BSc Economics

“I always felt the course was kept relevant and in keeping with global economic headlines. I also found the lecturers were very approachable and easy to talk to.”

In their words

Simon Beeson, BSc Economics Alumnus, HSBC

Article

Does someone’s age or country of origin have any bearing on their level of honesty?

Read It

Video

An internship during your degree studies is becoming a strong route into graduate employment.

Watch It
BSc Economics is our core degree programme, covering all key areas of the economy. If you think and feel “I want to be an economist”, or “I want to understand how the economy works”, or “I want to improve the way the economy works”, this is the degree for you.

Whether you are interested in business, politics or simply how the world ticks, economics is a wonderful discipline for understanding how individuals make choices, how those choices create markets, and how markets interact to create national and global economies. It also provides the essential understanding for how economic policies can be developed to improve social welfare.

Overview

BSc Economics is our core degree programme, covering all key areas of the economy. This degree is perfect if you want to understand how the economy works and how to improve it. You will have the chance to select from a broad range of modules that reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the subject, focusing on key areas of economics including the global and domestic economy.

We offer core modules in economic analysis and quantitative methods, as well as a choice of modules. Throughout your studies you will be encouraged to develop expertise in economic modelling techniques and statistical analysis. This will provide you with the skills needed to analyse the economy valued by employers. We have received excellent feedback from our students, having been ranked first for academic support and second for overall satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey. 

There is also the opportunity to select modules within Political, Social and International Relations, Philosophy, and Language and Communication Studies.

Find out more about how Economics at UEA inspires ideas, creates careers and invests in you.

Course Structure

This three year course provides a wide range of integrated contemporary modules, enabling you to explore the diverse area of economics. You will have a varied choice of modules throughout the degree programme enabling you to direct your own learning.

Year 1

During your first year of study you will engage with key concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics in the year-long modules ‘Introductory Macroeconomics’ and ‘Introductory Microeconomics’. You will also take modules such as ‘Introductory Mathematics for Economists’ and ‘Introductory Statistics for Economists’, which introduce you to basic economic modelling and statistical techniques.

You will have the opportunity to select modules from the School of Economics, or those offered within Political, Social and International Studies, Philosophy, and Language and Communication Studies.

Year 2

During your second year you will have the opportunity to tailor your degree programme according to your own interests, studying areas which you may find particularly relevant for your future career or further studies.

You will continue to develop your understanding of macro and microeconomics as well as skills in the collection and analysis of data. In ‘Introductory Econometrics’ you will build your statistical skills, which you will apply in the form of a practical project designed to answer a research question in the module ‘Econometrics Research Project’. This module is also designed to enhance the employability of our graduates.

Optional second-year modules cover areas including international trade, the European economy, strategy, behavioural economics, economic thought and mathematical economics.

Year 3

In your final year you will have an even broader range of optional modules to choose from, as you will be encouraged to pursue a curriculum of economic disciplines that match your own interests. Your final year provides the opportunity to further your study of macroeconomics, microeconomics and econometrics.

You will also choose further optional modules in economics and finance, which cover areas such as labour, public policy, corporate finance, financial markets, derivatives, risk management, history of economic thought, economics and business of sport, alternative investments, and environmental economics.

You will also have the option to take a dissertation during your final year.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out through examinations and a variety of forms of coursework, including essays, oral presentations, research exercises and group work.

  • Essays are used for testing general levels of understanding and ability to apply concepts
  • Course tests are used for checking on mastery of technical material
  • Econometric projects are used for testing ability to apply, interpret and assess statistical techniques
  • In some modules, teaching and assessment is supported by audience response system technologies, which help to establish a dialogue between teachers and students, and to convey useful feedback to students in real time
  • Critical review of an academic article is employed in order to test both understanding and the ability to critically assess
  • Examinations allow for open-ended treatment of material

What Next?

You will be well placed to choose from a wide range of career opportunities, including business, consulting, banking, politics, insurance, working in the Civil Service, business economics, personnel, accountancy, actuarial work, marketing, investment and financial risk analysis, and international organisations.

Many of our graduates go on to build careers in leading organisations, both nationally and internationally, such as:

  • Amazon
  • Aviva
  • Bank of England
  • Barclays
  • BDO
  • Deloitte
  • Ernst and Young
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Government Economic Service (such as HM Treasury and the Home Office)
  • Grant Thornton
  • HSBC
  • JP Morgan
  • KPMG
  • Lloyds
  • PwC
  • Santander

Economics graduates are also amongst the best paid: a HESA (2014) survey showed that economics sits just behind medical and engineering degrees at the top of the graduate salaries table. 

Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS

This is a compulsory module for all ECO students and it is a prerequisite for later economic modules. The aim of the module is to introduce you to the fundamental principles, concepts and tools of macroeconomics and to apply these to a variety of real world macroeconomic issues. There is some mathematical content - you will be required to interpret linear equations and solve simple linear simultaneous equations. The module will introduce students to core macroeconomic indicators such as income, inflation, unemployment and the stance of the balance of payments. Thus, focussing predominantly on the short-run, the module will consider: (1) models for equilibrium in the goods market and the money market, (2) applications of such models to discuss the role of fiscal and monetary policy, (3) the trade-off between inflation and unemployment, and (4) the role of expectations in macroeconomic analysis.

ECO-4006Y

20

INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMISTS

This module covers those mathematical techniques that are most relevant to the study of Economics at University level. The mathematics part of the module will focus on developing understanding of linear and non-linear functions, progressing to a treatment of differential calculus. The focus will be on the mathematical techniques themselves and their economic applications. This module is a prerequisite for the year 2 module Introduction to Econometrics. Students with strong performance on this module - a final mark of at least 70 - will have the opportunity to broaden their quantitative skills by taking the optional module Mathematical Economics later in their degree.

ECO-4001A

20

INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS

This is a compulsory module for all ECO students and it is a prerequisite for later economic modules. The aim of the module is to introduce you to the fundamental principles, concepts and tools of microeconomics. The aim of the module is apply these to a variety of real world economic issues. There is some mathematical content - you will be required to interpret linear equations, solve simple linear simultaneous equations and use differentiation. The module is primarily concerned with: (1) the ways individuals and households behave in the economy; (2) the analysis of firms producing goods and services; (3) how goods and services are traded or otherwise distributed - often but not exclusively through markets; and (4) the role of government as provider and/or regulator.

ECO-4005Y

20

INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS FOR ECONOMISTS

Basic statistical knowledge is fundamental to any understanding of applied topics in economics, business and related disciplines. The module aims to provide students with experience in the use of real statistic data and a fuller understanding of probability and statistical inference techniques. This module is a prerequisite for the year 2 module Introductory Econometrics.

ECO-4001B

20

Students will select 20 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will select either ECO-4002A or 40 credits of Language (PPLB) from the modules identified below. (Students choosing a language option are expected to study the same language in semester one and semester two). If you wish to study a modern foreign language which is not listed, please discuss this with your Course Director as we are unable to list every potential language module here.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. (If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

THE ECONOMICS OF SOCIETY

This module emphasises the application of economics to real-world dilemmas. It focuses on how applied economics can be used to study 'wicked problems'. Such problems, sometimes referred to as 'social messes', are often highly confrontational: How can we control problems of crime? Why do societies suffer from significant complications from drug addiction? How can we reduce deaths from terrorism and war? The module demonstrates how economics can play a crucial part in the debates, illustrating the value of the economic approach in transforming policy recommendations.

ECO-4002A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students who select ECO-4002A (from Option Range A) will select 20 credits from the following modules.

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

This module fundamentally deals with ideas about the power of the media and the ways that various political actors use that power. It will examine this in terms of how political actors use the media in political communications. Students will cover ideas about media effects, branding in politics, and soft power in international relations, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties and resistance or civic movements. These will be discussed in relation to the roles of journalists and public opinion, communications in elections, as well national building and branding and the communication of transnational actors. Students will get practical experience analysing and producing communication strategies.

PPLM4001B

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

THE ECONOMICS OF BUSINESS DECISION-MAKING

This module, introducing key concepts and findings from behavioural economics, investigates how economics can be used to understand the behaviour of consumers, workers and managers. Providing a means to introduce key developments in economic analysis, from neuroeconomics to the economics of emotion, the focus is on how such economic insights can ultimately improve on the nature of business and managerial decision-making.

ECO-4002B

20

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

ECONOMETRICS RESEARCH PROJECT

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4001B (or equivalent) and ECO-5006A This module builds on the econometric techniques introduced in Introductory Econometrics. Specifically students will use their data analysis and econometric skills to produce a research project using cross-section data drawn from nationally representative survey data. The survey provides information on household composition, employment and skills, income and wealth, education, health and lifestyle, social and political attitudes, well-being, environment and transport, children and families giving scope to allow students to consider a broad range of potential topic areas. The project will provide students with a range of practical, analytical and interpretative skills.

ECO-5008B

20

INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4006Y This is a module in intermediate economic theory. It is part of the compulsory core of the economic undergraduate programme and builds on the concepts covered in Introductory Macroeconomics (ECO-4006Y). The module focuses on contemporary controversies in macroeconomic policy and performance, providing practical insights into concerns such as unemployment, inflation and economic growth. The module aims to develop your understanding of key economic models, to develop your skills in applying these models and to provide the framework for further study in Economics.

ECO-5007B

20

INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4005Y This is a module in intermediate microeconomic theory. It is part of the compulsory core of the economic undergraduate programme and builds on the concepts covered in Introductory Microeconomics (ECO-4005Y). The module will focus on understanding consumer and firm behaviour, choice under uncertainty, market competition and failure and strategic interaction. The module aims to develop your understanding of key economic models, to develop your skills in applying these models and to provide the framework for further study in Economics.

ECO-5007A

20

INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4001B (or equivalent) This module introduces students to some basic econometric techniques and the problems which arise in their use. Students will have the opportunity to apply these techniques to a variety of economic problems and estimate models with the aid of statistical software. Module topics include Ordinary Least Squares estimation and the estimation of Limited Dependent Variable models.

ECO-5006A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4005Y and ECO-4006Y This module considers various economic issues from a behavioural economics perspective, such as biases in decision making; extrinsic and intrinsic motivation; which pay schemes work best; respect and autonomy in organizations; understanding cooperation and coordination; and how we can nudge people to make better decisions.

ECO-5005B

20

HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

This module offers an overview of the evolution of economic thought over the past four centuries, from Adam Smith's concept of natural order to current days' debate on the Re-thinking Economics Movement. The discussion of alternative theories will focus on a critical appraisal of assumptions, methodology, and results. Embracing an historical approach, we will explore core issues in the Methodology of Economics, including the concept of equilibrium, the concept of rationality, and the role of Mathematics in the economic analysis. The aim of the module is to develop students' critical thinking, allowing them to form judgements on different approaches to economic analysis.

ECO-5009B

20

INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND INTEGRATION

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4005Y and ECO-4006Y This module tries to develop students' understanding of the international economy. The module tries to explain global flows of goods through international trade using a number of classical "core models" of international trade theory and also some of the more recently developed models of "New" trade theory. The module also deals with trade policy and its effects on overall economic welfare and with controversial issues like strategic trade policy.

ECO-5005A

20

MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4003A OR TAKE ECO-4001A Students can only enrol on this module if they obtained a mark of 60% on ECO-4003A or 70% on ECO-4001A - Please seek further advice if you have any concerns about your suitability for this module. The module provides an introduction to mathematical techniques for economists: linear algebra, comparative static analysis, optimisation, calculus, applications (e.g. growth models, market equilibria, constrained utility maximisation and cost minimisation). The module will be particularly useful for students intending to undertake postgraduate study in Economics. Please note that this module requires good mathematical aptitude and a willingness to work hard at solving the seminar problems and other problems. The only way to master the material in this module is to work through lots of examples on a regular basis.

ECO-5003A

20

STRATEGIC THINKING

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4005Y This module presents and explores different formal concepts of game theory. Game theory provides a framework to understand how people behave in the strategic situations that arise when the welfare of any person depends on both his own choices and the decisions of others. There is an abundance of such situations in economics and in other social sciences. Examples include bargaining situations (e.g. between workers and employers), interactions between firms in an industry, arms rivalry and military conflicts or war against terrorism.

ECO-5004A

20

THE EUROPEAN ECONOMY

BEFORE TAKING THIS MODULE YOU MUST TAKE ECO-4005Y and ECO-4006Y, OR NBS-4003Y, OR NBS-5016Y This module goes out from recent EU developments, emphasising the challenges posed by Brexit, as well as by monetary union and financial crisis. To appreciate the significance of economic integration and the various options available for the UK upon leaving the European Union, we explore the economics of preferential trade and further dimensions essential to a single market. The module reconsiders economic growth in the context of an integrated economy, and the potential knock-on effects from a country's withdrawing from the single European market. It evaluates the role of factor mobility, questioning the economic theory underpinning the freedom of movement of workers, as well as exploring trends and effects of cross-border migration in Europe. The module presents two common policies governing European economies, offering an overview of EU competition policy and the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), along with their implications for non-EU members. The discussion then moves into the economics of monetary unions. This reviews the arguments in favour and against adopting common currencies, and emphasises the role of a lender of last resort. A final part reviews the issue of fiscal policy co-ordination, exploring developments in public debt and financial market integration, along with the institutional challenges raised by the euro crisis.

ECO-5006B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Carbon Labelling

    New research suggests that an initiative to show consumers which products are more environmentally friendly needs to be easy to understand to be effective.

    Read it Carbon Labelling
  • Norwich Economic Papers

    The Norwich Economic Papers provides an opportunity for ECO students to engage in and publish scholarly work in economics.

    Read it Norwich Economic Papers

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB excluding General Studies
  • International Baccalaureate 32 If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2 and 3 subjects at H3
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM BTEC Public Services is not accepted.
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 5 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade B.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.0 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a International Foundation or International Year One programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further. 

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515