BA Politics and Media Studies


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
PL32
A-Level typical
ABB (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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This course starts from the assumption that in order to understand modern politics, we need to understand the central role played by media. From Russell Brand's celebrity politics to Barack Obama's social media campaigns, contemporary politics are inextricably intertwined with all forms of media and communications. For some commentators, this is a worrying trend towards infotainment, for others it is evidence of a new and possibly more democratic way of doing politics. Our BA in Politics and Media Studies will provide you with the theoretical and analytical tools to understand this relationship. You will study in detail how contemporary media are changing the nature of politics, but also how political, social and economic interests shape the media industries.

The course will provide you with the critical and practical skills necessary to understand and engage with modern politics and modern media.

Overview

In contemporary politics it can sometimes seem that spin doctors and celebrities are more important than prime ministers and presidents. Critics complain that politics is now all presentation and no policy.

Studying the BA Politics and Media Studies allows you to look in detail at the ways in which modern media are changing the nature of politics. You will study the political, social and economic factors that shape the media industries and the ways in which those industries are used and potentially abused for political gain.

Media is undeniably important when it comes to the way modern politics is communicated, and politicians have started to using channels such as social networking sites and chat shows to connect with voters. Celebrities use rock concerts and television shows to advocate their social and political causes. Citizens are starting to take control of political communication by writing blogs and posting videos online. For some this is a worrying trend towards ‘infotainment’, for others this is evidence of a new and possibly more democratic way of ‘doing politics’.

This course enables you to study and understand this growing phenomenon, and in the process gain a unique perspective when it comes to analysing politics and the changing way that modern society relates to it.

Course structure

The degree programme is comprised of compulsory modules to give you a solid grounding in the subject area, along with a range of optional modules so you can tailor your degree to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to spend a semester studying abroad in your second year. In your final year we offer a limited number of Parliamentary and EU placements. For further details please see our Careers and Employability pages.

Year 1

In the first year you will be introduced to key debates in media studies and political science. You will take a number of compulsory modules to introduce you to this core content such as ‘Media, Society and Power’ and ‘Social and Political Theory'. 

You will also have the opportunity to choose an optional module from a ranging including those in politics, media, philosophy, film and television studies or a modern language.

Year 2

In the second year you will take compulsory modules that explore the political role of the media and key concepts in political science. ‘Building Blocks of Political Science’, Methods of Social Research’ and ‘Politics and Media’, are compulsory modules that introduce you to more advanced debates in political science and media studies. Alongside this you will be able to select from a range of optional modules offered within Politics and International Relations which will enable you to start specialising in a particular area of the subject.

During this year you will also have the opportunity to spend a semester studying abroad. This could be at one of our partner universities in North America, Australasia, Japan, Hong Kong and Europe. For further details please see the Year Abroad tab.

Year 3

In the third year you will continue to study a combination of modules that encompass politics and media by selecting from a range of optional modules, building your own programme of study. You will have to complete a large piece of independent research in the form of a dissertation.  There is also an opportunity to learn key skills in media production.

For further details of compulsory and optional modules we currently offer in each year of the programme, please see the Course Profile tab.

In your final year, we offer a limited number of work placements and internships. Our students get hands-on experience of what it means to work in the EU, but also local and national government. Students on this course have carried out research projects for think tanks and members of parliament. There are also opportunities for work shadowing and short placements in the media industry.

Assessment

The majority of teaching is carried out through a mixture of lectures and seminars. Lectures are an opportunity for you to get an introduction to a topic, and seminars are an opportunity for in-depth discussion of a topic led by a member of staff. Many of the modules you study are assessed continuously, through essays and other methods, but you will also be expected to complete an examination at the end of each year in contribution to your assessment.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Study Abroad

Students who are enrolled on 3-year programmes in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities have the option of applying to study abroad at one of UEA’s Partner Universities, for one semester of the second year. Please see our Study Abroad website for further information and criteria.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

This module introduces students to some of the key contemporary debates and issues in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations. The central theme of the module is liberal democracy, its nature, scope and potential strengths and weaknesses. We consider forces which have had an impact upon western liberal democracy - such as globalisation and the media - and examine case studies which illustrate the success and failure of liberal democracy in practice. The case studies change from year to year, but currently include Weimar Germany, Northern Ireland, Britain and the Middle East, and the US .

PPLX4052A

20

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

This module fundamentally deals with ideas about the power of the media and the ways that various political actors use that power. It will examine this in terms of how political actors use the media in political communications. Student will cover ideas about media effects, branding in politics, and soft power in international relations, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties and resistance or civic movements. These will be discussed in relation to the roles of journalists and public opinion, communications in elections, as well national building and branding and the communication of transnational actors. Students will get practical experience analysing and producing communication strategies.

PPLM4001B

20

MEDIA, SOCIETY AND POWER

This module introduces first year students to the main theories of mass communications and provides them with the key skills of academic reading and writing. Students will reflect on the importance of reading for academic research and learn how to assess and discuss the relevance and impact of milestones in mass communications theory from the nineteenth century to the present. The module explores theoretical approaches to media content, production, regulation and reception, including key themes such as freedom of speech, public sphere and political economy.

PPLM4054A

20

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY

This module explores the ways in which a variety of thinkers have sought to understand modern society, culture and politics. You will learn to grapple with fascinating and challenging theories of contemporary life by reading the work of writers such as Rousseau and Kant, Marx and Weber, Freud and Foucault. Is modern life shaped by capitalism or bureaucracy? Are we freer than ever before, or slaves to the market and the state? Are we truly individuals or does society shape our identity? What is power and who has it? These are the kinds of question you will debate in class as you learn to think deeply about what drives the world today.

PPLX4051A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

This module focuses on the role of discourse in the structuring of social relations. Its aim is to show that the linguistic features that make up our texts and verbal exchanges reflect the purpose language is put to in a specific context. Particular consideration is given to the discourse of the media, advertising and politics and how it affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the relationship between individuals and social groups. Students are introduced to the main concepts and essential analytical tools and are encouraged to select their own material for analysis (class practice and formative exercises) on the basis of relevance to their studies and interests. This module equips students with the necessary skills to undertake their own critical analysis of any texts encountered in the course of their studies and beyond and is, therefore, suited to students majoring in political and social sciences, media and cultural studies, literature, philosophy and languages. Students attend a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar.

PPLL4011B

20

GLOBAL POLITICS 2

This module focuses on particular issues and debates in contemporary global politics. It can be taken as a stand-alone module, but it also builds on the ideas and concepts introduced in Global Politics I. It takes in debates related to power in the international system, such as US hegemony, the rise of China and the future of the EU. It engages with security issues, such as nuclear proliferation and global terrorism. It considers ethical issues such as human rights and humanitarian intervention, as well as considering transnational problems such as global finance, the global environment and global governance.

PPLI4055B

20

GREAT BOOKS

This module revolves around the close reading of four classic texts from the distant or the recent past, which offer profoundly original perspectives on problems that must constantly be faced and reflected upon by mankind. The specific problem we shall focus on in Spring 2017 is the opposition of liberty and oppression, seen in particular from the point of view of the relation between freedom and revolution. Our main task will be to explore a genealogy of the idea of revolution and then devote ourselves to philosophically central conceptions of revolution, beginning with Marx (and looking at his influence on thinkers and political figures such as Lenin or Rosa Luxemburg) and continuing with critics of Marx who made an effort to reconceive the very idea of revolution, notably the French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil and the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. These figures and their ideas will naturally attract a number of other texts, some philosophical and some literary (authors may include Homer, LaBoetie, Landauer, Levi, Melville, Todorov), which will be discussed to broaden the context in which our four classics can be situated and explore their theoretical resonance with other classics.

PPLP4065B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

BUILDING BLOCKS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the key theoretical issues and debates that underpin the discipline of political science so that students understand the main methodological and ideological approaches to political science. It will also be of relevance to international relations students. The module will provide important foundations for the remainder of the politics major degree. It will be one of two compulsory modules for single honours Politics students. The first part of the module will focus on understanding basic political concepts ('building blocks') such as a rational choice, culture, and institutions, and critically examine these concepts and their application, linking to key empirical debates in political science about power, representation, accountability and policy making in western democracies. The second part focuses on meta-theoretical concerns such as how to compare political phenomena and systems, ideas and material explanation, structure and agency, epistemology and ontology.

PPLX5160A

20

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

Students acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. A variety of skills can be acquired - interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, computerised data analysis, report writing, etc. Assessment is via two individual research reports, one quantitative and one qualitative, the data being either provided to students or collected by them as part of a collaborative piece of primary research. This module is compulsory for students taking degrees in Politics and Society, Culture and Media. These two group of students will be taught in separate streams, and the material in each will be tailored to their subject-specific needs.

PPLX5047A

20

POLITICS AND MEDIA

Media is an inescapable part of contemporary political life. This module examines the many dimensions of media's political involvement. We start with arguments about media power, and then go on to look at questions of media bias, before turning to the ways in which political communication has changed (and is changing). We look at the role of the state in using and controlling media and the new techniques of media management. This leads to a discussion about media effects. We end by asking what is meant by a democratic media and how new media are changing the relationship between politics and media. This module links closely to Level 6 modules such as International Communication and Politics and Popular Culture.

PPLM5001B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and international relations, the module explores a variety of themes and case studies including: gender, representation and the media, feminist methodologies and international relations, gender and IPE.

PPLM5002A

20

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS (LEVEL 5)

The module looks at the linkage between language and politics, at propaganda and the (mis)representation of the world. It places particular emphasis on the acquisition of linguistic tools that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes. Presentations of the main concepts and examples are linked with practice sessions in which students have the opportunity to design and produce political texts. In addition we, use analytical exercises to test and challenge the theories of language use and the practices of politics focusing on both historical and contemporary situations and data. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to understand and engage with politics (and language itself) in a significantly different way to before.

PPLL5015B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

The module introduces students to the role of media and communications in processes of globalisation with a particular focus on questions of cultural change. It discusses the cultural implications of global media images and cultural products by exploring audience practices and media representations in different contexts. The first weeks of the module introduce the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation. The rest of the module discusses and assesses these approaches by critically exploring the connections between global media products and cultural transformation; changes and continuities in audience practices around the world; and the potential of media representations to transform social interaction across geographical borders.

PPLM5003B

20

NEW MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media. .

PPLM5053A

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module explores the relationship between media culture and social identities. Discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, it critically reflects upon the relationship between media culture and social power and considers how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption.

PPLM5042B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

If you wish to take PPLX5049B: Study Abroad you will need to submit a concession request via your HUB. You will not be able to submit your enrolment choices online. Please contact PSI_UG.HUB@uea.ac.uk for more details. Please note that you are only permitted to take one level 4 module during your second year of studies.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

COMPARATIVE POLITICS

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop understanding of political systems in advanced Western states. Students graduating from the module will be able to demonstrate: - critical understanding of the main theories, models and concepts applied in the analysis of political systems and their comparison - knowledge of national political systems and their institutional dynamics, political processes and debates concerning the emergence of new political regimes, the politics of territory, parties and party systems, political leadership, legislatures, interest groups, the state and public policy, and identity and citizenship; - critical awareness of current debates in comparative politics - key skills, including critical evaluation, analytical investigation, written presentation, and oral communication.

PPLX5162B

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and international relations, the module explores a variety of themes and case studies including: gender, representation and the media, feminist methodologies and international relations, gender and IPE.

PPLM5002A

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

IN AND OUT: THE POLITICS OF MIGRATION

This module will address the politics of migration and citizenship. It will provide students with a background to political thought on citizenship, membership and belonging. It will then examine migration at the international, state and individual levels. The international level will focus on historical movements of people (such as from Europe and Asia towards the Americas) and contemporary flows of refugees and guest workers. The state level will look comparatively at immigration and emigration policies and critically assess the logic behind them. Attention will be given to different countries in various regions for comprehensive comparative evaluation. Different types of migration will be considered, including economic (such as non-immigrant and immigrant work visas), family (such as spousal and family reunification visas) and humanitarian (refugees, asylum seekers, and special humanitarian protections). The politics of these migration categories will be foregrounded, including governmental tactics of management, how they comply or fail to comply with international human rights norms, and the foreign policy implications of humanitarian visas. Finally the individual level will consider narrative accounts of migration in order to understand policy and practice from a bottom-up and experiential perspective. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate and analyse the politics of migration as manifest in the various policies and practices.

PPLI5060B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SINCE 1945

This module provides a brief historical and theoretical review of the cold war. It then goes on to look at some of the key issues of the post-cold war world. How far have international relations changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989? What are the prospects for peace, stability and prosperity now that the ideological and military struggle between the USSR and the USA is over? Has international terrorism replaced communism as the main threat to the West?

PPLI5045A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful, is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

JOURNALISM: CONTEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

An introductory practical journalism module for students of politics or related topics who intend a career in journalism. The course will cover the basic skills and knowledge of the reporter, news production skills, news values and news sources, professional and ethical standards, online presentation and writing, radio, video and TV reporting. The course will include interview techniques, and package creation for radio and TV news. There will be workshops on scripting for radio and TV, including writing to picture. There will be practical instruction in camera work and editing (including mobile journalism) and timeline video and audio editing. The teaching approach will be one three-hour workshop each week - allowing sufficient class time for workshop and production activities. A feature of the course will be regular and detailed review of mainstream media, including online news sites, local and national radio and TV broadcasts.

PPLM5051Y

40

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS (LEVEL 5)

The module looks at the linkage between language and politics, at propaganda and the (mis)representation of the world. It places particular emphasis on the acquisition of linguistic tools that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes. Presentations of the main concepts and examples are linked with practice sessions in which students have the opportunity to design and produce political texts. In addition we, use analytical exercises to test and challenge the theories of language use and the practices of politics focusing on both historical and contemporary situations and data. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to understand and engage with politics (and language itself) in a significantly different way to before.

PPLL5015B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

The module introduces students to the role of media and communications in processes of globalisation with a particular focus on questions of cultural change. It discusses the cultural implications of global media images and cultural products by exploring audience practices and media representations in different contexts. The first weeks of the module introduce the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation. The rest of the module discusses and assesses these approaches by critically exploring the connections between global media products and cultural transformation; changes and continuities in audience practices around the world; and the potential of media representations to transform social interaction across geographical borders.

PPLM5003B

20

NEW MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media. .

PPLM5053A

20

POLITICS IN THE USA

Virtually alone among the world's modern democratic nations, the US does not have parliamentary government. This module is an introduction to the American system, in which power is divided between state and federal authorities, and further among legislative, executive and judicial branches. Does this open-textured system encourage democratic participation? Has it become so chaotic that sound policy making is discouraged?

PPLX5164A

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

STUDY ABROAD MODULE

The School of PPL has various arrangements with overseas Universities where it is possible to spend a semester studying abroad. For more information on this please contact Dr Elizabeth Cobbett (International exchanges), Dr V Koutrakou (ERASMUS exchanges) - or the Study Abroad Office. Assessment types may vary, depending on university abroad.

PPLX5049B

60

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module explores the relationship between media culture and social identities. Discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, it critically reflects upon the relationship between media culture and social power and considers how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption.

PPLM5042B

20

TOPICS IN BRITISH POLITICS

Some people are arguing that British politics is in crisis - tumbling electoral turnouts, decline of political parties, cynicism about the political class, high levels of apathy etc. We examine and make sense of this problem (if it is a problem), by examining in depth three or four topics. Recently these have included: changing patterns of electoral behaviour and campaigning; the issue of electoral reform; the evolving role of political parties in the face of social and technological change.

PPLX5048A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

if you select PPLX6042Y in this option range you cannot take it from option range B.

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING MEDIA DISCOURSES

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE PPLM6075B. The module focuses on the qualitative analysis of political discourse in the press, TV and computer-mediated communication. Specifically we investigate how topics such as International Relations, EU politics, immigration and Climate change are construed and interpreted by the media, and how this "social construction of reality" impacts on agenda-formation in public opinion and political decision taking. The methods we adopt include Systemic-Functional Linguistics, Cognitive Semantics and Multimodal Analysis. The aim of the module is to bring together theory and hands-on analysis and research in media products.

PPLM6074B

30

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of staff. The goal is to produce an extended essay of approximately 8,000 words, which relates in-depth research on a specialist topic to wider issues in politics, media and culture, sociology and international studies. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. There is a series of lectures and workshops that all students will be expected to attend (four in the first semester, three in the second) as well as meeting their supervisor on a regular basis

PPLX6042Y

30

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA and COMMUNICATION

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE PPLM6097A Students are advised that they should ideally have previously taken a media-related module before choosing this one. This module explores media and communication at the international level and focuses on the major issues in international communication within the contemporary global society. Combining theory and empirics, it explores how the media address regional and global issues beyond the nation-state, global media infrastructure, international flow of information, global news production, the role of media in international situations of conflict and war, political propaganda, public diplomacy, and the transnational media cultural consumption. By successfully completing this module, students will be able to understand the role of media and communication in global society and critically evaluate the process of international communication in the political, social and cultural aspects of contemporary world.

PPLM6043A

30

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 6)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism). This is a 30-credit variant of PPLL6035A and it may not be taken by language and communication students.

PPLL6137A

30

POLITICS AND POPULAR CULTURE

Popular culture links to politics in a variety of ways, some obvious, some less obvious. There are the politicians who seek the endorsement of film stars; there are the politicians who were film stars; and there are the rock performers who pretend that they are politicians. And then there are the states that censor popular culture to those that sponsor it and use it as propaganda. This module explores the many ways in which popular culture and politics are linked. It aims to introduce students to competing theories of the politics of popular culture; to look at how popular culture features in political communication; to explore developments in the political economy of popular culture, especially in relation to globalisation, new media and power within the cultural industries; to consider the main debates about the censorship of popular culture and state subsidy of it; and to explore arguments about the value and effect of popular culture, and about its role in personal and collective identity.

PPLM6037A

30

REGULATION AND POLICY FOR MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION

The aim of this module will be to enable students to understand the dynamics and issues of media and communications policy and how various levels of governance are involved in regulating media and communications industries. It takes as a starting point the assumption that the media and communications sector is special case in terms of public policy because of the role that communication plays in how we govern society, in democratic and other systems. Following background sessions on rationales, models, actors, and norms, this module will make use of case studies from national, European and global level policy debates that will be adapted each year to the current situation. For example that of press regulation or BBC Charter renewal in the UK, data protection or copyright in the EU, spectrum or domain name governance at the international level. Students will also practice professional skills relevant to various types of career, particularly any in fields of advocacy, civil service, media and communications industry, and politics. They will practice doing policy and stakeholder analysis and use evidence to draft policy interventions.

PPLM6101A

30

RHETORIC: DEMOCRACY AND THE POLITICS OF PERSUASION

Political activity involves a lot of talking, discussing and debating, speechifying, speaking and listening. In Parliaments, from public platforms and through many forms of media people try to persuade others to see things their way, to take their side and to adopt their proposals. Naturally, therefore, the form, function and implications of different forms of public argument are an important concern of political theorists and scientists. This course will explore some contemporary theorists who, in different ways, help us think through the politics of public speech and persuasion (Arendt, Dryzek, Laclau, Ranciere and others). It will also introduce you to the rhetorical tradition. Rhetoric, according to Aristotle, is "the ability to identify in any given case the available means of persuasion". In studying political rhetoric we learn about the different ways in which political arguments may be made and about how we might try to persuade particular people, about particular things at particular times.

PPLX6086A

30

THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEWS (LEVEL 6)

The module seeks to provide an understanding of how the special cultural product we call 'news' is created. It examines the changing economic, political, legal and cultural contexts of newspaper production in a variety of media (print, web, broadcast). It presents and assesses different theories about how these contexts (or 'structures') impact on the day to day practice of journalism and the nature of the news message. An important part of the module involves tracing the reflections and refractions of these wider processes in actual news media discourse. We will use frequent practical analysis exercises to test and challenge the theories of new production and the practices of new production in today's fast-changing news environment. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to 'read' news media in a very different way to before. This is a 30-credit variant of PPLL6016B and it may not be taken by language and communication students.

PPLL6136B

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

If you select PPLX6042Y from this option range you cannot take it from option range B.

Name Code Credits

AUSTRALIA THE LUCKY COUNTRY?: POLITICS, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY

This module examines the history, structures and key institutions of Australian government and their broader relationships with Australian society and culture. It has been argued Australia was manacled to its colonial past, and lacked innovation and proactivity. At the same time, the phrase, 'lucky country', has been used to project Australia as uniquely stable, politically, socially, and economically. Is this accurate? Some think so, attributing it to Australia's system of government: are they right? This module addresses such questions and, in its later stages, considers some of the challenges Australia faces, both internal such as multiculturalism and Aboriginality, and external, for example, regionalisation and globalisation.

PPLX6064B

30

BETTER WORLDS? UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More's Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas - often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform.

PPLX6041A

30

CAPITALISM AND ITS CRITICS

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop an understanding of capitalism and its political and social impact. Students graduating from the module will be able to demonstrate: -critical understanding of the main theories, models and concepts applied in the analysis of capitalism -critical understanding of normative debates about capitalism -knowledge of the arguments made by advocates and critics of capitalism, with an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses

PPLX6081B

30

CONSUMER CULTURE AND SOCIETY

This module seeks to critically examine consumer cultures within Euro-American societies. It understands consumer culture as a specific form of material culture that is not restricted to commerce, but is both an economic and cultural phenomenon. It is divided into three sections. The first two will explore the main theoretical and conceptual foundations which underpin the study of consumer cultures. The final applies these debates to specific case studies. The themes explored as a part of the module will intersect with larger questions of identity, modernity and globalisation. The main aims of the module are to challenge previous claims that production determines consumption and engage with broader ideas about the negotiation of power, and how individuals use goods to construct their own cultural identities.

PPLM6061B

30

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of staff. The goal is to produce an extended essay of approximately 8,000 words, which relates in-depth research on a specialist topic to wider issues in politics, media and culture, sociology and international studies. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. There is a series of lectures and workshops that all students will be expected to attend (four in the first semester, three in the second) as well as meeting their supervisor on a regular basis

PPLX6042Y

30

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

This module is restricted to students from PPL and HIS who are nationals of a European Economic Area (EEA) member state (UK, other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Lichtenstein), and who have undertaken a level 5 PPL EU related module. This module, PPLI6087B, will focus on preparing enrolled students for a training placement in Brussels by developing a practical understanding of how the EU works and it will provide knowledge of 'domestic' EU public affairs such as regional policy, public health, sport, business promotion, trading standards, energy and environmental policy, funding and regulation. It does NOT offer experience of foreign affairs, diplomacy or security, although broad experience of working in Brussels is an important addition to any CV. There will be seminars, workshops and briefings during the Spring Semester and the four week training placement in Brussels will be taken between Easter and late Autumn at dates set by the school and the host organisation in Brussels. The placement is optional and not tied to successful completion of the module. A substantial contribution will be made towards the costs of accommodation and travel for each placement. There are a limited number of places and selection will be by competitive interview from those eligible to apply. Selection will be based principally on the judgement of the interviewing panel of which applicants will (a) gain the most from the training placement and, (b) the extent to which candidates demonstrate real drive and commitment.

PPLI6087B

30

MULTICULTURALISM

This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination will include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offense. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

PPLX6072B

30

POLITICS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Students graduating from this module will have a sound understanding of the multi-level nature of politics and governance in Britain, how government works and is delivered, and where public policy decisions are made and by whom. They will also understand how interest intermediation and public affairs interacts with the political process at local, national and international levels, in a variety of settings, and the 'rules' for ensuring probity and transparency. New skills will be developed and awareness raised of what it takes to secure a career in politics, public services and/or public affairs with opportunities to enhance employability such as through optional 'real world' professional practice projects - the aim being to help students to build contacts, increase confidence, gain relevant experience and demonstrate their skills.

PPLX6088B

30

TEENAGE KICKS: MEDIA, YOUTH AND SUBCULTURE

This module will address the historical development of the commercial youth market and introduce key debates relating to young people and their uses of mainstream and underground media. It will examine a range of theoretical approaches to youth culture, subculture and post-subculture, employing case studies of popular and alternative music, club culture, film, television, subcultural style and new digital technologies. It will address questions of ideology, identity and representation, most significantly issues of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and encourage students to discuss how cultural interests and practices are used to construct individual and group identities. It will focus primarily on the British post-war context - highlighting the influence of American popular culture, Black Diaspora and technological transformation on British youth - but will also examine young people's media use and subcultures in other national and transnational contexts. The emphasis will be on analysing the extent to which cultural power is negotiated and resisted through shared media consumption and subculture formation

AMAM6072A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.
  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

______________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Political, Social and International Studies)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515