MEng Energy Engineering


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Master of Engineering



UCAS Course Code
H801
A-Level typical
AAB (2019/0 entry) See All Requirements
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Key facts

This course has academic accreditation and we are officially an Accredited Academic body of the Energy Institute.

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Find out what it’s like to study Engineering at UEA.

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Engineering at UEA is built on great links with industry, exciting research and diverse teaching. We have a multidisciplinary approach to engineering research, which brings together academics from many of our highly respected Schools including Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Biological Sciences.

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Train to be a future leader of the energy sector. Wind turbines, nuclear power stations and biofuels are becoming increasingly widespread, and at UEA we aim to produce Energy Engineering graduates with the capacity and expertise to design and build them.

Our Masters course will help you understand the technological and digital developments that will shape the energy industry of the future. And you’ll be given integrated learning opportunities that often reflect a real industrial context from the outset, supporting the development of your soft and hard engineering knowledge and skill sets.

In your final year you’ll have the opportunity to put everything you’ve learned into practice through a major team-based project. You’ll be given a real brief to work from, and you’ll be encouraged to undertake site visits so that you can develop proposals, which you’ll then present to professional engineers.

Overview

East Anglia is a major region for energy engineering, and you’ll feel the benefit of our connections with local industry right from the start of this four-year course. You’ll get a taste of the many career paths energy engineering could open up to you through role-model meetings, site visits and opportunities for short-term internships and placements.

Our close partnerships with major engineering companies also enable us to support and encourage student innovation and the development of your networking skills. Both of which are critical to the sector and to ensuring we can deliver the engineers the energy industry needs today, and for the future.

All engineering courses within the School share an integrated programme structure during the first year to demonstrate the potential breadth of the discipline. We work closely with other UEA Schools including Environmental Sciences, Computing Sciences and Mathematics, so that your learning is informed by a range of expertise.

This course is accredited by the Energy Institute.
 

Course Structure

Year 1

In your first year you’ll take on design projects to gain a grounding in engineering mathematics and principles, supported by a broad introduction to energy from practising engineers. Engineering Studies will allow you to study a number of more focused engineering disciplines. Introductions to mechanical, electronic and electrical and energy engineering are delivered through fieldwork, and design and build tasks.

After these introductions you’ll be given the flexibility to change your degree path based on what you’ve learnt. You can choose your preferred path at any point before the start of your second semester or, with appropriate module choices, further delay the decision until the end of second year.

Year 2

Year two will build on the foundations of your first year, exploring design in greater depth and using renewable energy examples to illustrate advanced principles. You will bring your energy expertise to the multi-disciplinary team design exercise.

You’ll develop a thorough understanding of micro-hydro schemes by analysing pumps and turbines linked to pipe flow and networks. While the hands-on study of analogue and digital electronics will push your understanding of electricity further. And your mathematical knowledge will be developed through more advanced material, including programming skills.

Year 3

Your individual project will be the major focus of your third year. Essentially this is your chance deepen your knowledge of the areas of energy engineering that fascinates you most. Previous examples include ‘Investigating the impact of a tidal barrage in a particular location’ and ‘Prediction of the long-term impact of electric cars on the National Grid’.

In addition to your research project, you’ll be given a brief introduction to health and safety risk management, with nuclear power and solar energy used as examples. And you’ll begin to understand how the National Grid works.

Year 4

In your final year you’ll undertake a major multidisciplinary design project. Team-based, it will encourage you to explore the breadth of your learning to-date in the context of an industrial project.

The project will typically be based on a real client brief, acquired or adapted from industry, and presented to you in the autumn term. You’ll work within a team to explore the brief, carry out site visits, and develop proposals, which you will then present to professional energy engineers.

Teaching and Learning

Your Energy Engineering course will combine lectures, workshops and tutorials. You’ll then be asked to apply the knowledge gained to a research problem or a series of questions, or to solve a design problem. Because it is this application of knowledge that will help you gain a deeper understanding of the material and help you to retain what you have learnt.

Throughout your studies you will develop skill sets in line with the guidance provided by the Engineering Council and our accrediting body, The Energy Institute. Which means you’ll graduate with the capabilities you need to get your career off to a flying start, including being an effective communicator, digitally literate, and capable of dealing with problems where you have insufficient data.

You’ll develop your communication skills through written reports, oral presentations and workshop discussions. And workshops will also give you time to develop digital skillsets in computer analysis and design. 

What’s more, we’ll provide you with multiple opportunities to connect with industry, when you will be encouraged to develop your networking abilities and to your exposure to our industrial contacts.

By combining excellence in teaching and encouraging your industrial connections, we aim to secure your success as you progress through your programme and beyond.

Independent study

Independent study will be guided by the requirements of your research projects, design work and problem-solving exercises. You can expect to explore your module content widely, through which you will develop the independent learning skills so highly valued by employers.

This will culminate in the development and presentation of your final year industrial project.

Assessment

Our assessment strategies are as varied as our teaching. In acknowledging the individual ways in which you might prefer to demonstrate your learning, assessment patterns are designed to present opportunities for you to shine through a variety of assessments across the programme.

Assessment examples include written work, poster presentations, illustrative sketches and traditional examinations.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

We also offer a BEng Engineering (Energy) with a Year in Industry degree if you are interested in spending a year on an industrial placement.

After the course

As a UEA Energy Engineering graduate, you’ll have excellent career prospects in a thriving industry. Our graduates are in particular demand from renewable energy, power network and energy management companies, and previous graduates have gone on to employment in multiple energy sectors, including off-shore wind.

Subject to satisfactory performance in your undergraduate degree, you will also be well-positioned study for a PhD. And the STEM capital you’ll have gained could potentially support a successful career in accountancy, law, teaching and finance.

Career destinations

Examples of careers that you could enter include:

  • Energy management
  • Renewable energy installation and operation
  • Energy from waste
  • Power networks
  • Engineering supply chain
  • Law
  • Teaching
  • Accountancy and finance

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of course-related costs.

Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the Energy Institute on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

The current period of accreditation is for afive-year period, from the2016student cohort intake to the2020student cohort intake.

We would expect to apply for renewal of accreditation at the end of this period.

Course Modules 2019/0

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

CREATIVE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

This module allows you to explore the development of digital technologies that have revolutionised engineering design and creative engineering practice. Through consideration of computer coding and digital tools, the aim is to promote your digital literacy and your ability to evidence this through the demonstration of appropriate applications. The early development of a digital skill-set, applied across a breadth of applications, will allow you to gain skills that you could use in industry placements during the summer vacations. The impact of digital innovation and disruptive technologies such as drones, 3D printing and the 'Internet of Things' will also be explored.

ENG-4006Y

20

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICS

This module utilises the mathematical concepts from the Mathematics for Scientists module in an engineering context, before complementing the material with practical mechanics to solve real-world problems. Over the first semester students are introduced to the vocational necessity of estimation in the absence of accurate data through a team-based competition, as well as the practical geometry and numerical methods which can be used when analytical techniques fail. This is supplemented by practical exercises in graphical presentation and data analysis which will contribute to the coursework element of the module. Teaching then concentrates on mechanics in the second semester, encompassing Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics and conservation laws before a final exam.

ENG-4004Y

20

ENGINEERING PRACTICE

In Engineering Practice you will explore the role of the engineer operating in the modern world. You will experience what it is like to face the challenges of design. You will be encouraged to explore your creative design talent while also developing an awareness of issues relating to sustainability, health, safety and professional ethics. To help you communicate your designs, you will learn to produce professional technical drawings and engineers' sketches alongside 3D models using CAD software. Your industrial experience will grow through your participation in site visits in both semesters. In Semester 2 you will participate in an inter-university design challenge and apply your new skill sets in graphical, written and oral communication to a real project-based design. In this term you also explore the final pillar of Sustainability through an introduction to economics .

ENG-4003Y

20

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES AND LAWS

This module introduces three distinct topics which are essential for a wide range of engineering disciplines. During the first semester, you will investigate how to harness the properties of modern materials within an engineering context. Exposure to materials section software enhances your learning and the material is assessed by a formative course test. Fluid mechanics and hydraulics are introduced and applications to pipe networks are used to develop your confidence in commercial software. An introduction to thermodynamics and heat transfer completes the module. You will complete a number of laboratory exercises which are assessed by two formal summative reports.

ENG-4002Y

20

ENGINEERING STUDIES

This module is designed to assist you in making an informed choice of career pathway and introduces you to a variety of engineering disciplines. You will get a hands-on introduction to electronic-electrical engineering, you will be exposed to a range of energy industry specialists and encouraged to develop your understanding of the UK and global energy mix. In addition to a brief overview of civil engineering you will be introduced to the basics of structural engineering and fundamental principles that civil and mechanical engineers use (structural frames, bridges, foundations, stresses, machine design), putting these in context. Permeating the delivery of the electronic-electrical and energy topics you will develop programming, simulation and practical problem solving skills using software e.g. MATLAB, Simulink, Arduino.

ENG-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

You will cover differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods as part of this module. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for those across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C.

ENV-4015Y

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

ANALOGUE AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

A practical introduction to electronics, this module is structured to consider analogue electronics and digital electronics in turn. Topics you'll cover include passive and active components, including op-amps, transistors, logic gates, flip-flops and registers. Circuits you'll study include amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, combinational and sequential logic and state machines. You'll spend much of your time doing practical work - underpinned by lectures - where you will build prototypes circuits, as well as designing and building Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs).

CMP-5027A

20

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES AND DESIGN

This module purposely fuses the boundaries conventionally constraining engineering designers, to enable you to fully explore the breadth of design principles and processes presented within a contemporary design challenge. Supported by a framework of integrated learning, you will continue to develop your ability to straddle the boundaries of creative design practice in the determination of holistic design solutions. Societal design challenges will add real-world context to problems posed as you explore the issues facilitating the realisation of revolutionary ideas in contemporary design practice.

ENG-5003Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the second in a series of three mathematical modules for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples.

MTHB5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods, partial differential equations and solid mechanics. There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. The module is taught by mathematicians with considerable expertise in the use of mathematics in the natural/environmental sciences and is largely designed to equip students with the tools necessary for advanced second and third level modules, particularly those in the physical sciences.

MTHB5007B

20

RENEWABLE ENERGY

This module builds on understanding in wind, tidal and hydroelectric power and introduces theories and principles relating to a variety of renewable energy technologies including solar energy, heat pumps and geothermal sources, fuel cells and the hydrogen economy, biomass energy and anaerobic digestion. You will consider how these various technologies can realistically contribute to the energy mix. You will study the various targets and legislative instruments that are used to control and encourage developments. Another key aspect of the module is the study and application of project management and financial project appraisal techniques in a renewable energy context.

ENG-5002B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

DYNAMICS AND VIBRATION

You will build on the introductory material you gained in first year engineering mechanics. An appreciation of why dynamics and vibration are important for engineering designers leads to consideration of Single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems, Equation of motion, free vibration analysis, energy methods, natural frequency, undamped and damped systems and loading. Fourier series expansion and modal analysis are applied to vibration concepts: eigenfrequency, resonance, beats, critical, under-critical and overcritical damping, and transfer function. Introduction to multi-degree of freedom (MDOF) systems. Applications to beams and cantilevers. MathCAD will be used to support learning.

ENG-5004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (2)

It is vital that everyone working in business has an understanding of accounting data in order that financial information can be used to add value to the organisation. You'll be provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of accounting and an introduction to the role, context and language of financial reporting and management accounting. The module assumes no previous study of accounting. You'll begin with building a set of accounts from scratch so that you will be able to analyse and provide insight form the major financial statements. You'll also look at management decision making tools such as costing, budgeting and financial decision making. You will be required to actively participate in your learning both in lectures and seminars. The module employs a learn by doing approach.

NBS-4010Y

20

INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (2)

The aim of this module is for you to develop an understanding of the structure, functioning, and performance of organisations with particular reference to the behaviour of the individuals and groups who work within them. Specifically, the module aims are to: # Develop an appreciation of the nature and historical development of organisational behaviour (OB). # Introduce key concepts and theories in organisational behaviour. # Develop an understanding of the linkages between OB research, theory, and practice. # Develop analytical and academic writing skills.

NBS-4011Y

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. Shelf Sea Dynamics is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here. We strongly recommend that you also gain oceanographic fieldwork experience by taking the 20-credit biennial Marine Sciences field course.

ENV-5016A

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

This module is highly practical and will allow you to study how electricity is generated and how it is distributed to users. The first part studies DC and AC electricity and looks at how RLC circuits behave through complex phasor analysis. The second part will give you the chance to study electricity generators, beginning with magnetism and Faraday's Law. Synchronous and asynchronous generators are studied along with application to conventional power stations and to renewable generation (e.g. wind). You'll also look at transformers and transmission lines with a view to distribution of electricity. Voltage conversion methods such as the rectifier, buck and boost converters are examined and finally electricity generation through solar is covered. Your lab classes will build on material from lectures which in turn forms the basis for coursework.

ENG-6001B

20

FOSSIL FUELS

You will be introduced to geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels, and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity on society. Some knowledge of Earth science and basic Chemistry will be expected.

ENV-6009A

20

INDIVIDUAL ENERGY PROJECT

This module allows you to display your full talents and understanding of energy engineering principles through an extended piece of individual project work. This significant piece of work is worth 40 credits of the overall degree and runs over both semesters of the third year. The project will comprise research, design, implementation and practical elements. The subject of the project will be negotiated between you and a supervisor at the start of the module. The supervisor will then continue to support you in project management, report-writing and the applied design process throughout the assignment.

ENG-6003Y

40

NUCLEAR AND SOLAR ENERGY

This module addresses the technical aspects of nuclear power and solar energy, whilst letting students apply their knowledge from the Engineering Practice module to make ethical decisions incorporating health and safety risk assessments. Successful design of nuclear installations requires a detailed quantitative risk analysis within a regulatory framework that imposes high tolerances. In contrast, the rapid installation of solar panels at domestic scale requires education to ensure smaller companies remain in line with legislation. Although these energies are considered cleaner, it is essential to consider the environmental impact and planning law, as well as changing the societal perception of both.

ENG-6002Y

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BUSINESS AND COMPANY LAW

This module is highly vocational and primarily designed for those taking accounting and related degrees, who wish to satisfy the curriculum requirements of the accounting profession, as having a foundation in aspects of English business and company law. You'll cover in particular detail the Law of Contract and Company Law but also a wide variety of other subject areas, including the English Legal System, Partnership and Agency Law, Law of Torts, Criminal Law, Data Protection Law and Employment Law.

NBS-5004Y

20

BUSINESS FINANCE

On this module you'll learn about the basic principles of financial management and how to apply them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. For example, you'll consider why the firm's owners would like the manager to increase firm value, and how the manager will choose between investments that may pay off at different points of time or have different degrees of risk. Moreover, you'll explore how companies raise the necessary funds to pay for these investments and why they might prefer a particular source of finance. Overall, this module will present you with the tools of modern financial management in a consistent conceptual framework.

NBS-5008Y

20

CONTROL SYSTEMS

Control systems are everywhere; automatic control of wind turbines, building management controls, aerospace controls. Understanding control systems is important for all engineers. The module begins with a review of the underlying theory of control utilising Laplace transforms and other techniques. Open and closed loop systems, feedback and stability will be considered. Matlab and other software tools will support your learning. Industrial applications will be introduced using case studies from local companies.

ENG-6007A

20

ENGINEERING INDUSTRIAL PROJECT 1

This module provides you with an opportunity to gain valuable credit-bearing industrial experience. It comprises a 10-week minimum placement over the summer vacation and submission of inception, interim and final reports which are presented at an assessed viva in the autumn term. This module replaces a 20-credit option module in the following academic year. Where possible a distinct project element of the placement will be identified for which you have overall responsibility. The main objectives of the placement are to develop your understanding of real engineering industry, the importance of risk and commercial awareness, and how sustainability is addressed in modern engineering practice.

ENG-6011A

20

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

What are the rules that dictate how company accounts should be prepared and why do those rules exist? This is the essence of this module. Whilst company directors may wish to present the financial condition of a business in the best possible light, rules have been developed to protect investors and users of the accounts from being misled. You'll develop knowledge and skills in understanding and applying accounting standards when preparing financial statements. You'll also prepare and analyse statements of both individual businesses and groups of companies. Large UK companies report using International Financial Reporting Standards and these are the standards that you'll use. You'll begin by preparing basic financial statements and progress, preparing accounts of increasing complexity by looking at topics including goodwill, leases, cashflow statements, foreign currency transactions, financial instruments and group accounts. You'll also deepen your analytical skills through ratio analysis. You'll learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars and self-study, and be assessed by coursework (20%) and final examination (80%). On successful completion of this module, you'll have acquired significant technical skills in both the preparation and analysis of financial statements. This will give you a strong basis from which to build should you wish to study advanced financial accounting or are planning on a career in business or accounting.

NBS-5002Y

20

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

If you become a manager of people, how will you look after those in your team, department or wider organisation? Will you seek to empower, encourage and energise your staff? How will you deal with conflict and management control? You'll have the chance to examine a range of approaches to managing people across a variety of organisational contexts and issues. By doing so, you'll discover valuable insights into the way that organisations work and the impact that different human resource management approaches can have on organisations, people and business. You'll learn about the strategic significance of human resource management for competitive advantage, and particularly the processes to recruit, reward and retain the staff your organisation needs. You'll also explore contemporary issues about managing employees against a background of change and internationalisation. On successful completion of the module, you'll have gained insight into the ways that organisations deal with their workforce. You'll have developed skills and knowledge that will help equip you for future management practice. And you'll learn useful lessons about job markets and how to get and grow in the job you desire.

NBS-5011Y

20

MODELLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES

Our aim is to show how environmental problems may be solved from the initial problem, to mathematical formulation and numerical solution. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically via computer programming. The module consists of lectures on numerical methods and computing practicals; the practicals being designed to illustrate the solution of problems using the methods covered in lectures. We will guide students through the solution of a model of an environmental process of their own choosing. The skills developed in this module are highly valued by prospective employers.

ENV-6004A

20

OPERATIONS STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT

What does it take for an organisation to succeed? Managing operations well is critical to every type of organisation and requires both strategic and tactical skills. Only through effective and efficient utilisation of resources can an organisation be successful in the long run. Operations management is concerned with explaining how manufacturing and service organisations work. This module will introduce you to this functional field of management which encompasses the design and improvement of the processes and systems employed in the creation and delivery of an organisation's products and services.

NBS-5010Y

20

STRESS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

Beginning with a revision of first and second year concepts of elasticity this module will consolidate an understanding of the relationship between stress and strain in a variety of contexts such as torsion, shear and bending of open and closed sections with applications in aerospace, wind engineering, bridge design and others. Analytical techniques such as Mohr's circle will be covered and you will explore the way that design codes place practical limits on stress and strain such as in bolted and welded connections.

ENG-6006Y

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is therefore challenging. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction', as well as how to deal with climate denialists.

ENV-6008A

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

TEAM ENERGY PROJECT

This module recreates the industrial process of working in a multi-disciplinary consultancy, competing for the work from a client. Industrial partners offer a new real life project each year, with previous examples including designing a CHP facility to integrate anaerobic digestion, improving the industrial efficiency of a linen hiring company, and working with a client to produce a smart energy efficient building. Over the first semester each team responds to the brief from the conceptual stage through to a working scheme. In the second semester your team delivers a final report and presentation and each team member focuses on a few specific elements of the process to complete an individual design element. This flagship module provides confidence and commercial awareness of real-world industry.

ENG-7010Y

40

Students will select 80 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS

MODULE NOT AVAILABLE UNTIL 2019/20. RESERVED FOR ENGINEERING MASTERS STUDENTS. A number of computational techniques are used in engineering design and practice such as : Computer-Aided Drafting, Computer-Aided Design, Finite Element Analysis, Computer Numerical Control of manufacturing equipment, Computational Fluid Dynamics. In a hands-on approach students will develop a broad awareness and detailed competence in some of these techniques building on material introduced during earlier years of the degree.

ENG-7008A

20

ENERGY FUTURES

This module will provide you with an understanding of the developing landscape and challenges in the broad area of energy generation and transduction. It has a particular emphasis on the science that underpins emerging technologies related to the hydrogen economy, photovoltaics and biological or solar fuels. It will encompass cross-discipline aspects of chemistry, physics materials and biological science and you will gain knowledge of how these disciplines interplay in the design and construction of new devices for energy harvesting and utilisation. A Level Chemistry or equivalent will be required.

CHE-7801Y

20

ENGINEERING INDUSTRIAL PROJECT 2

This module provides an opportunity to gain valuable credit-bearing industrial experience. It comprises a 10-week minimum placement over the summer vacation and submission of inception, interim and final reports which are presented at an assessed viva in the autumn term. This module replaces a 20-credit option module in the academic year following the placement. . Where possible a distinct project element of the placement will be identified for which you have overall responsibility. The main objectives of the placement are to develop your understanding of real engineering industry, the importance of risk and commercial awareness, and how sustainability is addressed in modern engineering practice. To ensure that your experience delivers the learning outcomes you prepare a learning plan before you commence the placement.

ENG-7011A

20

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EFFECTIVENESS

Environmental Assessment is considered to be more effective when conducted at strategic levels of decision making, and is usually perceived to have a goal of achieving sustainable development. This module provides experience of conducting a particular form of strategic assessment, Sustainability Appraisal (SA), which incorporates environmental, social and economic considerations into plan making. Through practice of SA, a field course involving hands-on application of environmental assessment techniques, and consideration of effectiveness theory, this module will examine what makes assessment effective.Please note that there will be a charge for attending this field course (in the range of GBP300-GBP400) to cover attendance.

ENV-7021K

20

MECHANICAL AND MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

Mechanical engineering is often distinguished from other disciplines by the many production line processes that it utilises. You will develop manufacturing and business awareness through studying aspects of production lines such as quality systems, Kanban, Just in Time, Lean Manufacture etc. You will contrast the approaches in different sectors (e.g. aerospace, automotive mass production, automotive specialist production etc.) at a range of scales. This module is reserved for Engineering Masters Students

ENG-7013Y

20

MODERN METHODS IN AIR POLLUTION SCIENCE

Air pollution is one of the most significant environmental problems of the 21st century, with serious implications for human health, ecosystem and infrastructure damage, and global atmospheric and climate change. In this module, you will study the current methods used to monitor air pollutants at urban, regional and global scales, and how these measurements are interpreted using a variety of numerical models and graphical tools.

ENV-7040B

20

OIL AND GAS ENGINEERING

The aim of this module is to expose you to the technical and commercial realities of the oil and gas industry. An overview of the subject leads to a number of specific case studies provided by practising engineers. A number of assessment techniques are used, from individual presentations to analysis of reserves or research for a briefing document addressing issues of health and safety risk management. Each year the case studies will reflect the expertise of the visiting practising engineers. Although there are no pre-requisites this module is a good follow on to the Fossil Fuels module.

ENG-7012A

20

THEORY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Environmental assessment is a term used to describe procedures for evaluating the potential environmental consequences of policies, programmes, plans and projects. It is a well established tool for environmental policy integration, being routinely employed in more than 100 nations and by many international aid and funding agencies. This multidisciplinary module focuses on the theory and methods of environmental assessment and the decision-making contexts in which they are employed. It explains the procedural stages of, and selected methodologies for, environmental assessment and provides practical experience in applying them.

ENV-7020A

20

WAVE, TIDAL AND HYDRO ENERGY ENGINEERING

This module studies renewable energy sources that use the energy stored in water to produce electrical energy. An examination is made into the potential energy and kinetic energy stored in water, either implicitly through waves/tide or explicitly in hydro. Devices for energy extraction from waves are examined but an essential focus is on wave forces on structures. Tidal energy extraction devices including barrages, lagoons and tidal stream turbines are also studied. The design and operation of hydroelectric turbines is studied with a particular focus on pipe flow and pipe networks using commercial software.

ENG-7004B

20

WIND ENERGY ENGINEERING

Wind energy is the main provider of renewable energy and the source that is receiving the majority of investment, making its study vital to energy engineering. This module begins by examining the kinetic energy of moving air and the design of wind turbines to extract this energy. Different turbine designs are briefly examined and comparisons made of their effectiveness. Issues regarding placement of wind turbines and practical considerations are discussed and include data collection of wind speeds for possible wind farm sites using optimal spacing of turbines. The focus is on developing Excel skills and Technical Report-writing skills using wind energy as the context.

ENG-7003B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

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Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAB including Mathematics and one other Science subject or ABB including Mathematics and one other Science subject with a A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 33 points including HL6 in Mathematics and one other science subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBC including Mathematics and one other science subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 4 subjects at H2 and 2 subjects at H3 including Mathematics and one other science subject
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 36 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 9 credits at Level 3, including 12 Level 3 Maths credits and 12 Level 3 credits in one other Science
  • BTEC DDD in an Engineering pathway alongside Maths A-level. Excludes Public Services
  • European Baccalaureate 80% overall including 80% in Mathematics one other science subject

Entry Requirement

You are required to have English Language at a minimum of Grade C/4 or above and Mathematics at Grade B/5 or above at GCSE Level.

 

Science A-levels must include a pass in the practical element.

A-Level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Scholarships

ScottishPower Foundation Scholarships

ScottishPower Foundation has announced 28 postgraduate energy and environment scholarship grants in the UK for the 2017/18 academic year, to be split amongst 7 of the UK’s most respected universities, including UEA (with a guaranteed 4 places to be specific scholarships eligible to UEA students only). To coincide with this, ScottishPower Renewables has donated £100k to the ScottishPower Foundation to go towards funding these places.

The programme aims to help train a generation of highly skilled professionals to face up to the challenges that lie ahead, including the development of a sustainable energy model.

Final year students on the undergraduate integrated master’s courses, MEng Energy Engineering and MEng Engineering can apply for the scholarship for 4th year of study.

The scholarship meets full enrolment costs and provides a generous monthly living allowance of £1,200.

More information: https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/scholarships/scottishpower-scholarship

Application deadline: 7 April 2017

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time  undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515