BSc Natural Sciences

Video

Studying Natural sciences is an ideal way to combine interests from more than one area of science. The Natural Sciences degree programmes are at the heart of the science faculty. The science faculty has a powerful reputation for innovation, excellence and working across the boundaries of different academic disciplines.

Watch It

Video

New Building for Science and Engineering - Due to open in July 2019. Take an animated tour of our new £31 million state-of-the-art teaching and learning building on the UEA campus.

Watch It

Video

Hear from Robert about studying Natural Sciences at UEA.

Watch It

Video

Hear from Sauda about studying Natural Sciences at UEA.

Watch It

Video

Hear from Paul about studying Natural Sciences at UEA.

Watch It

Key facts

There’s no such thing as a typical Natural Sciences degree. Our students can take modules from any of the Science Schools at UEA and build a unique course to suit their interests. We’ve got expertise in a huge range of fields, from Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Science to Maths, Physics and Computing.

Article

From cataracts to climate change; superbugs to the solar system - UEA research impacts the world. Discover more about research at UEA.

Read It
Biology alone will not beat cancer; environmentalists alone will not mitigate global warming: scientific advances are forged through shared knowledge and collaboration. By studying Natural Sciences you’ll gain an appreciation of complex scientific concepts, and be able to approach them from more than one angle.

Our radically interdisciplinary Natural Sciences programme gives you the opportunity to create your own unique degree, crossing conventional boundaries and tailoring your learning to suit your interests from across the sciences. You could study any combination of Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Physics.

The Faculty of Science is based at the heart of Norwich Research Park, so whichever subjects you choose, you’ll be learning at the forefront of scientific advances, with cutting-edge work driving our teaching. Because of this, graduates from our Natural Sciences degrees are highly employable.

Overview

Our Natural Sciences course is ideal if you wish to study more than one area of science while retaining a larger degree of flexibility than traditional joint degrees allow. You’ll study modules from a minimum of two of the main disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Physics. And you’ll have the opportunity to study specialist topics as your degree programme develops. Whichever subjects you choose, you will be learning at the forefront of your chosen disciplines with our stimulating, research-led teaching programme.

Our programme will give you an appreciation of complex concepts from across contemporary science. To give you an example: you could find yourself examining the biological complexities of how a virus spreads through a population, along with the computational techniques necessary to predict and illustrate it.

You’ll experience what is required of a competent scientist; from the deliberation needed to design an experiment, including consideration of the results, to the excitement of discovering something new.

This highly competitive degree provides you with vital knowledge of several scientific disciplines and the flexibility of the degree allows you to direct your learning around your own interests or career goals.

You’ll acquire technical skills and subject-specific knowledge as well as transferable skills desired by employers including high levels of literacy and numeracy, data collection, collation and management, understanding and analysing complex systems, devising strategies of intervention, critical thinking, time management, organisational and analytical skills, teamwork and communication skills.

In your final year you will complete a supervised research project, which can be in a combination of disciplines.

Course Structure

This three-year course is made up of optional modules from across the Faculty of Science. It will give you the opportunity to develop your existing scientific knowledge, while discovering new avenues of scientific study.

In your second and third years you’ll have the chance to choose from a diverse range of modules from science schools across the faculty; from topics covering artificial intelligence to quantum mechanics and symmetry.

Your personal academic adviser will support you on choosing the best modules for you. The adviser is an academic in your main area of interest, who will help you make the right choices for your chosen scientific path. This interaction starts even before you arrive at UEA, with online discussions to choose your first year modules.

In your final year of study you will undertake a substantial research project that will reflect your own scientific interests, supervised by an academic working in the same research area.

Teaching and Learning

You will learn from academics working at the forefront of their respective fields. The Faculty of Science is an integral partner of the Norwich Research Park, so you can be sure you’ll be learning within a cutting-edge research environment, where you’ll benefit from constant exposure to the very latest scientific developments.

The teaching will include a mixture of lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops, laboratories, live online sessions and pre-recorded online material, depending on your areas of interest. In all the teaching sessions, you will be learning alongside students in that discipline, ensuring that you are being taught at the same level as a more specialised student. 

As well as being taught by our world-class lecturers, you’ll be assigned a personal academic advisor, who will help you tailor your choices from across the sciences, ensuring you create a degree that ignites your passion and crosses conventional boundaries. We’ll also provide you with a high level of academic and pastoral care.

Independent study

You’ll have plenty of opportunities for independent study using our state-of-the-art University library facility.

Your independent study will, of course, be best exemplified by your final year project, which we encourage you to deliver as independently as possible.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods across the different modules, ranging from 100% coursework to 100% examination.

Coursework assessment methods include course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, field exercises, field notebooks, literature reviews, essays and seminar presentations. Skills-based modules are assessed by 100% coursework.

You will also undertake a final year project, which will include a substantial piece of written research work and will count for 33% of your final year mark.

Study abroad or Placement Year

There is the option to take advantage of a Year Abroad, in Australasia, Canada, United States or Europe by studying on the BSc Natural Sciences with a Year Abroad.

By selecting the BSc Natural Sciences with a Year in Industry, you would spend your third year on an industrial placement, which would allow you to immerse yourself in a commercial environment and gain invaluable experience. We have links with organisations such Astra Zeneca, Aviva, Environment Agency, and GlaxoSmithKline

After the course

You will graduate exceptionally well prepared for your future career, having gained skills that are highly valued by employers.

Many Natural Sciences graduates continue to specialise in their chosen scientific fields across a broad range of careers, including forensics, teaching, science journalism and laboratory research. You might also choose to progress to postgraduate study or research.

We work with UEA’s Careers Service to support you at every stage of your course, from finding paid or voluntary work opportunities and choosing a career, through to applying for graduate jobs and further study.

Career destinations

Example of careers that you could enter include:

  • Forensic science
  • Teaching
  • Science journalism
  • Laboratory research

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2020/1

Students must study the following modules for credits:

Name Code Credits

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BIODIVERSITY

This module explores life on Earth. You will be introduced to the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. You will explore the evolutionary relationships that link the major groups and discover the immense biodiversity of living organisms. Central to this evolutionary path is how microorganisms, plants and animal invaded the land and coped with limited water. You will study this subject through lectures, workshops, laboratory-based practical classes and field trips. You will gain practical experience handling a wide range of organisms and learn how to report experimental work that you carry out. A key part of this module is the production of a learning portfolio which will help develop independent study skills in relation to the topic of the module.

BIO-4001A

20

GEOPHYSICS AND ASTROPHYSICS

In this module, you will learn about the methods used to model the physics of the Earth and Universe. You will explore the energy, mechanics, and physical processes underpinning Earth's systems. This includes the study of its formation, subsequent evolution and current state through the understanding of its structure and behaviour - from our planet's interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. In the second part of this module, you will study aspects of astrophysics including the history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. You will learn to predict differences between idealised physics and real life situations. You will also improve your skills in problem solving, written communication, information retrieval, poster design, information technology, numeracy and calculations, time management and organisation.

PHY-4003A

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module, you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues.

ENV-4001A

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

This module explores how information is stored in DNA, how it is expressed, copied and repaired, and how DNA is transmitted between generations. It has significant focus on the application of molecular biological and genetics knowledge, including animal, plant and microbial biotechnology and synthetic biology.

BIO-4018A

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. You will explore the energy, mechanics, and physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour - from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. You will study Plate Tectonics to explain Earth's physiographic features - such as mountain belts and volcanoes - and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. You will also explore geological time - the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet - and how geological maps can be used to understand Earth history. This course provides you with an introduction to geological materials - rocks, minerals and sediments - and to geological resources and natural hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ATMOSPHERE and OCEANS

The habitability of planet Earth depends on physical and chemical systems that control everything from the weather and climate to the growth of all living organisms. This module introduces you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret them. It leads naturally to second and third year study of these systems in more detail, but even if you choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences, a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The module is made up of two distinct components. One focuses on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) The other focuses on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). Interrelationships between these components are explored throughout. Teaching of this module is through a mix of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half-day field trip. This module provides a Basic Chemistry introduction for those students who have little or no background in chemistry prior to joining UEA.

ENV-4007B

20

COMPUTING PRINCIPLES

The module introduces formulations and techniques essential for any degree in computing science.

CMP-4002B

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module is based on the relational model and will introduce you to important aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. You will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. You will use a modern relational database management system to gain practical experience. You will also develop programming experience using SQL, and using a high level programming language to write applications that access the database.

CMP-4010B

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

Why do trees grow tall? Why do male birds have long bright feathers? Why do people cooperate? Why does sex exist? Why do we grow old and die? These and other questions in biology can be understood if we learn how to think in terms of natural selection and adaptation. This module introduces the main concepts in evolutionary theory, from the original ideas introduced by Darwin to the modern developments, and uses these concepts to understand a wide range of topics in behaviour and ecology. We start from evolution and discuss how Darwin arrived at the idea of natural selection, its critiques and how to address them; we then study the basics of Mendelian genetics and population genetics and learn how to check if a population is evolving' we discuss adaptation and optimisation in biology; then we move to specific issues like the evolution of reproductive systems and life cycles, the evolution of stable sex-ratios and coevolution between species; we discuss the concept of selfish genes and how it helps us think in terms of adaptation; we study the methods used to understand long-term evolution and speciation; and we conclude the first part with ideas from evolutionary medicine to understand why we get sick, and human evolution and social behaviour. In the second part of the module we focus to ecology: we discuss the general concepts of abiotic limits, resources and models of intraspecific competition and logistic growth; we learn the basic concepts of demography and population growth, interspecific competition, predation, predator-prey dynamics, and we discuss at length mutualism and cooperation in nature; finally we talk about the nature of the English countryside and issues in conservation biology and ecosystem services. In the third part we focus on behaviour: after a general introduction on the key concepts in the study of animal behaviour we discuss cooperation among non-kin and the concept of kin selection and kin conflict; we review animal communication and models of sexual selection and sexual conflict.

BIO-4002B

20

PROBABILITY

Probability is the study of the chance of events occurring. It has important applications to understand the likelihood of multiple events happening together and therefore to rational decision-making. This module will give you an introduction to the modern theory of probability developed from the seminal works of the Russian mathematician A.N. Kolmogorov in 1930s. Kolmogorov's axiomatic theory describes the outcomes (events) of a random experiment as mathematical sets. Using set theory language you will be introduced to the concept of random variables, and consider different examples of discrete random variables (like binomial, geometric and Poisson random variables) and continuous random variables (like the normal random variable). In the last part of the module you will explore two applications of probability: reliability theory and Markov chains. Aside of the standard lectures and workshop sessions, there will be two computer-lab sessions of (2 hours each) where you will apply probability theory to specific everyday life case studies. The only pre-requisites for this module are a basic knowledge of set theory and of calculus that you would have acquired during the Autumn semester. If you have done probability or statistic at A-level you will rediscover its contents now taught using a proper and more elegant mathematical formalism.

MTHA4001B

10

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

The purpose of this module is to give you a solid grounding in the essential features of programming. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-4009B

20

BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

This module focuses on exploring and understanding the evolving relationships between human development and the natural environment from ecological perspectives with some context from social sciences. The module is intended to give you a flavour of the issues, themes and considerations relating to biodiversity at different scales of biological organization, ecosystem services and sustainable development. The module (1) examines practical and theoretical considerations of sustainable development; (2) explores the options advanced for establishing a sustainable balance between human needs and those of natural systems and ecosystems; (3) investigates how the growing human enterprise and human resource use has affected biodiversity and the biosphere and (4) considers the scales of biodiversity loss, from the biosphere to biomes, ecosystems, ecological communities, populations, individuals, and genes. The module comprises 12 weeks of lectures and practicals. You will attend two lectures and one practical session in most weeks. The lectures introduce, review and critique particular concepts and perspectives. The practicals provide opportunities to examine in more detail some of the issues raised during the lectures, accompanied by practical exercises. Identical practical sessions will be run each week, on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. You will be notified in which group and on which day you are expected to take part in the practical. The beginning of the module revolves around sustainable development, the human footprint and examine sustainable development in relation to human resource use and ecosystem services. Lectures consider interactions between human societies and the composition and structure of natural (terrestrial, freshwater and marine) ecosystems, anthropocentric impacts on biomes, ecosystems, communities, populations, and the genetic diversity of individuals. They introduce some approaches and ideas fundamental to modern quantitative conservation ecology. The practicals will introduce ecological communities, there will be some elementary statistical analysis and if Government advice at the time allows, there will be a field trip to a nature reserve. The slides of the lectures will be posted every week on the Blackboard pages of this module. You can download or print them off for yourself as and when required. These are not a substitute for taking part in the lectures. For each lecture and practical, you will be pointed to additional readings to explore some of the issues raised in more depth. These are found on the module Talis reading list and reading lists at the end of each lecture. These will be useful for your assignments.

ENV-4006B

20

Students will select 0 - 120 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ACOUSTICS AND LABORATORY IN PHYSICS

One half of the module will cover the physics of acoustics, especially with relation to music and musical instruments. The Matlab programming environment will be introduced and used to analyse a series of sounds. These analyses will form the basis for a written report on those sounds. The other half of the module will be a practical laboratory. A variety of experiments will be carried out and the data analysis written up in report format.

PHY-4004Y

20

ALGEBRA 1

Algebra plays a key role in pure mathematics and its applications. We will provide you with a thorough introduction and develop this theory from first principles. In the first semester, we consider linear algebra and in the second semester, we move on to group theory. In the first semester, we develop the theory of matrices, mainly (though not exclusively) over the real numbers. The material covers matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects. We conclude with the definition of abstract vector spaces. At the heart of group theory in Semester 2 is the study of symmetry and the axiomatic development of the theory. The basic concepts are subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, factor groups, group actions and the Isomorphism Theorem.

MTHA4006Y

20

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Introducing important concepts in analytical chemistry, this module covers a range of qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques that underpin more complex instrumental analytical methodologies. Exploring these techniques, you will learn how to apply them to "real-life" analytical problems.

CHE-4501Y

20

BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY

This module will provide an introduction to fundamental aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. The essential roles played by proteins and enzymes in signalling, transport and metabolism will be considered in terms of their structures. You will discover how living cells are visualised and the nature of cell membranes and organelles.

BIO-4016B

20

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY

This module will provide 1st year students with essential information about the physical and chemical principles that underpin our understanding of biochemical systems and cellular metabolism. This module is going to be delivered to 1st year students on the Biological Sciences, Biomedicine and Molecular Biology and Genetics degree programs.

BIO-4017Y

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

After a shared introduction to chemical bonding, atomic and molecular structure and chemical principles, this module will provide you with an introduction to the structures, properties and reactivities of molecules and ionic solids. The first few lectures of this module are integrated with the module 'Chemistry of Carbon Based Compounds' and is supported and illustrated by the bonding, structure and periodicity experiments of the first year practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory A or Research Skills in Biochemistry. The latter part will concentrate more on fundamental aspects of inorganic Chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between chemical bonding and the structures and properties of molecules.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

In this module you will study: (a) Complex numbers. (b) Vectors. (c) Differentiation; power series. (d) Integration: applications, curve sketching, area, arc-length. (e) First and second-order, constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (f) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of coordinates by Jacobians. Green's Theorem in the plane.

MTHA4008Y

30

CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will provide an understanding of the key aspects of cell biology and how these relate to the physiology of living systems. It will highlight how these principles are key to understanding some of the physiological processes, as well as the central role of homeostasis in human physiology. It will also explore the function of some of the major organ systems of the human body.

BIO-4015B

20

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

You will be laboratory based to cover experimental aspects of the 'core' chemistry courses, Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds, Bonding, Structure and Periodicity, Light, Atoms and Materials and Analytical Chemistry. You will use spreadsheets for analysing and presenting data, which is also covered in this module.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

After a shared introduction to atomic structure and periodicity, you will be introduced to the concepts of bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, the mechanistic description of organic reactions, the organic functional groups, the shapes of molecules and stereochemical issues including the concepts of enantiomers, diastereoisomers and racemates.

CHE-4101Y

20

ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, RELATIVITY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

This module gives an introduction to important topics in physics, with particular, but not exclusive, relevance to chemical and molecular physics. Areas covered include optics, electrostatics and magnetism and special relativity. The module may be taken by any science students who wish to study physics beyond A Level.

PHY-4001Y

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module provides an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. It begins with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This leads on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, nature, landscape and risk. In addition, the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers are introduced. You will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means.

ENV-4010Y

20

LIGHT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

This module introduces students to the major areas of classical physical chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, and electrolyte solutions as well as spectroscopy. Chemical kinetics will consider the kinetic theory of gases and the rate of processes, in particular either in the gas phase or in solution. The appropriate theoretical basis for understanding rate measurements will be developed during the course, which will include considerations of the order of reaction, the Arrhenius equation and determination of rate constants. Thermodynamics deals with energy relationships in large assemblies, that is those systems which contain sufficient numbers of molecules for 'bulk' properties to be exhibited and which, are in a state of equilibrium. Properties discussed will include the heat content or enthalpy (H), heat capacity (Cp, Cv), internal energy (U), heat and work. The First Law of Thermodynamics will be introduced and its significance explained. It is very important that scientists have an understanding of the behaviour of ions in solution, which includes conductivity and ionic mobility. The interaction of radiation with matter is termed spectroscopy. Three main topics will be discussed: (i) ultraviolet/visible (UV / Vis) spectroscopy, in which electrons are moved from one orbital to another orbital; (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy, a technique which provides important information on the variety of bond types that a molecule can possess; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which allows 'molecular skeletons' to be identified.

CHE-4202Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for you if you have an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. It will provide you with an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition, 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.

CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

You will cover differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods as part of this module. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for those across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. Recommended if you have grade A*-C at A-level Mathematics, or equivalent.

ENV-4015Y

20

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

To understand Life we have to study and understand the molecular properties of life's components. For any biochemist these are cells, energy, macromolecules, biochemical reactions and transport (of energy or chemical components). The tools we use as scientists in our quest for understanding life are various physical and analytical methods. You will be introduced to the basic principles of thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and reaction kinetics. You will conclude the module by having a look at various physical and analytical techniques that are being used in current Biochemistry. This lectures will introduce you and provide you with essential information about some of the physical principles that underpin our understanding of molecular and cellular systems. The complementary seminar series will help to consolidate your understanding through applying this knowledge to selected topics in biochemistry and provide you with the opportunity to develop skills in problem solving, data analysis, scientific writing, and presentation. The module is also enriched with six math workshops. In these workshops you are going to consolidate but also further develop basic and more advanced mathematical skills that directly relate with this module but that will also assist you for the duration of your degree.

BIO-4007Y

20

PROGRAMMING 1

In taking this module you will gain a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented programming, using a modern programming language such as Java. The module is designed such that you are not expected to have previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many students taking the module will have done so in some measure.

CMP-4008Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS I

We will explore how quantitative skills can solve a range of environmental and geographical problems. We will think critically about numbers in the media and learn how scientists use numbers. Our workshops will focus on the practical use of Maths through physical equations and mathematical models. Designed primarily for students who have no AS/A-Level Maths qualification (or equivalent), you will also receive statistical training, learning about summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers.

ENV-4013Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS II

Mathematical and statistical skills are key to all brands of Environmental Sciences and Geography. This module will strengthen these skills and will consolidate your Mathematics knowledge from GCSE level, introducing you to differentiation and integration. You'll learn to recognise the purpose of simple statistical methods, to choose the appropriate methods to test hypotheses and to summarise data using tables and graphs. You'll apply these quantitative skills to contemporary environmental and geographical problems, inspired by research in the School of Environmental Sciences. Assessment is through an online course test and an exam. This module will widen the range of Science modules that you can take during your studies in Geography and Environmental Sciences. Upon successful completion of the module, you'll have acquired skills in applying a range of mathematical and statistical methods to problems in Environmental Sciences and Geography.

ENV-4014Y

20

REAL ANALYSIS

We will explore the mathematical notion of a limit and see the precise definition of the limit of a sequence of real numbers and learn how to prove that a sequence converges to a limit. After studying limits of infinite sequences, we move on to series, which capture the notion of an infinite sum. We then learn about limits of functions and continuity. Finally, we will learn precise definitions of differentiation and integration and see the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

You will gain a range of transferable skills, tools and resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences and Geography. It aims to provide a broad understanding of the research process through activities that involve formulating research questions, collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, collating and evaluating information and presenting results. Lectures and practical classes will be taught during Semester 1, whilst a week-long residential field course applies field, lab and other skills to a variety of Environmental Science and Geography topics in Semester 2. Depending on the size of the cohort, students on selected degree programmes may be offered the option of an alternative field course arrangement.

ENV-4004Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

If you are a Biochemistry student, this module will provide you with practical and research skills. In the laboratory, you will experience experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations provide practical chemistry skills, complementing lectures in other first year modules. In seminars and workshops, you will develops skills such as analysing data, using references critically, and presenting results in different formats.

CHE-4602Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; error propagation in physical chemistry and physical principles through applied mathematics. The module also contains a broadly based series of lectures on science, coupled with activities based upon them. The twin objectives for this part of the module are to provide a contextual backdrop for the more focused studies in other concurrent and subsequent degree courses, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information.

CHE-4050Y

20

Students will select 100 - 120 credits from the following modules:

In this option range 20 of the 100-120 credits may be selected from a School outside the Science Faculty, not listed in this profile, with the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA II

The module offers an introduction to vector space theory in the first semester followed by ring theory in the second semester. For vector spaces you will learn about subspaces, basis and dimension, linear maps, rank-nullity theorem, change of basis and the characteristic polynomial. This is followed by an introduction to rings using integers as a model. We develop the theory with many examples related to familiar concepts such as substitution and factorisation. Important examples of commutative rings include fields, domains, polynomial rings and their quotients.

MTHA5008Y

20

ANALOGUE AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

A practical introduction to electronics, this module is structured to consider analogue electronics and digital electronics in turn. Topics you'll cover include passive and active components, including op-amps, transistors, logic gates, flip-flops and registers. Circuits you'll study include amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, combinational and sequential logic and state machines. You'll spend much of your time doing practical work - underpinned by lectures - where you will build prototypes circuits, as well as designing and building Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs).

CMP-5027A

20

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module will train you to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment. In lectures and in the lab you will explore important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate, looking at nutrient cycles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students taking this module are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module makes a good combination with Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

Explore how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. Three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analysing water quality, provide an important practical component to this module. A good complement to other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and modules in development studies or geography, it can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry or other geochemical and hydrology modules. Students selecting this module must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5041A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

Study the organisation of system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of hardware and software components is emphasised throughout this module. Central concepts are reinforced by practical work in the laboratory. The architectures portion of the module focuses on the components of a processor, including the registers and data path, and you will explore concepts such as instruction fetch cycles, instruction decoding and memory addressing modes. The operating systems component focuses on how the system software manages the competing demands for the system hardware, including memory management and disc and processing scheduling.

CMP-5013A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news. Stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are among the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and processes in the atmosphere, from the Earth's surface to the stratosphere, and considers current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem-solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs, as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

We will explore how evolution and ecology shape animal behaviour, examining how important traits have evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles provide the theoretical framework, and we will explore key concepts of selfishness, altruism, conflict, survival, optimality, reproduction, parental care and death. Relevant research will be used to lead our understanding of the ultimate function of key traits. In parallel with the lectures, students design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, working in a group to collect original data in order to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module aims to develop your understanding of contemporary biochemistry, especially in relation to mammalian physiology and metabolism. There will be a particular focus on proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, bioenergetics and signalling processes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

This module will provide you with an opportunity to explore various aspects of biology in society. You will have an opportunity to discuss a number of examples - ranging from the scientific and ethical considerations of genetically modified (GM) crops, stem cell research, and designer babies, to the introduction of non-native species, and whether culling should be used a means of species control. You will critically analyse the way biological science issues are represented in popular literature and various media. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become scientific reality. Conversely, science fiction can often portray science inaccurately. During the module you will research relevant scientific literature, and fictional works, to consider both the scientific and ethical arguments for various developments, and to discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within examples of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

This module will equip you with an understanding of the principles and techniques used in contemporary biophysical chemistry. You will learn experimental techniques for measuring thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biological molecules. You will gain firm grounding in the physical principles describing those properties and their use to provide quantitative descriptions of those properties. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry you will explore three major themes; i) spectroscopic properties of biomolecules, ii) thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins and enzymes, and, iii) methods defining biomolecule size and mass. Through weekly seminars you will benefit from putting your knowledge into practice, communicating your ideas and growing your confidence in quantitative data analysis and problem solving. During laboratory-based practical work, you will develop your skills in sample preparation together with the collection and interpretation of spectroscopic data. Your participation in this module will give you the knowledge to appreciate how, and why, biophysical chemistry contributes to advances in medicine, sustainable energy solutions and healthy ageing.

CHE-5601Y

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is suggested that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology) or BIO-5009A (Genetics).

BIO-5005B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND FURTHER LINEAR ALGEBRA

Combinatorics is one of the most applicable and accessible part of mathematics, yet it is also full of challenging problems. We shall cover many basic combinatorial concepts including counting arguments (enumerative combinatorics) and Ramsey theory. Linear Algebra underpins much of modern mathematics and is the key to many applications. We will introduce bilinear forms and symmetric operators on vector spaces leading to the diagonalization of linear maps and the spectral theorem. This theorem is key to many applications in statistics and physics. Other topics covered will include polynomials of linear maps, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem and the Jordan normal form of a matrix.

MTHF5031Y

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces you to major concepts and definitions in community ecology, macro-ecology and biogeography. You will use these to explore how communities are structured in relation to local-scale to regional-scale processes, how they function and respond to perturbations at different scales, and result in emergent macro- to global-scale patterns of biodiversity distribution. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of theory and fundamental science to understanding the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, species exploitation, non-native species, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples you will draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

COMPLEX ANALYSIS

This module covers the standard basic theory of the complex plane. The areas covered in the first semester, (a), and the second semester, (b), are roughly the following: (a) Continuity, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables, differentiation, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations. (b) Topology of the complex plane, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5006Y

20

CONSERVATION, ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY IN THE TROPICS (FIELDCOURSE)

Conservation ecology and biodiversity are central areas of research in the biological sciences and they share many theories, concepts and scientific methods. This module intends to take a practical approach to the commonalities in these areas using a combination of seminar work and fieldwork. The seminars will develop ideas in sub-tropical and tropical biology: students will research issues affecting conservation of biodiversity in the tropics, considering the species ecology and the habitats, threats and challenges. There will be a significant component of small group work and directed, independent learning. The field component of this module will be a two week residential field trip to the tropics, one of two field sites (depending on numbers of students and availability).The field sites are run by expert field ecologists and during the two weeks we will explore the local environment, learn about the ecology of the landscape and about the species that inhabit the area. We will develop and run practical sessions on survey and census techniques, use of technology in modern field biology and the role of protected areas in species conservation. Students will conduct original research on the field trip, informed by prior research at UEA, to gain a deeper understanding of an aspect of tropical biology. There will be an assessed presentation on the field trip and many opportunities to develop the students own interests. All student participants will take an active role in the organisation and running of the module in order to gain project management and field logistics experience. Students will be responsible for the sourcing, storage and transport of field equipment on the way to the field site and of samples on the return to the UK. Students will gain experience of travelling to a remote area and of working through licensing and customs processes. At the end of the module a report is written on the field project in the style of a journal article addressing specific questions in ecology conservation or biodiversity. Throughout the module students will be expected to maintain a modern-media record of their project from the initial desk based work at UEA, through the field component to outcomes and reporting. NOTE: There will be a significant additional cost to this module to cover the costs of transportation and accommodation in the field. Costs will be detailed at an initial meeting for interested students and will be clearly advertised. 2018/19 costs were GBP1300 per student. Students will need to provide any visas required for entry into the host country, sturdy walking boots and appropriate field clothing. All attendees must ensure that all travel vaccinations etc are in order prior to departure.

BIO-5020K

20

CONSTRUCTING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES

How can human geographers help us understand and address pressing environmental and social problems? This is the central question of the module which affirms the distinctive value and relevance of work in contemporary human geography. Throughout you will explore a wide range of approaches to environmental and social problems in contemporary human geography. You'll gain a firm grounding in social constructivism which is underlying philosophy of these approaches. You'll also learn how to communicate insights from human geography to policy-makers and practitioners, and how to critically evaluate examples of human geographers' engagements with policy. You'll begin with the basics of social constructivism, learn why this approach is used by human geographers, and consider the value of this perspective. You'll then delve deeper, exploring the social construction of a different object or problem each week. Topics covered will include: nature, hazards, alternative economies, and social difference. By looking at what these human geography perspectives mean for real-world environmental and social problems you'll practice applying what you've learnt to current policy problems and learn about how human geographers are making a difference to these issues. You'll learn through a mixture of lectures, workshops and self-directed study and you'll be assessed through a written policy brief and reflective report (100%).

ENV-5038B

20

DATA SCIENCE FOR BIOLOGISTS

This module will teach students the tools they need to use computing and programming to handle biological data. As big data becomes more mainstream across all biological disciplines (from multi-omics to complex ecological datasets), biology students need to have skills in computer programming and data analysis. Here they will learn how to organise and store large data sets, run a data science project, and communicate their findings with visuals and clear insights. This module will be available to students in year 2 (Level 5), and will focus on providing students with the data handling tools to problem solve across a range of biological disciplines.

BIO-5023Y

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms and in the efficient implementation of a wide range of important data structures.

CMP-5014B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA

This module builds on the mathematical fundamentals introduced in year 1 and covers both Differential Equations and Linear Algebra. You'll develop the pre-requisite mathematical skills for Actuarial Methods and Models, and Advanced Statistics. In Differential Equations you will develop skills for solving both Ordinary Differential Equations and Partial Differential Equations by a variety of techniques. For Ordinary Differential Equations the methods include series solutions and the method of Frobenius. Fourier series are introduced and utilised when solving Partial Differential Equations by separation of variables. In Linear Algebra you will develop skills in the algebra of matrices, including: Matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects.

MTHB5008A

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

This module is designed to develop good observational, descriptive and analytical skills and is particularly suitable for students with interest in Geology, Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic geological skills, together with some geophysical and physical geography skills that will be of use when carrying out independent projects. The module will include: (i) observing, describing and recording of characteristics of geological materials (minerals, soils, sediments, rocks and fossils) in the field, in hand specimen and under the microscope; (ii) measuring and recording of spatial and 3D structural data on maps, stereographic and rose diagram projections, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping, and (iii) an introduction to applied geophysical techniques. The module includes a week-long residential fieldwork component in the Easter vacation which has an added cost implication in the region of GBP300. There will be an alternative arrangement for students who for whatever reason are unable to undertake the residential fieldwork. There is a co-requisite or pre-requisite of 20 or more credits from the modules: Earth Surface Processes, Global Tectonics or Exploring the Earth's Subsurface. Students who have previously taken ENV-5030B Geology Skills, or ENV-5029B Geology Lab Skills cannot take this module. They will, however, have an opportunity to take part in the residential field course.

ENV-5030B

20

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES

This module draws upon on a range of scientific disciplines including geomorphology, sedimentology, soil science and eco-geomorphology. The module overviews a variety of Earth's surface environments and the processes that lead to expression in landforms, soil evolution, sediment accumulation and ultimately, the formation of sedimentary rocks. The environments covered include deep and marginal marine, intertidal, aeolian, glacial and fluvial. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding of erosion, transport, deposition, accumulation and burial and the evolution of soils. East Anglian case studies will be used to illustrate and explain eco-geomorphology and coastal processes, dovetailed with soil evolution. Geomorphological expression will be linked to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rock. There will be an introduction to the methods and different types of evidence used by geologists, physical geographers and other earth scientists.

ENV-5042A

20

ENERGY TRANSITIONS

This module examines the complexities of the transition to low carbon energy systems. It draws on a range of disciplines, theories and perspectives to critically examine many of the key challenges. It begins by exploring how we can understand energy systems and how they differ across space and time. The module draws on historical analyses to understand how energy systems have evolved in the past, as well as examining the different ways in which we can imagine the future of energy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the complexities of changing energy systems, enabling them to critically engage with debates around future "energy transitions", the role that innovation and emergent technologies might play, and the various challenges of shifting towards renewable based energy systems.

ENV-5022B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar slides and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This module investigates the principles of evolutionary biology, covering various sub-disciplines, i.e. adaptive evolution, population ecology, molecular and population genetics, speciation, biogeography, systematics, and finishing with an overview of Biodiversity. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the fundamentals of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works. Key topics and recent research will be used to highlight advances in the field and inspire thought. Weekly interactive workshops will explore a number of the conceptual issues in depth through discussions, modelling and problem solving. Although there are no pre-requisites in terms of specific modules, students will need a basic understanding of Evolution and Genetics to undertake this module.

BIO-5008B

20

EXPLORING THE EARTH'S SUBSURFACE

In this module you will learn about the processes that shape the Earth's shallow subsurface, and how to detect and map subsurface structures and resources. Physical properties of solid materials and subsurface fluids will be explored, including how fluid movement affects these properties. Methods to image the subsurface will be introduced using real datasets, collected by the class where possible. We will apply the theory to real-life problems including risk mitigation, engineering and resource exploration. This module will include fieldwork on campus where possible, specialist computer software, and some light mathematical analysis (trigonometry, rearranging linear equations, logarithms).

ENV-5004B

20

GENETICS

The aim is to provide you with an appreciation of genetics at a fundamental and molecular level and to demonstrate the importance and utility of genetic studies. Genetics and molecular biology lie at the heart of biological processes, ranging from cancer biology to evolution.

BIO-5009A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module focuses on developing practical skills to support independent use of spatial analysis and digital mapping in a Geographical Information System. It covers ways to obtain data, integrate it, undertake analysis to address research questions, and present the results. Weekly teaching will consist of both lecture material to cover underlying concepts, and a three-hour practical exercise focusing on a particular aspect of GIS data and/or analysis. At the time of writing this module description (May 2020) we cannot guarantee there will be continuous access to UEA's IT labs during the module - Government advice may mean that we must all work remotely, or that lab capacity is reduced due to social distancing. If working remotely it would be essential to have access to a Windows PC/laptop that can run ArcGIS Pro, or to very good (fast and reliable) broadband. Specifications for the software are available via Blackboard under UEA Software and Support (below your list of modules). Please contact the MO if you have any questions.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior exert a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system and have done so throughout geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GRAPHICS 1

This module will provide you with an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics. You will gain a strong foundation in computer graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. You need to have a good background in programming to take this module. OpenGL is used as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes.

CMP-5010B

20

HEAT, ATOMS AND SOLIDS

Exploring fundamental aspects of thermodynamics and condensed matter physics, you'll be introduced to ideas about the electronic structure based on the free-electron Sommerfeld and band theories, along with the concept of phonons and their contribution to the heat capacity of a solid. Also you'll consider the structure, bonding and properties of solids, in particular electronic conductivity and magnetism, as well as atomic structure and atomic spectroscopy, and Entropy in terms of a macroscopic Carnot cycle and the statistical approach. Two important distributions of particles will be treated; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac. Changes of state, 1st and 2nd order phase transitions and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation will be described.

PHY-5004Y

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

This module will provide you with an understanding of the themes and principles of physiology and a detailed knowledge of the major human organ systems. An understanding of how disease affects the ability of organ systems to maintain the status quo will be an important part of this course.

BIO-5004A

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

In this module you will learn about the development of the technologies which are the basis of search on the Web. Search engine development has been driven by large increases in online documents and the need to provide better results. You will learn about a range of techniques for improving search results and how to evaluate their impact.

CMP-5036A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

In this module, you'll study the structure, bonding and reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds. The module is a prerequisite for the 3rd level inorganic course, Inorganic Compounds: Structure and Functions. You'll cover the electronic structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes (ligand field theory), the chemistry of main group clusters, polymers and oligomers, the structures and re-activities of main group and transition metal organometallics, and the application of spectroscopic methods (primarily NMR, MS and IR) to inorganic compounds. You'll have laboratory classes linked to the lecture topics and so you will need to have completed either of the level 4 practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory (A) or Research Skills in Biochemistry.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

CHE-5501Y

20

INVISCID FLUID FLOW

This module introduces some of the fundamental physical concepts and mathematical theory needed to analyse the motion of a fluid, with the focus predominantly on inviscid, incompressible motions. You will examine methods for visualising flow fields, including the use of particle paths and streamlines. You will study the dynamical theory of fluid flow taking Newton's laws of motion as its point of departure, and the fundamental set of equations comprising conservation of mass and Euler's equations will be discussed. The reduction to Laplace's equation for irrotational flow will be demonstrated, and Bernoulli's equation is derived as a first integral of the equation of motion. Having established the basic theory, the way is set for a broader discussion of flow dynamics including everyday practical examples. Vector calculus will cover divergence, gradient, curl of vector field, the Laplacian, scalar potential and path-independence of line integral, surface integrals, divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. Computational fluid dynamics will also be studied.

MTHA5007Y

20

LINEAR REGRESSION USING R

This is a module designed to give you the opportunity to apply linear regression techniques using R. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect you to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to provide an introduction to R and then provide the specifics in linear regression.

CMP-5043B

10

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

Specialist materials dominate the modern world, and it is our ability as chemists to control their properties. Understanding and controlling material properties is the central theme of this module. In this module you will learn about two key classes of material: polymers and inorganic solids. You'll gain a firm grounding in the specialist methods used to characterise these materials. This will enable you to appreciate the unique properties of these materials, and how they can be controlled. In the practical element of the module, you'll gain skills in synthesising and characterising polymers and inorganic solids. In the polymers thread, you'll begin by gaining an appreciation of the role they play in society and why they are unique. You'll then encounter methods we can use to understand the properties of polymers, and how we can control them. You'll also explore the wide range of mechanisms that can be used to make organic polymers. In the thread focussed on inorganic materials, you'll explore the ionic model for inorganic solids, before gaining an appreciation of the synthesis and characterisation methods that allow access to these materials. You'll then explore the variety of properties that solids can exhibit, including semi conduction and magnetism. This lecture-based content is complemented by the practical component of the course, where you'll gain hands-on experience in both synthesis and characterisation.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Mathematical modelling is concerned with how to convert real problems, such as those arising in industry or other sciences, into mathematical equations, and then solving them and using the results to better understand, or make predictions about, the original problem. This topic will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry. We will consider population modelling, chaos, and aerodynamics.

MTHF5032Y

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

This module introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module serves as a further introduction to general mathematics for scientists

MTHB5009A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods, partial differential equations and solid mechanics. There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. The module is taught by mathematicians with considerable expertise in the use of mathematics in the natural/environmental sciences and is largely designed to equip students with the tools necessary for advanced second and third level modules, particularly those in the physical sciences.

MTHB5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

Medicinal chemistry is a highly interdisciplinary area and this module is designed to introduce a variety of topics in the field of medicinal chemistry. Some of the topics that will be discussed in a series of lectures include, Molecular and biomolecular interactions, Biomolecules: Proteins and nucleic acids, Phases of drug action, Pharmacokinetics, Proteins and receptors as drug targets, DNA as a drug target and development of antitumor agents.

CHE-5150Y

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

You will be given a background to the fundamental principles of molecular biology, in particular the nature of the relationship between genetic information and the synthesis, and three dimensional structures, of macromolecules. You will also gain practical experience of some of the techniques used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material, and the necessary theoretical framework. The module also includes an introduction to bioinformatics, the computer-assisted analysis of DNA and protein sequence information.

BIO-5003B

20

NETWORKS

Explore how networks are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. You will take a layered approach to the study of networks, with emphasis on the functionality of the OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. You will examine the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to overall reliable data transmission that the network provides, with a focus on the practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information (e.g. VoIP) and network security. Labs and coursework are highly practical and underpin the theory learnt in lectures.

CMP-5037B

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This course builds on Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds (the first year organic chemistry course). You will cover four main topics. The first 'aromaticity' includes benzenoid and hetero-aromatic systems. The second major topic is the organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Spectroscopic characterisation of organic compounds is reviewed and the final major topic is 'stereochemistry and mechanisms'. This covers conformational aspects of acyclic and cyclic compounds. Stereoelectronic effects, Neighbouring Group Participation (NGP), Baldwin's rules, Cram's rule and cycloaddition reactions are then discussed.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy, the thermodynamics of solutions and chemical kinetics of complex reactions. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one Level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

The module studies the biochemical, physiological and developmental processes of plants.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) - never before has it been so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R-studio. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

PROBABILITY

Probability is the study of the chance of events occurring. It has important applications to understand the likelihood of multiple events happening together and therefore to rational decision-making. This module will give you an introduction to the modern theory of probability developed from the seminal works of the Russian mathematician A.N. Kolmogorov in 1930s. Kolmogorov's axiomatic theory describes the outcomes (events) of a random experiment as mathematical sets. Using set theory language you will be introduced to the concept of random variables, and consider different examples of discrete random variables (like binomial, geometric and Poisson random variables) and continuous random variables (like the normal random variable). In the last part of the module you will explore two applications of probability: reliability theory and Markov chains. Aside of the standard lectures and workshop sessions, there will be two computer-lab sessions of (2 hours each) where you will apply probability theory to specific everyday life case studies. The only pre-requisites for this module are a basic knowledge of set theory and of calculus that you would have acquired during the Autumn semester. If you have done probability or statistic at A-level you will rediscover its contents now taught using a proper and more elegant mathematical formalism.

MTHA4001B

10

PROGRAMMING 2

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and is a continuation of programming 1. It contains greater breadth and depth and provides students with the range of skills needed for many of their subsequent modules. We introduce C in order to improve your low level understanding of how programming works. We recap Java and deepen your understanding of the language by teaching topics such as nested classes, enumeration, generics, reflection, collections and threaded programming. We also cover C++ and introduce C# to highlight the similarities and differences between languages.

CMP-5015A

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

The purpose of this module is to give you a solid grounding in the essential features of programming. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

You'll cover the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

RENEWABLE ENERGY

This module builds on understanding in wind, tidal and hydroelectric power and introduces theories and principles relating to a variety of renewable energy technologies including solar energy, heat pumps and geothermal sources, fuel cells and the hydrogen economy, biomass energy and anaerobic digestion. You will consider how these various technologies can realistically contribute to the energy mix. You will study the various targets and legislative instruments that are used to control and encourage developments. Another key aspect of the module is the study and application of project management and financial project appraisal techniques in a renewable energy context.

ENG-5002B

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

The shallow shelf seas that surround the continents are the oceans that we most interact with. They contribute a disproportionate amount to global marine primary production and CO2 drawdown into the ocean, and are important economically through commercial fisheries, offshore oil and gas exploration, and renewable energy developments (e.g. offshore wind farms). You will explore the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal waters, their effect on biological, chemical and sedimentary processes, and how they can be harnessed to generate renewable energy. You will develop new skills during this module that will support careers in the offshore oil and gas industry, renewable energy industry, environmental consultancy, government laboratories (e.g. Cefas) and academia. The level of mathematical ability required to take this module is similar to Ocean Circulation and Meteorology I. You should be familiar with radians, rearranging equations and plotting functions.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS

Human geography and the environmental social sciences employ a range of approaches and methods with which to explore their diverse research questions. This module will introduce you to the practice of social science research, including methods that use quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (non-numerical) data. Through a combination of lectures, workshops, and practical activities, you will learn how to design and carry out your own research. By the end of the module you will know how to formulate an interesting research question; how to choose an appropriate method to investigate it; how to ensure that you collect good quality data; how to analyse and interpret your data; and how to present the results of your research. The module is recommended if you intend to use social research methods in your independent dissertation project. In addition to gaining practical research skills, you will develop your ability to critically evaluate research studies that use social science methods. As well as benefiting your academic studies, these analytical and practical research skills are highly valued in many occupational sectors.

ENV-5040A

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. You will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. You will be taught state of the art phased software development methodologies focusing on the activities of initial class model design to actual operational software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

TIME SERIES

This module considers both the theory and practice of statistical modelling of time series. Students will be expected to analyse real data using R.

CMP-5042B

10

TOPICS AND LABORATORY IN PHYSICS

This module explores physics as an empirical science through a series of laboratory experiments that probe key concepts and physical laws. The laboratory sessions will be underpinned by associated teaching surrounding the studied phenomena, and will complement topics addressed in other modules in the physics course.

PHY-5003Y

20

WEATHER

The weather affects everyone and influences decisions that are made continuously around the world. From designing and siting a wind farm to assessing flood risk and public safety, weather plays a vital role. Have you ever wondered what actually causes the weather we experience, for example why large storms are so frequent across north western Europe, especially in Winter? In this module you will learn the fundamentals of the science of meteorology. We will concentrate on the physical processes that underpin the radiation balance, thermodynamics, wind-flow, atmospheric stability, weather systems and the water cycle. We will link these to renewable energy and the weather we experience throughout the Semester. Assessment will be based entirely on a set of practical reports that you will submit, helping you to spread your work evenly through the semester. You will learn how Weather is a rich fusion of descriptive and numerical elements and you will be able to draw effectively on your own skill strengths while practising and developing others, guided by Weatherquest's Meteorologists.

ENV-5043A

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS

ENV-5009B

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Weather is one of the most popular topics of conversation. But how, specifically, does it present risks and opportunities, to people, organisations and to the wider environment? In this module you will develop a clear understanding of these linkages and an evidence base to draw on in future roles in which weather is a factor. You'll learn how to confidently source a diverse range of real-time weather information and you'll practice analysing such data, leading subsequently to successful interpretation and effective communication, both written and in front of the camera. You'll see, first hand, how meteorology depends upon computer systems for the efficient sharing, processing and visualisation of weather information. Being taught by weather practitioners with long experience of providing weather services to users, you will get the inside track on what it's like to work in weather. Weather Forecasting is one central theme and application which will provide a focus for learning. How are forecasts made and delivered, who uses forecasts and what are their distinctive needs? Success in forecasting depends in part on a good physical understanding of atmospheric processes - through practical work, we'll study those processes and use real examples of weather systems and events to reinforce the learning. At the end of the module, through an embedded week-long Easter residential fieldcourse, you'll apply your enhanced process understanding and forecasting knowledge in a hands-on way to design and implement meteorological field experiments, testing hypotheses through the collection and interpretation of field data collected using weather sensors. You'll write up your choice of fieldcourse experiment for assessment, after first receiving informal feedback on a related poster presentation.

ENV-5010K

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a level 4 module from the following list.

Name Code Credits

ACOUSTICS AND LABORATORY IN PHYSICS

One half of the module will cover the physics of acoustics, especially with relation to music and musical instruments. The Matlab programming environment will be introduced and used to analyse a series of sounds. These analyses will form the basis for a written report on those sounds. The other half of the module will be a practical laboratory. A variety of experiments will be carried out and the data analysis written up in report format.

PHY-4004Y

20

ALGEBRA 1

Algebra plays a key role in pure mathematics and its applications. We will provide you with a thorough introduction and develop this theory from first principles. In the first semester, we consider linear algebra and in the second semester, we move on to group theory. In the first semester, we develop the theory of matrices, mainly (though not exclusively) over the real numbers. The material covers matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects. We conclude with the definition of abstract vector spaces. At the heart of group theory in Semester 2 is the study of symmetry and the axiomatic development of the theory. The basic concepts are subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, factor groups, group actions and the Isomorphism Theorem.

MTHA4006Y

20

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Introducing important concepts in analytical chemistry, this module covers a range of qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques that underpin more complex instrumental analytical methodologies. Exploring these techniques, you will learn how to apply them to "real-life" analytical problems.

CHE-4501Y

20

ATMOSPHERE and OCEANS

The habitability of planet Earth depends on physical and chemical systems that control everything from the weather and climate to the growth of all living organisms. This module introduces you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret them. It leads naturally to second and third year study of these systems in more detail, but even if you choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences, a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The module is made up of two distinct components. One focuses on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) The other focuses on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). Interrelationships between these components are explored throughout. Teaching of this module is through a mix of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half-day field trip. This module provides a Basic Chemistry introduction for those students who have little or no background in chemistry prior to joining UEA.

ENV-4007B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY

This module will provide an introduction to fundamental aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. The essential roles played by proteins and enzymes in signalling, transport and metabolism will be considered in terms of their structures. You will discover how living cells are visualised and the nature of cell membranes and organelles.

BIO-4016B

20

BIODIVERSITY

This module explores life on Earth. You will be introduced to the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. You will explore the evolutionary relationships that link the major groups and discover the immense biodiversity of living organisms. Central to this evolutionary path is how microorganisms, plants and animal invaded the land and coped with limited water. You will study this subject through lectures, workshops, laboratory-based practical classes and field trips. You will gain practical experience handling a wide range of organisms and learn how to report experimental work that you carry out. A key part of this module is the production of a learning portfolio which will help develop independent study skills in relation to the topic of the module.

BIO-4001A

20

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY

This module will provide 1st year students with essential information about the physical and chemical principles that underpin our understanding of biochemical systems and cellular metabolism. This module is going to be delivered to 1st year students on the Biological Sciences, Biomedicine and Molecular Biology and Genetics degree programs.

BIO-4017Y

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

After a shared introduction to chemical bonding, atomic and molecular structure and chemical principles, this module will provide you with an introduction to the structures, properties and reactivities of molecules and ionic solids. The first few lectures of this module are integrated with the module 'Chemistry of Carbon Based Compounds' and is supported and illustrated by the bonding, structure and periodicity experiments of the first year practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory A or Research Skills in Biochemistry. The latter part will concentrate more on fundamental aspects of inorganic Chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between chemical bonding and the structures and properties of molecules.

CHE-4301Y

20

CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will provide an understanding of the key aspects of cell biology and how these relate to the physiology of living systems. It will highlight how these principles are key to understanding some of the physiological processes, as well as the central role of homeostasis in human physiology. It will also explore the function of some of the major organ systems of the human body.

BIO-4015B

20

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

You will be laboratory based to cover experimental aspects of the 'core' chemistry courses, Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds, Bonding, Structure and Periodicity, Light, Atoms and Materials and Analytical Chemistry. You will use spreadsheets for analysing and presenting data, which is also covered in this module.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

After a shared introduction to atomic structure and periodicity, you will be introduced to the concepts of bonding and hybridisation, conjugation and aromaticity, the mechanistic description of organic reactions, the organic functional groups, the shapes of molecules and stereochemical issues including the concepts of enantiomers, diastereoisomers and racemates.

CHE-4101Y

20

COMPUTATION AND MODELLING

Computation and modelling are essential skills for the modern mathematician. While many applied problems are amenable to analytic methods, many require some numerical computation to complete the solution. The synthesis of these two approaches can provide deep insight into highly complex mathematical ideas. This module will introduce you to the art of mathematical modelling, and train you in the computer programming skills needed to perform numerical computations. A particular focus is classical mechanics, which describes the motion of solid bodies. Central to this is Newton's second law of motion, which states that a mass will accelerate at a rate proportional to the force imposed upon it. This leads to an ordinary differential equation to be solved for the velocity and position of the mass. In the simplest cases the solution can be constructed using analytical methods, but in more complex situations, for example motion under resistance, numerical methods may be required. Iterative methods for solving nonlinear algebraic equations are fundamental and will also be studied. Further examples drawn from pure mathematics and statistics demonstrate the power of modern computational techniques.

MTHA4007Y

20

COMPUTATION AND MODELLING

Computation and modelling are essential skills for the modern mathematician. While many applied problems are amenable to analytic methods, many require some numerical computation to complete the solution. The synthesis of these two approaches can provide deep insight into highly complex mathematical ideas. This module will introduce you to the art of mathematical modelling, and train you in the computer programming skills needed to perform numerical computations. A particular focus is classical mechanics, which describes the motion of solid bodies. Central to this is Newton's second law of motion, which states that a mass will accelerate at a rate proportional to the force imposed upon it. This leads to an ordinary differential equation to be solved for the velocity and position of the mass. In the simplest cases the solution can be constructed using analytical methods, but in more complex situations, for example motion under resistance, numerical methods may be required. Iterative methods for solving nonlinear algebraic equations are fundamental and will also be studied. Further examples drawn from pure mathematics and statistics demonstrate the power of modern computational techniques.

MTHA4007Y

20

DATABASE SYSTEMS

This module is based on the relational model and will introduce you to important aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. You will explore the tools and methods for database design and manipulation as well as the programming of database applications. You will use a modern relational database management system to gain practical experience. You will also develop programming experience using SQL, and using a high level programming language to write applications that access the database.

CMP-4010B

20

ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, RELATIVITY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

This module gives an introduction to important topics in physics, with particular, but not exclusive, relevance to chemical and molecular physics. Areas covered include optics, electrostatics and magnetism and special relativity. The module may be taken by any science students who wish to study physics beyond A Level.

PHY-4001Y

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

Why do trees grow tall? Why do male birds have long bright feathers? Why do people cooperate? Why does sex exist? Why do we grow old and die? These and other questions in biology can be understood if we learn how to think in terms of natural selection and adaptation. This module introduces the main concepts in evolutionary theory, from the original ideas introduced by Darwin to the modern developments, and uses these concepts to understand a wide range of topics in behaviour and ecology. We start from evolution and discuss how Darwin arrived at the idea of natural selection, its critiques and how to address them; we then study the basics of Mendelian genetics and population genetics and learn how to check if a population is evolving' we discuss adaptation and optimisation in biology; then we move to specific issues like the evolution of reproductive systems and life cycles, the evolution of stable sex-ratios and coevolution between species; we discuss the concept of selfish genes and how it helps us think in terms of adaptation; we study the methods used to understand long-term evolution and speciation; and we conclude the first part with ideas from evolutionary medicine to understand why we get sick, and human evolution and social behaviour. In the second part of the module we focus to ecology: we discuss the general concepts of abiotic limits, resources and models of intraspecific competition and logistic growth; we learn the basic concepts of demography and population growth, interspecific competition, predation, predator-prey dynamics, and we discuss at length mutualism and cooperation in nature; finally we talk about the nature of the English countryside and issues in conservation biology and ecosystem services. In the third part we focus on behaviour: after a general introduction on the key concepts in the study of animal behaviour we discuss cooperation among non-kin and the concept of kin selection and kin conflict; we review animal communication and models of sexual selection and sexual conflict.

BIO-4002B

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module provides an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. It begins with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This leads on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, nature, landscape and risk. In addition, the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers are introduced. You will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means.

ENV-4010Y

20

GEOPHYSICS AND ASTROPHYSICS

In this module, you will learn about the methods used to model the physics of the Earth and Universe. You will explore the energy, mechanics, and physical processes underpinning Earth's systems. This includes the study of its formation, subsequent evolution and current state through the understanding of its structure and behaviour - from our planet's interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. In the second part of this module, you will study aspects of astrophysics including the history of astrophysics, radiation, matter, gravitation, astrophysical measurements, spectroscopy, stars and some aspects of cosmology. You will learn to predict differences between idealised physics and real life situations. You will also improve your skills in problem solving, written communication, information retrieval, poster design, information technology, numeracy and calculations, time management and organisation.

PHY-4003A

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module, you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues.

ENV-4001A

20

LIGHT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

This module introduces students to the major areas of classical physical chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, and electrolyte solutions as well as spectroscopy. Chemical kinetics will consider the kinetic theory of gases and the rate of processes, in particular either in the gas phase or in solution. The appropriate theoretical basis for understanding rate measurements will be developed during the course, which will include considerations of the order of reaction, the Arrhenius equation and determination of rate constants. Thermodynamics deals with energy relationships in large assemblies, that is those systems which contain sufficient numbers of molecules for 'bulk' properties to be exhibited and which, are in a state of equilibrium. Properties discussed will include the heat content or enthalpy (H), heat capacity (Cp, Cv), internal energy (U), heat and work. The First Law of Thermodynamics will be introduced and its significance explained. It is very important that scientists have an understanding of the behaviour of ions in solution, which includes conductivity and ionic mobility. The interaction of radiation with matter is termed spectroscopy. Three main topics will be discussed: (i) ultraviolet/visible (UV / Vis) spectroscopy, in which electrons are moved from one orbital to another orbital; (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy, a technique which provides important information on the variety of bond types that a molecule can possess; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which allows 'molecular skeletons' to be identified.

CHE-4202Y

20

MATHEMATICAL SKILLS

The unit provides you with a thorough introduction to some systems of numbers commonly found in Mathematics: natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, modular arithmetic. It also introduces you to common set theoretic notation and terminology and a precise language in which to talk about functions. There is emphasis on precise definitions of concepts and careful proofs of results. Styles of mathematical proofs you will discuss include: proof by induction, direct proofs, proof by contradiction, contrapositive statements, equivalent statements and the role of examples and counterexamples. In addition, this unit will also provide you with an introduction to producing mathematical documents using Latex, and an introduction to solving mathematical problems computationally using both Symbolic Algebra packages and Excel.

MTHA4001A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced to you.

CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for you if you have an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. It will provide you with an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition, 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.

CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

You will cover differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods as part of this module. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for those across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. Recommended if you have grade A*-C at A-level Mathematics, or equivalent.

ENV-4015Y

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

This module explores how information is stored in DNA, how it is expressed, copied and repaired, and how DNA is transmitted between generations. It has significant focus on the application of molecular biological and genetics knowledge, including animal, plant and microbial biotechnology and synthetic biology.

BIO-4018A

20

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

To understand Life we have to study and understand the molecular properties of life's components. For any biochemist these are cells, energy, macromolecules, biochemical reactions and transport (of energy or chemical components). The tools we use as scientists in our quest for understanding life are various physical and analytical methods. You will be introduced to the basic principles of thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and reaction kinetics. You will conclude the module by having a look at various physical and analytical techniques that are being used in current Biochemistry. This lectures will introduce you and provide you with essential information about some of the physical principles that underpin our understanding of molecular and cellular systems. The complementary seminar series will help to consolidate your understanding through applying this knowledge to selected topics in biochemistry and provide you with the opportunity to develop skills in problem solving, data analysis, scientific writing, and presentation. The module is also enriched with six math workshops. In these workshops you are going to consolidate but also further develop basic and more advanced mathematical skills that directly relate with this module but that will also assist you for the duration of your degree.

BIO-4007Y

20

PROGRAMMING 1

In taking this module you will gain a solid grounding in the essential features of object-oriented programming, using a modern programming language such as Java. The module is designed such that you are not expected to have previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many students taking the module will have done so in some measure.

CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

The purpose of this module is to give you a solid grounding in the essential features of programming. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-4009B

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS I

We will explore how quantitative skills can solve a range of environmental and geographical problems. We will think critically about numbers in the media and learn how scientists use numbers. Our workshops will focus on the practical use of Maths through physical equations and mathematical models. Designed primarily for students who have no AS/A-Level Maths qualification (or equivalent), you will also receive statistical training, learning about summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers.

ENV-4013Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS II

Mathematical and statistical skills are key to all brands of Environmental Sciences and Geography. This module will strengthen these skills and will consolidate your Mathematics knowledge from GCSE level, introducing you to differentiation and integration. You'll learn to recognise the purpose of simple statistical methods, to choose the appropriate methods to test hypotheses and to summarise data using tables and graphs. You'll apply these quantitative skills to contemporary environmental and geographical problems, inspired by research in the School of Environmental Sciences. Assessment is through an online course test and an exam. This module will widen the range of Science modules that you can take during your studies in Geography and Environmental Sciences. Upon successful completion of the module, you'll have acquired skills in applying a range of mathematical and statistical methods to problems in Environmental Sciences and Geography.

ENV-4014Y

20

REAL ANALYSIS

We will explore the mathematical notion of a limit and see the precise definition of the limit of a sequence of real numbers and learn how to prove that a sequence converges to a limit. After studying limits of infinite sequences, we move on to series, which capture the notion of an infinite sum. We then learn about limits of functions and continuity. Finally, we will learn precise definitions of differentiation and integration and see the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

You will gain a range of transferable skills, tools and resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences and Geography. It aims to provide a broad understanding of the research process through activities that involve formulating research questions, collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, collating and evaluating information and presenting results. Lectures and practical classes will be taught during Semester 1, whilst a week-long residential field course applies field, lab and other skills to a variety of Environmental Science and Geography topics in Semester 2. Depending on the size of the cohort, students on selected degree programmes may be offered the option of an alternative field course arrangement.

ENV-4004Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

If you are a Biochemistry student, this module will provide you with practical and research skills. In the laboratory, you will experience experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations provide practical chemistry skills, complementing lectures in other first year modules. In seminars and workshops, you will develops skills such as analysing data, using references critically, and presenting results in different formats.

CHE-4602Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; error propagation in physical chemistry and physical principles through applied mathematics. The module also contains a broadly based series of lectures on science, coupled with activities based upon them. The twin objectives for this part of the module are to provide a contextual backdrop for the more focused studies in other concurrent and subsequent degree courses, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information.

CHE-4050Y

20

BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

This module focuses on exploring and understanding the evolving relationships between human development and the natural environment from ecological perspectives with some context from social sciences. The module is intended to give you a flavour of the issues, themes and considerations relating to biodiversity at different scales of biological organization, ecosystem services and sustainable development. The module (1) examines practical and theoretical considerations of sustainable development; (2) explores the options advanced for establishing a sustainable balance between human needs and those of natural systems and ecosystems; (3) investigates how the growing human enterprise and human resource use has affected biodiversity and the biosphere and (4) considers the scales of biodiversity loss, from the biosphere to biomes, ecosystems, ecological communities, populations, individuals, and genes. The module comprises 12 weeks of lectures and practicals. You will attend two lectures and one practical session in most weeks. The lectures introduce, review and critique particular concepts and perspectives. The practicals provide opportunities to examine in more detail some of the issues raised during the lectures, accompanied by practical exercises. Identical practical sessions will be run each week, on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. You will be notified in which group and on which day you are expected to take part in the practical. The beginning of the module revolves around sustainable development, the human footprint and examine sustainable development in relation to human resource use and ecosystem services. Lectures consider interactions between human societies and the composition and structure of natural (terrestrial, freshwater and marine) ecosystems, anthropocentric impacts on biomes, ecosystems, communities, populations, and the genetic diversity of individuals. They introduce some approaches and ideas fundamental to modern quantitative conservation ecology. The practicals will introduce ecological communities, there will be some elementary statistical analysis and if Government advice at the time allows, there will be a field trip to a nature reserve. The slides of the lectures will be posted every week on the Blackboard pages of this module. You can download or print them off for yourself as and when required. These are not a substitute for taking part in the lectures. For each lecture and practical, you will be pointed to additional readings to explore some of the issues raised in more depth. These are found on the module Talis reading list and reading lists at the end of each lecture. These will be useful for your assignments.

ENV-4006B

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. You will explore the energy, mechanics, and physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour - from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. You will study Plate Tectonics to explain Earth's physiographic features - such as mountain belts and volcanoes - and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. You will also explore geological time - the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet - and how geological maps can be used to understand Earth history. This course provides you with an introduction to geological materials - rocks, minerals and sediments - and to geological resources and natural hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

NATURAL SCIENCES BSC PROJECT

This individual research module is compulsory for all Natural Sciences students and is only available to Natural Sciences students. It comprises supervised research in at least one area of science. It may involve research partners across the Norwich Research Park. The project can involve collection of data in the laboratory or in the field, and/or development of a piece of equipment, and/or development of software or a theoretical/numerical model, and/or analysis of pre-existing data from a variety of sources. It must include independent scientific analysis. It will be assessed by a written report, a presentation, and a web log maintained throughout the project.

NAT-6001Y

40

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

In this option range 20 of the 60-80 credits may be selected from a School outside the Science Faculty, not listed in this profile, with the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED PHYSICS LABORATORY

This module explores concepts in physics through a series of advanced laboratory experiments, working in teams. The experiments are underpinned by associated teaching in other modules of the Physics course.

PHY-6003Y

20

ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES

Covers advanced features of established OO languages including C++ and Java, introduces F# (functional language) and C# (hybrid language) including .NET/CLR, and C++11,14. On the other side of the language spectrum, procedural and lower level languages such as C, IL, Bytecode and x86 assembly language are studied. Furthermore, code optimisation and high-performance computing (cluster, GPU) are addressed as well. Finally, practical methods as part of software engineering are reiterated including agile programming, design patterns and software testing.

CMP-6048A

20

ADVANCED STATISTICS

This module covers two topics in statistical theory: Linear and Generalised Linear models and also includes Stochastic processes. The first two topics consider both the theory and practice of statistical model fitting and students will be expected to analyse real data using R. Stochastic processes including the random walk, Markov chains, Poisson processes, and birth and death processes.

CMP-6004A

20

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHYSICS

On this module you will study a selection of advanced topics in classical physics that provide powerful tools in many applications as well as provide a deep theoretical background for further advanced studies in both classical and quantum physics. The topics include analytical mechanics, electromagnetic field theory and special relativity. Within this module you will also complete a computational assignment, developing necessary skills applicable for computations in many areas of physics

PHY-6002Y

20

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

This module will introduce you to core techniques in Artificial Intelligence. Topics covered may include state space representation and search algorithms, knowledge representation, expert systems, Bayesian networks, Markov Models, Neural networks, Deep learning, and an Introduction to Robotics and Drone.

CMP-6040A

20

AUDIOVISUAL PROCESSING

This module explores how computers process audio and video signals. In the audio component, the focus is on understanding how humans produce speech and how this can be processed by computer for speech recognition and enhancement. Similarly, the visual component considers the human eye and camera, and how video is processed by computer. The theoretical material covered in lectures is reinforced with practical laboratory sessions. The module is coursework only and requires you to build a speech recogniser capable of recognising the names of students studying the module using both audio and visual speech information.

CMP-6026A

20

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

The global biodiversity crisis threatens mass species loss. What are the implications for society? How can communities solve this problem in a world that is facing other challenges of climate change, food security, environmental and social justice? In this inter-disciplinary module, (designed for students of Geography, Environmental Science, Ecology and International Development who have an interest in biodiversity and its conservation), you will focus on the interactions between biodiversity and human societies. The module adopts a rigorous evidence-based approach. You will first critically examine the human drivers of biodiversity loss and the importance of biodiversity to human society, to understand how underlying perspectives and motivations influence approaches to conservation. You will then examine conflicts between human society and conservation and how these potentially can be resolved, reviewing institutions and potential instruments for biodiversity conservation in both Europe and developing countries. Coursework is inter-disciplinary and will require you to evaluate and communicate the quality of evidence showing effectiveness of conservation interventions and approaches.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

Explore the evolution, biodiversity and ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. You will study ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid-ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems in detail and predict the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and a voluntary employability visit to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) in Lowestoft. You will be expected to have some background in biology, e.g. have taken a biology, ecology or biogeochemistry based second year module in order to study this module.

ENV-6005A

20

BIOLOGY OF AGEING: EVOLUTION, ECOLOGY AND HUMAN HEALTH

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the fundamentals of the biology of ageing, as well as to the latest discoveries in evolutionary and applied biogerontology. The students will learn about the ultimate evolutionary causes of ageing, the genetics of ageing, and the role of the environment in shaping differences in ageing between populations, sexes, and individuals. The module material will cover ageing in wild populations of animals and plants, in laboratory model organisms, and in historical and contemporary human populations. Special attention will be given to ageing as a global challenge facing modern societies and to the research advances aimed at extending healthy lifespan in humans. The module will use Mechanisms of Life-History Evolution (2011) (Oxford University Press, eds. Flatt and Heyland) and The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life (2017) (Cambridge University Press, eds. Shefferson, Jones and Salguero-Gomez) as the items of core reading and will refer back to some of the chapters in these books.

BIO-6031A

20

CANCER BIOLOGY

On this module you will learn about the various roles of genes in cancer cell signalling, the cell cycle, cell death processes such as apoptosis, metastasis and angiogenesis, and discuss the potential for novel therapies. The use of animal models and the problems with drug resistance will be discussed. You will develop key skills in the critical analysis of primary cancer research papers. We work closely with experts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital wherever possible, enabling you to gain an in-depth appreciation of cancer as a disease process from both the scientific and clinical viewpoints.

BIO-6009A

20

LAND AND WATER PROCESSES AND MANAGEMENT

In this module, you will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins. You will address the fundamental requirement for an interdisciplinary catchment-based approach to managing and protecting water resources that includes an understanding of land use and its management. The module content includes the design of catchment monitoring programmes, nutrient mass balance calculations, river restoration techniques, an overview of UK and European agri-environmental policy and approaches to assessing and mitigating catchment flooding.

ENV-6018B

20

CELL BIOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE

Do you want to learn about the key topics within cell biology and understand how these relate to human diseases? You will learn about the structure and function of cells in health and disease through a combination of practical demonstrations, where you will experience some of the imaging techniques used in the study of Cell Biology. You will also participate in a workshop, where you will learn how to design experiments. This module will provide you with a solid understanding of aspects of cell structure, function and related diseases concerning: ubiquitination; the cytoskeleton; cell division; cell signalling in motility and wound healing; the extracellular matrix; growth factors and proliferation; cell differentiation and adult stem cells and apoptosis.

BIO-6006B

20

CELLULAR SIGNALLING

How do cells receive and react to information from their external environment? What is the molecular basis for how cells respond to external signalling cues and how does this relate to physiological processes? In this module you will study cellular signalling by ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, enzyme-linked receptors; the associated signal transduction mechanisms and relevance to human physiology and disease. The module includes aspects of the molecular basis of cellular signalling, structure-function relationships and pharmacology. You will study the molecular basis of cellular signalling by three principle receptor families, namely ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors and enzyme-linked receptors. You will build on your knowledge of cell biology and human physiology to deepen your understanding of cellular signalling. You will learn through lectures and independent study.

BIO-6003A

20

CHEMICAL PHYSICS - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

The module will consist of topics covering important areas of modern physical chemistry and chemical physics. The material will blend together experimental and theoretical aspects of photonics, condensed phase dynamics in molecular and macromolecular fluids and quantum and classical simulations.

CHE-6250Y

20

CLIMATE SYSTEMS

What sets the mean global temperature of the world? Why are some parts of the world arid whilst others at the same latitudes are humid? This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the processes that determine why the Earth's climate (defined, for example, by temperature and moisture distribution) looks like it does, what the major circulation patterns and climate zones are and how they arise. You will study why the climate changes in time over different timescales, and how we use this knowledge to understand the climate systems of other planets. This module is aimed at you if you wish to further your knowledge of climate, or want a base for any future study of climate change, such as the Meteorology/Oceanography.

ENV-6025B

20

COMPUTER VISION

Computer Vision is about "teaching machines how to see". You will study methods for acquiring, analysing and understanding images in both lectures and laboratories. The practical exercises and projects that you undertake in the laboratory will support the underpinning theory and enable you to implement contemporary computer vision algorithms.

CMP-6035B

20

CONTROL SYSTEMS

Automatic control is essential in any field of engineering and science. Control systems are an integral part of robotic systems, manufacturing systems, self-driven vehicles and any industrial operation and household application involving control of temperature, humidity, flow, pressure, etc. A competent engineer should be familiar with the control theories commonly used nowadays and their practical application. In particular, this module is focused on the analysis and design of control systems based on the classical control theory. Among other topics, this module covers: Systems modelling using Laplace transforms. System identification. Open-loop and closed-loop control systems and the importance of feedback. Evaluation of systems stability and behaviour using different analysis tools like Bode plots, the Routh-Hurwitz criterion, the Root Locus method or Nyquist plots. Design and tuning of different common types of controllers, like PID controllers and lead/lag compensators, to meet a variety of design requirements. Digital control systems. Programming and operation of PLCs (programmable logic controllers) and its use in automatic industrial systems. Analysis and design of control systems using Matlab In order to reinforce the learning and engagement, different case studies of industrial applications from local companies are introduced and potentially a site visit.

ENG-6007A

20

DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY

This module will give an introduction to ideas of differential geometry. Key examples will be curves and surfaces embedded in 3-dimensional Euclidean space. We will start with curves and will study the curvature and torsion, building up to the fundamental theorem of curve theory. From here we move on to tangent spaces and the first and second fundamental forms, Gaussian curvature, and further topics.

MTHE6030A

20

DYNAMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

The ocean is an important component of the Earth's climate system. This module covers mathematically modelling of the large-scale ocean circulation and oceanic wave motion. This module builds upon the techniques in fluid dynamics and differential equations that you developed in year two. It then uses these techniques to explain some interesting phenomena in the ocean that are relevant to the real world. We begin by examining the effects of rotation on fluid flows. This naturally leads to the important concept of geostrophy, which enables ocean currents to be inferred from measurements of the sea surface height or from vertical profiles of seawater density. Geostrophy also plays a key role in the development of a model for the global scale circulation of abyssal ocean. The role of the wind in driving the ocean will be examined. This enables us to model the large-scale circulation of the ocean including the development of oceanic gyres and strong western boundary currents, such as the Gulf Stream. The module concludes by examining the role of waves, both at the sea surface and internal to the ocean. The differences between wave motion at mid-latitudes and the Equator are examined, as is the roll of the Equator as a wave-guide. The equatorial waves that you will study are intimately linked with the El Nino phenomenon that affects the climate throughout the globe.

MTHE6007B

20

EDUCATION RESEARCH

This module is about the understanding of the theory and practice of education research. The module will lead the student through a variety of pedagogical frameworks of learning with opportunity for discussion and critical reflection. The student will design an intervention study, based around a designed resource which will be evaluated for learning effectiveness. This project will enable the student to develop their own research project questions and apply the theory of education to their work.

BIO-6030Y

20

ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

This module is highly practical and will allow you to study how electricity is generated and how it is distributed to users. The first part studies DC and AC electricity and looks at how RLC circuits behave through complex phasor analysis. The second part will give you the chance to study electricity generators, beginning with magnetism and Faraday's Law. Synchronous and asynchronous generators are studied along with application to conventional power stations and to renewable generation (e.g. wind). You'll also look at transformers and transmission lines with a view to distribution of electricity. Voltage conversion methods such as the rectifier, buck and boost converters are examined and finally electricity generation through solar is covered. Your lab classes will build on material from lectures which in turn forms the basis for coursework.

ENG-6001B

20

EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND STEM CELL BIOLOGY

You will study the mechanisms that drive embryonic development, including the signals and signalling pathways that lead to the establishment of the body plan, pattern formation, differentiation and organogenesis. Your lectures will cover different model organisms used in the study of development with a focus on vertebrate systems. The relevance of embryonic development to our understanding of human development and disease is a recurring theme throughout the module, which also covers stem cells and organoids and their role in enhancing our understanding of development and disease, healthy tissue maintenance and drug discovery.

BIO-6012A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

Modern everyday life rests fundamentally on the availability of energy. Since the 1970s, however, serious concerns have been raised about the sustainability of current energy systems. Traditionally, these problems have been analysed (and solutions proposed) from within the engineering and physical sciences. Understanding, managing and attempting to solve energy problems, however, demands a thorough appreciation of how people, at a range of scales, engage with energy in the course of their daily lives. This is a critical challenge for the social sciences, and will be the core focus of this module. Through this module, you will discover and explore a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. You will learn how to apply these ideas to contemporary energy problems and use them to generate your own visions for a sustainable energy future. You'll also be given the chance to work as part of a team and to communicate your ideas through both written and oral presentation. You'll begin by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. You'll then go into more depth around different theories of social and technical change before exploring how these can be used to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems that are currently being tried and tested around the world. You'll learn through a combination of lectures and seminars involving interactive group projects, class debates, practical exercises and student-led learning. At the end of the module, you will have developed the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to allow you to apply theories of social and technical change to a range of real-world energy problems. You'll be able to develop and critically analyse your own (and already existing) visions of a sustainable energy future, and you'll be able to creatively communicate these ideas to a range of different audiences.

ENV-6026B

20

ENERGY MATERIALS

This module is designed to provide you with an understanding of the developing landscape and challenges in the broad area of energy generation and transduction. It has a particular emphasis on the science that underpins emerging technologies related to the hydrogen economy, photovoltaics and biological or solar fuels. Necessarily it encompasses cross-discipline aspects of chemistry, physics materials and biological science with the students gaining knowledge of how these disciplines interplay in the design and construction of new devices for energy harvesting and utilisation.

CHE-6350Y

20

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module provides up-to-date learning in evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module examines how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society. The module covers 5 areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine; (v) case studies in ancient DNA and human evolution.

BIO-6017A

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION GENETICS

You will gain a deep understanding about conservation genetics / genomics based on an evolutionary / population-genetic framework, thereby covering contemporary issues in conservation biology, evolution, population biology, genetics, organismal phylogeny, Next Generation Sequencing, and molecular ecology. This is an advanced course in evolutionary biology / conservation genetics that will benefit you if you plan to continue with a postgraduate degree in ecology, genetics, conservation, or evolution. It is also ideal if you are wishing to deepen your knowledge in 1st and 2nd year conservation / evolution / genetics modules. A background in evolution, genetics, and/or molecular biology is highly recommended.

BIO-6008B

20

FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS

The Mathematical Modelling of Finance is a relatively new area of application of mathematics yet it is expanding rapidly and has great importance for world financial markets. The module is concerned with the valuation of financial instruments known as derivatives. Introduction to options, futures and the no-arbitrage principle. Mathematical models for various types of options are discussed. We consider also Brownian motion, stochastic processes, stochastic calculus and Ito's lemma. The Black-Scholes partial differential equation is derived and its connection with diffusion brought out. It is applied and solved in various circumstances.

MTHE6026B

20

FOSSIL FUELS

You will be introduced to geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity on society. Some knowledge of Earth science and basic Chemistry will be expected.

ENV-6009A

20

GENOMES, GENES AND GENOMICS

This module will provide you with knowledge of the biological analysis of genomes. This will focus on our understanding of genome composition, organisation and evolution, and the global regulation of gene expression. When you have completed this module you will understand contemporary methods that inform us about the biology of genomes.

BIO-6013A

20

GEOPHYSICAL HAZARDS

Geophysical hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis and landslides have significant environmental and societal impacts. This module focuses on the physical basis and analysis of each hazard, their global range of occurrence, probability of occurrence and their local and global impact. You will address matters such as hazard monitoring, modelling and assessment, and consider approaches towards risk mitigation and the reduction of vulnerability (individual and societal), with an emphasis on their practical implementation. Scenarios and probabilities of mega-disasters are also investigated. All the teaching faculty involved have practical experience of supplying professional advice on these hazards (and related risks) in addition to their own research involvement. A basic knowledge of physical science and of mathematics is assumed e.g. use of logs, exponentials, powers, cosines, rearrangement of equations.

ENV-6001B

20

GRAPHICS 2

Explore the fundamentals of 3D geometric transformations and viewing using OpenGL and learn the theory and implementation of fundamental visibility determination algorithms and techniques for lighting, shading and anti-aliasing. You'll study 3D curves and fundamental geometric data structures, as well as considering the issues involved with modern high performance graphics processors.

CMP-6006A

20

GROUPS AND ALGEBRA

This module is about further topics in algebra. It builds on the knowledge obtained on groups, rings and vector spaces in the first two years. Groups can be studied directly, or via objects called algebras (which have the structures of both rings and vector spaces). On the other hand, algebras can also be studied in their own right. Some of these concepts will be explored in this module.

MTHE6033A

20

HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

We will trace the development of mathematics from prehistory to the high cultures of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley civilisation, through Islamic mathematics, and on to mathematical modernity, through a selection of topics. We trace the rise of calculus and algebra, from the time of Ancient Greek and Indian mathematicians, up to the era of Newton and Leibniz. Other topics are also discussed. We will explore mathematical practice and conceptual developments in different historical and geographical settings.

MTHA6002A

20

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY

This module provides a detailed coverage of the biology of selected infectious microorganisms, in the context of host and responses to pathogens. The properties of organs, cells and molecules of the immune system are described, along with the mechanism of antibody diversity generation, and the exploitation of the immune response for vaccine development. Examples of pathogens are used to illustrate major virulence strategies.

BIO-6010B

20

INORGANIC COMPOUNDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

This module concentrates on two important themes in contemporary inorganic chemistry: (i) the role of transition metals in homogeneous catalysis; (ii) the correlation between the structures of transition metal complexes and their electronic and magnetic properties. The structure and bonding in these compounds will be discussed as well as their applications in synthesis. There will be a series of problem-solving workshops interspersed with the lectures.

CHE-6301Y

20

MACHINE LEARNING

This module covers the core topics that dominate machine learning research: classification, clustering and reinforcement learning. We describe a variety of classification algorithms (e.g. Neural Networks, Decision Trees and Learning Classifier Systems) and clustering algorithms (e.g. k-NN and PAM) and discuss the practical implications of their application to real world problems. We then introduce reinforcement learning and the Q-learning problem and describe its application to control problems such as maze solving.

CMP-6002B

20

MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

This module provides an overview of the uses of microorganisms in biotechnological principles. It provides training in the basic principles that control microbiological culture growth, the microbial physiology and genetics that underpin the production of bioproducts such as biofuels, bioplastics, antibiotics and food products, as well as the use of micro-organisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation.

BIO-6004A

20

MICROBIAL CELL BIOLOGY

This module will provide you with a detailed understanding of cutting-edge developments in microbial cell biology. You will cover essential techniques used to carry out modern day molecular microbiology. These techniques will be further explained to you in the context of work done on model microbial systems in research conducted on the Norwich Research Park (NRP). The module is taught to you by world-leading research scientists from the NRP and focuses on the structure and analysis of bacterial genomes, the bacterial cytoskeleton, sub-cellular localisation, cell shape and cell division and intercellular communication between bacteria and higher organisms. You will also have research-led seminars delivered by NRP PhD students.

BIO-6005B

20

MODELLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES

Our aim is to show how environmental problems may be solved from the initial problem, to mathematical formulation and numerical solution. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically via computer programming. The module consists of lectures on numerical methods and computing practicals, the practicals being designed to illustrate the solution of problems using the methods covered in lectures. We will guide you through the solution of a model of an environmental process of your own choosing. The skills developed in this module are highly valued by prospective employers.

ENV-6004A

20

MOLECULAR ENZYMOLOGY IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

The module sets out to explain the molecular basis of the often complex catalytic mechanisms of enzymes concentrating particularly on their relevance to and applications in biotechnology and medicine. An extended practical based on the kinetics of a model enzyme, chymotrypsin, helps underpin concepts learnt in the module.

BIO-6001A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Environmental economics provides a set of tools and principles which can be useful in understanding natural resource management issues. This module introduces you to key principles and tools of environmental economics for students who have not studied the subject previously. It then explores how these principles can be applied to address a number of complex economy-environment problems including climate change, over-fishing and water resources management. In this module you will have the opportunity to practically apply cost-benefit analysis as a framework for decision-making and will gain knowledge on the key non-market valuation techniques that are used to monetarily value environmental goods and services. At the end of the module you will have gained insights into how environmental economics is used in developing natural resource management policy as well as some of the challenges in using environmental economics in policy-making.

ENV-6012B

20

NEW GEOGRAPHIES OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

The onset of the Anthropocene, a geological epoch defined by the human shaping of planet Earth, is seeing people starting to fundamentally rethink the human place in nature. What does this mean for the study of human geography? In this module you'll explore the debate over the onset of the Anthropocene, and the unique contribution that human geographers can make to it. You'll gain a firm grasp on how the idea of the Anthropocene is re-shaping geographical thought, and will encounter concepts and methods from across the field of human geography which can help us to think in new ways about the past, present and future of human-environment relationships. You'll also learn new skills in communicating geographical ideas and theories by written, oral and visual means. You'll begin with an introduction to the Anthropocene debate and to the different kinds of evidence that are drawn upon to define the character of this new age. You'll then range across the discipline, taking on-board ideas and insights from historical, political, social and cultural geography on the complex roots, meanings and politics of environmental change. Through a mixture of lectures, seminars, field classes and self-directed study, you'll explore what it means to be a geographer in a rapidly changing world. You'll develop a new appreciation of the processes shaping our environmental present, as well as the critical capacities needed to help shape our environmental future. Lectures cover topics such as Geopolitics as if the Earth Mattered, Cities in the Anthropocene, and Conservation at the end of Nature. As you study you'll put your new knowledge into practice, gaining experience in communicating your ideas in tutorials, group discussions, presentations and written work.

ENV-6032A

20

NUCLEAR AND SOLAR ENERGY

This module addresses the technical and financial aspects of nuclear power and solar energy, whilst letting you apply your knowledge from the Engineering Practice module to make ethical decisions incorporating health and safety risk assessments. Successful design of nuclear installations requires a detailed quantitative risk analysis within a regulatory framework that imposes high tolerances. Furthermore, you will obtain advanced knowledge and skills for the optimal design and performance analysis for cost-effective configurations of PV systems, solar thermal systems and hybrids to achieve sustainable development. Although these energies are considered cleaner, it is essential to consider the environmental impact and planning law, as well as changing the societal perception of both.

ENG-6002Y

20

NUMBER THEORY

Number Theory is the study of arithmetical properties of the integers: properties of, and patterns in, prime numbers, integer solutions of equations with integer coefficients, etc. Gauss called Number Theory "the queen of mathematics" and, following on from work of Fermat and Euler, is responsible for the emergence of Number Theory as a central subject in modern mathematics. Since then, Number Theory has developed in many directions, including Algebraic, Analytic and Probabilistic Number Theory, Diophantine Geometry and has found surprising applications in modern life (notably in Cryptography). In this module, building on first year material on prime factorization and basic congruences, and second year material on groups, rings and fields, you will study various aspects of Number Theory, including certain diophantine equations, polynomial congruences and the famous theorem of Quadratic Reciprocity.

MTHE6035B

20

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES

You will cover several key topics required to plan the synthesis of organic compounds, and to understand the properties displayed by organic compounds. The first topic is on synthesis planning, strategy and analysis, supported by a study of further important oxidation and reduction reactions. The second topic is on the various types of pericyclic reactions and understanding the stereochemistry displayed by an analysis of frontier orbitals. The third topic is on the use of organometallic compounds in synthesis with a particular emphasis on the use of transition metal-based catalysts. The fourth topic is the synthesis of chiral non-racemic compounds, and describes the use of chiral pool compounds and methods for the amplification of chiral information, including asymmetric reductions and oxidations. The final topic is on physical organic chemistry and includes aspects of radical chemistry.

CHE-6101Y

20

PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY

This module examines the geological evidence for climatic change through the Quaternary Period (the last 2.6 million years) and the longer-term evolution of climate through the Cenozoic Era (the last 65 million years). You will explore the interpretation and causal mechanisms behind these major global environmental changes using a diverse range of approaches - isotope geochemistry, sedimentology, palaeoecology and organic geochemistry. We will focus on the geochemical, biological and sedimentological information that can be obtained from marine sediments, ice cores, and terrestrial environments and use these records to reconstruct the timing extent and magnitude of selected climatic events in the geological record.

ENV-6017B

20

PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are ubiquitous in applied mathematics. They arise in many models of physical systems where there is coupling between the variation in space and time, or more than one spatial dimension. Examples include fluid flows, electromagnetism, population dynamics, and the spread of infectious diseases. It is therefore important to understand the theory of PDEs, as well as different analytic and numerical methods for solving them. This module will provide you with an understanding of the different types of PDE, including linear, non-linear, elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic; and how these features affect the required boundary conditions and solution techniques. We will study different methods of analytical solution (such as greens functions, boundary-integral methods, similarity solutions, and characteristics); as well as appropriate numerical methods (with topics such as implicit versus explicit schemes, convergence and stability). Examples and applications will be taken from a variety of fields.

MTHE6034A

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

The module covers a selection of advanced topics in Physical Chemistry including statistical thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and theories of reaction rates, photochemistry, electrochemistry and diffraction techniques.

CHE-6201Y

20

PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRODUCTION

Plant biotechnology can play an important role in providing crop varieties with increased disease resistance, better P and N (Phosphorous and Nitrogen) use efficiency, and higher nutritional value. It includes not just genetic modification, but any technology to obtain desirable traits in plants, such as mutagenesis and marker-assisted selection. The identification of important traits from wild germplasm and existing cultivars, and their introduction into elite cultivars has been achieved primarily using conventional plant breeding methods. This module will identify the major challenges for sustainable crop production, and highlight the role of plant biotechnology and current plant breeding strategies.

BIO-6025B

20

PROTEIN STRUCTURE, CHEMISTRY AND ENGINEERING

The structural basis of the function of many proteins has been elucidated and this, together with the ready availability of chemical and biochemical techniques for altering proteins in a controlled way, has led to the application of proteins in a wide variety of biological and chemical systems and processes. These include their use as industrial catalysts and medicines, in organic syntheses and in the development of new materials. This module provides an introduction to the principles underlying this rapidly expanding and commercially-relevant area of the molecular biosciences and gives insights into their applications.

CHE-6601Y

20

QUANTUM MECHANICS

This module covers the laws of physics described by quantum mechanics that govern the behaviour of microscopic particles. The module will focus on non-relativitic quantum mechanics that is described by the Schrodinger equation. Time-dependent and time-independent solutions will be presented in different contexts including an application to the hydrogen atom. Approximation schemes will also be discussed, with particular emphasis on variational principles, WKB approximation.

MTHE6032A

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

You will gain an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public and explore the theories surrounding learning and communication. You will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Examining case studies in a variety of different scientific areas, alongside looking at how information is released in scientific literature and subsequently picked up by the public press, will give you an understanding of science communication. You will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. You will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. If you wish to take this module you will be required to write a statement of selection. These statements will be assessed and students will be allocated to the module accordingly.

BIO-6018Y

20

SET THEORY

This module is concerned with foundational issues in mathematics and provides the appropriate mathematical framework for discussing 'sizes of infinity'. On the one hand we shall cover concepts such as ordinals, cardinals, and the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms with the Axiom of Choice. On the other, we shall see how these ideas come up in other areas of mathematics, such as graph theory and topology. Familiarity with and a taste for mathematical proofs will be assumed. Therefore, second year Analysis is a desired prerequisite.

MTHE6003B

20

SOCIAL EVOLUTION

Life is organised hierarchically. Genes aggregate in cells, cells aggregate in organisms, and organisms aggregate in societies. Each step in the formation of this hierarchy is termed a major evolutionary transition. Because common principles of social evolution underlie each transition, the study of altruism and cooperation in nature has broadened out to embrace the fundamental hierarchical structure common to all life. This module investigates this new vision of social evolution. It explores how principles of social evolution underlying each transition illuminate our understanding of life's diversity and organisation, using examples ranging from selfish genetic elements to social insects and mammals.

BIO-6011B

20

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FIELD COURSE TO SPAIN

This module seeks to promote a deeper understanding of the interactions between the natural environment and human society through field-based teaching and project work in Almeria, southern Spain. The region provides classic examples of landform evolution and arid environments, as well as experiencing major socio-economic changes in recent decades. Field activities will focus on such issues as agriculture, water resources, renewable energy and adaptation to climate change. Methods for evaluating the sustainability of developments will be examined. The module is assessed by an individual evidence report and public communication item. You will need to contribute 50% of the field course costs (the remainder is paid by the School). In addition, the field course will run only if a minimum number of 21 students enrol and commit to paying the student contribution. If interest exceeds the maximum number that the field centre can accommodate then priority will be given to students according to the number of possible prerequisite modules they have taken.

ENV-6030K

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is therefore challenging. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction', as well as how to deal with climate denialists.

ENV-6008A

20

THE PHYSICS OF THE UNIVERSE

In this module you will apply physics concepts and mathematical techniques to discover the astrophysics that govern the Universe at various scales, in both time and space. This includes stellar structure and evolution; stellar systems and populations; our Milky Way, other galaxies, and galactic systems; and the early Universe. You will also learn about the observational tools such as telescopes and detectors.

PHY-6001Y

20

TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This module is to provide an awareness of new bond construction in advanced organic chemistry. It has aspects of natural product chemistry and the associated bioactivity of natural compounds. The module will illustrate how advanced synthetic chemistry can be used to construct compounds that might find applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

CHE-6151Y

20

WAVES

You will gain an introduction to the theory of waves. You will study aspects of linear and nonlinear waves using analytical techniques and Hyperbolic Waves and Water Waves will also be covered. It requires some knowledge of hydrodynamics and multi-variable calculus. The module is suitable for those with an interest in Applied Mathematics.

MTHE6031B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a level 5 module from the following list.

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA II

The module offers an introduction to vector space theory in the first semester followed by ring theory in the second semester. For vector spaces you will learn about subspaces, basis and dimension, linear maps, rank-nullity theorem, change of basis and the characteristic polynomial. This is followed by an introduction to rings using integers as a model. We develop the theory with many examples related to familiar concepts such as substitution and factorisation. Important examples of commutative rings include fields, domains, polynomial rings and their quotients.

MTHA5008Y

20

ANALOGUE AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

A practical introduction to electronics, this module is structured to consider analogue electronics and digital electronics in turn. Topics you'll cover include passive and active components, including op-amps, transistors, logic gates, flip-flops and registers. Circuits you'll study include amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, combinational and sequential logic and state machines. You'll spend much of your time doing practical work - underpinned by lectures - where you will build prototypes circuits, as well as designing and building Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs).

CMP-5027A

20

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module will train you to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment. In lectures and in the lab you will explore important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate, looking at nutrient cycles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students taking this module are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module makes a good combination with Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

Explore how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. Three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analysing water quality, provide an important practical component to this module. A good complement to other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and modules in development studies or geography, it can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry or other geochemical and hydrology modules. Students selecting this module must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5041A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

Study the organisation of system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of hardware and software components is emphasised throughout this module. Central concepts are reinforced by practical work in the laboratory. The architectures portion of the module focuses on the components of a processor, including the registers and data path, and you will explore concepts such as instruction fetch cycles, instruction decoding and memory addressing modes. The operating systems component focuses on how the system software manages the competing demands for the system hardware, including memory management and disc and processing scheduling.

CMP-5013A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news. Stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are among the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and processes in the atmosphere, from the Earth's surface to the stratosphere, and considers current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem-solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs, as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

We will explore how evolution and ecology shape animal behaviour, examining how important traits have evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles provide the theoretical framework, and we will explore key concepts of selfishness, altruism, conflict, survival, optimality, reproduction, parental care and death. Relevant research will be used to lead our understanding of the ultimate function of key traits. In parallel with the lectures, students design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, working in a group to collect original data in order to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module aims to develop your understanding of contemporary biochemistry, especially in relation to mammalian physiology and metabolism. There will be a particular focus on proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, bioenergetics and signalling processes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

This module will provide you with an opportunity to explore various aspects of biology in society. You will have an opportunity to discuss a number of examples - ranging from the scientific and ethical considerations of genetically modified (GM) crops, stem cell research, and designer babies, to the introduction of non-native species, and whether culling should be used a means of species control. You will critically analyse the way biological science issues are represented in popular literature and various media. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become scientific reality. Conversely, science fiction can often portray science inaccurately. During the module you will research relevant scientific literature, and fictional works, to consider both the scientific and ethical arguments for various developments, and to discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within examples of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

This module will equip you with an understanding of the principles and techniques used in contemporary biophysical chemistry. You will learn experimental techniques for measuring thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biological molecules. You will gain firm grounding in the physical principles describing those properties and their use to provide quantitative descriptions of those properties. Using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry you will explore three major themes; i) spectroscopic properties of biomolecules, ii) thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins and enzymes, and, iii) methods defining biomolecule size and mass. Through weekly seminars you will benefit from putting your knowledge into practice, communicating your ideas and growing your confidence in quantitative data analysis and problem solving. During laboratory-based practical work, you will develop your skills in sample preparation together with the collection and interpretation of spectroscopic data. Your participation in this module will give you the knowledge to appreciate how, and why, biophysical chemistry contributes to advances in medicine, sustainable energy solutions and healthy ageing.

CHE-5601Y

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is suggested that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B (Molecular Biology) or BIO-5009A (Genetics).

BIO-5005B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMBINATORICS AND FURTHER LINEAR ALGEBRA

Combinatorics is one of the most applicable and accessible part of mathematics, yet it is also full of challenging problems. We shall cover many basic combinatorial concepts including counting arguments (enumerative combinatorics) and Ramsey theory. Linear Algebra underpins much of modern mathematics and is the key to many applications. We will introduce bilinear forms and symmetric operators on vector spaces leading to the diagonalization of linear maps and the spectral theorem. This theorem is key to many applications in statistics and physics. Other topics covered will include polynomials of linear maps, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem and the Jordan normal form of a matrix.

MTHF5031Y

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces you to major concepts and definitions in community ecology, macro-ecology and biogeography. You will use these to explore how communities are structured in relation to local-scale to regional-scale processes, how they function and respond to perturbations at different scales, and result in emergent macro- to global-scale patterns of biodiversity distribution. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of theory and fundamental science to understanding the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, species exploitation, non-native species, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples you will draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

COMPLEX ANALYSIS

This module covers the standard basic theory of the complex plane. The areas covered in the first semester, (a), and the second semester, (b), are roughly the following: (a) Continuity, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables, differentiation, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations. (b) Topology of the complex plane, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5006Y

20

CONSERVATION, ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY IN THE TROPICS (FIELDCOURSE)

Conservation ecology and biodiversity are central areas of research in the biological sciences and they share many theories, concepts and scientific methods. This module intends to take a practical approach to the commonalities in these areas using a combination of seminar work and fieldwork. The seminars will develop ideas in sub-tropical and tropical biology: students will research issues affecting conservation of biodiversity in the tropics, considering the species ecology and the habitats, threats and challenges. There will be a significant component of small group work and directed, independent learning. The field component of this module will be a two week residential field trip to the tropics, one of two field sites (depending on numbers of students and availability).The field sites are run by expert field ecologists and during the two weeks we will explore the local environment, learn about the ecology of the landscape and about the species that inhabit the area. We will develop and run practical sessions on survey and census techniques, use of technology in modern field biology and the role of protected areas in species conservation. Students will conduct original research on the field trip, informed by prior research at UEA, to gain a deeper understanding of an aspect of tropical biology. There will be an assessed presentation on the field trip and many opportunities to develop the students own interests. All student participants will take an active role in the organisation and running of the module in order to gain project management and field logistics experience. Students will be responsible for the sourcing, storage and transport of field equipment on the way to the field site and of samples on the return to the UK. Students will gain experience of travelling to a remote area and of working through licensing and customs processes. At the end of the module a report is written on the field project in the style of a journal article addressing specific questions in ecology conservation or biodiversity. Throughout the module students will be expected to maintain a modern-media record of their project from the initial desk based work at UEA, through the field component to outcomes and reporting. NOTE: There will be a significant additional cost to this module to cover the costs of transportation and accommodation in the field. Costs will be detailed at an initial meeting for interested students and will be clearly advertised. 2018/19 costs were GBP1300 per student. Students will need to provide any visas required for entry into the host country, sturdy walking boots and appropriate field clothing. All attendees must ensure that all travel vaccinations etc are in order prior to departure.

BIO-5020K

20

CONSTRUCTING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES

How can human geographers help us understand and address pressing environmental and social problems? This is the central question of the module which affirms the distinctive value and relevance of work in contemporary human geography. Throughout you will explore a wide range of approaches to environmental and social problems in contemporary human geography. You'll gain a firm grounding in social constructivism which is underlying philosophy of these approaches. You'll also learn how to communicate insights from human geography to policy-makers and practitioners, and how to critically evaluate examples of human geographers' engagements with policy. You'll begin with the basics of social constructivism, learn why this approach is used by human geographers, and consider the value of this perspective. You'll then delve deeper, exploring the social construction of a different object or problem each week. Topics covered will include: nature, hazards, alternative economies, and social difference. By looking at what these human geography perspectives mean for real-world environmental and social problems you'll practice applying what you've learnt to current policy problems and learn about how human geographers are making a difference to these issues. You'll learn through a mixture of lectures, workshops and self-directed study and you'll be assessed through a written policy brief and reflective report (100%).

ENV-5038B

20

DATA SCIENCE FOR BIOLOGISTS

This module will teach students the tools they need to use computing and programming to handle biological data. As big data becomes more mainstream across all biological disciplines (from multi-omics to complex ecological datasets), biology students need to have skills in computer programming and data analysis. Here they will learn how to organise and store large data sets, run a data science project, and communicate their findings with visuals and clear insights. This module will be available to students in year 2 (Level 5), and will focus on providing students with the data handling tools to problem solve across a range of biological disciplines.

BIO-5023Y

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms and in the efficient implementation of a wide range of important data structures.

CMP-5014B

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA

This module builds on the mathematical fundamentals introduced in year 1 and covers both Differential Equations and Linear Algebra. You'll develop the pre-requisite mathematical skills for Actuarial Methods and Models, and Advanced Statistics. In Differential Equations you will develop skills for solving both Ordinary Differential Equations and Partial Differential Equations by a variety of techniques. For Ordinary Differential Equations the methods include series solutions and the method of Frobenius. Fourier series are introduced and utilised when solving Partial Differential Equations by separation of variables. In Linear Algebra you will develop skills in the algebra of matrices, including: Matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects.

MTHB5008A

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

This module is designed to develop good observational, descriptive and analytical skills and is particularly suitable for students with interest in Geology, Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic geological skills, together with some geophysical and physical geography skills that will be of use when carrying out independent projects. The module will include: (i) observing, describing and recording of characteristics of geological materials (minerals, soils, sediments, rocks and fossils) in the field, in hand specimen and under the microscope; (ii) measuring and recording of spatial and 3D structural data on maps, stereographic and rose diagram projections, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping, and (iii) an introduction to applied geophysical techniques. The module includes a week-long residential fieldwork component in the Easter vacation which has an added cost implication in the region of GBP300. There will be an alternative arrangement for students who for whatever reason are unable to undertake the residential fieldwork. There is a co-requisite or pre-requisite of 20 or more credits from the modules: Earth Surface Processes, Global Tectonics or Exploring the Earth's Subsurface. Students who have previously taken ENV-5030B Geology Skills, or ENV-5029B Geology Lab Skills cannot take this module. They will, however, have an opportunity to take part in the residential field course.

ENV-5030B

20

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES

This module draws upon on a range of scientific disciplines including geomorphology, sedimentology, soil science and eco-geomorphology. The module overviews a variety of Earth's surface environments and the processes that lead to expression in landforms, soil evolution, sediment accumulation and ultimately, the formation of sedimentary rocks. The environments covered include deep and marginal marine, intertidal, aeolian, glacial and fluvial. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding of erosion, transport, deposition, accumulation and burial and the evolution of soils. East Anglian case studies will be used to illustrate and explain eco-geomorphology and coastal processes, dovetailed with soil evolution. Geomorphological expression will be linked to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rock. There will be an introduction to the methods and different types of evidence used by geologists, physical geographers and other earth scientists.

ENV-5042A

20

ENERGY TRANSITIONS

This module examines the complexities of the transition to low carbon energy systems. It draws on a range of disciplines, theories and perspectives to critically examine many of the key challenges. It begins by exploring how we can understand energy systems and how they differ across space and time. The module draws on historical analyses to understand how energy systems have evolved in the past, as well as examining the different ways in which we can imagine the future of energy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the complexities of changing energy systems, enabling them to critically engage with debates around future "energy transitions", the role that innovation and emergent technologies might play, and the various challenges of shifting towards renewable based energy systems.

ENV-5022B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar slides and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This module investigates the principles of evolutionary biology, covering various sub-disciplines, i.e. adaptive evolution, population ecology, molecular and population genetics, speciation, biogeography, systematics, and finishing with an overview of Biodiversity. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the fundamentals of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works. Key topics and recent research will be used to highlight advances in the field and inspire thought. Weekly interactive workshops will explore a number of the conceptual issues in depth through discussions, modelling and problem solving. Although there are no pre-requisites in terms of specific modules, students will need a basic understanding of Evolution and Genetics to undertake this module.

BIO-5008B

20

EXPLORING THE EARTH'S SUBSURFACE

In this module you will learn about the processes that shape the Earth's shallow subsurface, and how to detect and map subsurface structures and resources. Physical properties of solid materials and subsurface fluids will be explored, including how fluid movement affects these properties. Methods to image the subsurface will be introduced using real datasets, collected by the class where possible. We will apply the theory to real-life problems including risk mitigation, engineering and resource exploration. This module will include fieldwork on campus where possible, specialist computer software, and some light mathematical analysis (trigonometry, rearranging linear equations, logarithms).

ENV-5004B

20

GENETICS

The aim is to provide you with an appreciation of genetics at a fundamental and molecular level and to demonstrate the importance and utility of genetic studies. Genetics and molecular biology lie at the heart of biological processes, ranging from cancer biology to evolution.

BIO-5009A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module focuses on developing practical skills to support independent use of spatial analysis and digital mapping in a Geographical Information System. It covers ways to obtain data, integrate it, undertake analysis to address research questions, and present the results. Weekly teaching will consist of both lecture material to cover underlying concepts, and a three-hour practical exercise focusing on a particular aspect of GIS data and/or analysis. At the time of writing this module description (May 2020) we cannot guarantee there will be continuous access to UEA's IT labs during the module - Government advice may mean that we must all work remotely, or that lab capacity is reduced due to social distancing. If working remotely it would be essential to have access to a Windows PC/laptop that can run ArcGIS Pro, or to very good (fast and reliable) broadband. Specifications for the software are available via Blackboard under UEA Software and Support (below your list of modules). Please contact the MO if you have any questions.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior exert a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system and have done so throughout geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GRAPHICS 1

This module will provide you with an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics. You will gain a strong foundation in computer graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. You need to have a good background in programming to take this module. OpenGL is used as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes.

CMP-5010B

20

HEAT, ATOMS AND SOLIDS

Exploring fundamental aspects of thermodynamics and condensed matter physics, you'll be introduced to ideas about the electronic structure based on the free-electron Sommerfeld and band theories, along with the concept of phonons and their contribution to the heat capacity of a solid. Also you'll consider the structure, bonding and properties of solids, in particular electronic conductivity and magnetism, as well as atomic structure and atomic spectroscopy, and Entropy in terms of a macroscopic Carnot cycle and the statistical approach. Two important distributions of particles will be treated; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac. Changes of state, 1st and 2nd order phase transitions and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation will be described.

PHY-5004Y

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

This module will provide you with an understanding of the themes and principles of physiology and a detailed knowledge of the major human organ systems. An understanding of how disease affects the ability of organ systems to maintain the status quo will be an important part of this course.

BIO-5004A

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

In this module you will learn about the development of the technologies which are the basis of search on the Web. Search engine development has been driven by large increases in online documents and the need to provide better results. You will learn about a range of techniques for improving search results and how to evaluate their impact.

CMP-5036A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

In this module, you'll study the structure, bonding and reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds. The module is a prerequisite for the 3rd level inorganic course, Inorganic Compounds: Structure and Functions. You'll cover the electronic structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes (ligand field theory), the chemistry of main group clusters, polymers and oligomers, the structures and re-activities of main group and transition metal organometallics, and the application of spectroscopic methods (primarily NMR, MS and IR) to inorganic compounds. You'll have laboratory classes linked to the lecture topics and so you will need to have completed either of the level 4 practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory (A) or Research Skills in Biochemistry.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

CHE-5501Y

20

INVISCID FLUID FLOW

This module introduces some of the fundamental physical concepts and mathematical theory needed to analyse the motion of a fluid, with the focus predominantly on inviscid, incompressible motions. You will examine methods for visualising flow fields, including the use of particle paths and streamlines. You will study the dynamical theory of fluid flow taking Newton's laws of motion as its point of departure, and the fundamental set of equations comprising conservation of mass and Euler's equations will be discussed. The reduction to Laplace's equation for irrotational flow will be demonstrated, and Bernoulli's equation is derived as a first integral of the equation of motion. Having established the basic theory, the way is set for a broader discussion of flow dynamics including everyday practical examples. Vector calculus will cover divergence, gradient, curl of vector field, the Laplacian, scalar potential and path-independence of line integral, surface integrals, divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. Computational fluid dynamics will also be studied.

MTHA5007Y

20

LINEAR REGRESSION USING R

This is a module designed to give you the opportunity to apply linear regression techniques using R. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect you to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to provide an introduction to R and then provide the specifics in linear regression.

CMP-5043B

10

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

Specialist materials dominate the modern world, and it is our ability as chemists to control their properties. Understanding and controlling material properties is the central theme of this module. In this module you will learn about two key classes of material: polymers and inorganic solids. You'll gain a firm grounding in the specialist methods used to characterise these materials. This will enable you to appreciate the unique properties of these materials, and how they can be controlled. In the practical element of the module, you'll gain skills in synthesising and characterising polymers and inorganic solids. In the polymers thread, you'll begin by gaining an appreciation of the role they play in society and why they are unique. You'll then encounter methods we can use to understand the properties of polymers, and how we can control them. You'll also explore the wide range of mechanisms that can be used to make organic polymers. In the thread focussed on inorganic materials, you'll explore the ionic model for inorganic solids, before gaining an appreciation of the synthesis and characterisation methods that allow access to these materials. You'll then explore the variety of properties that solids can exhibit, including semi conduction and magnetism. This lecture-based content is complemented by the practical component of the course, where you'll gain hands-on experience in both synthesis and characterisation.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Mathematical modelling is concerned with how to convert real problems, such as those arising in industry or other sciences, into mathematical equations, and then solving them and using the results to better understand, or make predictions about, the original problem. This topic will look at techniques of mathematical modelling, examining how mathematics can be applied to a variety of real problems and give insight in various areas. The topics will include approximation and non-dimensionalising, and discussion of how a mathematical model is created. We will then apply this theory to a variety of models such as traffic flow as well as examples of problems arising in industry. We will consider population modelling, chaos, and aerodynamics.

MTHF5032Y

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

This module introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module serves as a further introduction to general mathematics for scientists

MTHB5009A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods, partial differential equations and solid mechanics. There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. The module is taught by mathematicians with considerable expertise in the use of mathematics in the natural/environmental sciences and is largely designed to equip students with the tools necessary for advanced second and third level modules, particularly those in the physical sciences.

MTHB5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

Medicinal chemistry is a highly interdisciplinary area and this module is designed to introduce a variety of topics in the field of medicinal chemistry. Some of the topics that will be discussed in a series of lectures include, Molecular and biomolecular interactions, Biomolecules: Proteins and nucleic acids, Phases of drug action, Pharmacokinetics, Proteins and receptors as drug targets, DNA as a drug target and development of antitumor agents.

CHE-5150Y

20

MICROBIOLOGY

A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

You will be given a background to the fundamental principles of molecular biology, in particular the nature of the relationship between genetic information and the synthesis, and three dimensional structures, of macromolecules. You will also gain practical experience of some of the techniques used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material, and the necessary theoretical framework. The module also includes an introduction to bioinformatics, the computer-assisted analysis of DNA and protein sequence information.

BIO-5003B

20

NETWORKS

Explore how networks are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. You will take a layered approach to the study of networks, with emphasis on the functionality of the OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. You will examine the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to overall reliable data transmission that the network provides, with a focus on the practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information (e.g. VoIP) and network security. Labs and coursework are highly practical and underpin the theory learnt in lectures.

CMP-5037B

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This course builds on Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds (the first year organic chemistry course). You will cover four main topics. The first 'aromaticity' includes benzenoid and hetero-aromatic systems. The second major topic is the organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Spectroscopic characterisation of organic compounds is reviewed and the final major topic is 'stereochemistry and mechanisms'. This covers conformational aspects of acyclic and cyclic compounds. Stereoelectronic effects, Neighbouring Group Participation (NGP), Baldwin's rules, Cram's rule and cycloaddition reactions are then discussed.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy, the thermodynamics of solutions and chemical kinetics of complex reactions. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one Level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

The module studies the biochemical, physiological and developmental processes of plants.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) - never before has it been so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R-studio. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

PROGRAMMING 2

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and is a continuation of programming 1. It contains greater breadth and depth and provides students with the range of skills needed for many of their subsequent modules. We introduce C in order to improve your low level understanding of how programming works. We recap Java and deepen your understanding of the language by teaching topics such as nested classes, enumeration, generics, reflection, collections and threaded programming. We also cover C++ and introduce C# to highlight the similarities and differences between languages.

CMP-5015A

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

The purpose of this module is to give you a solid grounding in the essential features of programming. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

You'll cover the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

RENEWABLE ENERGY

This module builds on understanding in wind, tidal and hydroelectric power and introduces theories and principles relating to a variety of renewable energy technologies including solar energy, heat pumps and geothermal sources, fuel cells and the hydrogen economy, biomass energy and anaerobic digestion. You will consider how these various technologies can realistically contribute to the energy mix. You will study the various targets and legislative instruments that are used to control and encourage developments. Another key aspect of the module is the study and application of project management and financial project appraisal techniques in a renewable energy context.

ENG-5002B

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

The shallow shelf seas that surround the continents are the oceans that we most interact with. They contribute a disproportionate amount to global marine primary production and CO2 drawdown into the ocean, and are important economically through commercial fisheries, offshore oil and gas exploration, and renewable energy developments (e.g. offshore wind farms). You will explore the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal waters, their effect on biological, chemical and sedimentary processes, and how they can be harnessed to generate renewable energy. You will develop new skills during this module that will support careers in the offshore oil and gas industry, renewable energy industry, environmental consultancy, government laboratories (e.g. Cefas) and academia. The level of mathematical ability required to take this module is similar to Ocean Circulation and Meteorology I. You should be familiar with radians, rearranging equations and plotting functions.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS

Human geography and the environmental social sciences employ a range of approaches and methods with which to explore their diverse research questions. This module will introduce you to the practice of social science research, including methods that use quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (non-numerical) data. Through a combination of lectures, workshops, and practical activities, you will learn how to design and carry out your own research. By the end of the module you will know how to formulate an interesting research question; how to choose an appropriate method to investigate it; how to ensure that you collect good quality data; how to analyse and interpret your data; and how to present the results of your research. The module is recommended if you intend to use social research methods in your independent dissertation project. In addition to gaining practical research skills, you will develop your ability to critically evaluate research studies that use social science methods. As well as benefiting your academic studies, these analytical and practical research skills are highly valued in many occupational sectors.

ENV-5040A

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. You will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. You will be taught state of the art phased software development methodologies focusing on the activities of initial class model design to actual operational software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

TIME SERIES

This module considers both the theory and practice of statistical modelling of time series. Students will be expected to analyse real data using R.

CMP-5042B

10

TOPICS AND LABORATORY IN PHYSICS

This module explores physics as an empirical science through a series of laboratory experiments that probe key concepts and physical laws. The laboratory sessions will be underpinned by associated teaching surrounding the studied phenomena, and will complement topics addressed in other modules in the physics course.

PHY-5003Y

20

WEATHER

The weather affects everyone and influences decisions that are made continuously around the world. From designing and siting a wind farm to assessing flood risk and public safety, weather plays a vital role. Have you ever wondered what actually causes the weather we experience, for example why large storms are so frequent across north western Europe, especially in Winter? In this module you will learn the fundamentals of the science of meteorology. We will concentrate on the physical processes that underpin the radiation balance, thermodynamics, wind-flow, atmospheric stability, weather systems and the water cycle. We will link these to renewable energy and the weather we experience throughout the Semester. Assessment will be based entirely on a set of practical reports that you will submit, helping you to spread your work evenly through the semester. You will learn how Weather is a rich fusion of descriptive and numerical elements and you will be able to draw effectively on your own skill strengths while practising and developing others, guided by Weatherquest's Meteorologists.

ENV-5043A

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS

ENV-5009B

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Weather is one of the most popular topics of conversation. But how, specifically, does it present risks and opportunities, to people, organisations and to the wider environment? In this module you will develop a clear understanding of these linkages and an evidence base to draw on in future roles in which weather is a factor. You'll learn how to confidently source a diverse range of real-time weather information and you'll practice analysing such data, leading subsequently to successful interpretation and effective communication, both written and in front of the camera. You'll see, first hand, how meteorology depends upon computer systems for the efficient sharing, processing and visualisation of weather information. Being taught by weather practitioners with long experience of providing weather services to users, you will get the inside track on what it's like to work in weather. Weather Forecasting is one central theme and application which will provide a focus for learning. How are forecasts made and delivered, who uses forecasts and what are their distinctive needs? Success in forecasting depends in part on a good physical understanding of atmospheric processes - through practical work, we'll study those processes and use real examples of weather systems and events to reinforce the learning. At the end of the module, through an embedded week-long Easter residential fieldcourse, you'll apply your enhanced process understanding and forecasting knowledge in a hands-on way to design and implement meteorological field experiments, testing hypotheses through the collection and interpretation of field data collected using weather sensors. You'll write up your choice of fieldcourse experiment for assessment, after first receiving informal feedback on a related poster presentation.

ENV-5010K

20

Important Information

The University makes every effort to ensure that the information within its course finder is accurate and up-to-date. Occasionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, informing students and will also keep prospective students informed appropriately by updating our course information within our course finder.

In light of the current situation relating to Covid-19, we are in the process of reviewing all courses for 2020 entry with adjustments to course information being made where required to ensure the safety of students and staff, and to meet government guidance.

Further Reading

  • University Taster Events

    Come to one of our taster events and experience university life for yourself. Book now.

    Read it University Taster Events
  • OPENING IN SUMMER 2019

    Discover our new building for the next generation of Scientists and Engineers.

    Read it OPENING IN SUMMER 2019
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAA including two Science A-Levels from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT or AAB including two science A-levels from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT with an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 34 points including HL 6 in two Sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT
  • Scottish Highers AAAAA including two Sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB including two Sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H2 including two Sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT
  • Access Course Pass Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3 including 24 credits in two Science subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT
  • BTEC DDD in Applied Science, or Applied Science (Medical Science) is acceptable. Excludes BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services and BTEC Business Administration
  • European Baccalaureate Overall 82% including 85% in two Sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology or ICT

Entry Requirement

Science A-levels must include a pass in the practical element.

A-Level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade C/4 and GCSE Mathematics grade C/4 or above.

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes. 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS : 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)
  • We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme and an interview. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level AAA including two science subjects from list below or AAB with an A in the Extended Project. Science A-levels must include a pass in the practical element.
  • International Baccalaureate 34 points including two HL 6 science subject from list below.
  • Scottish Highers AAAAA including 2 Science subjects from the list below.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBB including 2 Science subjects from the list below.
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H2, including two science subjects from list below.
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at level 3, including 24 level 3 credits in two science subjects from the list below. Science pathway required.
  • BTEC DDD in Applied Science or Applied Science (Medical Science). Excludes BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services and BTEC Business Administration
  • European Baccalaureate 82% overall including 85% in two science subjects from list below.

Entry Requirement

English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C

A Level General Studies and Critical Thinking not accepted.

Two A-level (or equivalent) subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Further Mathematics, Environmental Science or Geography or Geology, and Information and Communication Technology.

Science A Levels must include a Pass in the Practical Element.

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree: 

 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements


 

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C/4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and Overseas applicants

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

Scholarships

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515