by writers such as Daniel Defoe, Horace Walpole, and Elizabeth Inchbald, who developed very different versions of the novel. You will also examine how writers such as Samuel Johnson, Frances Burney, and Olaudah Equiano navigated the new possibilities for authorship that were opening up in the period. Ultimately you are invited to become an "eighteenth-centuryist" and to make imaginative connections between the exciting range of genres that emerged in this century and the culture that produced them.

LDCL5041A

20

EMPIRE AND AFTER: GLOBALIZING ENGLISH

Today, literature in English is produced in many countries across the world and English increasingly enjoys a status as a 'global' language. In this module you will explore how this situation came about by placing the development of English literary traditions both in the British Isles and elsewhere into the long historical context of the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with canonical works by British writers from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth and into the twentieth centuries, you will then consider literary and political responses to the experience of empire and colonization by writers from areas such as South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australasia, and the Americas. You will explore how 'English Literature' has been shaped on a global scale by global historical forces, and how different the history of the English literary tradition looks when placed alongside and in counterpoint to these 'other' writings in English. You will then discuss the writings of authors such as Daniel Defoe, Joseph Conrad, Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, Amitav Ghosh, Kate Grenville and J.M Coetzee amongst others. The module will introduce you to the theoretical and conceptual apparatus of postcolonial literary studies and to some of the key frameworks for understanding the formation of the modern world, such as race and racism, nations and nationalism, colonial discourse and postcolonial theory, and how gender and sexuality were pivotal in the formation of colonial and post-colonial identities.

LDCL5079A

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

In this module you will learn about individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

In this module, you'll examine examples of twentieth-century European writing (all read in translation). Rather than (merely) place writers in their national contexts, you'll deal with topics, issues and formal experiments that complicate, sometimes transcend, national boundaries. In fact you'll interrogate what 'European' might mean in relation to literature - where are the borders? Are continental Europeans fundamentally 'other'? And if so, how does this otherness manifest itself aesthetically, thematically, tonally and formally? You'll look at how writers from different countries frequently challenge the conventions of genre and the conventions of reading and interpreting. Among a range of important innovations (or continuities), you may explore varieties of 'European' modernism, postmodernism, the absurd, fantasy, noir, and other genres. You'll also ask how European writers have responded to the challenges, upheavals and catastrophes of the twentieth century and how they deal with the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within Europe. You'll engage with these topics in weekly lectures, and you'll be assessed by means of an individually chosen project (supported by a formative proposal followed by individual and group tutorials).

LDCL5033B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? And the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society and could we think differently about it or change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills.

LAW-5012B

20

FRENCH YEAR 1 HONOURS (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

This module is for students studying French Honours language degrees. This module is for Level 4 students and comprises of three strands (A1, A2, B1).

PPLF4001A

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

In this module, you will build on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and explore new topics. It is an ideal complement to your degree pathway whether you wish to choose a consumer or commercial-oriented option within your law degree course. You will focus on doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. You will balance theoretical analysis and practical application in this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

What does the world look like to a Marxist, or a liberal, or a feminist, or a realist? We all hold particular ideas about how the world works: about why certain events happen, who the key actors in the international system are, and whether it is even possible to change things for future generations. Theories of International Relations (IR) attempt to capture these assumptions, explaining the world in different ways to others. You will explore how the discipline of IR emerged in the early 20th century, before investigating the very different theories which have shaped, and sometimes dominated, academic and policy makers' ideas about how the world actually works.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today's world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violence's, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

PPLI5056B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

The module seeks to introduce students to the way in which law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which more specialised modules can then build.

LAW-5013B

20

LIES, ALGORITHMS AND CONCERTOS: UNDERSTANDING MEDIA AND CULTURAL POLICY

How should we deal with the dissemination of 'fake news'? What role do algorithms play in the media we consume, and is it concerning? What kind of government intervention is there in media markets and in cultural life and how does this get decided? This module will enable students to understand the dynamics and issues of media and cultural policy and how various levels of governance are involved in regulating media cultural sectors. The module will start by introducing students to public policy and policy making processes, covering multi-level governance, multi-stakeholderism, and the policy cycle. It will then enhance students' understanding though deep dives into current issues in media and cultural policy, such as audio-visual media policy, arts institutions, net neutrality, harmful content on platforms, sports and premium content rights, urban regeneration through culture, evolving models of (self/co-)regulation. The module will draw on examples from across the globe and at various level including local, regional, national and supra-national policy making, with special efforts made to integrate ones from non-Western contexts. Students will have the opportunity to work on real policy issues and practice professional skills in simulations and assessment activities. This module is for anyone interested in media and culture or in public policy in general. It covers topics that touch our daily lives so would be useful to anyone concerned about the shape of our society.

PPLM5005B

20

READING LITERATURE IN HISTORY

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

MEDIEVAL WRITING (pre-1789)

This module provides an introduction to the study of medieval literature. You will explore Chaucer's poetry (through works such as 'The Clerk's Tale', 'The Merchant's Tale', 'The Nun's Priest's Tale'), the wonderful Morall Fabillis of Robert Henryson, the work of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe, and a number of important Middle English Romances, including the superb 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'. You will work in three inter-related ways: by exploring a range of important medieval literary genres (the lyric, allegorical narrative, romance, 'mystical writing', 'life writing', moral fable, dream vision); by considering important aspects of the medieval world (social, political, religious) and their textual representation; and by addressing the material circumstances in and by which medieval texts were written and read, published and circulated (in manuscripts and in the very earliest printed books). The aim, then, is really two-fold: to introduce you to the remarkable riches of medieval literature (one of the pay-offs of the relative linguistic difficulty of Middle English is that it forces us to attend slowly and carefully to the textual details of our material in a way I suspect we don't always find ourselves able to and in a way that the texts we will be reading wonderfully reward), and, at the same time, to allow you to try your hand as medievalists, exploring the distinctive possibilities and practices that come with working with this material.

LDCL5063A

20

MODERNISM

The modernist movement transformed literature and the arts worldwide in the early part of the 20th century, peaking in the period between 1918 and 1939. Although the term modernism was rarely used by authors in this period, in the period after World War II it became the usual term to describe a group of writers, responding to one another, whose work is characterised by radical experiments with language and form, which aimed to do justice to a range of many subjects such as the mysteries of consciousness and the unconscious, gender, sexuality, and desire, violence and democracy, the primitive and the mechanical. We will be reading a range of authors, including such long-canonised figures as James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, HD, Gertrude Stein, and Virginia Woolf, but expanding the modernist canon in the light of recent scholarship to other more recently revived authors such as Djuna Barnes, Mina Loy, Dorothy Richardson, and Jean Rhys. We will trace some of the origins of modernism in earlier literary movements such as Symbolism, Imagism, Aestheticism, and Impressionism, and explore its kinship with foreign literary movements such as Dada and Surrealism. Modernism invented modern methods of criticism and we will be placing a particular emphasis on the close reading of poetry and poetic prose. A study of modernism is essential for understanding all 20th century literature and this module is highly recommended for any students wishing to take any modules in 20th-century literature.

LDCL5045A

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN (and beyond): THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War and its end with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War period.

HIS-5017B

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

POLITICS, POLICY AND PRACTICE

This module builds upon key themes in the politics of development that recur throughout the politics-related modules in DEV: distributions of power and resources, geographies of poverty and inequality, and dynamics of social and political change. The module mixes lectures with student led sessions that are intended to provide space for students to draw out their experiences of development in practice, and to think through concrete strategies for making human society a little less unequal, violent, and destructive. Students are encouraged to approach 'development' as a 'relational whole', and to think critically about the complex and often contradictory nature of change. The module culminates in a workshop in which groups of students will present strategies for fostering more equitable processes of social change.

DEV-6011B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module introduces you to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. You'll consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. The module is structured chronologically, starting with the development of propaganda during World War I and finishing with a consideration of propaganda in the 21st century.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. This module examines how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. It also interrogates the cohesiveness of this body, or bodies, of law. Particular focus is placed on human rights, self-determination, use of force, international criminal law, environmental and trade law. The module addresses both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently considers how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

1780-1840 was the Age of Revolution and Romanticism, often regarded as a revolutionary style of writing. It was the age of the American and French Revolution and the Wars they entailed, the age of slavery and rebellion, of empire and conquest. You may think of Romantic writing as mainly nature poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. But the signs of a 'Romantic' sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and social commentary. In this module you'll be introduced to some of the most exciting Romantic period writing, including poetry, fiction and non-fictional prose from the Age of Revolution. You'll also explore key period artistic and literary concepts such as the sublime, beautiful, picturesque, the Hellenic, and pastoral, and you'll analyse the many ways in which the writers of the period exploited concepts of landscape. You'll look at issues such as the Supernatural and Dreaming. Your understanding of Romantic writing will be enhanced by an analysis of aesthetics, politics, and of the work of women writers. During the course you'll explore poetry by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, as well as Jane Austen's novel Mansfield Park (1816) and Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein (1818; 1831). You may also consider writings by less familiar poets, such as John Clare, Charlotte Smith, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Mary Robinson, as well as prose works by Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and Mary Wollstonecraft and others. You'll look at how writing is gendered in the period and the implications of this for both male and female writers. You'll be taught through a mixture of one-hour weekly lectures and two-hour weekly seminars, as well as self-directed study. You'll gain experience in communicating your ideas in tutorials, as well as through written work and presentations. You'll be assessed through two formative pieces (a close reading and a project bibliography) and one summative piece on a project chosen by yourself in discussion with your seminar tutors.

LDCL5034B

20

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION (pre-1789)

This module introduces you to a huge variety of kinds of writing from one of Britain's most exciting and turbulent periods of cultural, political and intellectual transformation: the seventeenth century. The module works through lectures, which establish larger questions we might ask of the week's material, and seminars, in which we read passages of texts together closely. We begin in the early seventeenth century by exploring the ways English writing was transformed by its encounters with classical texts (giving you the opportunity to read classical authors such as Horace and Martial in translation), before turning to explore women writers' complicated relationship to early-modern literary culture. We examine the emergence of new forms of life-writing, especially those written by women, and explore the ways in which seventeenth-century travellers wrote about their encounters with the Middle East. In the module's latter section, we ask how literary forms were transformed by the extraordinary upheavals of the English civil war and the execution of the monarch. Authors we study include famous figures such as Ben Jonson, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton (including a look at his masterpiece, Paradise Lost), as well as many lesser-known writers, including women such as Lucy Hutchinson and Hester Pulter. To better understand the ways early-modern texts' circumstances of publication shape their meaning, we offer the opportunity to sign up for an (entirely optional) visit to the Norfolk Heritage Centre (in the centre of Norwich) to handle their remarkable collection of seventeenth-century books.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE (pre-1789)

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. Shakespeare is now so universally known and read that it is easy to forget that he wrote at a specific historical moment for specific audiences, actors and theatrical spaces. What happens to our understanding of Shakespeare's plays when we read them within the context of theatrical performance? This is what our module enables you to do -- and in doing so, it aims to give you fresh, new ways to interpret Shakespearean language and theatricality. Lectures equip you with methods and contexts for reading Shakespeare's plays; seminars give you the chance to put these into practice through close, attentive readings of his plays. Each week we study a different play in detail. The summative assessment asks you to put what you've been learning into practice by writing a critical analysis of more than one play using some of the module's methods.

LDCL5070B

20

SPANISH YEAR 1 HONOURS (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

This module is for students studying Spanish Honours language degrees. This module is for Level 4 students and comprises of three strands (A1, A2, B1).

PPLH4001A

20

THE LAW OF PROTEST AND DISSENT

This module will explore the legal challenges arising from different forms of protest and dissent around the world - from temporary encampments to 'occupations', from Pride parades to far-right rallies, from direct action campaigns and 'Critical Mass' bicycle rides to funeral pickets and anti-abortion protests. You will discuss and explore what kinds of dissent and protest are (or ought to be) legally protected, and what kind of regulation might legitimately be permitted. You will also examine the State's legal obligations to protect and facilitate peaceful protest and the implications of these for protest policing. The challenge of how law ought to deal with those who resist or reject the exclusivity of orthodox modes of political participation (party politics, periodic elections) is one that confronts all democratic systems governed by the rule of law. Yet, in some circumstances, even the argument that law might properly govern or manage political dissent is something of a contradiction in terms: how can law attempt to govern those that oppose or fundamentally reject its very authority? In responding to this underlying challenge, the module seeks to provide you with a thorough grounding in the core legal standards relating to the legal protection of dissent and the right to protest.

LAW-5033B

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, on this module you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module asks you to use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both their own identities and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

PPLM5042B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it's a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You'll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works - its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you'll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

LDCC5013A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it's a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You'll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works - its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you'll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

LDCC5014B

20

VICTORIAN WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the Victorian period, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors such as George Eliot, Tennyson, Dickens, Darwin, Charlotte Bronte, and the Brownings. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of 19th-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, periodical writing and public controversy).

LDCL5067B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgement that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars and Humanitarian Crises is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war, the humanitarian implications of civil wars, the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action, terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts and strategies and challenges of peace-building.

DEV-6003A

20

WRITING ACROSS BORDERS

This module will study how literary texts move across borders of history, geography and culture and what happens to them when they do. It will focus on particular examples of textual travelling drawn from different historical periods and, in the process, raise critical questions about cultural exchange and the idea of literature as a form of translation and adaptation.

LDCL4021B

20

Important Information

The University makes every effort to ensure that the information within its course finder is accurate and up-to-date. Occasionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, informing students and will also keep prospective students informed appropriately by updating our course information within our course finder.

In light of the current situation relating to Covid-19, we are in the process of reviewing all courses for 2020 entry with adjustments to course information being made where required to ensure the safety of students and staff, and to meet government guidance.

Further Reading

  • PRO BONO

    Law Clinic brings together an unrivalled range of pro bono opportunities for our students.

    Read it PRO BONO
  • Earlham Hall

    Following a major restoration project, UEA School of Law moved back to its former residence of Earlham Hall in the spring of 2014. Earlham Hall has been fully restored with newly refurbished offices, seminar rooms, a lecture theatre and substantial student space.

    Read it Earlham Hall
  • UEA Law Society

    Watch our video from the UEA Law Society

    Read it UEA Law Society

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAA
  • International Baccalaureate 34 points
  • Scottish Highers AAAAA
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H2
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits.
  • BTEC Contact the institution for more information
  • European Baccalaureate 82%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study: 

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time. 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application. 

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year. 

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

 

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. 

 

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants. 
  • A Level AAA
  • International Baccalaureate 34 points
  • Scottish Highers AAAAA
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H2
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC Contact the institution for more information
  • European Baccalaureate 82%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study: 

Pre-sessional English at INTO UEA 

English for University Study at INTO UEA

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of the following preparation programme:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support 

 

Tuition Fees 

Information on tuition fees can be found here: 

 

 

Scholarships and Bursaries 

 

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  

 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates. 

 

Scholarships

 

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option. 

 

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges. 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14. 

 

FURTHER Information

Please complete ourOnline Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University.  

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515 

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515