BSc Environmental Geography and International Development


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Science



UCAS Course Code
FL87
A-Level typical
ABB (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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This unique degree takes advantage of UEA's globally recognised expertise in both Environmental Science and International Development to give you world-class training in the interplay between our physical environment and human society.

The courses focuses on the science and management of natural resources, the effects of environmental change, and the importance of conservation and sustainable development in maintaining a habitable planet.

You'll be introduced to the discipline's major themes in your first year, while learning the analytical tools you need to understand them more deeply. Your second year is hugely flexible, with over 50 modules to choose from as you explore your own interests, and in your final year you'll have the chance to study or work in a developing country before bringing everything you've learnt together into a research project.

Overview

There is a pressing need for people with knowledge of environmental implications who can use their expertise to help countries and communities to develop. Human societies depend on their physical and natural environment for their livelihoods and wellbeing, and development is essential to alleviate poverty and improve living conditions. This degree programme will give you the skills to not only carry out this development, but also ensure that it is sustainable.

This innovative three year degree programme, offered jointly by the School of Environmental Sciences and School of International Development, is renowned for its quality and teaching acumen.

The course allows you to explore the varied links between the environment and international development. It focuses on the science and management of natural resources, the effects of environmental change, and the importance of conservation and sustainable development, many of these in both local and global contexts. You will also be able to tailor your learning programme according to your own interests as you select modules from an extensive and diverse range of subjects, including year-long overseas or industrial placement modules to enhance your learning experience.

Alternatively you can gain first-hand work experience in the developing world by opting for our overseas work experience module in the final year. You will be able to benefit from existing links within the School of International Development to arrange placements in teaching, conservation or community care in places such as Peru, Togo, Mongolia, Thailand, Nepal and Kenya. If overseas experience isn’t for you, the independent research project can be completed at UEA during the final year.

By studying Environmental Geography and International Development at UEA you find out the answers to these questions and many more:

  • What is the geological evidence for climate change?
  • How has the Earth changed over the last 2.5 million years?
  • How does pollution affect human health and well-being?
  • How are international environmental treaties formed?
  • How can the environment be accounted for within an economic system?

Field Course Options

Field courses and practical classes are an integral part of training our environmental science students. You will be introduced to many different geological environments, ecological habitats and learn a variety of practical techniques using specialist equipment through the wide range of field courses available.

Course Structure

The degree is run across the School of Environmental Sciences and the School of International Development in order to offer students a wide range of diverse modules. This flexibility allows students to tailor their degree around their specific interests, possibly focusing on a particular developing region or applying niche principles across a wider cross-section of the developing world.

First Year
A series of compulsory modules introduce you to the major global environmental challenges of international development. These will be taken alongside multi-disciplinary modules from the wider Faculty of Science to develop the essential analytical skills you will need during further years – including Maths for Scientists and Dynamic Earth.

Second Year
In your second year you will be given greater freedom to tailor your course around your own interests, choosing from over 50 specialist modules from Aquatic Ecology to Atmospheric Chemistry. You will also have the option to study abroad in Europe, North America or Australasia for the year, or alternatively spend a year working on an industrial placement accumulating vital experience.

Final Year
During your final year you will have the opportunity to spend the autumn semester of the final year studying or working in the developing world in a related department on an established course of study at an institution recommended by UEA. Study destinations include Fiji, Mauritius, Vietnam, India, Venezuela, Peru, Nicaragua, Mexico, Uganda, South Africa, Lebanon and Egypt. Your time abroad will be spent studying.

You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research in a topic that matches your interests. You will also study advanced level subjects chosen from a wide range of optional modules, from Fossil Fuels to Contemporary Issues in Resource Development and Conservation. This will be alongside a further free choice module taken from across the university.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are employed within this course, dependant on the module you are studying. They range from 67% examination and 33% coursework, to 100% coursework. Coursework assessment methods include essays, written discussions, class tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, field exercises, field notebooks and seminar presentations.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This module year long module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences. The aim is to provide a broad understanding of the research process by undertaking different activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. The module will include the use of digital mapping technologies (such as geographical information systems GIS) and a 6 day residential field course held during the Easter Break.

ENV-4004Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven challenging and oftentimes contentious. The concepts of `sustainability' and `sustainable development' have been coined to denote processed aiming to achieve this balance. Yet this has been hampered by contestation and ambiguity surrounding these concepts. This module introduces sustainable development, and examines why sustainability is so difficult to achieve, bringing together social and ecological perspectives. This module considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, through the contributions of a variety of social science disciplines. It also explores sustainability from an ecological perspective, introducing a range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere and topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular, genetic and chemical ecology. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination. TEACHING AND LEARNING A series of lectures in this module considers sustainability in theory and practice by examining the relationships between environment and society, drawing upon contributions from social science disciplines and perspectives (e.g. politics, health assessment, participation). These lectures, complemented by seminars and practicals introduce sustainable development, explore how interpretations have evolved over time, analyse how these are used by groups and interests in society, and examine the challenges of its implementation. These are followed by lectures which consider interactions between human societies and natural ecosystems, the anthropogenic impacts on biomes, ecosystems, communities, populations and the genetic diversity of individuals. The introduce approaches and ideas fundamental to modern quantitative conservation ecology. The practicals include an introduction to ecological communities, measuring ecological diversity, elementary statistical analysis, field exercises involving terrestrial environments and field trip to a nature reserve to examine relationships between landscape management and/or one or more approaches to measuring biological diversity. Self-directed reading provides opportunities for the students on this module to explore and reflect on these and other aspects in more detail. This module is intended to give you a flavour of the issues, themes and considerations relating to biodiversity, ecosystem services and human development. It does not require in-depth prior knowledge of social sciences, biology chemistry or physics.

ENV-4006B

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour#from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features#such as mountain belts and volcanoes#and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time#the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet and introduce geological materials, resources and hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be assigned to 20 Credits from the following units. Assignments will be made according to previous Maths qualifications.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y or ENV-4003Y. This module is designed for students who have mathematics at GCSE-A grade; or have AS or A2 maths below grade C. This module will consolidate GCSE level mathematics and develop your quantitative skills further in order to broaden the range of quantitative Environmental Science modules you are able to take at Level 5 and 6. It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these quantitative skills to applied environmental and geographical problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and course test / examination.

ENV-4014Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4003Y. This module is designed for students in the Faculty of Science with A2 or AS level mathematics. It covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The following modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C.

ENV-4015Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

THIS MODULE CAN NOT BE TAKEN WITH ENV-4002Y This module is about revising GCSE level mathematics and learning how to apply these skills to solving applied environmental science problems. It is designed for students who have a GCSE in maths at grade C or B or equivalent level and will cover essential mathematics (algebra, indices and scientific notation, manipulating and solving equations, units, accuracy and errors, reading graphs, logs, exponentials, trigonometrical functions, concept of rate of change, and an introduction to calculus). It will also cover the most important statistical methods that you will need during the rest of your career in ENV, including ways of summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. An important part of this module is applying these quantitative skills to environmental and geographical problems. This module is assessed by formative assessment and course test / examination.

ENV-4013Y

20

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

Students will select 80 - 100 credits from the following modules:

Under Options Range A at least 20 credits selected must be modules beginning DEV and at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester. Please note that if you would like to study an ENV or DEV module not listed below, please speak to the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes laboratory work and three field visits. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module can be taken alongside hydrology or geochemical modules, it fits well with other ecology modules and can fit well with modules in development studies. Pre-requisite requirements are: An A-level in a biological subject, a biologically biased access course or any 1st year ecology module in ENV or BIO. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data. Lectures will show how the chemical and physical features of freshwaters influence their biological communities. Students may attend video screenings that complement lectures with examples of aquatic habitats in the tropics. To do well in this module, students need to show that they can use primary literature to illustrate or contradict ideas introduced in lectures: There will be one formal session that shows how to do this. Practical work is an important part of this Module and is an opportunity to develop skills in taxonomy mainly using microscopes, chemical analysis of freshwaters, field observation, working in small groups, mini-lecture presentation, writing a research proposal and statistical analysis of ecological data. If interested in a career in ecology, the usual route is via a higher degree (Masters or PhD), for which a first or 2:1 is needed. This might lead into research or management work, either in an academically orientated environment or in industry. An alternative path is via casual or voluntary work leading ultimately into conservation or management, but bear in mind that many committed and keen people follow the same route and competition for permanent and paid jobs can be intense. There are also opportunities to enter relevant employment directly after graduation. The Environment Agency, which is responsible for the management, monitoring and legal regulation of many aspects of freshwater, estuaries and coastal waters, is a potential employer. Consulting engineers and many multinational companies have environmental departments that tackle aquatic projects. For this type of work, students might combine ecological modules with management options, or with more physical sciences such as soils, hydrology, hydrogeology, water resources, oceanography and environmental chemistry. Careers in international development on the natural resources side may also benefit from a background in freshwater science.

ENV-5001A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. It offers a historical perspective on how climate has influenced society, on how global climate change has developed as a scientific object of enquiry, and on the difficulties and controversies over policies and politics on this issue, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces the major community concepts and definitions, before looking in some detail at community patterns and processes including: species interactions; energy flows and productivity; and the hierarchy of drivers influencing community assembly, structure and diversity. Progression through these topics culminates in a macro-ecological perspective on community patterns and biodiversity. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of ecological theory and the fundamental science to the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, non-native species and pathogens, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples we draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The course includes UK fieldwork as well as an overseas field trip to Chile, Kenya or India. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BA GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS, THOUGH STUDENTS ON OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMMES ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-5016B

20

GEOMORPHOLOGY

Geomorphology is the scientific study of landforms and the processes that shape them. This module will provide an introduction to understanding a number of earth surface processes that lead to expression in landforms and soil evolution. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding erosional and depositional concepts, weathering and sediment transport and the evolution of soils in landscape. The emphasis will be on local East Anglian field sites as case studies illustrating and explaining ecogeomorphology, coastal and glacial geomorphology, dovetailed with soil evolution. The geomorphological/landscape expression will be linked to an 'ecosystem service appreciation' in each key teaching block. Students will also be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by physical geographers and earth scientists (e.g., maps, imagery and field observations). This module is assessed by an essay/data analysis exercise and students will also be set formative assessments. This module provides a knowledge base of particular relevance to the semester 2 module ENV-5035B SEDIMENTOLOGY.

ENV-5034A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module builds upon the introduction to the use of GIS provided in the first year Research and Field Skills module (ENV-4004Y), focusing on how students can obtain their own data (both from a wide range of online sources and in the field), integrate it together and then undertake analysis and presentation tasks. Such skills are particularly important for the final year projects (ENV-6021A) undertaken by many students. Skills in GIS are also valued by many prospective employers across public, private and non-profit sectors, and also for further study at MSc or PhD level. The module will review the different techniques that can be used to create and edit data in a GIS, as well as existing digital databases (both UK and global) from which map data can be extracted and downloaded. ESRI ArcGIS will be the main software used, but there will also be an introduction to open source tools such as QGIS. The module will emphasize issues of data quality (e.g. uncertainty and accuracy) as they apply to spatial data and introduce the use of scripting tools (e.g. Python) as a way of documenting and efficiently repeating more complex analysis procedures. To make links with project work and employability there will also be case studies of GIS use in the workplace. Teaching will consist of a one-hour lectures and a three-hour practical class each week. The lectures will cover key concepts, data sources and techniques in GIS, with a particular emphasis on environmental applications. These will be reinforced by practical exercises mainly using the ArcGIS software. Students should expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of scheduled classes on their formative and summative coursework.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, , the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed. TEACHING AND LEARNING There will be 2 lectures and a 3-hour practical class each week for 11 weeks (there is a Reading Week in week 6). Lectures will introduce you to the full scale of plate tectonics, from the whole Earth to regional scale features at Earth surface with an emphasis on understanding the underlying processes and latest scientific developments in understanding these processes. Theory from lectures is supported by applied examples in practicals through use of maps, experimental analogue materials, and paper exercises. There is some maths (re-arranging and solving simple equations) at a level suitable for all ENV students. COURSE CONTENT Earth structure and heat budget Models for tectonic plate motion The Wilson cycle Features and process that characterise continental and oceanic crust, plate boundaries. Faults and seismicity Making and evolving magma Differentiation, storage, movement and eruption of magma How this unit fits into your degree: This is an excellent introduction to some of the principles that underpin many topics in the Earth Sciences in particular. It can be taken as a general interest module but also works particularly well for those with an interest in natural hazards and/or geological processes. Topics discussed also involve some of the basic geological principles behind the deposition and storage of fossil fuels. CAREER PROSPECTS A knowledge of Earth's structure and geological processes are desirable for understanding many of Earth's natural systems, to support interpretations of geophysical surveys, (relevant to sub-surface resources of all kinds) and understanding of geo-hazards. Thus is relevant to research and employment in construction industry, geo-consultancy, geo-hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Typical employers may include the BGS, geophysical companies (e.g. Gardline, Fugro) and prepare for MSc and PhD that may lead to employment with companies and consultants engaged in resource exploration (from hydrocarbons to water to CO2 storage). The transferable employability skills include self-directed report writing, thinking in 4D (3D spatial + time), team work, also the integration of physical process with people, resources and the environment.

ENV-5018A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

Hydrology and hydrogeology are Earth Science subjects concerned with the assessment of the natural distribution of water in time and space and the evaluation of human impacts on the distribution and quality of water. Knowledge of Hydrology and Hydrogeology is fundamental to the management of freshwater resources for the benefits of drinking water supply, food production and aquatic habitats. This module provides an introduction to geological controls on groundwater occurrence, aquifer characteristics (porosity and permeability), basic principles of groundwater flow, basis hydrochemistry, an introduction to catchment hydrology, hydrological data collection and analysis, runoff generation processes and the principles of rainfall-runoff and flood modelling. Practical classes develop analytical skills in solving hydrogeological and hydrological problems as well as field skills in pumping test analysis and stream gauging. A field excursion to the River Thurne catchment in Norfolk is also offered in this module. The module aims to equip students with the basic skills required to pursue careers in water resources engineering and management.equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84. TEACHING AND LEARNING This module not only provides the framework for learning the key technical and management aspects of low carbon energy but also provides students with the opportunity to explore the future of energy provision in greater depth in the practical sessions. These include an energy tour, debates and smaller seminar group discussions on the practical applications of low carbon energy technologies and energy efficiency and the management of future energy demand. They will provide students with the opportunity to share their knowledge and opinions in this most important field. Students will be expected to supplement the lectures and other learning activities by undertaking self-directed reading of text books, the research literature and policy documents. COURSE CONTENT # Importance of low carbon energy in terms of climate change, resource limits, fuel poverty and energy security # Current energy use and trends # How energy is produced, distributed and managed in the UK # Economic analysis of low carbon technologies # Low carbon energy technologies: biomass, wind, solar, hydro, wave, tidal, etc. # UK sectoral energy management: domestic, transport and business # Hydrogen energy and fuel cells CAREER PROSPECTS Energy and carbon management, renewable energy development, energy supply industry, energy policy development, energy efficiency consultancy, sustainable transportation development.

ENV-5022B

20

MARINE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

Life on Earth began in the oceans and the oceans continue to have a major influence on global ecosystems and climate. The chemical composition of seawater is fundamental to the existence of life in the oceans - it is the life support system on which marine productivity is based. Investigating the distribution of nutrients in the ocean allows us to understand the processes that control marine productivity and its impact on global climate, as well as the effect of anthropogenic over-supply of nutrients (eutrophication) on the natural system. Phytoplankton growth in the ocean produces gases that can influence atmospheric composition and climate. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere directly affect the marine carbon cycle and cause Ocean Acidification, which threatens to cause considerable harm to marine ecosystems. Direct intervention in the chemical composition of the ocean has been proposed by some as potential geo-engineering solutions to help mitigate the effects of global climate change. This module explores all of these major issues and demonstrates the central role that the oceans play in global biogeochemical cycles and the Earth System.

ENV-5019A

20

MARINE SCIENCES FIELDCOURSE

This 11 day 20 credit field course studies physical, chemical and biological coastal oceanographic processes and will probably take place in June. The course includes lectures and practical experience of oceanographic instrumentation, chartwork, numerical analysis of data using matlab and a poster presentation at ENV. The second week of the course will take place in Oban, using the oceanographic research ships and laboratory facilities of the Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory http://www.sams.ac.uk. The course has no pre- or co-requisites, however it will be of particular relevance to those who have studying ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation, ENV-5019A Chemical Oceanography and ENV-6055A Biological Oceanography and Marine Ecology. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN ONLY ENROL ONTO THIS MODULE VIA AN APPLICATION FORM FROM THE SCHOOL AND NOT VIA THE STANDARD MODULE ENROLMENT PROCESS. ALSO THE MODULE RUNS IN THE SUMMER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR.

ENV-5020K

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processed in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential. TEACHING AND LEARNING Practical session will provide opportunities for individual and group-based work in which problem sheets and data analysis exercises are tackled. Lectures will provide the forum for introduction of theoretical material and also for following up and summarising the key points emanating from previous practical sessions. Lecturers will also ensure that attention is drawn, as appropriate, to links between theory and 'current weather', often in the form of references to online information resources. The course Blackboard site will provide opportunities for students to assess their own progress through informal formative assessment material. # The Structure of the Atmosphere # Short and long wave radiation in the atmosphere # Thermal equilibrium of the Earth atmosphere system # Laws of thermodynamics applied to the atmosphere # Atmospheric Stability # Atmospheric Dynamics # Atmospheric momentum balance # Meteorological surface observations and plotting codes # Cloud physics CAREER PROSPECTS Students regularly go on to careers in the Met Office, in meteorological consultancy and in a number of other research organisations in the UK and abroad, either directly or after taking a higher degree. Meteorology interfaces with many other disciplines n the environmental sciences (eg oceanography, hydrology, energy and epidemiology) and impacts upon most sectors of the economy. While graduates regularly move directly into weather forecasting and analysis jobs, a career in meteorological research would often first require a higher degree. This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential, including a basic understanding of differentiation and integration.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon material introduced in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. Practical sessions, some computer based, will provide opportunities for individual- and group-based work in which problem sheets, simulations and case study exercises are tackled, coupled with experiential sessions in forecasting and broadcast meteorology. Lectures will provide the forum for introduction of theoretical material and also for following up and summarising the key points emanating from previous practical sessions. Lectures will also ensure that attention is drawn, as appropriate, to links between theory and 'current weather', often in the form of references to online information resources. A non-compulsory programme of complementary monthly evening seminars is also available through the Royal Meteorological Society's East Anglian Centre, based at UEA, including talks by employers.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, involving students in designing scientific experiments to quantify the effects of micro- and synoptic-scale weather and climate processes, focusing on lake, forest and mountain environments. RESIDENTIAL FIELD COURSE The additional Field Course runs during the first seven days of the Easter Vacation based at Hawkshead Youth Hostel in Cumbria. There will be a charge for attending this field course. The charge is heavily subsidized by the School, but students enrolling must understand that they will commit to paying a sum to cover attendance. As the details of many modules and field courses have changed recently the following figures should be viewed as ball-park estimates only. If you would like firmer data please consult the module organizer closer to the field course. The cost to the student will be in the order of GBP160.

ENV-5010K

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

This module continues to explore and develop the themes covered in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development and Natural Resources And Development 2 and exposes students to a number of new quantitative data collection and analysis tools to analyze and interpret data sets. The module also introduces some conceptual and management approaches to natural resources. The module focuses on the understanding of climate and water as resources and agricultural research and agricultural systems. The module is taught around themes of: quantifying natural resources - the water balance; managing water resources - supply and demand; dealing with environmental variability; agricultural research and innovation; and participation processes and users of outputs.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, and a framework for analysing the social determinants of health, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, and broad patterns of health inequality. The social determinants of health and risk environments are then examined in detail, , focusing on how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The module provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The module also develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011A

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and justice, violence and non-violence, democratisation and electoral systems and the role of the media. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but also integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars.

DEV-5008B

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) never before it was so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is, thus, fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology it is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and, from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals will be based on statistical or modelling projects and will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferrable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history of environmental change, contain the fossil record and host many of the world's natural resources. This module includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks, their stratigraphy and the sedimentary structures they contain. Topics will include: (1) sedimentary fluid dynamics; (2) modern and ancient sedimentary environments including rivers, coastal margins, shallow shelf seas and the deep ocean; (3) differences between siliciclastic and carbonate depositional systems, and (4) the interactions between organisms and sediments. This module replaces ENV-2A85/ENV-5011A.

ENV-5035B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS WITH FIELDCOURSE

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. The module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. This will cover different perspectives on research, developing a research question, research design, research ethics, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and includes quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method approaches. The learning outcomes will be for students to be able to demonstrate: (i) Knowledge and critical understanding of relevant concepts and principles (ii) Ability to apply concepts and principles to the design of social science research (iii) Knowledge of some of the main methods of enquiry (iv) Ability to evaluate critically different approaches (v) Ability to present effectively a research proposal, both orally and in writing. The module will include a field course at Easter based in Keswick, an area which provides excellent opportunities for studying a range of geographical and environmental issues, including flooding, low-carbon energy developments, spatial contrasts in economic development and landscape management. The first part of the field course will consist of four days of faculty-organised activities where students will be able to practice questionnaire surveys, interviewing and other social research methods. During the final two days students will work in small groups to plan a research investigation from a list of pre-defined topics. Each group will present their research proposal on the final afternoon of the field course as a piece of formative assessment and the individual members will then write separate short reports on their proposal as their second item of summative assessment for the module. There will be an additional charge for students to attend the field course, though the cost is substantially reduced through financial support from ENV.

ENV-5036K

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students with the required pre-requisites may select a maximum of 20 credits from modules below: Under Options Range A at least 20 credits selected must be modules beginning DEV and at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester.

Name Code Credits

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

This module will give students an essential grounding in International Relations theory, encompassing both the foundational theories of realism and liberalism, and contemporary debates about hegemony, neo-imperialism and post-positivism. The module is structured around the positivist/post-positivist divide and starts with classical realism and neo-realism, and liberalism and neo-liberalism. It then explores the English School and constructivism before turning to more critical theories like post-colonialism, feminism and gender studies, and postmodernism.

PPLI5059A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful, is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology with an emphasis on development, signalling and response to the environment. It consists of practical classes and lectures. It encompasses molecular genetics, molecular, biochemical and physiological perspectives, and affords an understanding of aspects of plant and plant cell function including photosynthesis and the mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic environments.

BIO-5006A

20

THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE IN THE CONTEXT OF LEARNING, TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY

Aim: To help students consider the complex relationship between language and learning, the implications this relationship has for teaching, and how education-policy has addressed some issues to do with language and 'literacy'. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course it is hoped students will better understand: a) key issues surrounding the learning and/or teaching of reading, writing, talking and listening in English; b) the importance for learning of different kinds of talk in classrooms; c) contrasting approaches to understanding and teaching 'literacy'; d) how the language of formal education can construct particular views of the child. Content: Through seminars, mini-lectures, student presentations and creative work students will meet and investigate some ideas and theories to do with language and learning in English, and some educational policy related to this. Why isn't teaching just a matter of telling, and learning just a matter of listening? How do children learn, or teach themselves, to read, write and talk? Whose English (spoken and written) counts in formal education, who says, and why? If new technologies are changing English, what are the implications for formal education? And how might your language create your identity as well as express it?

EDUB5017B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

At least 20 credits selected under Options Range B must be modules beginning DEV-6* and at least 20 credits must be modules beginning ENV-6*. Note: Students must check that the modules chosen from this range do not have a timetable clash, noting that no more than one module using the same timetable slot e.g. 'C' can be taken in one semester. Please note that if you would like to study an ENV or DEV module not listed below, please speak to the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

The global biodiversity crisis threatens mass species loss. What are the implications for society? How can communities solve this problem in a world that is facing other challenges of climate change, food security and justice? This inter-disciplinary module focused on the interactions between biodiversity and human societies is designed for students of Geography, Environmental Science, Ecology and International Development who have an interest in biodiversity. The module adopts a rigorous evidence-based approach. Classes first critically examine the human drivers of biodiversity loss and the importance of biodiversity to human society, to understand how underlying perspectives and motivations influence approaches to conservation. We then examine conflicts between human society and conservation and how these potentially can be resolved, reviewing institutions and potential instruments for biodiversity conservation in both Europe and developing countries. Although particularly relevant to Ecology students with an interest in biodiversity conservation, the module is also suitable for Environmental Science or Geography students who have not taken ecological modules; where a simple understanding of ecological principles is important to understanding material, these will be reviewed in class. There are no formal pre-requisites. The module is particularly relevant for students who have previously taken one or other of: ENV-5014A Population Ecology and Management; ENV-5002B Environmental Politics and Policy Making; BIO- 5014B Community, Ecosystem and Macro-Ecology; or DEV-5013Y Natural Resources and Development. At Level 6 it is complementary to: ENV-6012B Natural Resources and Environmental Economics; ENV-6024B Science, Society and Sustainability; or DEV-6005B Contemporary Issues in Resource Development and Conservation.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

This module examines the microbial processes that underpin our dependence on the marine environment for 'services' such as climate modulation and nutrient regeneration. The module will cover the evolution, biodiversity and molecular ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. Example ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems will be studied in detail and predictions of the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen, and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics will be examined. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and employability visits to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

ENV-6005A

20

CATCHMENT WATER RESOURCES

This module will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins to enable students to analyse aspects of land management that affect catchment water resources and ecosystems.

ENV-6018B

20

CLIMATE SYSTEMS

This module is about understanding the processes that determine why the Earth's climate (defined, for example, as its temperature and moisture distribution) looks like it does, what are the major circulation patterns and climate zones around the world and how do they arise, how and why the climate can change in time over different timescales, and how we can use this knowledge to understand the climate systems of other planets. This course is aimed at those students who wish to further their knowledge of climate and climatology, and also want a base for any future study of climate change, such as students doing the Meteorology/Oceanography or the Environmental Geography and Climate Change degrees. Note that Meteorology I (ENV 5008A) is a prerequisite for this module. After completing this module, students should be able to: # Understand the processes that control the energy balance of the atmosphere (following on from ENV-5008A) # Explain the temperature and moisture structure of the atmosphere # Understand the science underlying regional and global circulations and climatic zones (complementing level M/6-level Global Circulation and Dynamical Oceanography, feeding into M-level Physical Science Basis of Climate Change) # Identify how and why climate changes on a variety of timescales (feeding into M-level Physical Science Basis of Climate Change, M-level Geoengineering) # Use this knowledge to understand other climate.

ENV-6025B

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

RDC aims to use recent research and practical experience in the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis of critical challenges in resource development and conservation in the developing world. Specifically, themes such as the relation between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control are examined through discussions of theory and the use of case studies, in order to develop an understanding of their natural and social science, and policy dimensions. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

This module will introduce students to a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. The module begins by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. The second part of the module then introduces some theories of social and technical change and uses these to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems - including behaviour change initiatives, domestic energy efficiency technologies, and community-scale renewables - that are currently being tried and tested around the world. TEACHING AND LEARNING The module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars involving group projects, peer discussions, practical exercises and student-led learning. The lectures (2 per week) will introduce students to some core theoretical ideas about the relationships between energy and people, as well as examining a series of people-based solutions to energy problems that have been attempted around the world. The seminar sessions (1 per week) will give students the opportunity to engage with the lecture content in more depth through a range of exercises designed to promote discussion with both course lecturers and peers. Essential readings will be identified for each lecture. To do well in the module students will need to demonstrate that they have engaged extensively with the literature in this area, particularly regarding the 'real world' implications of theoretical ideas and debates. CAREER PROSPECTS Contemporary energy problems are a key concern of central and local government policy, business activities, charity and community work and wider public debates. A key reason why existing solutions to these problems either fail or are not as effective as at first assumed, is that they are often based on a poor understanding of how people use and engage with energy in the course of their everyday lives. Improving students' understanding of the relationships between energy and people and providing them with the intellectual tools necessarily to critically assess energy problems and potential solutions will therefore give them with a significant advantage in this growing job market. In addition to enhancing employability in the specific area of energy, this module will also provide students with a range of key transferable skills that will help them secure gainful employment on completion of their undergraduate degree. These include: developing analytical and critical thinking skills; understanding how to work effectively in teams; advocacy and negotiation skills; developing creative approaches to presentation; and presenting work to different audiences.

ENV-6026B

20

FIELD COURSE TO EAST AFRICA

This fourteen-day field course to a remote part of north-western Kenya is set provisionally to run in late June/early July 2016 and only if 24 students accept a place with a waiting list of at least six reserves. A significant personal contribution towards costs is required and students must also pay for their own vaccinations and entry visa (because these costs vary between individuals). In most years, students stay in Kenya for two weeks after the field course for holidays that they have organized themselves. The field course is likely to be based in the Marich Pass Field Studies Centre in West Pokot and will be advertised in November 2015 via emails to eligible students. Applications are made directly to the Module Organizer. Places will be offered by email and must be accepted before the Christmas Break.

ENV-6015K

20

FOSSIL FUELS

Geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) are introduced. These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels, and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity. This module is suitable for students taking degrees in the School of Environmental Sciences. Some knowledge of Earth science will be expected. Therefore before taking this module you must take or be taking at least 20 credits of Earth Science or Geophysics modules at honours level. This module replaces ENV-3A35.

ENV-6009A

20

GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES FIELD COURSE TO SPAIN

Pre-requisite: at least two of the following: ENV-5003A Climate Change: Science and Policy; ENV-5018A Geodynamics: Earth's Engine; ENV-5021A Hydrology and Hydrogeology; ENV-5022B Low Carbon Energy; ENV-5028B GIS Skills for Project Work; ENV-5031B or ENV-5036K Social Research Skills for Geographers and Environmental Scientists; ENV-5034A Geomorphology. The module will use the same Urra field centre in the Almeria region of southern Spain as ENV-6029K Geosciences Field Course to Spain and there will be some overlap in the sites visited and material covered. As a consequence, students may not take both of these field courses to Spain. This module is designed to promote a deeper understanding of the interactions between the natural environment and human society in particular geographical contexts through a field-based teaching and project work in Almeria, southern Spain. This region provides classic examples of landform evolution and arid environments, as well as experiencing major socio-economic changes in recent decades. Field activities will focus on such issue as agriculture, water resources, renewable energy and adaptation to climate change. Methods for evaluating potential natural resources, siting new developments and landscape-scale planning will be implemented and assessed. These techniques are applicable to many aspects of geography and the environmental sciences, as well as being relevant to a range of future careers.

ENV-6030K

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Economics of Development (DEV-5012Y). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Have you ever wondered why human economic activity seems to be so bad for the environment? Does it have to be like that? Is it possible for human beings to enjoy high standards of living and a high quality environment? Through the study of the principles of Environmental Economics this course sets out to answer those questions. Addressing a wide-range of economy-environment problems including car pollution, over-fishing, climate change and declining oil stocks, the course shows that most environmental problems can be solved through the adoption of policies crafted with the careful application of economic reasoning.

ENV-6012B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

OVERSEAS STUDY UNIT

This overseas based module is designed to enable students to undertake courses of study approved by the School and organised in association with overseas institutions of learning. The assessment is based on a 2500 word essay on a subject to be agreed with the OSU convenor. The subject will normally be thematically linked to the content of the course of study overseas. Students will also have to pass local exams and complete and pass other forms of local assessments at their host university. The work burden should be equivalent to a 20 credit module at UEA, i.e. around 4-8 hours a week. THIS IS RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6002A

20

PUBLIC POLICY AND WELFARE

This inter-disciplinary module is organized around the following themes: i) the politics of public and social policy; ii) poverty, livelihoods and international organisations; iii) migration and the International Labour Organisation; iv) fair trade, consumer movements and corporate social responsibility; v) Trade Unions and NGOs; vi) the media and public policy; and vii) health. Using a relational approach to development, it analyses the changing and uneven conditions of the working poor in the developing world, combining examination of their conditions in different countries and regions with critical analysis of the activities of international organisations, the media, consumer movements and organisations of the working poor.

DEV-6008B

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is challenging, in large part because of this complexity. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction'. The complexity of the carbon cycle leads to a truly inter-disciplinary module, incorporating elements of chemistry, ecology, physics, mathematics and geography. We also consider several human dimensions such as: how to 'decarbonise' the UK; geoengineering the climate; how to deal with climate denialists; how to verify greenhouse gas emissions; and the policy relevance of the carbon cycle. The understanding of the carbon cycle gained from this module is an important foundation for all climate change studies. Emphasis is given to the most recent, cutting-edge research in the field.

ENV-6008A

20

URBAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module will examine the historical and contemporary development and governance of urban centres around the globe. In order to understand these processes, we will explore both the structure of human settlements and the multiple relationships and processes that shape and reshape urban spaces. We will examine the changing environmental, political, social, and economic dynamics of cities and smaller urban centres, drawing on case studies from the global north and the global south. The module will cover a range of concepts and topics which have preoccupied urban geographers, including: urbanization and urban growth patterns; urban economic restructuring and neoliberalism; urban infrastructure; poverty and inequality; informality; migration; citizenship; urban nature; urban environmental governance; and urban planning and regeneration. A one-day field trip is an integral part of the module.

DEV-6010B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of WHC is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool, including territorial solutions to violent conflicts and the establishment of power-sharing arrangements.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module aims to provide an up-to-date and thought-provoking discussion about evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module will examine how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society as it relates to understanding, treating, and preventing disease. Evidence will be presented that all aspects of the human condition have an evolutionary basis. The course will cover 4 broad areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context, and discussion of the factors that drive evolutionary change; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine.

BIO-6017A

20

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW AND REFUGEE LAW

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the law governing armed conflict, whereas Refugee Law provides important protection for the victims of armed conflict. During this module students will consider key issues in both IHL and refugee law, such as the difference between combatants and civilians, legitimate targets and illegal weapons and the scope of protection offered to refugees. During seminars students will apply these principles and assess the legality of current international events. This module will be a prerequisite for students wishing to take part in the UEA Law School and British Red Cross Humanitarian Law Project.

LAW-6007A

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

This module aims to bring an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module will be made aware of the theories surrounding learning and communication. They will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Students will examine case studies in a variety of different scientific areas. They will look at how information is released in scientific literature and how this is subsequently picked up by the public press. They will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. Students will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS REGISTERED IN THE SCIENCE FACULTY.

BIO-6018Y

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students may take 0-20 credits of Level 5 modules in Year 3.

Name Code Credits

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes laboratory work and three field visits. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module can be taken alongside hydrology or geochemical modules, it fits well with other ecology modules and can fit well with modules in development studies. Pre-requisite requirements are: An A-level in a biological subject, a biologically biased access course or any 1st year ecology module in ENV or BIO. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data. Lectures will show how the chemical and physical features of freshwaters influence their biological communities. Students may attend video screenings that complement lectures with examples of aquatic habitats in the tropics. To do well in this module, students need to show that they can use primary literature to illustrate or contradict ideas introduced in lectures: There will be one formal session that shows how to do this. Practical work is an important part of this Module and is an opportunity to develop skills in taxonomy mainly using microscopes, chemical analysis of freshwaters, field observation, working in small groups, mini-lecture presentation, writing a research proposal and statistical analysis of ecological data. If interested in a career in ecology, the usual route is via a higher degree (Masters or PhD), for which a first or 2:1 is needed. This might lead into research or management work, either in an academically orientated environment or in industry. An alternative path is via casual or voluntary work leading ultimately into conservation or management, but bear in mind that many committed and keen people follow the same route and competition for permanent and paid jobs can be intense. There are also opportunities to enter relevant employment directly after graduation. The Environment Agency, which is responsible for the management, monitoring and legal regulation of many aspects of freshwater, estuaries and coastal waters, is a potential employer. Consulting engineers and many multinational companies have environmental departments that tackle aquatic projects. For this type of work, students might combine ecological modules with management options, or with more physical sciences such as soils, hydrology, hydrogeology, water resources, oceanography and environmental chemistry. Careers in international development on the natural resources side may also benefit from a background in freshwater science.

ENV-5001A

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. It offers a historical perspective on how climate has influenced society, on how global climate change has developed as a scientific object of enquiry, and on the difficulties and controversies over policies and politics on this issue, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces the major community concepts and definitions, before looking in some detail at community patterns and processes including: species interactions; energy flows and productivity; and the hierarchy of drivers influencing community assembly, structure and diversity. Progression through these topics culminates in a macro-ecological perspective on community patterns and biodiversity. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of ecological theory and the fundamental science to the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, non-native species and pathogens, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples we draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the theoretical and empirical development of contemporary environmental politics. It is structured to analyse these issues from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on dynamic examples of environmental politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module encourages and supports student-led learning by enabling students to develop their own theoretical interpretations of real world examples of politics. These are explored in seminar presentations and in an extended (4000 word) case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics/social sciences.

ENV-5002B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The course includes UK fieldwork as well as an overseas field trip to Chile, Kenya or India. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BA GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS, THOUGH STUDENTS ON OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMMES ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-5016B

20

GEOMORPHOLOGY

Geomorphology is the scientific study of landforms and the processes that shape them. This module will provide an introduction to understanding a number of earth surface processes that lead to expression in landforms and soil evolution. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding erosional and depositional concepts, weathering and sediment transport and the evolution of soils in landscape. The emphasis will be on local East Anglian field sites as case studies illustrating and explaining ecogeomorphology, coastal and glacial geomorphology, dovetailed with soil evolution. The geomorphological/landscape expression will be linked to an 'ecosystem service appreciation' in each key teaching block. Students will also be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by physical geographers and earth scientists (e.g., maps, imagery and field observations). This module is assessed by an essay/data analysis exercise and students will also be set formative assessments. This module provides a knowledge base of particular relevance to the semester 2 module ENV-5035B SEDIMENTOLOGY.

ENV-5034A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module builds upon the introduction to the use of GIS provided in the first year Research and Field Skills module (ENV-4004Y), focusing on how students can obtain their own data (both from a wide range of online sources and in the field), integrate it together and then undertake analysis and presentation tasks. Such skills are particularly important for the final year projects (ENV-6021A) undertaken by many students. Skills in GIS are also valued by many prospective employers across public, private and non-profit sectors, and also for further study at MSc or PhD level. The module will review the different techniques that can be used to create and edit data in a GIS, as well as existing digital databases (both UK and global) from which map data can be extracted and downloaded. ESRI ArcGIS will be the main software used, but there will also be an introduction to open source tools such as QGIS. The module will emphasize issues of data quality (e.g. uncertainty and accuracy) as they apply to spatial data and introduce the use of scripting tools (e.g. Python) as a way of documenting and efficiently repeating more complex analysis procedures. To make links with project work and employability there will also be case studies of GIS use in the workplace. Teaching will consist of a one-hour lectures and a three-hour practical class each week. The lectures will cover key concepts, data sources and techniques in GIS, with a particular emphasis on environmental applications. These will be reinforced by practical exercises mainly using the ArcGIS software. Students should expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of scheduled classes on their formative and summative coursework.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, , the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed. TEACHING AND LEARNING There will be 2 lectures and a 3-hour practical class each week for 11 weeks (there is a Reading Week in week 6). Lectures will introduce you to the full scale of plate tectonics, from the whole Earth to regional scale features at Earth surface with an emphasis on understanding the underlying processes and latest scientific developments in understanding these processes. Theory from lectures is supported by applied examples in practicals through use of maps, experimental analogue materials, and paper exercises. There is some maths (re-arranging and solving simple equations) at a level suitable for all ENV students. COURSE CONTENT Earth structure and heat budget Models for tectonic plate motion The Wilson cycle Features and process that characterise continental and oceanic crust, plate boundaries. Faults and seismicity Making and evolving magma Differentiation, storage, movement and eruption of magma How this unit fits into your degree: This is an excellent introduction to some of the principles that underpin many topics in the Earth Sciences in particular. It can be taken as a general interest module but also works particularly well for those with an interest in natural hazards and/or geological processes. Topics discussed also involve some of the basic geological principles behind the deposition and storage of fossil fuels. CAREER PROSPECTS A knowledge of Earth's structure and geological processes are desirable for understanding many of Earth's natural systems, to support interpretations of geophysical surveys, (relevant to sub-surface resources of all kinds) and understanding of geo-hazards. Thus is relevant to research and employment in construction industry, geo-consultancy, geo-hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Typical employers may include the BGS, geophysical companies (e.g. Gardline, Fugro) and prepare for MSc and PhD that may lead to employment with companies and consultants engaged in resource exploration (from hydrocarbons to water to CO2 storage). The transferable employability skills include self-directed report writing, thinking in 4D (3D spatial + time), team work, also the integration of physical process with people, resources and the environment.

ENV-5018A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

Hydrology and hydrogeology are Earth Science subjects concerned with the assessment of the natural distribution of water in time and space and the evaluation of human impacts on the distribution and quality of water. Knowledge of Hydrology and Hydrogeology is fundamental to the management of freshwater resources for the benefits of drinking water supply, food production and aquatic habitats. This module provides an introduction to geological controls on groundwater occurrence, aquifer characteristics (porosity and permeability), basic principles of groundwater flow, basis hydrochemistry, an introduction to catchment hydrology, hydrological data collection and analysis, runoff generation processes and the principles of rainfall-runoff and flood modelling. Practical classes develop analytical skills in solving hydrogeological and hydrological problems as well as field skills in pumping test analysis and stream gauging. A field excursion to the River Thurne catchment in Norfolk is also offered in this module. The module aims to equip students with the basic skills required to pursue careers in water resources engineering and management.equivalent mathematical skills. For example, an ability to work with common mathematical operations is essential such as the simple rearrangement of equations, and the ability to convert between varying units of length and volume. Basic differential equations will be presented for the description of groundwater flow.

ENV-5021A

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module will focus on the decarbonisation of energy supply and demand in a carbon constrained world. It will examine the role of energy efficiency and low carbon energy technologies, such as wind energy, solar energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, taking into consideration important current issues and sectors for application. This knowledge is used to support an analysis of future energy supply and demand that includes management, policy and technical aspects. This version of the module is assessed by formative assessment and coursework. This module replaces ENV-2A84. TEACHING AND LEARNING This module not only provides the framework for learning the key technical and management aspects of low carbon energy but also provides students with the opportunity to explore the future of energy provision in greater depth in the practical sessions. These include an energy tour, debates and smaller seminar group discussions on the practical applications of low carbon energy technologies and energy efficiency and the management of future energy demand. They will provide students with the opportunity to share their knowledge and opinions in this most important field. Students will be expected to supplement the lectures and other learning activities by undertaking self-directed reading of text books, the research literature and policy documents. COURSE CONTENT # Importance of low carbon energy in terms of climate change, resource limits, fuel poverty and energy security # Current energy use and trends # How energy is produced, distributed and managed in the UK # Economic analysis of low carbon technologies # Low carbon energy technologies: biomass, wind, solar, hydro, wave, tidal, etc. # UK sectoral energy management: domestic, transport and business # Hydrogen energy and fuel cells CAREER PROSPECTS Energy and carbon management, renewable energy development, energy supply industry, energy policy development, energy efficiency consultancy, sustainable transportation development.

ENV-5022B

20

MARINE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

Life on Earth began in the oceans and the oceans continue to have a major influence on global ecosystems and climate. The chemical composition of seawater is fundamental to the existence of life in the oceans - it is the life support system on which marine productivity is based. Investigating the distribution of nutrients in the ocean allows us to understand the processes that control marine productivity and its impact on global climate, as well as the effect of anthropogenic over-supply of nutrients (eutrophication) on the natural system. Phytoplankton growth in the ocean produces gases that can influence atmospheric composition and climate. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere directly affect the marine carbon cycle and cause Ocean Acidification, which threatens to cause considerable harm to marine ecosystems. Direct intervention in the chemical composition of the ocean has been proposed by some as potential geo-engineering solutions to help mitigate the effects of global climate change. This module explores all of these major issues and demonstrates the central role that the oceans play in global biogeochemical cycles and the Earth System.

ENV-5019A

20

MARINE SCIENCES FIELDCOURSE

This 11 day 20 credit field course studies physical, chemical and biological coastal oceanographic processes and will probably take place in June. The course includes lectures and practical experience of oceanographic instrumentation, chartwork, numerical analysis of data using matlab and a poster presentation at ENV. The second week of the course will take place in Oban, using the oceanographic research ships and laboratory facilities of the Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory http://www.sams.ac.uk. The course has no pre- or co-requisites, however it will be of particular relevance to those who have studying ENV-5016A Ocean Circulation, ENV-5019A Chemical Oceanography and ENV-6055A Biological Oceanography and Marine Ecology. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN ONLY ENROL ONTO THIS MODULE VIA AN APPLICATION FORM FROM THE SCHOOL AND NOT VIA THE STANDARD MODULE ENROLMENT PROCESS. ALSO THE MODULE RUNS IN THE SUMMER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR.

ENV-5020K

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processed in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential. TEACHING AND LEARNING Practical session will provide opportunities for individual and group-based work in which problem sheets and data analysis exercises are tackled. Lectures will provide the forum for introduction of theoretical material and also for following up and summarising the key points emanating from previous practical sessions. Lecturers will also ensure that attention is drawn, as appropriate, to links between theory and 'current weather', often in the form of references to online information resources. The course Blackboard site will provide opportunities for students to assess their own progress through informal formative assessment material. # The Structure of the Atmosphere # Short and long wave radiation in the atmosphere # Thermal equilibrium of the Earth atmosphere system # Laws of thermodynamics applied to the atmosphere # Atmospheric Stability # Atmospheric Dynamics # Atmospheric momentum balance # Meteorological surface observations and plotting codes # Cloud physics CAREER PROSPECTS Students regularly go on to careers in the Met Office, in meteorological consultancy and in a number of other research organisations in the UK and abroad, either directly or after taking a higher degree. Meteorology interfaces with many other disciplines n the environmental sciences (eg oceanography, hydrology, energy and epidemiology) and impacts upon most sectors of the economy. While graduates regularly move directly into weather forecasting and analysis jobs, a career in meteorological research would often first require a higher degree. This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of Radiation Balance, Cloud Physics, Thermodynamics and Dynamics and the assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential, including a basic understanding of differentiation and integration.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon material introduced in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. Practical sessions, some computer based, will provide opportunities for individual- and group-based work in which problem sheets, simulations and case study exercises are tackled, coupled with experiential sessions in forecasting and broadcast meteorology. Lectures will provide the forum for introduction of theoretical material and also for following up and summarising the key points emanating from previous practical sessions. Lectures will also ensure that attention is drawn, as appropriate, to links between theory and 'current weather', often in the form of references to online information resources. A non-compulsory programme of complementary monthly evening seminars is also available through the Royal Meteorological Society's East Anglian Centre, based at UEA, including talks by employers.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A (Meteorology I) by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, micro-scale processes, the General Circulation and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, involving students in designing scientific experiments to quantify the effects of micro- and synoptic-scale weather and climate processes, focusing on lake, forest and mountain environments. RESIDENTIAL FIELD COURSE The additional Field Course runs during the first seven days of the Easter Vacation based at Hawkshead Youth Hostel in Cumbria. There will be a charge for attending this field course. The charge is heavily subsidized by the School, but students enrolling must understand that they will commit to paying a sum to cover attendance. As the details of many modules and field courses have changed recently the following figures should be viewed as ball-park estimates only. If you would like firmer data please consult the module organizer closer to the field course. The cost to the student will be in the order of GBP160.

ENV-5010K

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

This module continues to explore and develop the themes covered in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development and Natural Resources And Development 2 and exposes students to a number of new quantitative data collection and analysis tools to analyze and interpret data sets. The module also introduces some conceptual and management approaches to natural resources. The module focuses on the understanding of climate and water as resources and agricultural research and agricultural systems. The module is taught around themes of: quantifying natural resources - the water balance; managing water resources - supply and demand; dealing with environmental variability; agricultural research and innovation; and participation processes and users of outputs.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, and a framework for analysing the social determinants of health, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, and broad patterns of health inequality. The social determinants of health and risk environments are then examined in detail, , focusing on how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The module provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The module also develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011A

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and justice, violence and non-violence, democratisation and electoral systems and the role of the media. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but also integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars.

DEV-5008B

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) never before it was so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is, thus, fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology it is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and, from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals will be based on statistical or modelling projects and will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferrable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history of environmental change, contain the fossil record and host many of the world's natural resources. This module includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks, their stratigraphy and the sedimentary structures they contain. Topics will include: (1) sedimentary fluid dynamics; (2) modern and ancient sedimentary environments including rivers, coastal margins, shallow shelf seas and the deep ocean; (3) differences between siliciclastic and carbonate depositional systems, and (4) the interactions between organisms and sediments. This module replaces ENV-2A85/ENV-5011A.

ENV-5035B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS WITH FIELDCOURSE

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. The module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. This will cover different perspectives on research, developing a research question, research design, research ethics, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and includes quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method approaches. The learning outcomes will be for students to be able to demonstrate: (i) Knowledge and critical understanding of relevant concepts and principles (ii) Ability to apply concepts and principles to the design of social science research (iii) Knowledge of some of the main methods of enquiry (iv) Ability to evaluate critically different approaches (v) Ability to present effectively a research proposal, both orally and in writing. The module will include a field course at Easter based in Keswick, an area which provides excellent opportunities for studying a range of geographical and environmental issues, including flooding, low-carbon energy developments, spatial contrasts in economic development and landscape management. The first part of the field course will consist of four days of faculty-organised activities where students will be able to practice questionnaire surveys, interviewing and other social research methods. During the final two days students will work in small groups to plan a research investigation from a list of pre-defined topics. Each group will present their research proposal on the final afternoon of the field course as a piece of formative assessment and the individual members will then write separate short reports on their proposal as their second item of summative assessment for the module. There will be an additional charge for students to attend the field course, though the cost is substantially reduced through financial support from ENV.

ENV-5036K

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change.

ENV-5012A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB including Geography
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including HL Geography at 5
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including Geography
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 subjects at H2 including Geography
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 Level 3 credits and 15 at Merit, including 12 Level 3 credits in Geography
  • BTEC Only accepted alongside A-level Geography
  • European Baccalaureate 75% overall, with at least 70% in Geography

Entry Requirement

 

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS : 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in General Science FS1

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Biomedicine and Health FS2

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Mathematics FS3 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB including Geography
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including HL Geography at 5
  • Scottish Highers AABBBB including Geography
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including Geography
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB including Geography
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3, including 12 Level 3 credits in a science based subject
  • BTEC DDM in a science related subject
  • European Baccalaureate Overall 75% with 70% in Geography

Entry Requirement

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in General Science FS1

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Biomedicine and Health FS2

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Mathematics FS3 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

A level Geography or equivalent.

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact us for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and English Language at grade C or above.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit 

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

 

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Environmental Sciences)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515