LLB Law with American Law


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Laws



UCAS Course Code
M123
A-Level typical
AAA (2018/9 entry) See All Requirements
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UEA Law Society won the prize for 'Best Pro Bono Activities' at the LawCareers.Net Student Law Society Awards 2018

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“The year I spent in the USA has often been a talking point in job interviews and no doubt helped me get where I am today – in one of the world’s largest law firms.”

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Richard Pike, Associate Solicitor, Dispute Resolution Department (London Office), Baker & McKenzie

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UEA Law School is a vibrant community of expert academics and ambitious students with strong and meaningful links to the wider community, supported by our highly successful alumni.

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Join a top Law School that offers an intimate and engaging, student-focused law degree experience. Gain the skills and confidence you need to excel within or beyond the legal profession.

You will study in the superb, collegiate environment of Earlham Hall, where you will benefit from the expertise of teachers conducting influential research in a wide range of fields including commercial law, competition law, the law of public protest, internet and media law, law and medicine, and the law of government commerce. You will also be able to help the local community by offering pro bono legal advice.

Overview

The LLB (Hons) in Law with American Law offers an exciting opportunity to combine a qualifying law degree with a broader educational and cultural experience.

Although the US legal system originates from the English common law it has developed in markedly different ways.Its study provides a comparative element to your legal education and an insight into the politics, history and culture of the United States. As well as taking two American Law modules at UEA, you will spend your third year at one of our partner law schools in the US. At the end of this four year course, you will obtain an English qualifying law degree and have a good understanding of the US legal system, making this course an attractive prospect for those intending to enter the legal profession.

You will start your degree by establishing the building blocks of legal knowledge. At the same time, you will begin to cultivate important skills, such as reasoning, research and writing, formulating convincing arguments, negotiating and working as part of a team.

The point of legal study is not simply to memorise the law, but to be able to engage with it skillfully. As such, many of the skills you will develop are transferrable and will be valuable to you within or beyond a career in law.

In your second year, alongside your English law modules, you will study the US legal system and US Constitutional Law in preparation for the year abroad. You will spend your third year at one of our partner US law schools, where you will take classes alongside American students. Currently students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama), South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas) or Stetson University College of Law (Tampa, Florida).

Beginning in the second year, you will have the opportunity to tailor your degree to suit your interests. Our semesterised modular system means that core modules are a semester long, not year long, allowing you to study more broadly.

You will be free to choose one optional module at UEA in your second year and five in your fourth year. You will have a wide choice of options including Criminology, Family Law, Law and Business, British Human Rights Law, Company Law, Competition Law, Crime and Sentencing, Intellectual Property Law, Internet Law, International Humanitarian Law and Media Law.

During your degree you will also have many opportunities to build your skills, confidence and professional CV through extra-curricular activities. You could, for example, complete an internship at a law firm. Or you could ‘marshal’, spending a day on the bench with a judge during a trial. You could benefit from the alumni-mentoring scheme, where UEA Law School graduates offer career mentoring to individual students. Or you could make a difference in the local community, working for the public good (pro bono). In less than five years, our students have recovered no less than £2.5 million for welfare claimants wrongly denied payments. In 2014 we won the prestigious national award ‘LawWorks Pro Bono Partnership Award’.

You can also have fun, build your profile and hone valuable skills by joining in UEA Law Society activities. As well as social events, these include junior and senior mooting contests where a point of law is debated in a simulated court hearing. Finals are held in real courts where they are judged by real judges or barristers. The Law Society also holds negotiation, client interviewing, mediation and legal triathlon competitions, the finals of which are hosted by law firms. In 2016 the UEA Law Society won LawCareers.Net award for ‘Best Pro Bono’ activities.

Course Structure

Year 1

In your first year you will establish a solid grounding in the subjects necessary to qualify for legal practice. These include Constitutional and Administrative Law, Criminal Law, and Contract Law. You will also attend the Law School’s Skills Development workshops. You will develop important legal skills such as legal reasoning, research and writing, as well as career management skills.

Year 2

Alongside your English law subjects, you will study the US legal system and learn about US Constitutional Law in preparation for the year abroad. You will also have the opportunity to begin tailoring your degree by choosing an optional module that suits your interests. At the same time, you’ll continue to attend the Skills Development Workshops.

Year 3

You will spend your third year at a US law school, where you will select classes from the broad range offered on the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree programme. Currently, students attend either Cumberland Law School at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama), South Texas College of Law (Houston, Texas) or Stetson University College of Law (Tampa, Florida).

Year 4

In your fourth year you will choose from a wide range of optional modules. These currently include Criminology, Family Law, Law and Business, British Human Rights Law, Company Law, Competition Law, Crime and Sentencing, Intellectual Property Law, Internet Law, International Humanitarian Law and Media Law.

Teaching and Learning

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. Lectures provide overviews of key legal issues while seminars allow further, focused study in small groups. The rest of your working hours will be spent developing your understanding and skills through independent study and activities such as law clinic and student competitions.

This course will give you an excellent balance of independent thinking and study skills, helping you grow into a self-motivated learner and researcher, as well as an analytical thinker. You will develop accuracy and precision in your written work, be versed in time management, becoming highly organised and confident in self-directed study. Throughout your degree, you will be given guidance on your work and constructive feedback to help you improve. You can undertake your independent studies in UEA’s state-of-the-art library or our wood-paneled law student common room.

Assessment

You will be assessed by a mixture of examinations and coursework. Some optional modules are assessed entirely by coursework while others include seen, pre-release or open book exams. You will also be required to submit non-assessed coursework regularly throughout the year, providing an opportunity for written feedback from your lecturers.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

We also offer LLB Law with European Legal Systems, offering the chance to spend a year studying in Europe.

After the course

You will graduate ready to begin your professional training and continue the process of qualifying as a barrister or solicitor. Alternatively, you can use your transferable skills in other careers such as business, banking, accountancy, the civil or diplomatic service, the charitable sector, management and human resources, teaching, journalism or academia.

Many of our graduates have gone on to build careers in leading firms in London and internationally, such as Clifford Chance, Linklaters, Freshfields, Clyde & Co, Herbert Smith, Baker & McKenzie and Eversheds, and at a wide variety of other firms of all sizes and types. Others work as in-house counsel in limited companies, public authorities and the Government Legal Service. We also have a significant number of alumni who are barristers, including several Queen’s Counsel.

Career destinations

Career destinations related to your degree include:

  • Legal Practice (solicitor, barrister, paralegal)
  • Other law related careers (NGOs, international organisations, in-house compliance, legal researchers, police)
  • Public Sector (Civil Service Fast Stream, local government, politics, education)
  • Financial Services (tax, banking, insurance, investment, accountancy)
  • Management and human resources (typically through graduate recruitment schemes)
  • Media / journalism

Course related costs

You are eligible for reduced fees during your year abroad. Further details are available on our Tuition Fee webpage. 

There will be extra costs related to items such as your travel and accommodation during your year abroad, which will vary depending on location.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Accreditation

Further information on the study of law

A Law degree allows students to develop a strong set of transferable skills that can be applied to a wide variety of law and non-law related professions. For students beginning their degrees in September 2019/20, a qualifying law degree is also required for those wishing to enter legal practice as either a solicitor or a barrister. All three of our LLB programmes are qualifying law degrees for these purposes.

At present, entry into the legal profession also requires a postgraduate qualification (the Legal Practice Course for solicitors and the Bar Professional Training Course for barristers) and a period of training (training contract for solicitors or a pupillage for barristers).

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has announced that the pathway for qualifying as a solicitor will change for students beginning their studies on or after September 2020. The new system will centre on a Solicitors Qualifying Exam and its full details are not yet known.

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

This module covers Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and aspects of Human Rights - collectively these (intertwined) subjects are described as 'Public Law'. Public Law involves the study of rules, principles and practices relating to the way in which we are governed; this module explores the law that provides the framework for the UK's constitutional (and/or political) structure. We will consider the main principles of the United Kingdom's constitution, the key institutions of government and the relationship they have with each other. We will also look at the relationship between individuals and the state, notably when we cover judicial review and rights-protection under the UK's Human Rights Act. The underlying themes of the module are 'power and accountability' - both political and legal. It also is important to be aware that Public Law does not exist in a vacuum, rather both the historical and political context and recent developments and current affairs, are of particular relevance to this module.

LAW-4003A

20

CONTRACT LAW

During this module, you will consider the nature of contractual obligations, the legal principles which govern the formation, content and validity of contracts and the remedies available for breach of contractual obligations. It provides you with an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines of the English law of contract.

LAW-4006B

20

ENGLISH LEGAL PROCESS

On this module, you'll examine the key actors, institutions and processes of the English legal system. You'll explore how a criminal case progresses from the commission of a crime through to trial, including the role of the police, the judiciary and the jury. You'll also study aspects of the civil justice system, including alternative forms of dispute resolution. As a result, you'll gain an understanding of the procedural framework in which substantive law operates.

LAW-4004A

20

LAW IN PRACTICE

This module addresses four important aspects of the 'Law in Practice'. First, students will study key issues affecting contemporary legal practice, such as access to justice, the opening of the legal professions to competition from other providers, diversity in the legal professions, litigation costs/conditional fee agreements and professional ethics. Second, students will be exposed to perspectives on law that 'cut across' other law modules, such as thematic and contextual approaches to law (e.g. law and economics, socio-legal approaches). Third, students will receive tuition in key skills (most of which are highly transferable) such as effective oral and written communication, negotiation, team-working, interpreting data and advocacy - together with opportunities to practice and develop these skills. Finally we will look, with the assistance of many external speakers, at career options and career management for law graduates.

LAW-4001Y

20

LEGAL METHOD, SKILLS AND REASONING

This module will introduce you to legal method (determining the meaning and application of statutes and law-making through cases), legal research, legal writing and legal reasoning about law and fact in a common law legal system.

LAW-4002A

20

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW

You'll be introduced to the core principles of English criminal law and given the opportunity to examine criminal laws in their social contexts. You'll examine the core principles through a series of illustrative case-studies. Topics will include: homicide; causation; non-fatal offences against the person; property offences; defences; inchoate liability; and complicity. This is avaialble to students on Law, Law with European Legal Systems, Law with American Law, Visiting Studies in Law, Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law.

LAW-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW

On this module you'll be introduced to the study of US Law. You'll explore the history and origins of the US legal system, the federal system of government, and the court structure, including the role of the US Supreme Court. You'll then consider issues of civil and criminal justice, including capital punishment. As well as learning about the legal system, you'll gain an understanding of US legal education in preparation for your year abroad at a US law school. This module is only available to students on LLB Law with American Law.

LAW-5011A

20

LAND LAW

What does it mean to say "I own this land"? This module addresses this question and offers a number of surprising answers. You will consider the myriad of ways in which ownership of land can be affected by the interests of third parties. You will learn when these interests will bind an owner, and whether there are any mechanisms to remove those interests (thus making the land more valuable!) In addition, you will learn how ownership of land may carry with it rights over neighbouring land. You will begin your studies in Land Law by addressing the legal foundations of ownership. You will consider and offer opinions as to why there is no stringent statutory definition for 'land'. You will then engage with an analysis of a key distinction in Land Law: the difference between registered and unregistered land. For each, there are a variety of mechanisms for proving ownership of the land, protecting third party interests (e.g. rights of passage, or an 'easement'), and you will consider if any of those third-party interests may be removed. You will then consider how we use land; specifically, how cohabiting couples receive acknowledgement of their interests through a 'trust of land', and how 'mortgages' have developed a market for land. Land Law is taught through lectures, seminars, and self-guided study. In particular, you will benefit from an approach to teaching (the 'socio-legal' approach) which places the law within its broader social context.

LAW-5008A

20

THE LAW OF TORT

This module introduces the English Law of Tort. It provides an understanding of the fundamental principles and key doctrines that govern liability for wrongful acts and omissions. We will look at the duties that individuals owe to one another for tortious wrongs and the remedies that are available if a tortious act has been committed. The Law of Tort examines both case law and statutory law on specific torts such as negligence, torts against the person, nuisance, defamation and product liability.

LAW-5016B

20

THE LAW OF TRUSTS

In this module you'll consider the creation of private express, resulting and constructive trusts. You'll explore the application of the trust in family and commercial contexts, and the duties and liabilities of trustees in the administration of trusts.

LAW-5007A

20

US CONSTITUTIONAL METHOD

This module offers an in depth analysis of select topics of US Constitutional Law focusing on the method of resolving new issues arising long after the Constitution and its amendments were drafted, employed by the US Supreme Court. Topics include Checks and Balances, Judicial Review, Equal Protection, Privacy, Global Jurisdiction and Global reach of US Constitutional Law. Teaching is in the form of weekly seminars, using the Socratic Method.

LAW-5010B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

During this module you will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, you will explore the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. You will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, you will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving you a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. You will also develop your knowledge on the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

CRIMINOLOGY

This module considers key theoretical perspectives in criminology, drawing upon this foundational knowledge to understand and explain different kinds of criminal behaviour, and society's response to them. It considers how crime is defined and researched, situating the criminal law in social context. The aim of the module is to introduce students to the study of criminology, and to engage students in critical discussions of how crime is defined and by whom; why criminal behaviour is an enduring feature of contemporary liberal societies; and society's response to crime. The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of: #key theoretical and empirical issues in criminology; #the value of theory in explaining patterns of crime and criminalisation. #the nexus between criminological theory and criminal justice policy in relation to specific case study examples.

LAW-5032B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

In this module you will learn about individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

In this module, you will build on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and explore new topics. It is an ideal complement to your degree pathway whether you wish to choose a consumer or commercial-oriented option within your law degree course. You will focus on doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. You will balance theoretical analysis and practical application in this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

An introduction to the ways law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which specialised modules will build.

LAW-5013B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. In this module, you will examine how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. It also interrogates the cohesiveness of this body, or bodies, of law. Particular focus will be placed on human rights, self-determination, use of force, international criminal law, environmental and trade law. You will address both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently consider how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

THE LAW OF PROTEST AND DISSENT

This module will explore the legal challenges arising from different forms of protest and dissent around the world - from temporary encampments to 'occupations', from Pride parades to far-right rallies, from direct action campaigns and 'Critical Mass' bicycle rides to funeral pickets and anti-abortion protests. Students will discuss and explore what kinds of dissent and protest are (or ought to be) legally protected, and what kind of regulation might legitimately be permitted. We will also examine the State's legal obligations to protect and facilitate peaceful protest and the implications of these for protest policing. The challenge of how law ought to deal with those who resist or reject the exclusivity of orthodox modes of political participation (party politics, periodic elections) is one that confronts all democratic systems governed by the rule of law. Yet, in some circumstances, even the argument that law might properly govern or manage political dissent is something of a contradiction in terms: how can law attempt to govern those that oppose or fundamentally reject its very authority? In responding to this underlying challenge, the module seeks to provide a thorough grounding in the core legal standards relating to the legal protection of dissent and the right to protest.

LAW-5033B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

You'll spend the year abroad at one of our partner law schools in the US where you'll take classes offered by the host institution. Your programme of study must be approved by the course director.

LAW-5003Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

EU LAW

This module provides you with an understanding of the key principles of the law of the European Union. It focuses on essential aspects of the internal market (the free movement of goods, workers and citizenship), and the relationship between EU Law and the national legal systems. In addition, the module teaches you how to retrieve and work with information about EU law from a range of sources and to further develop your critical analysis skills. This module is only availbable to students on Law with European Legal Systems.

LAW-6005A

20

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module offers you the opportunity to explore the "hows" and the "whats" of human rights protection in the UK. In the first couple of weeks, we consider the modalities of the Human Rights Act (HRA) and will touch upon the general jurisprudence of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). For the major part of the module, we will look at a range of substantive rights and consider how - by what means and to what extent - they are protected in domestic law under the HRA. Areas that we will cover, given the topical and dynamic nature of the course, cannot be predicted but in past years classes have covered: protest, media privacy, police powers, counter-terrorism, religious freedom, prisoners' rights and digital surveillance and security. This module, while not reserved for students in the Law School, is not recommended for those from other schools within UEA or from partner institutions abroad who have no experience of working with common law cases. Such students are advised to contact the module organiser in advance to discuss the appropriateness of their prior experience.

LAWZ6022A

20

COMPANY LAW

An introduction to the legal regulation and control of companies and those persons involved with them, principally directors and shareholders. You will explore, among others, the nature, types and functions of companies, the consequences of incorporation, the company's organs and agents, the rights and obligations of shareholders, the structure and management of the board of directors and its relationship with the shareholders. Knowledge of the company and how it works is relevant to many aspects of legal practice, and this module provides a modern treatment of company law, concentrating on aspects that are of practical importance. It is relevant, not only to those who wish to pursue a career as commercial or company lawyers, but also to those with other aspirations. Non-Law Students will not be permitted by the Law School to transfer to this module once the teaching has started.

LAW-6006A

20

COMPARATIVE LAW

Lectures on the methods, aims and uses of Comparative Law and the main legal traditions of the world today.

LAW-6008A

20

COMPETITION LAW

This module is designed to allow a good understanding of the substantive and procedural rules of competition law as well as the core economic concepts of competition. It focuses on the main principles of competition law and investigates the means by which competition laws tackle such problems as cartels, abuses of monopolies and mergers. Broader issues, such as remedies and enforcement strategies will also be reviewed. The module will help to place the UK competition regime within its European and international contexts.

LAW-6010A

20

CRIME AND SENTENCING

'Crime and Sentencing' examines sentencing law and penal policy in England and Wales. We look at the main theories of sentencing and punishment: retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation, and restoration. We then explore the sources of sentencing law and sentencing decisions: statute, case-law, ministerial statements, and informal sources. We will examine recent history of sentencing law in England and Wales, evaluating the coherence of the overall sentencing structure. We explore the impact of moves towards structured sentencing, focusing on the impact of sentencing guidelines and the Sentencing Council on promoting consistency in sentencing. We will analyse the use of imprisonment asking, 'What are prisons for and are they used appropriately?' You'll also examine the treatment of offenders with mental health problems and those who are deemed dangerous, as well as the use of mandatory minimum sentences (sometimes called 'three strikes and you're out' laws). We will also consider the role of victims in sentencing proceedings. Restorative justice will be examined as an innovative yet controversial means of responding to crime that places victims at the heart of responses to crime. This module is available to students on Law, Law with European Legal Systems, Law with American Law, Visiting Studies in Law, Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law.

LAWZ6023B

20

DISCRIMINATION LAW

You will examine the historical development of UK and EU discrimination law, the causes of discrimination, the meaning of the concepts of "equality" and "discrimination", potential justifications for discrimination, and the substantive UK and EU law concerning discrimination because of sex, gender reassignment, sexual orientation, marriage/civil partnership, pregnancy/maternity, race, religion or belief, disability and age. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of EU Law on the development of UK anti-discrimination law, on the difficulties of enforcing anti-discrimination laws, and on future directions in discrimination law.

LAW-6011A

20

DISSERTATION

This module offers you an opportunity to produce a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words. You will undertake a study in an area of law that is of particular interest to you under the guidance of a member of faculty who acts as supervisor. The period of study extends over the duration of two semesters, which are normally consecutive autumn and spring semesters.

LAW-6002Y

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 2

During this module you will examine some of the more complex and controversial employment law issues, including collective labour law, worker participation in the enterprise, work-life balance rights and the protection of human rights in the workplace. These issues are examined from both a conceptual and a practical perspective. By taking this module, you will also gain an understanding of the sources and role of international labour standards, and the relevant domestic and international institutions and mechanisms that protect collective rights and human rights at work, including the Central Arbitration Committee, the Certification Officer, and the ILO.

LAW-6021B

20

FAMILY LAW: ADULT RELATIONSHIPS

Adult Relationships Law is a socio-legal study of marriage (the formation of marriage, the purposes and status of marriage, claims to equal marriage); divorce (the ground of divorce, how the process works, whether the process should be reformed); financial settlements on divorce (what settlement can be expected, should prenups be enforceable); cohabitation without marriage (remedies on breakdown of the relationship, should cohabitants have divorce-style rights); and domestic violence. This module reflects both the practical application of family law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-6013A

20

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

Intellectual Property (IP) law can affect the music you listen to, the brands you buy, the films you watch, the technology you use, the books you read, the shape of the bottle you drink from, the websites you view... In short, IP law applies to nearly everything in your daily life. Primarily, it deals with the protection and encouragement of innovation in technology, business, the arts, and the creative industries. Intellectual property is an exciting and up to the minute field of law which is constantly evolving. You will be introduced to, and encouraged to think about, the practical importance of intellectual property rights and their economic and philosophical justifications. There will also be a technological dimension to the module, whereby you will be introduced to the impact technology has had on the development and enforcement of IP rights. You will learn the basics of intellectual property law over a broad spectrum, including how to apply the law to representative factual situations. The course is designed to give a rounded overview of the three main areas of Intellectual Property; copyright, patents and trade marks.

LAW-6019B

20

INTERNATIONAL AND EU ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

"What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? "(Henry David Thoreau, a letter to H.G.O. Blake, May 20, 1860). Our planet is being plundered, degraded and polluted at an unprecedented rate. This pattern of human activity compromises not only the right of future generations to a healthy environment, but also their ability to fulfil their most basic needs. The biggest environmental challenges of our time, such as climate change, trans-boundary pollution and the loss of biodiversity, require a common action by the international community as a whole. International Environmental Law represents the set of legal rules and principles that guide the international community in its collective effort to meet these challenges. This proposed module will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the context, foundations and the complexities of international environmental law, and its application through European Union (EU) law. You will review the historical background and the developments that shaped the evolution of this field of law. It will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the unique legal principles and regulatory approaches that guide environmental law-making, as well as with some knowledge of specific subject-areas, such as climate change law, biodiversity law, and water law. This module will be taught to you through the use of a "dual-themed" approach; each part will be covered by two lectures; the first seminar will present the international regulatory framework (i.e. 'international environmental law'), while the following seminar will include a more concrete discussion on the manner in which international law was adopted into, and refined through, the EU framework. Such a teaching methodology will provide you with a wider understanding of the topic; notably you will grasp the relevance of international law to our everyday life, the challenge of balancing environmental goals with other policy objectives, and the manner in which general international law principles can be, and have been, concretised via EU law.

LAW-6014A

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

This module will introduce you to the standards and mechanisms of international human rights law. Lectures will lay a foundation for focused seminar discussions on the content and scope of selected rights (such as the right to life, freedom from torture, and freedom of expression and assembly). A Civil Society Advocacy Project will run alongside the seminars to ensure that you become familiar with the regional (European, Inter-American and African) and international (UN treaty-bodies, Universal Periodic Review, the UN Human Rights Council and its 'Special Procedures') mechanisms of human rights implementation and enforcement. Through this Civil Society Advocacy Project, you will be encouraged to reflect critically on the adequacy of rights-based solutions to real-world problems.

LAW-6020B

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the body of international norms developed by states for the purpose of regulating wars. Rather than outlawing war (the domain of Public International Law and the raison d'etre for the United Nations), the basic tenet of IHL is to compel those involved in armed conflicts to fight clean wars. On the other hand, Refugee Law is concerned with the measures agreed to and provided by states to protect those forced to flee their countries. The connection between armed conflicts and the influx of refugees is demonstrated by the Syrian conflict, which led to one of Europe's major refugee crises. The module is designed to cover these topics in tandem. The focus of the IHL part of the module will be on evaluating the existing protection for victims of armed conflict and will review the status of the law in respect to issues such as targeting of civilians and illegal weapons. The changing face of wars and the evolution of means of warfare will be considered. Issues such as the treatment of prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, the use of drone strikes and nuclear proliferation will be looked at. The central question with respect to the refugee part of the Module would be whether the existing regime offers the necessary protection for victims of armed conflict.

LAW-6007A

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW

This module will introduce you to the English law and practice of international trade. Although there have been considerable attempts to harmonise the law relating to international trade at an international level, English law remains of very considerable importance and is often chosen as the applicable law to govern international transactions. You'll look at the English law relating to international sales, international payments and international carriage of goods by sea. As well as these core contracts in an international trade transaction, the module will also examine international dispute resolution and the problems of governing law, jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, and the growing use of international commercial arbitration as an alternative to international litigation. You will also look at why and how the laws in these areas have become increasingly harmonised.

LAW-6017B

20

INTERNET LAW

Internet law is a cross-cutting area of law for today's multinational and innovative environment, particularly relevant in industries like electronic commerce, information technology, and the media. You will cover topics including data protection and privacy, cybercrime, contracts, domain names, the control of content and the resolution of disputes. You will explore the application of law across traditional categories and are encouraged to reflect on the role of a national legal system in an interconnected world. Teaching will include some online elements as well as lectures and seminars.

LAW-6001A

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This unit does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LAW AND MEDICINE

The module provides an in-depth examination of a range of medico-legal issues and explores the interface between the law and medical ethics. It will investigate various areas of law and analyse the potential effect of legal rules on the provision of contemporary medicine. It will further address how the law impacts upon medical professionals in terms of their legal, professional and ethical accountability and consider important questions pertaining to patient rights.

LAW-6016B

20

MEDIA LAW

The aims of this module are: To introduce you to the structure of the media industries in the UK, the justification for, and different models of regulation. To consider the main social, technological and regulatory influences shaping its development. To consider the regulation of the media markets. To consider the issues relating to the management of reputation from a private law perspective, including defamation and the protection of privacy. To consider legal issues pertaining to journalism (e.g. , contempt, courts, privilege).

LAW-6009A

20

MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE

This module considers how the criminal justice system deals with errors. Using Packer's model as a conceptual framework, we will critically analyse current and previous arrangements for correcting miscarriages of justice. Defining and quantifying miscarriages of justice (and considering what level of error is "acceptable") will be considered. The causes of miscarriages of justice will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of forensic science and the issues with evidence such as DNA, fingerprints, fibre and hair analysis will be examined. Inter-disciplinary (drawing on psychological research) issues will be considered. The roles of the Court of Appeal and Criminal Cases Review Commission will be critically examined. Arrangements for compensating those who were wrongly convicted will be examined. You will be encouraged to challenge existing arrangements and consider critically proposals for change. A number of case studies will be used during the course and you will be encouraged to consider whether some were really miscarriages of justice.

LAW-6027B

20

THE CRIMINAL PROCESS

The Criminal Process examines key issues in contemporary English criminal justice. You'll explore principles and concepts that underpin the criminal justice system. You'll look at a series of case-studies that illustrate tensions and conflicts between those principles including: the 'right to silence' in police interviews and at trial; the treatment of rape complainants in the criminal process, including how such complainants are treated at court and the questions about their 'sexual history' that they can be asked at trial; key issues in evidence law, such as the admissibility of evidence of previous convictions at trial; the admissibility of 'unfairly' obtained evidence; and the jury system (we will examine whether trial by jury is the most effective way of organising trials). This module is avaialble to students on Law, Law with European Legal Systems, Law with American Law, Visiting Studies in Law, Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law.

LAW-6015A

20

THE ECONOMIC APPROACH TO LAW

The economic approach to law is an innovative approach to legal scholarship that offers exciting opportunities for understanding the law. It applies economic theory, principles and methods to rationalize legal rules and to understand their effect, often with reference to concepts of social welfare and efficiency. This approach to legal study has been useful in understanding and critiquing a growing number of legal fields that have no or little connection to economic activity and it has also become increasingly utilized in specialized fields of study such as competition law. This will be particularly helpful in explaining policy decisions taken by courts in departure from past principles. This introductory module will provide you with an overview of the use of the economic approach in legal analysis and reviews the insights provided by this approach to core areas of the law, such as property, contract, tort and crime. It, thus, draws together diverse areas of substantive law and provides a coherent and unified approach to them. You will have the opportunity to look across the substance of these core subjects and to revisit and review your understanding of them in the light of an alternative approach. The module will also provide you with an introduction to interesting concepts and ideas, such as game-theory and the potential contribution of economics to less-obvious areas of study such as international criminal law. The goal of this introductory module is to equip you with useful tools to critically assess areas of law with which you are already familiar. The understanding of economic theories and concepts will allow you to reflect more critically on specific rules and legal doctrines in order to ascertain whether they contribute to the achievement of the stated goals of the legislator, or otherwise to the realization of social welfare more generally. Where appropriate, use will be made of empirical studies to justify assumptions or to test predictions, thereby enhancing students' numeracy skills. Your knowledge about the economic approach to law can enrich your ability to make informed decisions about the law whether as future practitioners, academics or law-makers. This 'outside the box' thinking will also help you to develop your critical analysis and interdisciplinary skills which are transferable beyond the remit of legal practice and research. The Module will be delivered by a combination of lectures (applying the basic principles of the economic approach to law in property, contract and tort law as well as in litigation and crime) and seminars (exploring the material already discussed in lectures). You should have a solid understanding of contract, tort and criminal law as the material will examine English cases in all these areas. A willingness to engage with abstract thinking and some symbolic notation is also necessary. No prior knowledge of economics is required. Maths is also not required, nor will maths skills be assessed as part of the module. The module, however, offers a valuable opportunity if you are keen on extending your maths skills.

LAW-6028B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? Why has it been, and continues to be, involved in every corner of the globe? Your module offers a critical introduction to understanding the history of U.S. foreign relations. You will explore the key themes and traditions that have informed America's approach to international affairs, from foundational ideas in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to increasing influence in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In addition to analysing traditional political and diplomatic issues, you will consider the link between foreign and domestic policies, and the role of various state and non-state actors that have shaped America's actions abroad. You will work with original primary sources, the latest secondary literature, and a range of cultural and political texts including speeches, newspapers, and editorial cartoons. This broader consideration of foreign relations history engages important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, and the "international" and "cultural" turns - and connects them to emerging trends in the fields of American history and international relations. As a result, you will gain a detailed understanding of the history of U.S. foreign relations and the legacies that continue to shape debates about America's role in the world today.

AMAH5051B

20

AMERICAN JUSTICE: THE SUPREME COURT

Consider any major social issue in American life since the turn of the 20th Century and the Supreme Court has almost always been involved in some way. Free speech, freedom of the press, the death penalty, abortion: the Court has been at the centre of the debate. Why? And how? What gives the Court the power and the authority to overturn laws passed by democratically-elected governments? And should it have such power? In this module you'll explore the answers to these questions and many others. You'll learn how the Court operates, how it gained and developed its power, and how it has become such a central part of American political life. You'll read Court opinions and learn to understand how they are created and what influences them. You'll explore the relationship between the cases heard by the Court and the politics of the time, using a range of primary and secondary source material. And you'll develop a deeper understanding of the role played by law and the Court in shaping American history. From holding that the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding the scope of "equal protection of laws" in the second half of the century, you will be challenged to think about the interconnection between law and politics in American history through the example of the Supreme Court. Through discussions of issues including freedom of speech, labour rights, race, civil rights, and criminal justice practices, you'll explore key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and the Constitution in shaping them. In looking at the connections between law and policy you'll also consider how key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and American society more broadly. You'll learn through self-directed study and seminars. By the end of the module you will have a better understanding of key issues in American history and politics. You will have developed your skills in using primary and secondary sources as historical resources. You will have strengthened your reasoning, analytical, and debating skills and further developed your writing and oral communication skills.

AMAH5034A

20

ANIMAL WELFARE LAW

During this module you will consider the law relating to animal protection and animal welfare in England and Wales, including the effect on domestic law of EU law and international law. In particular, you will explore the original development of animal protection law, including the social and political context in which legislation was originally enacted. You will then move on to consider in detail the move from individual, narrow, situation-specific legislation to the general protection offered by the Protection of Animals Act 1911, the first general animal protection legislation in the UK. After considering the significant development of animal protection legislation in the UK, you will consider the field of animal welfare science, giving you a foundation in the basic welfare concepts on which the modern animal welfare law is based. After explaining the necessary concepts of animal welfare science, the module will move on to consider the development of law in the UK, which led to the Animal Welfare Act 2006, taking the law from its principal focus on prevention of cruelty towards an additional concern for a promotion of good welfare. You will also develop your knowledge on the law relating to the protection/welfare of animals in specific situations, such as: - The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, as amended (including currently proposed amendments); - Scientific testing (including consideration of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and the associated regulatory regime); - Wild animals (including the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996); - Farm animals (including the Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations 2007, as amended, and the EU Welfare of Animals (Transport) England Order 2006 and associated EU legislation); - Hunting (including the political and legal debates surrounding the Hunting Act 2004).

LAW-5019B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French which exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1.1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. On this module you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following topics: Meeting people Food and drink: Eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

BETWEEN EAST AND WEST: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY SINCE 1890

The beginning of the twentieth century witnessed a period of immense instability and change with the emergence of the United States as an international actor in the West and the Japanese break from the Chinese sphere of influence in the East. This was underpinned by technological developments, the expansion of global empires, extreme economic dislocation and two global wars. You will examine the conduct and content of the foreign policies of the major powers from the 1890s, with the Sino-Japanese War and the Spanish-American War, to the Japanese occupation of Asia. This will include assessing the interplay of the political, military, economic, strategic and cultural forces that shaped the beginning of the twentieth century and which continue to resonate in the contemporary world.

HIS-5065A

20

BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLES: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

The African American freedom struggle did not begin or end with the civil rights protests of the 1950s-1960s. Since the demise of slavery, black activists have been forcefully demanding racial equality. From 1865 to the present day, African Americans have not only asserted their rights as citizens, but have demanded an end to economic injustice, while questioning the actions of the U.S. government both at home and abroad. You will examine black political and cultural protest in the United States over the course of the 'long' civil rights movement. Covering the period from the first years of black freedom following the Civil War to the emergence of Black Lives Matter, you will learn about the breadth and diversity of African American activism. You will challenge popular narratives of the civil rights movement and uncover the radical impulses that have animated the freedom dreams of black America. You will study how African Americans responded to disenfranchisement, racial violence and economic inequality. You will also learn about the lives of key figures in the black freedom struggle such as Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Marcus Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune, Stokely Carmichael and Angela Davis. Ultimately, through the study of primary sources and secondary texts, you will grapple with the complexity of black political thought and develop a detailed understanding of how African Americans counteracted white supremacy. On successful completion of your module you will have a broad understanding of the major trends in African American political and cultural history from the nineteenth century to the present day. You will able be able to clearly articulate how African Americans have shaped our understanding of the American nation, democracy and the meaning of human rights. Finally, through the close study of a range of cultural and political texts including autobiographies, speeches, newspapers and film, you will develop key analytical skills that are vital to the interdisciplinary study of history and politics.

AMAH5050B

20

Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865

Race is central to the history of the United States. The conversations about race in 21st century America have their origins in a system of slavery that developed from the early colonial period. This module excavates these roots and thereby enables you to look to current conversations and understand where these began. You will follow a chronological sequence on the module, allowing us to trace the course of racial slavery in North America from its inception in 1619 through to its abolition in 1865. You will consider the roots of racism in the colonial era that strengthened during the antebellum years and beyond and consider their relationship with racial slavery. You will engage with the developing historical scholarship of slavery in the United States, gaining a deeper understanding of contemporary (then and now) debates concerning race and racial identity. Employing a range of resources including written and visual primary sources, oral histories, cinematic depictions, and nineteenth century novels, will allow you to see the networks of power articulated though race and ideas of "otherness". You'll learn through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study, often working with artifacts or source materials in seminars to enable you to think collectively about their meanings. Assessment will be entirely through coursework. The study of slavery in the United States will make you a better historian, whatever your area of interest. Concepts of race and ideas of "otherness" are so central to the study of history in the 21st century that the techniques and strategies of analysis employed on this module will enable you to think about the arguments of others more effectively and also position yourself within those debates.

AMAH5043A

20

CRIMINOLOGY

This module considers key theoretical perspectives in criminology, drawing upon this foundational knowledge to understand and explain different kinds of criminal behaviour, and society's response to them. It considers how crime is defined and researched, situating the criminal law in social context. The aim of the module is to introduce students to the study of criminology, and to engage students in critical discussions of how crime is defined and by whom; why criminal behaviour is an enduring feature of contemporary liberal societies; and society's response to crime. The module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of: #key theoretical and empirical issues in criminology; #the value of theory in explaining patterns of crime and criminalisation. #the nexus between criminological theory and criminal justice policy in relation to specific case study examples.

LAW-5032B

20

DIGITAL MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the andquot;network societyandquot;; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

PPLM5053A

20

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

You'll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You'll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you'll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you'll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth's natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

PPLX6098B

20

EMPLOYMENT LAW 1

In this module you will learn about individual employment law, including employment status and forms of working relationships, formation and content of contracts of employment, termination of employment at common law, unfair dismissal, redundancy and business transfers.

LAW-5015B

20

EU CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

This module examines European Union constitutional law and the functioning of the EU at supranational level. It will start with an analysis of the EU institutions and their interaction, the legislative process and the role of fundamental rights in EU law. It will then consider direct actions before the Court of Justice, in particular actions for annulment and actions against recalcitrant Member States. Finally, a topical issue of EU constitutional law will be addressed.

LAWZ5018B

20

FAKE NEWS! AMERICAN JOURNALISM, HISTORY AND PRACTICE.

How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to "the news"#but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. "The news" has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media#looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5049B

20

FAMILY LAW: CHILD LAW

Child Law is a socio-legal study of the moral and legal laws connecting parents, children and the state. We consider who is a parent; what rights and responsibilities parents have; to what extent children have been able to assert human rights; the welfare principle (the basis on which decisions about children are made); law and policy arguments surrounding post-separation parenting and contact; child protection and local authority duties towards children; when we take a child into care and why we tolerate some harm to children; and adoption. The module reflects both the practical application of child law - What is the law? How does it work in practice? - and the theoretical basis of the law - Why is the law the way it is? What does that say about society? How could we think differently about it, and change the law? It develops law-specific academic and practical skills, as well as transferable skills. International/exchange students are very welcome. Anyone who has not studied law before should contact the module organiser for advice prior to enrolment.

LAW-5012B

20

FURTHER TOPICS IN CONTRACT LAW

In this module, you will build on topics covered in the first-year core Contract Law module and explore new topics. It is an ideal complement to your degree pathway whether you wish to choose a consumer or commercial-oriented option within your law degree course. You will focus on doctrinal analysis, but will also seek to set these rules within the theory of contract law and to show the importance of contract to the business world and in "everyday" life. You will balance theoretical analysis and practical application in this module.

LAWZ5017B

20

GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE NEW REPUBLIC

Figures such as the self-made man, the domestic goddess, and the painted woman, are all familiar characters in the fictions we read about the United States. But these are not just works of the imagination to be found on the movie screen and in the work of novelists. These notable character types formed part of an emerging cultural landscape in the newly formed United States grounded in intersectional discourses of gender, race, class, and sexuality. You will examine the social construction of gender and sexuality in the newly formed United States, 1789-1861. Throughout your module you'll gain a detailed knowledge of post-revolutionary and antebellum America, and an awareness of the different characteristics of the northern and southern states during this period. You will also develop an in-depth historical and conceptual understanding of the extent to which gender interacted with other markers of difference, such as sexuality, race, class and ethnicity in the United States. You will also develop your ability to utilise, interpret and critically evaluate a wide range of source materials to explain and explore the historical context of particular gender stereotypes. You'll begin with an overview of the historical scholarship concerning gender more broadly. You will then explore various case studies each week tracing the models of gender that emerged in various contexts including consideration of region (North, South, and West), race (Native American, White and Black), and class (an emerging middle-class, the labouring poor, and elite southerners). You'll learn through weekly seminars and self-directed study. You'll be using a variety of resources including written and visual sources from the era, historical novels, and academic scholarship. You'll be assessed entirely through coursework on this module, with essay workshops and tutorials to guide you.

AMAH5002A

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

You'll examine the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities, providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods You'll explore both theoretical and methodological issues and cover theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. You'll explore a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

HUMAN RIGHTS: THE HISTORY OF AN IDEA

Reading key historical, philosophical, political, legal and literary texts, this module track will track the emergence of human rights as a cultural idea from their conception in the eighteenth century, through the development of political rights and humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, through to the Nuremberg trials and the United Nations of Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), into the post World War Two period and up to the present day.We will trace how the idea of human rights developed at key junctures, and untangle their relationship to political and historical change.

HIS-5043A

20

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

Where does global power lie? International Organisations (IOs) such as the United Nations, World Trade Organisation and International Monetary Fund have important roles to play but just how relevant are they today, more than 70 years after they were set up? And what about regional organisations such as the European Union and African Union, or ? non governmental organisations (NGOs) such as the Red Cross, Greenpeace and Amnesty International?. Can we say that these organisations collectively form a system of global governance? In this module we will discuss critically the theories and concepts used for the analysis of international cooperation and offer competing perspectives to gain substantive knowledge of the development, operation, and role of IOs in key policy domains. We will examine grand' dilemmas facing humanity (security, welfare, and environmental) and the forms of international governance set up to address those dilemmas. We ask why sovereign nation-states form, join and usually comply with the rules. We look too at the emergence of potential alternatives to western-centric IOs and bring together a critical evaluation of the main theories which seek to explain international cooperation with an examination of contemporary issues in these public policy fields. Finally, we consider whether international organisation (the latter singular) amounts to an effective form of global governance to the extent that it mitigates anarchy in the international system.

PPLI5057A

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

What does the world look like to a Marxist, or a liberal, or a feminist, or a realist? We all hold particular ideas about how the world works: about why certain events happen, who the key actors in the international system are, and whether it is even possible to change things for future generations. Theories of International Relations (IR) attempt to capture these assumptions, explaining the world in different ways to others. You will explore how the discipline of IR emerged in the early 20th century, before investigating the very different theories which have shaped, and sometimes dominated, academic and policy makers' ideas about how the world actually works.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today's world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violences, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

PPLI5056B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

Do you think gender affects the way that people speak? How do you think our language reflects gender differences in society? Do you think we can use language to create societal change? In this module, you will bring your own personal experiences to a lively critical discussion on the relationship between language and gender, putting together your own portfolio of evidence from your everyday life. You will bring your own modern-day reflections to historic studies on language and gender, starting with early 20th-century studies on how men and women use language differently, moving to 1960s sociolinguistic studies on how 'standard' language differs between women and men, and then, following the growth of the Women's Movement in the 1970s, studies on male dominance in mixed-gender talk. Finally, you will look at the recent move to reconceptualise 'gender' not as a 'fixed' phenomenon, but one that may be performed or 'interactionally achieved' in different ways in different contexts. You will bring your thoughts together in a final report, in which you will have the opportunity to reflect on the issues through your own case studies that you will collect over the course of the module.

PPLL6035A

20

LATIN AMERICA AND THE WORLD (LEVEL 6)

You'll study Latin America from a perspective that challenges the legacy of colonial rule, its political aftermath, and its cultural and economic consequences. You'll focus on topics such as indigenous politics, racism, environmentalism, gay rights, gender, religion, migration, urbanisation, the Chicano movement, narco-corridos, and various social and cultural movements. You'll examine these as examples of local responses to the colonial legacy and to dominant Western constructions of Latin America.

PPLH6009B

20

LATIN FOR HISTORIANS

This module provides an introduction to the linguistic skills in medieval Latin which enable students to read administrative documents such as charters, accounts, court rolls, etc. It is particularly suited for those who intend on proceeding to postgraduate study in aspects of the past, such as medieval history, which require a reading knowledge of Latin. This course is not intended for students who have already studied Latin to A level or equivalent.

HIS-5004B

20

LAW AND BUSINESS

An introduction to the ways law and business interact in terms of the different forms of business organisations and how we might choose between them, the considerations involved in sale and finance and other discrete areas of law on which specialised modules will build.

LAW-5013B

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN (and beyond): THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

We deal with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War and its end with collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War period.

HIS-5017B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

In this module, you will explore distinct types of interaction between philosophy and social science. We study classic philosophical works in order to shed light on theoretical frameworks in political theory; we discuss modern work in economic methodology to understand its presuppositions and its goals. Finally, we examine the problem of understanding meaningful human action, we ponder the possibility of establishing causal relations that connect social phenomena, and we reflect on the function of values in social enquiry.

PPLP6103A

20

POLITICS AND MEDIA

Media are an inescapable part of contemporary political life. This much is obvious. What is more difficult to know is how media affect the conduct of politics - and how politics affects the conduct of media. In this module, you'll examine the many dimensions of media's political involvement. You'll start with arguments about how 'powerful' media are, and then go on to look at questions of media 'bias', before turning to the ways in which political communication has changed (and is changing). We'll look at the role of the state in using and controlling media and the new techniques of media management - and at how, in particular, digital media are changing the relationship between politics and media. This will lead to a discussion of media effects and how to measure them. You'll end the module by asking what is meant by a democratic media and what the future might bring for the relationship of media and politics.

PPLM5001B

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

POLITICS, POLICY AND PRACTICE

This module is concerned with how policy is made, how it is implemented, and how it affects developing countries. It critically analyses the role of a variety of different development actors including international organisations, national governments, Non-Governmental Organisations, social movements, trade unions and the media. It focuses in particular on how policy impacts on the conditions of less well-off and less powerful groups in society. It underlines the contested nature of policy processes and asks how policy can work better for the poor.

DEV-6011B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/I

'Decouvrir et discuter.' Here are two key elements of this module which will further your French language and communication skills by working on them through the lens of French culture. If you have a French A level, any other international equivalent qualification, or if you have completed French Intermediate II, then this module is for you! You'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). You will focus on receptive skills (listening and reading) in particular and will be taught in an interactive and friendly environment (pairs and small groups). Your seminars will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will develop your confidence in speaking. In the lecture you will review and practise essential grammar points. You will have a great exposure to authentic French in all three components of the module, as it is entirely taught in French. The material that you will study in and out of class (videos, articles, short stories, films) will help you to further your knowledge of French culture, as well as to build up your French vocabulary on a variety of topics. You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills, and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand the main points of clear standard input on the topics covered in class, and to produce simple connected texts on these topics. You'll be able give reasons and explanations for your opinions, based on your personal experience and on the material studied in this module. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. You should not already have a level of French that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I - B1.1 CEFR

Would you like to become a more fluent German speaker who is able to deal with most situations whilst travelling? Do you need the confidence to survive a work placement abroad or a term at a German university? Or maybe you are keen to learn how to write an essay or deliver a short presentation German style. This advanced course in German is perfect if you have completed both intermediate modules or have A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this . You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you start to study grammar at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and describe and evaluate basic statistical information with confidence. During this module you will improve your understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at and evaluating conventions in the world of work and at universities in German-speaking countries. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and discuss topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. A first advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

Would you like to apply your Spanish language skills for intercultural dialogue? Then look no further as this is the right module for you. The core of the teaching will involve participating in a project and you will engage in a number of activities that focus on improving your Spanish whilst learning about an issue of global concern. During this module you will: - build on, and further enhance, your reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. - build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. - explore an issue of contemporary relevance and work together to find practical solutions to a real world problem. - learn through lectures, seminars, tutorials and independent study and develop knowledge of contemporary life, society and current affairs. - revisit and consolidate specific Spanish grammatical structures at a higher level to build up language proficiency. The oral classes will be arranged separately in smaller groups to maximize your opportunities for speaking in the target language. This module is suitable for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification.

PPLH4025A

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module introduces you to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. You'll consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. The module is structured chronologically, starting with the development of propaganda during World War I and finishing with a consideration of propaganda in the 21st century.

HIS-5050B

20

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Public international law is the legal regime that governs States, and as such balances law with international affairs and politics. In this module, you will examine how international law is formed, who it applies to, the role of the United Nations and how public international law protects individuals. It also interrogates the cohesiveness of this body, or bodies, of law. Particular focus will be placed on human rights, self-determination, use of force, international criminal law, environmental and trade law. You will address both the practical and theoretical aspects of public international law and consequently consider how the public international law framework applies to contemporary situations.

LAW-5014B

20

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

You'll analyse the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so you'll explore the historical circumstances behind the conflict, relations between the United States of America, the Soviet Union and other states, as well as the impact of nuclear weapons. The Cold War has been revisited by historians from various angles, and in a variety of ways, in recent years and this module is structured to enable engagement with these new histories. You'll take account of developments traditionally viewed as central to the history of the post-war era, while exploring lesser known case studies and alternative spheres where the conflict played out. This will include coverage of a range of states in Europe and beyond. Broader themes, such as the role of propaganda, sport and youth will also be considered, as will the overarching bodies of the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement and the emerging European project. The module concludes by asking why the Cold War ended so abruptly and why the process was peaceful in some cases and violent in others.

HIS-5024B

20

THE LAW OF PROTEST AND DISSENT

This module will explore the legal challenges arising from different forms of protest and dissent around the world - from temporary encampments to 'occupations', from Pride parades to far-right rallies, from direct action campaigns and 'Critical Mass' bicycle rides to funeral pickets and anti-abortion protests. Students will discuss and explore what kinds of dissent and protest are (or ought to be) legally protected, and what kind of regulation might legitimately be permitted. We will also examine the State's legal obligations to protect and facilitate peaceful protest and the implications of these for protest policing. The challenge of how law ought to deal with those who resist or reject the exclusivity of orthodox modes of political participation (party politics, periodic elections) is one that confronts all democratic systems governed by the rule of law. Yet, in some circumstances, even the argument that law might properly govern or manage political dissent is something of a contradiction in terms: how can law attempt to govern those that oppose or fundamentally reject its very authority? In responding to this underlying challenge, the module seeks to provide a thorough grounding in the core legal standards relating to the legal protection of dissent and the right to protest.

LAW-5033B

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, you will use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both your own identity and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you will critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

PPLM5042B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it's a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You'll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works - its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you'll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

LDCC5013A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it's a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You'll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works - its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you'll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

LDCC5014B

20

THEY CAME FROM OUTER-THE-CLOSET: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND PANIC IN AMERICAN FILM AND LITERATURE

With a main focus on the 20th century, we will explore key moments of change or crisis in the century and consider the ways the panic caused by such changes is distinctly gendered and/or sexualised. We will concurrently examine gender and sexual resistance to dominant ideas of American identity and the subsequent creation and/or promotion of liberationist discourses and alternative communities. Film will provide the focus for this cultural study, and the module will range widely over a number of different genres including the western, sci-fi, detective and LGBT themed works.

AMAS5020B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars and Humanitarian Crisis is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool.

DEV-6003A

20

WOMEN, POWER, AND POLITICS (I): ISABEL OF CASTILE TO MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

This module examines the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, we focus on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; marriage, family and life cycles; queens and queenship; honour and sexual identities; charity and welfare; women and work; material culture; women in the new world; education and learning; early feminists.

HIS-5064A

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • PRO BONO

    Law Clinic brings together an unrivalled range of pro bono opportunities for our students.

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  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

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  • Earlham Hall

    Following a major restoration project, UEA School of Law moved back to its former residence of Earlham Hall in the spring of 2014. Earlham Hall has been fully restored with newly refurbished offices, seminar rooms, a lecture theatre and substantial student space.

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  • UEA Law Society

    Watch our video from the UEA Law Society

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  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

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Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAA
  • International Baccalaureate 34 If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H2
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC D*D*D* Only acceptable in the following subjects: Applied Science, Applied Law, Forensic and Criminal Investigation or Business.
  • European Baccalaureate 82%

Entry Requirement

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.  

Due to the limited number of places for this particular degree programme, a course change to an alternative Law course may be offered at the time of offer, due to the strength of the application field. 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

 

Interviews

The majority of applicants will not be interviewed for this course, however some applicants are requested to attend an interview prior to being offered a place. Applicants who are invited for interview will include those that have taken Access and OU qualifications.

These interviews are normally quite informal and cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course, personal interests and extra-curricular activities. Applicants will be required to write a short essay as part of the interview process in test conditions. 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

Due to the limited number of places for this particular degree programme, a course change to an alternative Law course may be offered at the time of offer, due to the strength of the application field. 

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515