BSc Environmental Sciences and International Development

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The School of Environmental Sciences is one of the longest established, largest and most fully developed Schools of Environmental Sciences in Europe. Our holistic approach to teaching and research, integrating physical, chemical, biological, social and geotechnical sciences into the study of natural and human environments, is truly a modern philosophy for the new millennium.

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New Building for Science and Engineering - Due to open in July 2019. Take an animated tour of our new £31 million state-of-the-art teaching and learning building on the UEA campus.

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We have been awarded a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education for 50 years of ground-breaking environmental science at UEA. The royal accolade from the Queen is the UK’s most prestigious higher education award.

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Environmental Sciences has been ranked 4th in the UK, 11th in Europe and 40th in the World according to the QS World University Rankings 2018.

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Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere have reached a milestone at the British Antarctic Survey’s (BAS) Halley Research Station in Antarctica – according to UEA and BAS scientists.

Image: Tom Welsh, British Antarctic Survey

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View our video about Field Courses.

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Why are the problems of poverty, inequality and access to natural resources so intractable in some parts of the world? How do societies manage the trade-offs between environmental change and their own development needs? What are the root causes of injustice and inequity around the globe and how are they best addressed through good science, policy and action?

If these questions inspire you, then read on. This course is ideal for you if you have a science background and want to understand and explore different and better ways of using and sharing our planet’s natural resources.

Overview

Study the science of natural resources in the context of development in poorer societies across the world where resources are used unfairly, unjustly or unsustainably. Combining natural and social sciences, this three-year course is taught across the School of Environmental Sciences and the School of International Development. Your balance between the two subjects will depend on the modules you choose in your second and final years.

You will study alongside Environmental Sciences and International Development students, as well as students from Geography and other specialist degrees that share common interests.

Our intention in the third year and final year of this course is to offer you the opportunity to spend one semester overseas on the Development Work Placement module. This runs in the autumn semester of the final year. The availability of the opportunity will though be subject to government health advice at the time.

Course Structure

This three-year course will see you cultivate a wide range of skills and knowledge, whilst discovering how you can make a difference to our world. You will have the opportunity to build a degree that suits your interests, focusing your studies on one theme or constructing a more varied profile as you wish.

Year 1

In your first year you’ll study alongside students in the School of International Development to get an introduction to Development Studies and natural resources and development – focusing on principles and concepts. 

Your other modules (taken with Environmental Sciences students) will span the breadth of environmental sciences, from geoscience to ecology. You’ll also take modules to help you develop the research, field and quantitative skills you’ll need later in the course and in your career.

Year 2

In your second year you’ll take a module in natural resources and development and then choose five more modules selected from the Schools of Environmental Sciences and International Development.

Year 3

In your final year, you’ll carry out a substantial piece of independent project work that is equivalent to two modules. You’ll have the choice of a more natural science-based or development-based topic and plan the work with the help of a supervisor from the appropriate School for your topic. By your final year, you’ll probably have developed a theme for your degree – whether that’s conservation, climate change or international security in the context of international development.

Teaching and Learning

Teaching

You’ll take six modules per year with around 200 hours of learning effort for each module. You’ll spend about a third of this in formal classes with the rest divided between working on assignments and independent study.  

Independent study

You should expect to spend at least as long studying independently as attending formal classes. You will read around your module content to broaden your understanding and find contexts that spark your interest. In your third-year independent project you will self-direct your study with one-to-one support from staff.

Assessment

We’ll assess your work through a combination of coursework and end-of-year exams. In the second and third years, the mix depends entirely on your chosen modules.

Coursework is varied and, depending upon the module, it might involve essays, analytical reports, briefing papers, group projects, spoken presentations or seminars.

Study abroad or Placement Year

If government health advice at the time allows, you can choose to spend the first semester of your final year working with an overseas development project. You’ll have the freedom to find your own project with support from your lecturers. This is an ideal opportunity to collect data for your final-year independent project.

After the course

You’ll be well prepared to go on and work in national or international agencies, the private sector or government in development, environmental management, climate change, resource development or conservation of natural resources.

Career destinations

Examples of careers that you could enter include;

  • Education
  • Professional, scientific or technical work
  • Public administration and support services
  • Health and social work
  • Information and communication

Course related costs

You’ll need to make a contribution to the costs of any second or third year optional residential field course that you choose. The running of residential field courses will depend on government health advice at the time.

You will also need to pay for travel and usually living costs (depending on the host organisation) for the optional Development Work Placement module.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2020/1

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The module has an integrated biophysical core and deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

You will gain a range of transferable skills, tools and resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences and Geography. It aims to provide a broad understanding of the research process through activities that involve formulating research questions, collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, collating and evaluating information and presenting results. Lectures and practical classes will be taught during Semester 1, whilst a week-long residential field course applies field, lab and other skills to a variety of Environmental Science and Geography topics in Semester 2. Depending on the size of the cohort, students on selected degree programmes may be offered the option of an alternative field course arrangement.

ENV-4004Y

20

BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

This module focuses on exploring and understanding the evolving relationships between human development and the natural environment from ecological perspectives with some context from social sciences. The module is intended to give you a flavour of the issues, themes and considerations relating to biodiversity at different scales of biological organization, ecosystem services and sustainable development. The module (1) examines practical and theoretical considerations of sustainable development; (2) explores the options advanced for establishing a sustainable balance between human needs and those of natural systems and ecosystems; (3) investigates how the growing human enterprise and human resource use has affected biodiversity and the biosphere and (4) considers the scales of biodiversity loss, from the biosphere to biomes, ecosystems, ecological communities, populations, individuals, and genes. The module comprises 12 weeks of lectures and practicals. You will attend two lectures and one practical session in most weeks. The lectures introduce, review and critique particular concepts and perspectives. The practicals provide opportunities to examine in more detail some of the issues raised during the lectures, accompanied by practical exercises. Identical practical sessions will be run each week, on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. You will be notified in which group and on which day you are expected to take part in the practical. The beginning of the module revolves around sustainable development, the human footprint and examine sustainable development in relation to human resource use and ecosystem services. Lectures consider interactions between human societies and the composition and structure of natural (terrestrial, freshwater and marine) ecosystems, anthropocentric impacts on biomes, ecosystems, communities, populations, and the genetic diversity of individuals. They introduce some approaches and ideas fundamental to modern quantitative conservation ecology. The practicals will introduce ecological communities, there will be some elementary statistical analysis and if Government advice at the time allows, there will be a field trip to a nature reserve. The slides of the lectures will be posted every week on the Blackboard pages of this module. You can download or print them off for yourself as and when required. These are not a substitute for taking part in the lectures. For each lecture and practical, you will be pointed to additional readings to explore some of the issues raised in more depth. These are found on the module Talis reading list and reading lists at the end of each lecture. These will be useful for your assignments.

ENV-4006B

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. You will explore the energy, mechanics, and physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour - from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. You will study Plate Tectonics to explain Earth's physiographic features - such as mountain belts and volcanoes - and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. You will also explore geological time - the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet - and how geological maps can be used to understand Earth history. This course provides you with an introduction to geological materials - rocks, minerals and sediments - and to geological resources and natural hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

You will cover differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods as part of this module. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for those across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C. Recommended if you have grade A*-C at A-level Mathematics, or equivalent.

ENV-4015Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS I

We will explore how quantitative skills can solve a range of environmental and geographical problems. We will think critically about numbers in the media and learn how scientists use numbers. Our workshops will focus on the practical use of Maths through physical equations and mathematical models. Designed primarily for students who have no AS/A-Level Maths qualification (or equivalent), you will also receive statistical training, learning about summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers.

ENV-4013Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS II

Mathematical and statistical skills are key to all brands of Environmental Sciences and Geography. This module will strengthen these skills and will consolidate your Mathematics knowledge from GCSE level, introducing you to differentiation and integration. You'll learn to recognise the purpose of simple statistical methods, to choose the appropriate methods to test hypotheses and to summarise data using tables and graphs. You'll apply these quantitative skills to contemporary environmental and geographical problems, inspired by research in the School of Environmental Sciences. Assessment is through an online course test and an exam. This module will widen the range of Science modules that you can take during your studies in Geography and Environmental Sciences. Upon successful completion of the module, you'll have acquired skills in applying a range of mathematical and statistical methods to problems in Environmental Sciences and Geography.

ENV-4014Y

20

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

INDEPENDENT PROJECT - PROPOSAL

With guidance from a supervisor, you will choose a topic, design the research and collect, analyse and interpret data. You will report on progress at various stages: in the selection of a topic, the detailed plan, an interim report and an oral presentation. A final report in the form of a dissertation not exceeding 10,000 words is required. When planning the project and again after completing the report, you will reflect on the range of subject-specific and generic skills acquired through your degree and how you are reinforced and complemented by the skills acquired through your project. A final item of summative work assesses the clarity by which you communicate and evidence your range of skills in the form of a covering letter and cv for a potential job application. To further support the transition to employment, you can present a formative research poster that summarises the main aspects of the work to prospective employers.

ENV-6021B

0

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Under Options Range A at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester. Please note that if you would like to study an ENV or DEV module not listed below, please speak to the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module will train you to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment. In lectures and in the lab you will explore important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate, looking at nutrient cycles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students taking this module are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module makes a good combination with Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

Explore how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. Three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analysing water quality, provide an important practical component to this module. A good complement to other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and modules in development studies or geography, it can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry or other geochemical and hydrology modules. Students selecting this module must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5041A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

We will explore how evolution and ecology shape animal behaviour, examining how important traits have evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles provide the theoretical framework, and we will explore key concepts of selfishness, altruism, conflict, survival, optimality, reproduction, parental care and death. Relevant research will be used to lead our understanding of the ultimate function of key traits. In parallel with the lectures, students design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, working in a group to collect original data in order to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies.

DEV-5015A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces you to major concepts and definitions in community ecology, macro-ecology and biogeography. You will use these to explore how communities are structured in relation to local-scale to regional-scale processes, how they function and respond to perturbations at different scales, and result in emergent macro- to global-scale patterns of biodiversity distribution. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of theory and fundamental science to understanding the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, species exploitation, non-native species, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples you will draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES

This module draws upon on a range of scientific disciplines including geomorphology, sedimentology, soil science and eco-geomorphology. The module overviews a variety of Earth's surface environments and the processes that lead to expression in landforms, soil evolution, sediment accumulation and ultimately, the formation of sedimentary rocks. The environments covered include deep and marginal marine, intertidal, aeolian, glacial and fluvial. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding of erosion, transport, deposition, accumulation and burial and the evolution of soils. East Anglian case studies will be used to illustrate and explain eco-geomorphology and coastal processes, dovetailed with soil evolution. Geomorphological expression will be linked to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rock. There will be an introduction to the methods and different types of evidence used by geologists, physical geographers and other earth scientists.

ENV-5042A

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides you with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will begin by introducing you to some key policy themes in education and international development, and some established theories such as human capital, human development and capabilities, and theory on education as social reproduction. The module then goes into more depth with thematic content on themes such as early childhood development, conflict, gender and difference.

DEV-5003A

20

ENERGY TRANSITIONS

This module examines the complexities of the transition to low carbon energy systems. It draws on a range of disciplines, theories and perspectives to critically examine many of the key challenges. It begins by exploring how we can understand energy systems and how they differ across space and time. The module draws on historical analyses to understand how energy systems have evolved in the past, as well as examining the different ways in which we can imagine the future of energy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the complexities of changing energy systems, enabling them to critically engage with debates around future "energy transitions", the role that innovation and emergent technologies might play, and the various challenges of shifting towards renewable based energy systems.

ENV-5022B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar slides and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This interdisciplinary module will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduce and explain a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, and violence and religion.

DEV-5001A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module focuses on developing practical skills to support independent use of spatial analysis and digital mapping in a Geographical Information System. It covers ways to obtain data, integrate it, undertake analysis to address research questions, and present the results. Weekly teaching will consist of both lecture material to cover underlying concepts, and a three-hour practical exercise focusing on a particular aspect of GIS data and/or analysis. At the time of writing this module description (May 2020) we cannot guarantee there will be continuous access to UEA's IT labs during the module - Government advice may mean that we must all work remotely, or that lab capacity is reduced due to social distancing. If working remotely it would be essential to have access to a Windows PC/laptop that can run ArcGIS Pro, or to very good (fast and reliable) broadband. Specifications for the software are available via Blackboard under UEA Software and Support (below your list of modules). Please contact the MO if you have any questions.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior exert a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system and have done so throughout geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module serves as a further introduction to general mathematics for scientists

MTHB5009A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods, partial differential equations and solid mechanics. There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. The module is taught by mathematicians with considerable expertise in the use of mathematics in the natural/environmental sciences and is largely designed to equip students with the tools necessary for advanced second and third level modules, particularly those in the physical sciences.

MTHB5007B

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will prepare students for undertaking research within and beyond the university context i.e. both for the Dissertation and Field course modules and equipping students with key employability attributes for professional careers. In doing so, the module will introduce students to a range of qualitative, quantitative and spatial methods that human geographers use in research including research design, data collection and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will be taught using lecture-based classes and computer labs. The module is organised based on three research methods that use different approaches to data collection, analysis and presentation. The quantitative method focuses on building statistical skills to analyses secondary survey data as well as interpreting quantitative research findings. The GIS method focuses on data visualisation skills, mapping skills and basic GIS analysis. The qualitative method focuses on analysing and presenting qualitative data.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

In this module, you will focus on the governance of natural resources in the global South. In particular you will investigate some important and contested environment and development issues involving biodiversity conservation, agricultural technology and energy. These contests will include problems of human-wildlife conflict arising from protected areas, conflicts over genetically modified crops and debates about how to achieve food security. By focusing on these contested areas of policy and practice, you will gain insight into the challenges facing governance in the real world. Understanding of these challenges is supported by using different frameworks for analysing the underlying contexts, including an ecosystem services approach, political ecology and environmental justice.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module will develop your theoretical and empirical understanding of how social environments in different places affect people's health or ill-health. It is about the geographies of health. You will develop knowledge about how ill-health and health inequalities are linked to socio-economic inequalities, poverty and marginalisation. You will be able to apply this knowledge to questions of health policy and interventions designed to improve health. A key conceptual framework for this module is the social determinants of health (SDH). This includes analysis of the risk environment for ill-health, influenced by social structures (such as gender or class) in a particular setting, how people make a living, environmental change and the nature of health policy and the health services available to people. We are therefore also interested in the interventions which can help deal with risk environments, to make people less susceptible to disease and less vulnerable when they become ill. You will learn how some places have achieved good health. Case studies from different places and of different diseases are used to illustrate the social determinants of health, including infectious diseases (such as HIV, malaria, Ebola) and non-communicable diseases. The module is inter-disciplinary, drawing on theories and evidence from disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, public health and development studies, and to a lesser extent economics, demography and epidemiology. The module also provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill-health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised.

DEV-5011A

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) - never before has it been so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R-studio. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of International Development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students: #To understand quantitative analysis encountered in other modules #To become critical readers of published quantitative data analysis #To gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with research design, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and multiple regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In this module we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll learn the concepts and debates that are fundamental to social anthropology, and their relationships with development and change. The teaching methods on this module include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. Topics you'll cover include economic anthropology, ecological anthropology, personhood, embodiment, the anthropology of talk, identity and gender, cultural rights, technical change and the anthropology of development.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS

Human geography and the environmental social sciences employ a range of approaches and methods with which to explore their diverse research questions. This module will introduce you to the practice of social science research, including methods that use quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (non-numerical) data. Through a combination of lectures, workshops, and practical activities, you will learn how to design and carry out your own research. By the end of the module you will know how to formulate an interesting research question; how to choose an appropriate method to investigate it; how to ensure that you collect good quality data; how to analyse and interpret your data; and how to present the results of your research. The module is recommended if you intend to use social research methods in your independent dissertation project. In addition to gaining practical research skills, you will develop your ability to critically evaluate research studies that use social science methods. As well as benefiting your academic studies, these analytical and practical research skills are highly valued in many occupational sectors.

ENV-5040A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

Sub-Saharan Africa Development aims to provide students with a historical, political, social and economic analysis of key issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will develop a historically grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa's poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development students will develop understandings of the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5006B

20

WEATHER

The weather affects everyone and influences decisions that are made continuously around the world. From designing and siting a wind farm to assessing flood risk and public safety, weather plays a vital role. Have you ever wondered what actually causes the weather we experience, for example why large storms are so frequent across north western Europe, especially in Winter? In this module you will learn the fundamentals of the science of meteorology. We will concentrate on the physical processes that underpin the radiation balance, thermodynamics, wind-flow, atmospheric stability, weather systems and the water cycle. We will link these to renewable energy and the weather we experience throughout the Semester. Assessment will be based entirely on a set of practical reports that you will submit, helping you to spread your work evenly through the semester. You will learn how Weather is a rich fusion of descriptive and numerical elements and you will be able to draw effectively on your own skill strengths while practising and developing others, guided by Weatherquest's Meteorologists.

ENV-5043A

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS

ENV-5009B

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Weather is one of the most popular topics of conversation. But how, specifically, does it present risks and opportunities, to people, organisations and to the wider environment? In this module you will develop a clear understanding of these linkages and an evidence base to draw on in future roles in which weather is a factor. You'll learn how to confidently source a diverse range of real-time weather information and you'll practice analysing such data, leading subsequently to successful interpretation and effective communication, both written and in front of the camera. You'll see, first hand, how meteorology depends upon computer systems for the efficient sharing, processing and visualisation of weather information. Being taught by weather practitioners with long experience of providing weather services to users, you will get the inside track on what it's like to work in weather. Weather Forecasting is one central theme and application which will provide a focus for learning. How are forecasts made and delivered, who uses forecasts and what are their distinctive needs? Success in forecasting depends in part on a good physical understanding of atmospheric processes - through practical work, we'll study those processes and use real examples of weather systems and events to reinforce the learning. At the end of the module, through an embedded week-long Easter residential fieldcourse, you'll apply your enhanced process understanding and forecasting knowledge in a hands-on way to design and implement meteorological field experiments, testing hypotheses through the collection and interpretation of field data collected using weather sensors. You'll write up your choice of fieldcourse experiment for assessment, after first receiving informal feedback on a related poster presentation.

ENV-5010K

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students with the required pre-requisites may select a maximum of 20 credits from modules below: In Year 2, at least 20 credits taken must be modules beginning DEV and at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester.

Name Code Credits

ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY FOR SECOND YEARS

How can we avoid environmental catastrophe? How can philosophy help? The relationship between human beings and the natural world is the basis of everything we are and yet we do not seem to have found a way to avoid destruction, degradation and potential catastrophe. In this module we will examine various ways in which philosophy can examine our relationship with the natural world and contribute to the fight to protect the planet. Topics may include the ethics of climate change; value theory and nature; human-animal relationships; the ways science, art and politics affect our relationships with the natural world. This module will cover a selection of these topics, and students may wish to continue the course by taking the complementary Level 6 module in their third year.

PPLP5177B

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

What does the world look like to a Marxist, or a liberal, or a feminist, or a realist? We all hold particular ideas about how the world works: about why certain events happen, who the key actors in the international system are, and whether it is even possible to change things for future generations. Theories of International Relations (IR) attempt to capture these assumptions, explaining the world in different ways to others. You will explore how the discipline of IR emerged in the early 20th century, before investigating the very different theories which have shaped, and sometimes dominated, academic and policy makers' ideas about how the world actually works.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today's world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violence's, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

PPLI5056B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course. This module is designed for students with no prior or very limited knowledge of German.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, the dissertation is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography and International Development students.

DEV-6007Y

40

DISSERTATION (SPRING SUBMISSION)

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, the dissertation is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography and International Development students.

DEV-6018B

40

DISSERTATION (WINTER SUBMISSION)

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, the dissertation is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography and International Development students.

DEV-6017A

40

INDEPENDENT PROJECT

With guidance from a supervisor, you will choose a topic, design the research and collect, analyse and interpret data. You will report on progress at various stages: in the selection of a topic, the detailed plan, an interim report and an oral presentation. A final report in the form of a dissertation not exceeding 10,000 words is required. When planning the project and again after completing the report, you will reflect on the range of subject-specific and generic skills acquired through your degree and how these are reinforced and complemented by skills acquired through your project. A final item of summative work assesses the clarity by which you communicate and evidences your range of skills in the form of a covering letter and CV for a potential job application. To further support the transition to employment you can present a formative research poster that summarises the main aspects of the work to prospective employers.

ENV-6021Y

40

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

At least 20 credits selected under Options Range A must be modules beginning DEV-6* and at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV-6*. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester. Please note that if you would like to study an ENV or DEV module not listed below, please speak to the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

The global biodiversity crisis threatens mass species loss. What are the implications for society? How can communities solve this problem in a world that is facing other challenges of climate change, food security, environmental and social justice? In this inter-disciplinary module, (designed for students of Geography, Environmental Science, Ecology and International Development who have an interest in biodiversity and its conservation), you will focus on the interactions between biodiversity and human societies. The module adopts a rigorous evidence-based approach. You will first critically examine the human drivers of biodiversity loss and the importance of biodiversity to human society, to understand how underlying perspectives and motivations influence approaches to conservation. You will then examine conflicts between human society and conservation and how these potentially can be resolved, reviewing institutions and potential instruments for biodiversity conservation in both Europe and developing countries. Coursework is inter-disciplinary and will require you to evaluate and communicate the quality of evidence showing effectiveness of conservation interventions and approaches.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

Explore the evolution, biodiversity and ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. You will study ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid-ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems in detail and predict the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and a voluntary employability visit to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) in Lowestoft. You will be expected to have some background in biology, e.g. have taken a biology, ecology or biogeochemistry based second year module in order to study this module.

ENV-6005A

20

LAND AND WATER PROCESSES AND MANAGEMENT

In this module, you will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins. You will address the fundamental requirement for an interdisciplinary catchment-based approach to managing and protecting water resources that includes an understanding of land use and its management. The module content includes the design of catchment monitoring programmes, nutrient mass balance calculations, river restoration techniques, an overview of UK and European agri-environmental policy and approaches to assessing and mitigating catchment flooding.

ENV-6018B

20

CLIMATE SYSTEMS

What sets the mean global temperature of the world? Why are some parts of the world arid whilst others at the same latitudes are humid? This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the processes that determine why the Earth's climate (defined, for example, by temperature and moisture distribution) looks like it does, what the major circulation patterns and climate zones are and how they arise. You will study why the climate changes in time over different timescales, and how we use this knowledge to understand the climate systems of other planets. This module is aimed at you if you wish to further your knowledge of climate, or want a base for any future study of climate change, such as the Meteorology/Oceanography.

ENV-6025B

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION is a hands-on module that uses recent research and practical experience to analyse the challenges for more just development and conservation policies in the developing world. You will be examining themes such as the relationship between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control in the use of natural resources through an environmental justice lens, bringing together theory and the use of case studies, in order to learn how people across the world are trying to put in to practice different types of just transformations for sustainability. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as; African pastoralism, savannah-forest mosaics, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, indigenous territories, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module offers you the opportunity to explore how development ideas and aims are reflected in contemporary and emerging development practice. The module content is geared towards giving you tools with which to approach working in development, exploring the process of defining and developing development projects. We explore the history of different approaches to aid enterprises, and how they have been shaped by different geo-political and ideological forces. You will learn the difference between a log frame and a theory of change, how to create both, and how they may be useful to defining your endeavours. You will work in a team to develop your own project, with a justification of the need, an evidence-based approach and a strong analysis of the social and political context in which it is going to operate. This will also need a communications strategy and a fully costed budget, all of which you will be supported to learn how to do. However we will also encourage you to think critically about these processes, looking at how these tools have been developed and why, and being aware of their limitations and benefits.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module will provide you with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. You are expected to fund your own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The School has a database of projects to assist you with your project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). You are expected to work for a minimum of two months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing about the placement, and an essay related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

Modern everyday life rests fundamentally on the availability of energy. Since the 1970s, however, serious concerns have been raised about the sustainability of current energy systems. Traditionally, these problems have been analysed (and solutions proposed) from within the engineering and physical sciences. Understanding, managing and attempting to solve energy problems, however, demands a thorough appreciation of how people, at a range of scales, engage with energy in the course of their daily lives. This is a critical challenge for the social sciences, and will be the core focus of this module. Through this module, you will discover and explore a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. You will learn how to apply these ideas to contemporary energy problems and use them to generate your own visions for a sustainable energy future. You'll also be given the chance to work as part of a team and to communicate your ideas through both written and oral presentation. You'll begin by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. You'll then go into more depth around different theories of social and technical change before exploring how these can be used to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems that are currently being tried and tested around the world. You'll learn through a combination of lectures and seminars involving interactive group projects, class debates, practical exercises and student-led learning. At the end of the module, you will have developed the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to allow you to apply theories of social and technical change to a range of real-world energy problems. You'll be able to develop and critically analyse your own (and already existing) visions of a sustainable energy future, and you'll be able to creatively communicate these ideas to a range of different audiences.

ENV-6026B

20

FOSSIL FUELS

You will be introduced to geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity on society. Some knowledge of Earth science and basic Chemistry will be expected.

ENV-6009A

20

GEOPHYSICAL HAZARDS

Geophysical hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis and landslides have significant environmental and societal impacts. This module focuses on the physical basis and analysis of each hazard, their global range of occurrence, probability of occurrence and their local and global impact. You will address matters such as hazard monitoring, modelling and assessment, and consider approaches towards risk mitigation and the reduction of vulnerability (individual and societal), with an emphasis on their practical implementation. Scenarios and probabilities of mega-disasters are also investigated. All the teaching faculty involved have practical experience of supplying professional advice on these hazards (and related risks) in addition to their own research involvement. A basic knowledge of physical science and of mathematics is assumed e.g. use of logs, exponentials, powers, cosines, rearrangement of equations.

ENV-6001B

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: GREECE

This module alternates with Geosciences field courses to other destinations. In 2020/21 this module runs (field course to Greece). In 2019/20 and 2021/22 the Geosciences destination is to southern Spain. During this field course you will develop a deeper understanding and integration of geoscience subjects: the fieldwork will develop your applied skills such as aspects of structural geology, regional tectonics, sedimentology, palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments, and volcanology. There are two field bases in the Aegean (Greece), a) the Gulf of Corinth active rift (6 days plus a day off), and b) Santorini volcano (4 days) plus 3 travel days.

ENV-6022K

20

MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT

This module will address different forms of migration (e.g. internal, international, circular, return, seasonal, irregular) and reasons why people migrate (e.g. economic, political, social and environmental), and will critically explore the different ways in which these are related to development and change in societies of origin and destination. We will start by exploring migration from a historical perspective, and addressing different theoretical approaches with a multidisciplinary angle (including different methods of researching migration - both quantitative and qualitative), as well as regional differences and heterogeneity in migration trends and patterns across the globe. We will then look at key issues in migration studies including: types of migrants; networks and community organisations that link home and host societies; migrants' integration into the host society; the impact of climate change on people's movement; policies, citizenship and human rights; and the refugee crisis. Within these topics, we will also discuss inequalities across population subgroups (e.g. by age, gender, education and ethnicity) in terms of migration opportunities, access, networks and integration. These topics will be discussed through the analysis of case studies in various parts of the world and the participation of local community practitioners or migrants themselves in one or more seminar sessions. The module will also include one visit to a local museum to learn about the long and complex history of migration to Norfolk from the museum curators. With this comprehensive approach to migration this module will move beyond a narrow and casual view of the relationship between migration and development, and contribute to understanding the myriad ways in which global forces influence people's movements, and how these movements, in turn, have historically been transforming societies and communities.

DEV-6014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Environmental economics provides a set of tools and principles which can be useful in understanding natural resource management issues. This module introduces you to key principles and tools of environmental economics for students who have not studied the subject previously. It then explores how these principles can be applied to address a number of complex economy-environment problems including climate change, over-fishing and water resources management. In this module you will have the opportunity to practically apply cost-benefit analysis as a framework for decision-making and will gain knowledge on the key non-market valuation techniques that are used to monetarily value environmental goods and services. At the end of the module you will have gained insights into how environmental economics is used in developing natural resource management policy as well as some of the challenges in using environmental economics in policy-making.

ENV-6012B

20

NEW GEOGRAPHIES OF THE ANTHROPOCENE

The onset of the Anthropocene, a geological epoch defined by the human shaping of planet Earth, is seeing people starting to fundamentally rethink the human place in nature. What does this mean for the study of human geography? In this module you'll explore the debate over the onset of the Anthropocene, and the unique contribution that human geographers can make to it. You'll gain a firm grasp on how the idea of the Anthropocene is re-shaping geographical thought, and will encounter concepts and methods from across the field of human geography which can help us to think in new ways about the past, present and future of human-environment relationships. You'll also learn new skills in communicating geographical ideas and theories by written, oral and visual means. You'll begin with an introduction to the Anthropocene debate and to the different kinds of evidence that are drawn upon to define the character of this new age. You'll then range across the discipline, taking on-board ideas and insights from historical, political, social and cultural geography on the complex roots, meanings and politics of environmental change. Through a mixture of lectures, seminars, field classes and self-directed study, you'll explore what it means to be a geographer in a rapidly changing world. You'll develop a new appreciation of the processes shaping our environmental present, as well as the critical capacities needed to help shape our environmental future. Lectures cover topics such as Geopolitics as if the Earth Mattered, Cities in the Anthropocene, and Conservation at the end of Nature. As you study you'll put your new knowledge into practice, gaining experience in communicating your ideas in tutorials, group discussions, presentations and written work.

ENV-6032A

20

PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY

This module examines the geological evidence for climatic change through the Quaternary Period (the last 2.6 million years) and the longer-term evolution of climate through the Cenozoic Era (the last 65 million years). You will explore the interpretation and causal mechanisms behind these major global environmental changes using a diverse range of approaches - isotope geochemistry, sedimentology, palaeoecology and organic geochemistry. We will focus on the geochemical, biological and sedimentological information that can be obtained from marine sediments, ice cores, and terrestrial environments and use these records to reconstruct the timing extent and magnitude of selected climatic events in the geological record.

ENV-6017B

20

POLITICS, POLICY AND PRACTICE

This module builds upon key themes in the politics of development that recur throughout the politics-related modules in DEV: distributions of power and resources, geographies of poverty and inequality, and dynamics of social and political change. The module mixes lectures with student led sessions that are intended to provide space for students to draw out their experiences of development in practice, and to think through concrete strategies for making human society a little less unequal, violent, and destructive. Students are encouraged to approach 'development' as a 'relational whole', and to think critically about the complex and often contradictory nature of change. The module culminates in a workshop in which groups of students will present strategies for fostering more equitable processes of social change.

DEV-6011B

20

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FIELD COURSE TO SPAIN

This module seeks to promote a deeper understanding of the interactions between the natural environment and human society through field-based teaching and project work in Almeria, southern Spain. The region provides classic examples of landform evolution and arid environments, as well as experiencing major socio-economic changes in recent decades. Field activities will focus on such issues as agriculture, water resources, renewable energy and adaptation to climate change. Methods for evaluating the sustainability of developments will be examined. The module is assessed by an individual evidence report and public communication item. You will need to contribute 50% of the field course costs (the remainder is paid by the School). In addition, the field course will run only if a minimum number of 21 students enrol and commit to paying the student contribution. If interest exceeds the maximum number that the field centre can accommodate then priority will be given to students according to the number of possible prerequisite modules they have taken.

ENV-6030K

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is therefore challenging. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction', as well as how to deal with climate denialists.

ENV-6008A

20

URBAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module will examine the historical and contemporary development and governance of urban centres around the globe. In order to understand these processes, we will explore both the structure of human settlements and the multiple relationships and processes that shape and reshape urban spaces. We will examine the changing environmental, political, social, and economic dynamics of cities and smaller urban centres, drawing on case studies from the global north and the global south. The module will cover a range of concepts and topics which have preoccupied urban geographers, including but not limited to: urbanisation and urban growth patterns; urban economic restructuring and neoliberalism; urban infrastructure; poverty and inequality; informality; migration; citizenship; urban nature; and race and sexuality in the city. A one-day field trip focusing on urban planning and regeneration is an integral part of the module.

DEV-6010B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgement that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars and Humanitarian Crises is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war, the humanitarian implications of civil wars, the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action, terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts and strategies and challenges of peace-building.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ACTIVIST CAMPAIGNING

How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of this module will be the experience of a "live" campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a "reverse internship." As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.

PPLM6079B

20

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module provides up-to-date learning in evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module examines how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society. The module covers 5 areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine; (v) case studies in ancient DNA and human evolution.

BIO-6017A

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

You will gain an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public and explore the theories surrounding learning and communication. You will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Examining case studies in a variety of different scientific areas, alongside looking at how information is released in scientific literature and subsequently picked up by the public press, will give you an understanding of science communication. You will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. You will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. If you wish to take this module you will be required to write a statement of selection. These statements will be assessed and students will be allocated to the module accordingly.

BIO-6018Y

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students may take 0-20 credits of Level 5 modules in Year 3.

Name Code Credits

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module will train you to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment. In lectures and in the lab you will explore important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate, looking at nutrient cycles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students taking this module are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module makes a good combination with Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

Explore how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. Three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analysing water quality, provide an important practical component to this module. A good complement to other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and modules in development studies or geography, it can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry or other geochemical and hydrology modules. Students selecting this module must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data.

ENV-5041A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course. This module is designed for students with no prior or very limited knowledge of German.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

We will explore how evolution and ecology shape animal behaviour, examining how important traits have evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles provide the theoretical framework, and we will explore key concepts of selfishness, altruism, conflict, survival, optimality, reproduction, parental care and death. Relevant research will be used to lead our understanding of the ultimate function of key traits. In parallel with the lectures, students design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, working in a group to collect original data in order to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies.

DEV-5015A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces you to major concepts and definitions in community ecology, macro-ecology and biogeography. You will use these to explore how communities are structured in relation to local-scale to regional-scale processes, how they function and respond to perturbations at different scales, and result in emergent macro- to global-scale patterns of biodiversity distribution. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of theory and fundamental science to understanding the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, species exploitation, non-native species, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples you will draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

CONSTRUCTING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES

How can human geographers help us understand and address pressing environmental and social problems? This is the central question of the module which affirms the distinctive value and relevance of work in contemporary human geography. Throughout you will explore a wide range of approaches to environmental and social problems in contemporary human geography. You'll gain a firm grounding in social constructivism which is underlying philosophy of these approaches. You'll also learn how to communicate insights from human geography to policy-makers and practitioners, and how to critically evaluate examples of human geographers' engagements with policy. You'll begin with the basics of social constructivism, learn why this approach is used by human geographers, and consider the value of this perspective. You'll then delve deeper, exploring the social construction of a different object or problem each week. Topics covered will include: nature, hazards, alternative economies, and social difference. By looking at what these human geography perspectives mean for real-world environmental and social problems you'll practice applying what you've learnt to current policy problems and learn about how human geographers are making a difference to these issues. You'll learn through a mixture of lectures, workshops and self-directed study and you'll be assessed through a written policy brief and reflective report (100%).

ENV-5038B

20

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES

This module draws upon on a range of scientific disciplines including geomorphology, sedimentology, soil science and eco-geomorphology. The module overviews a variety of Earth's surface environments and the processes that lead to expression in landforms, soil evolution, sediment accumulation and ultimately, the formation of sedimentary rocks. The environments covered include deep and marginal marine, intertidal, aeolian, glacial and fluvial. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding of erosion, transport, deposition, accumulation and burial and the evolution of soils. East Anglian case studies will be used to illustrate and explain eco-geomorphology and coastal processes, dovetailed with soil evolution. Geomorphological expression will be linked to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rock. There will be an introduction to the methods and different types of evidence used by geologists, physical geographers and other earth scientists.

ENV-5042A

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides you with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will begin by introducing you to some key policy themes in education and international development, and some established theories such as human capital, human development and capabilities, and theory on education as social reproduction. The module then goes into more depth with thematic content on themes such as early childhood development, conflict, gender and difference.

DEV-5003A

20

ENERGY TRANSITIONS

This module examines the complexities of the transition to low carbon energy systems. It draws on a range of disciplines, theories and perspectives to critically examine many of the key challenges. It begins by exploring how we can understand energy systems and how they differ across space and time. The module draws on historical analyses to understand how energy systems have evolved in the past, as well as examining the different ways in which we can imagine the future of energy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the complexities of changing energy systems, enabling them to critically engage with debates around future "energy transitions", the role that innovation and emergent technologies might play, and the various challenges of shifting towards renewable based energy systems.

ENV-5022B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY FOR SECOND YEARS

How can we avoid environmental catastrophe? How can philosophy help? The relationship between human beings and the natural world is the basis of everything we are and yet we do not seem to have found a way to avoid destruction, degradation and potential catastrophe. In this module we will examine various ways in which philosophy can examine our relationship with the natural world and contribute to the fight to protect the planet. Topics may include the ethics of climate change; value theory and nature; human-animal relationships; the ways science, art and politics affect our relationships with the natural world. This module will cover a selection of these topics, and students may wish to continue the course by taking the complementary Level 6 module in their third year.

PPLP5177B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar slides and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This interdisciplinary module will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduce and explain a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analysis. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, and violence and religion.

DEV-5001A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module focuses on developing practical skills to support independent use of spatial analysis and digital mapping in a Geographical Information System. It covers ways to obtain data, integrate it, undertake analysis to address research questions, and present the results. Weekly teaching will consist of both lecture material to cover underlying concepts, and a three-hour practical exercise focusing on a particular aspect of GIS data and/or analysis. At the time of writing this module description (May 2020) we cannot guarantee there will be continuous access to UEA's IT labs during the module - Government advice may mean that we must all work remotely, or that lab capacity is reduced due to social distancing. If working remotely it would be essential to have access to a Windows PC/laptop that can run ArcGIS Pro, or to very good (fast and reliable) broadband. Specifications for the software are available via Blackboard under UEA Software and Support (below your list of modules). Please contact the MO if you have any questions.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior exert a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system and have done so throughout geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

What does the world look like to a Marxist, or a liberal, or a feminist, or a realist? We all hold particular ideas about how the world works: about why certain events happen, who the key actors in the international system are, and whether it is even possible to change things for future generations. Theories of International Relations (IR) attempt to capture these assumptions, explaining the world in different ways to others. You will explore how the discipline of IR emerged in the early 20th century, before investigating the very different theories which have shaped, and sometimes dominated, academic and policy makers' ideas about how the world actually works.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today's world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violence's, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

PPLI5056B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module serves as a further introduction to general mathematics for scientists

MTHB5009A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

This module is the third in a series of three mathematical units for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers matrix algebra and numerical methods, partial differential equations and solid mechanics. There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples, and the use of numerical computing software (Matlab) is extended with a dedicated programming component. The module is taught by mathematicians with considerable expertise in the use of mathematics in the natural/environmental sciences and is largely designed to equip students with the tools necessary for advanced second and third level modules, particularly those in the physical sciences.

MTHB5007B

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will prepare students for undertaking research within and beyond the university context i.e. both for the Dissertation and Field course modules and equipping students with key employability attributes for professional careers. In doing so, the module will introduce students to a range of qualitative, quantitative and spatial methods that human geographers use in research including research design, data collection and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will be taught using lecture-based classes and computer labs. The module is organised based on three research methods that use different approaches to data collection, analysis and presentation. The quantitative method focuses on building statistical skills to analyses secondary survey data as well as interpreting quantitative research findings. The GIS method focuses on data visualisation skills, mapping skills and basic GIS analysis. The qualitative method focuses on analysing and presenting qualitative data.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

In this module, you will focus on the governance of natural resources in the global South. In particular you will investigate some important and contested environment and development issues involving biodiversity conservation, agricultural technology and energy. These contests will include problems of human-wildlife conflict arising from protected areas, conflicts over genetically modified crops and debates about how to achieve food security. By focusing on these contested areas of policy and practice, you will gain insight into the challenges facing governance in the real world. Understanding of these challenges is supported by using different frameworks for analysing the underlying contexts, including an ecosystem services approach, political ecology and environmental justice.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module will develop your theoretical and empirical understanding of how social environments in different places affect people's health or ill-health. It is about the geographies of health. You will develop knowledge about how ill-health and health inequalities are linked to socio-economic inequalities, poverty and marginalisation. You will be able to apply this knowledge to questions of health policy and interventions designed to improve health. A key conceptual framework for this module is the social determinants of health (SDH). This includes analysis of the risk environment for ill-health, influenced by social structures (such as gender or class) in a particular setting, how people make a living, environmental change and the nature of health policy and the health services available to people. We are therefore also interested in the interventions which can help deal with risk environments, to make people less susceptible to disease and less vulnerable when they become ill. You will learn how some places have achieved good health. Case studies from different places and of different diseases are used to illustrate the social determinants of health, including infectious diseases (such as HIV, malaria, Ebola) and non-communicable diseases. The module is inter-disciplinary, drawing on theories and evidence from disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, public health and development studies, and to a lesser extent economics, demography and epidemiology. The module also provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill-health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised.

DEV-5011A

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

The module studies the biochemical, physiological and developmental processes of plants.

BIO-5006A

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) - never before has it been so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R-studio. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of International Development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students: #To understand quantitative analysis encountered in other modules #To become critical readers of published quantitative data analysis #To gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with research design, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and multiple regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In this module we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll learn the concepts and debates that are fundamental to social anthropology, and their relationships with development and change. The teaching methods on this module include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. Topics you'll cover include economic anthropology, ecological anthropology, personhood, embodiment, the anthropology of talk, identity and gender, cultural rights, technical change and the anthropology of development.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS

Human geography and the environmental social sciences employ a range of approaches and methods with which to explore their diverse research questions. This module will introduce you to the practice of social science research, including methods that use quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (non-numerical) data. Through a combination of lectures, workshops, and practical activities, you will learn how to design and carry out your own research. By the end of the module you will know how to formulate an interesting research question; how to choose an appropriate method to investigate it; how to ensure that you collect good quality data; how to analyse and interpret your data; and how to present the results of your research. The module is recommended if you intend to use social research methods in your independent dissertation project. In addition to gaining practical research skills, you will develop your ability to critically evaluate research studies that use social science methods. As well as benefiting your academic studies, these analytical and practical research skills are highly valued in many occupational sectors.

ENV-5040A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

Sub-Saharan Africa Development aims to provide students with a historical, political, social and economic analysis of key issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will develop a historically grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa's poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development students will develop understandings of the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5006B

20

WEATHER

The weather affects everyone and influences decisions that are made continuously around the world. From designing and siting a wind farm to assessing flood risk and public safety, weather plays a vital role. Have you ever wondered what actually causes the weather we experience, for example why large storms are so frequent across north western Europe, especially in Winter? In this module you will learn the fundamentals of the science of meteorology. We will concentrate on the physical processes that underpin the radiation balance, thermodynamics, wind-flow, atmospheric stability, weather systems and the water cycle. We will link these to renewable energy and the weather we experience throughout the Semester. Assessment will be based entirely on a set of practical reports that you will submit, helping you to spread your work evenly through the semester. You will learn how Weather is a rich fusion of descriptive and numerical elements and you will be able to draw effectively on your own skill strengths while practising and developing others, guided by Weatherquest's Meteorologists.

ENV-5043A

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS

ENV-5009B

20

WEATHER APPLICATIONS WITH FIELDCOURSE

Weather is one of the most popular topics of conversation. But how, specifically, does it present risks and opportunities, to people, organisations and to the wider environment? In this module you will develop a clear understanding of these linkages and an evidence base to draw on in future roles in which weather is a factor. You'll learn how to confidently source a diverse range of real-time weather information and you'll practice analysing such data, leading subsequently to successful interpretation and effective communication, both written and in front of the camera. You'll see, first hand, how meteorology depends upon computer systems for the efficient sharing, processing and visualisation of weather information. Being taught by weather practitioners with long experience of providing weather services to users, you will get the inside track on what it's like to work in weather. Weather Forecasting is one central theme and application which will provide a focus for learning. How are forecasts made and delivered, who uses forecasts and what are their distinctive needs? Success in forecasting depends in part on a good physical understanding of atmospheric processes - through practical work, we'll study those processes and use real examples of weather systems and events to reinforce the learning. At the end of the module, through an embedded week-long Easter residential fieldcourse, you'll apply your enhanced process understanding and forecasting knowledge in a hands-on way to design and implement meteorological field experiments, testing hypotheses through the collection and interpretation of field data collected using weather sensors. You'll write up your choice of fieldcourse experiment for assessment, after first receiving informal feedback on a related poster presentation.

ENV-5010K

20

Important Information

The University makes every effort to ensure that the information within its course finder is accurate and up-to-date. Occasionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, informing students and will also keep prospective students informed appropriately by updating our course information within our course finder.

In light of the current situation relating to Covid-19, we are in the process of reviewing all courses for 2020 entry with adjustments to course information being made where required to ensure the safety of students and staff, and to meet government guidance.

Further Reading

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  • TOP 12 FACTS ABOUT THE SCHOOL

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  • UEA Award

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    Read it Hear from our students

Entry Requirements

  • A Level BBB or ABC including one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics or BBC including one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics with an A in the Extended Project. Science A-Levels must include a Pass in the practical element
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points including HL5 in either Geography, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry or Physics
  • Scottish Highers AABBB including one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC including one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 2 subjects at H2 and 4 subjects at H3 including one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3 including 12 credits in either Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics
  • BTEC DDM in Applied Science, Applied Science (Medical Science), Environmental Sustainability or Countryside Management
  • European Baccalaureate 70% overall including 70% in one from Geography, Geology, Maths, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics

Entry Requirement

 

A-Level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Engineering

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Health and Life Sciences

International Foundation in Mathematics and Actuarial Sciences

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Pre-sessional English at INTO UEA

English for University Study at INTO UEA

 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time. 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application. 

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year. 

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition, some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. 

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants. 
  • A Level BBB or ABC or BBC with an A in the Extended Project, including one from Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics. Science A-Levels must include a pass in the practical element.
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points including Higher Level 5 in either Geography, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry or Physics.
  • Scottish Highers AABBB including one from Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC including one from Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics.
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3 including one from Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics.
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3 including 12 credits in either Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics.
  • BTEC DDM in Applied Science, Applied Science (Medical Science), Environmental Sustainability or Countryside Management. Excludes BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services, BTEC Business Administration and BTEC Forensic Science.
  • European Baccalaureate 70% overall, including 70% in one from Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Economics, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics.

Entry Requirement

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.  

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes:

Environmental Sciences with a Foundation Year

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students 

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515