BA Philosophy (with a Foundation Year)


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
V50F
A-Level typical
CCC (2019/0 entry) See All Requirements
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If you've thought about going to university, but something got in the way - or if you didn't achieve the grades you needed, but are passionate about your subject - our Humanities Foundation Year programme is perfect for you.

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Philosophy graduates leave with skills in analysis and argument, presentation and teamwork that are highly sought after in a wide range of professions. Our lecturers are highly experienced and active in research. Their specialised findings are the central focus of many taught modules, giving our students direct insight into the latest philosophical understanding and cutting-edge debates.

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Find out how studying at UEA helped Jack achieve his career goals. The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communications Studies has a lively, stimulating and welcoming atmosphere and brings together students and staff across a wide range of subjects, offering interdisciplinary teaching and research.

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Key facts

(Guardian University League Table 2019)

Gain the skills, knowledge and confidence you need to excel in a humanities degree, with our innovative Foundation Year programme.

At UEA we believe everyone should have the chance to study at degree level. If you have a passion for your subject, but for whatever reason, don’t yet have the grades required for the three-year programme, our Foundation Year is a great choice. You’ll undertake an intensive and exciting year of study, majoring in your chosen subject and developing your study skills. We offer a rigorous but supportive teaching and learning experience, that’s also very rewarding.

When you successfully finish your Foundation Year, you’ll be perfectly placed to progress to your BA Philosophy degree.

Overview

You will study with dedicated lecturers from UEA’s Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities, exploring a wide range of academic subjects including Literature, History, Philosophy, Film, Television and Media, American Studies, Politics and the History of Art.

You’ll benefit from smaller class sizes and individual tutorials, helping you to get the most out of the year. You’ll gain a sound theoretical basis for your continuing studies, as well as discovering new areas of study. You’ll be actively encouraged to develop your own scholarly interests and ideas throughout the year.

We’ll support you as you cultivate your study skills, gaining essential knowledge of many of the concepts, methods and techniques you will need in order to thrive on your degree programme. This is a very supportive programme and we’ll work closely with you to identify and work towards your own individual learning goals.

Course Structure

During your Foundation Year, you will study a mixture of compulsory and optional modules, enabling you to tailor your studies to your interests, while ensuring you develop the knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve your full potential during the rest of your degree.

In your Humanities: Techniques and Methods module you’ll discover the kinds of academic approaches and methodologies you’ll use in your degree.

In your Humanities: The Key Concepts module you’ll explore key theories and ideas in the humanities and discover how they relate to political, social, historical and cultural contexts. For example you might study ideology and myth, feminism, otherness, cultural landscapes, power and representation.

You may choose to study a module on the Cultural and Creative Industries where you will critically investigate a range of areas such as television, film, new media, publishing (fiction and non-fiction), archiving, galleries, museums and heritage, among others. You’ll have the chance to explore the relationship between theory and practice in these areas. Alternatively you can choose to study a language module in place of Cultural and Creative industries, such as Arabic, French, Japanese, Italian or Spanish.

The remaining modules offer you a range of subject-specific options including history, literature, visual cultures, politics, and media, or you can select to continue further with a language. By studying a combination of two of these options, you will not only be able to investigate key areas of your chosen degree subject, but you will also gain an interdisciplinary perspective on it through exploring an adjacent humanities discipline. This is your opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in subjects closely tied to the rest of your degree, or even to try something new while you are on the Foundation Year.

Teaching and Learning

Teaching

Our modules are taught via lectures, presentations, seminars and workshops, and incorporate a variety of teaching methods and study tasks to prepare you for the different types of learning and teaching you will experience during your full degree. Through seminars, interactive training sessions and supportive feedback you will be able to develop skills in areas such as essay writing, research, preparing and giving presentations, and understanding and evaluating scholarly arguments. Your Foundation Year will be taught by award-winning lecturers who are specialists in their fields, and the teaching is informed by cutting-edge subject research and a strong commitment to innovative and engaging teaching practice.

Independent study

Your Foundation Year will be an intensive course. You will need to work independently between classes to make sure you are fully prepared for seminars, workshops and assessments, and are making the most of the resources and facilities available to you at UEA. We will support you as you develop your ability to study independently in this way, cultivating skills that will be of great benefit in your degree, and later career.

Your modules will be accompanied by detailed reading lists that direct you towards essential reading and recommended texts, chapters and articles, as well as multimedia resources. This means you can organise and prioritise your research and wider reading easily. Study materials are also available via Blackboard (UEA’s online learning platform). Specially-designed group and individual study tasks will help you to work effectively between classes.

Assessment

During your Foundation Year you will be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment.

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff, and this in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. For example, there is a strong emphasis on formative assessment. That means you will receive feedback on drafts of written work to help you improve. Group tutorials will also help you hone your thinking.

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an individual adviser throughout your programme, receiving a series of individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well, are happy and are achieving your full potential.

After the course

Once you successfully finish your Foundation Year you will go straight on to the BA Philosophy degree.

If, during the year, you discover your interests and ambitions lie elsewhere, you can also apply to switch to one of the other degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, with the approval of the Admissions Director.

Explore your options, look at our courses, and decide where you want your degree to take you.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • Law
  • Journalism
  • The Civil Service
  • Cultural industries
  • Teaching or lecturing
  • Charity and environmental work

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2019/0

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITIES: TECHNIQUES AND METHODS

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

HUM-3006A

20

HUMANITIES: THE KEY CONCEPTS

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

HUM-3005Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Meeting people. Food and drink : eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes. Please note that your current level of Greek should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds beginners' level when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol on Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The term "Cultural and Creative Industries" encompasses a range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, and creative writing. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative subjects (television, film, media, music, publishing - fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines - among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of the cultural and creative industries. On successful completion of the module, you'll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

HUM-3007A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you will have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You will learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while travelling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, if you have studied French abroad for a long time, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business? Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds the beginners' level specified above when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You'll take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You'll also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure).

PPLB4023B

20

HISTORY AND SOCIETY

Dramatic changes took place in 19th-century England which still affect the way we live our lives today. Throughout this module you will explore some of the upheavals which took place, considering the impact that national trends and cultural developments had on individual households, villages, towns and regions. Through the close examination of primary source materials produced at the time, you'll look at the development of several key areas of 19th-century life in the English countryside. For example, this has included education, health and medicine, crime and punishment, changing Christian beliefs and attitudes to worship, as well as the often harsh realities experienced by rural society on a daily basis. You'll also have the opportunity to consider how the media in the 21st century, through documentaries, costume drama and celebrity shows, presents the past. You'll ask questions such as whether the time and budgetary restrictions directors and producers face create an accurate or distorted view of the way our ancestors lived. You'll also explore the ways in which sources and case studies are presented to audiences and you'll think about how this affects people's perceptions of the past. By the end of the module, you'll be able to place the 19th century within its wider context. You'll understand where many of our current ideas and reactions to various aspects of life, such as welfare and leisure, originated. And, in addition, you'll be able to assess the extent to which decisions our ancestors made in the 19th century still influence our culture and society two hundred years later.

HUM-3001B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successful completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

VISUAL CULTURES

Do images have meaning? Why does your favourite film/ television programme/ artist matter? You will discuss these issues in Visual Cultures, as you explore what makes some things beautiful, influential, or culturally significant. The module is designed to develop your appreciation of visual cultures (with a special focus on film, television, and art), and to encourage a deeper intellectual dive into your specific visual cultures interests. Along the way you will participate in some of the key academic debates in the field of visual cultures and familiarise yourself with the tools of these disciplines, such as close textual and contextual analysis, research and essay writing, and class discussion. The module is taught using a variety of learning settings and experiences, including lectures, screenings, workshops, seminars, and tutorials. The assessment likewise aims to develop a range of your academic skills.

HUM-3003B

20

LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES

What is literature? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? These are just some of the key questions you will be asking as you embark on your module. Over the course of your Literature and the Humanities module, you will be introduced to a wide range of key texts and themes in literary studies. You will also be examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts (historical, political, and cultural). The module is evolving all of the time, and in the past we have covered topics such as revolutionary writing, sexuality, Postcolonialism, and Ecocriticism, and we have studied texts ranging from poetry, to graphic novels, to jazz music, and blogs. You'll also have the opportunity to develop your own academic voice as you work on your assessments which are your opportunity to showcase your best work from the module. By the end of your module, you will have developed your ability to analyse texts, be able to explain why historical and cultural contexts are so important, and construct your own critical arguments effectively. You will also be better equipped to communicate complex ideas to others and apply interdisciplinary approaches to texts, images, and film.

HUM-3004B

20

MEDIA IN PRACTICE

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media#film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don't need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You'll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You'll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There'll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too#in the past we've created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA#and we'll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

HUM-3008B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

HUM-3002B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from medieval or modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle. The texts you study are in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant 'for their time', but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

What am I? What kind of world am I in? What can I know? How should I live my life? In this module, you'll grapple with fundamental philosophical questions that have great personal significance for each of us. You'll focus on perspectives from the history of modern philosophy (ca. 1650 to 1950). You'll get to debate the ideas of key thinkers, which might include Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, as well as other less well-known figures. This module will be suitable for you with or without prior experience of philosophy, and whether or not you are studying philosophy as part of your degree. It is a useful accompaniment to work in early modern history and English literature.

PPLP4063B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

You will be offered a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. You will cover a spectrum of related topics, typically including issues such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy to address these issues, you will be prepared for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from their results, adopts their methods, provokes them, comments on them, critiques them, and/or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one-week components, you will learn with academics drawn from across the institution. Each will explore case studies or more general examples (in lectures, workshops and seminars) demonstrating the impact that philosophical thought has had and continues to have on the development, methods and future direction of their own area of expertise (and vice-versa). Each of ten key subject areas are explored in this way followed by a week in which we review the lessons learned about the place of philosophy in the contemporary academy and in the wider world. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students. It provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of research - especially true at UEA - that they may wish to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other disciplines, offering, as it does, insight into philosophy's reach into other subjects including (potentially) their own major. It is assessed formatively on a weekly basis by the submission of a log-book in which the student reflects on the preceding week's teaching, followed by a final summative task in which the weekly logbooks are assembled into an essay-length submission.

PPLP4066A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

What do we mean when we say an argument is well-reasoned? What makes an argument either watertight, or unreliable? We can start to answer these questions by distinguishing between, on the one hand, the individual claims that occur in an argument and, on the other hand, the relationships between those claims (which is the argument's logical structure). During this module you'll study philosophical reasoning, looking in close detail at the role played by logical structure such that we have an argument which has not only a true conclusion, but one which is firmly supported. As a result, you'll arm yourself with indispensable tools for rigorous philosophical thought, for identifying problems in the arguments you encounter, and for defending your views effectively within and beyond academic philosophy. You'll study what we call "validity" in particular, gaining techniques for identifying valid arguments. As you discover how to break down the components of an argument, you'll sharpen your skills in argument-analysis and deepen your understanding of some key logical concepts, central to philosophy. In addition you'll master specific methods for examining validity in abstraction from natural language contexts. You'll strengthen these skills via a combination of seminars, lectures, workshops, and independent study. We'll focus heavily on practice exercises. The study of logic and reasoning will make you a better philosopher, whatever your specialism or area of interest. It will enable you to judge your own arguments and those of others more easily and effectively, and help you to organise your thoughts and communicate your ideas more effectively.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will choose one module from this list, which should be either (Theme A) a further philosophy module (PPLP4065B or PPLP4067B), or a module in one of the other four designated themes (Themes B to E), which allow the student to follow a subsidiary subject alongside their Philosophy. To embark on one of these other themes, students will choose from the specified modules as follows: (B) Classical Ideas: PPLP4067B, LDCL4016B, AMAA4004B or AMAA4025B; (C) Creative Writing: PPLP4067B, LDCL4020B; (D) Languages and Cultural Diversity: AMAA4004B, AMAA4024B, DEV-4005B, DEV-4008B, PPLC4012B, PPLL4011B, PPLP4065B, PPLP4067B, LDCL4016B or any language module for which the student is eligible; (E) Gender Studies: PPLL4011B, PPLP4065B, AMAA4025B, or HIS-4004B; (F) Film Studies: AMAM4021B, or AMAM4035B. Note: PPLP4065B and PPLP4067B are compatible with all routes. By default, in the event that a chosen module is oversubscribed, students will be enrolled on PPLP4065B or PPLP 4067B, whichever is available.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I (SPRING START)

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4051B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol on Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

Why may politicians say that 'immigration is a problem' rather than 'immigrants are a problem' and why am I addressing you as 'you' rather than 'the students' throughout this module outline? Can there be unbiased news reporting? In this module you will explore some of these questions and how the language and images that make up our texts and interactions reflect their purpose in specific contexts. We will explore the powerful expressive means by which agency, responsibility and blame are attributed to or removed from key players in the language of media, advertising and politics. We will see how the representation of events affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the power relationship between individuals and social groups. Essentially, this module is for those who are curious about the practical impact of expressive choices in everyday written and oral communication and wish to find out more about the creative but also manipulative power of language in context (discourse). By the end of this module, you will have learnt how particular linguistic and visual patterns may be used to report, persuade or instruct. You will have acquired the skill to critically assess and challenge others' perspectives, attitudes and values but also consider more critically how you may produce or change your language to achieve your desired aims, from increasing the cohesion of your writing to producing a more engaging website. These are highly valuable skills in any work environment. In the seminars, you will be encouraged to apply the new analytical tools presented in the lecture and you will be able to select your own material for analysis for formative exercises and the final assignment so that it relates to your studies and interests.

PPLL4011B

20

Landscape, Art and Culture

Most works of art - whether objects, buildings, or performances - are designed to serve a set of purposes. How their forms and functions relate may be straightforward and practical, or complex and elusive. Through a range of case studies, presented in lectures by our staff in Art History and World Art Studies, you will examine the connections between the uses, meanings, and appearances of art, culture, space, and landscape. You will also consider how these connections may change over time, especially in the context of cross-cultural contact. The opportunity to analyse texts on your own and in discussion groups will help you understand different points of view and construct an argument supported by evidence.

AMAA4004B

20

FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS OF THE GREAT CIVILISATIONS

In this module you'll explore the ways in which human beings have, from time immemorial, used narratives and poetry to create their models of the universe, and to think about issues relating to mankind's place within it. You'll focus on ancient texts from a variety of major civilisations over the last four millennia, many of them still treated as living sources of wisdom and insight, spiritual guidance and moral vision. It has become customary in modern philosophy to privilege rational discourse, in prose, as the acceptable way of doing philosophy, and to imagine that to be human is to be rational. But is it irrational to explore our world and discover the deeper truths through narrative? Is that even non-rational enquiry? Might it actually be one of the key ways in which philosophy can reach and engage every human being? And might that be why all civilisations have stories and poetry as their foundational texts, not philosophical arguments? In this module you'll acquire a basic knowledge of some key texts (including Homer, key parts of the King James Bible and the Quran) that any citizen of the world should know.

PPLP4067B

20

HUMANITARIAN COMMUNICATION

You will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as Non-Governmental Organisations. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. You will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as 'pornography of poverty', as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of 'post-humanitarian' communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging and the basics of development photography.

DEV-4008B

20

INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

What is anthropology? What do anthropologists study? How is anthropology different from other disciplines? This module presents an overview of key anthropological approaches and their connections with history and archaeology. Throughout this module, you'll learn about classical and contemporary anthropological themes by looking at approaches to nature, human ecology, material culture, art, ritual, religion, and globalization. You'll learn how important "culture" is in shaping the world. This enables you to comprehend the complexities of today's world.

AMAA4024B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire q wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

This is the first part of a two year course that covers basic principles in social anthropology, and uses them to understand society and processes of social change in developing countries. The SAID1 module provides an introduction to anthropological theory to advance student's knowledge of socio-cultural issues and disciplinary themes such as adaptation and the environment, human evolution, colonialism, witchcraft and magic, religion, kinship and marriage, class and hierarchy, exchange, rituals, myths and ceremonies. The module's main aim is to promote an understanding of key figures and debates in social theory and show how these can be applied to development issues and policies. The lectures and seminars are accompanied by a weekly film series in which ethnographic films addressing key anthropological debates are shown and discussed.

DEV-4005B

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

What does interpersonal communication actually involve? We will learn that interpersonal communication requires specific intercultural competences, especially when communicating with others who have different sets of assumptions that may lead to misunderstanding, even if the same language is used. This module will equip you with ways of thinking about issues such as language, (non) verbal communication, identity, intercultural interpersonal relationships and intercultural transitions. You will also learn that interpersonal communication involves a high level of self-awareness and critical understanding of issues surrounding the concept of identity. Through lectures and seminars, you will delve deeply into how you present yourself to others who are perceived to be different to you. On successful completion of the module, you will have developed greater self-awareness and sensitivity to intercultural understanding so that you are a more effective interpersonal communicator in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work, global organisations, multinational companies, foreign volunteering placements, etc. The module is delivered in the English language and you don't need to speak a foreign language to take it.

PPLC4012B

20

PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY

How do you represent a person? On this module, you will explore the genre of portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists from the ancient world to the present day. You will develop the skill of visual analysis as you consider issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. You will also continue to develop your writing skills, as we analyze works of art alongside histories and concepts of the individual self - perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

AMAA4025B

20

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY

In this module, we study some of the most original thinkers of the twentieth century, in order to reflect in unconventional ways on the ideas of human association and community as well as evaluate the loss of autonomy produced by cultural invasion and the institutionalisation of values. The basic goal of Radical Philosophy is to present you with a constellation of styles of thinking and forms of criticism that will stimulate you to examine in a rigorous way several thought-provoking perspectives on the idea of social transformation.

PPLP4065B

20

READING INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE: TUTORIAL CLASS

This module sets English literature in the context of other literary traditions. It focuses on how we read and respond to international literature in English translation. You'll explore a small number of texts originally written in languages other than English (from elsewhere in Europe and beyond), and aim to develop the critical skills necessary for working with them. There is no foreign language requirement for this module: we'll be comparing alternative translations of the same works and reflecting on the difference that translation makes to our reading experience. We'll also be reading at least one untranslated text and analysing how cultural difference is encoded within 'World Englishes'. Our discussions will be informed by contemporary theoretical debates in comparative literature, world literature, postcolonialism and translation studies.

LDCL4016B

20

STUDIES IN FILM HISTORY

This module provides you with an introduction to the history of cinema from 1946 to 1996, as it is traditionally understood within Film Studies. It will outline important developments in global film history, which will underpin your future study. We will help you to understand some of the complex processes of historical change (e.g. technological, industrial and socio-political) that transformed cinema during the period in question and will situate particular films in the aesthetic and narrative traditions in which the films were originally made and seen.

AMAM4021B

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

You will examine the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, you will explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. You will look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

WORLD CINEMAS

The concept of World Cinema pervades our everyday experiences of film. It is a category of films that can be seen increasingly from cinema listings to the high street. Inherent within the label are debates of resistance, industry, art, technology and aesthetics that have held sway since the dawn of cinema worldwide. In this module you will break down some of these discourses and address the significant cultural, economic and political influences that world cinema has had, and indeed still has, within cinema. There are innumerable cinemas that may be contained within the notion of "world cinema," but few are more long-lived, or as well-developed, as those we will investigate during this unit. Taking the conceptual frameworks of "Middle Eastern," "European" and "Asian" cinemas as starting points, you will break down the meanings that these regional, national and international definitions of cinema share. You will focus, for example, on the cinemas of Europe, Turkey, Middle East, Japan and America. This tightly focused definition of "world cinemas" is intended to introduce some of the most significant of contemporary world cinemas, while also focusing on those which have had the most influential global histories.

AMAM4035B

20

WRITING TEXTS

In this module theories of literature and experiments in writing will intersect. In weekly lectures and seminar discussions, and through the reading of a carefully curated dossier of essays, you'll explore important questions about writing and literature. What is the difference between writing and speaking? What is a literary text and how does it differ from non-literary texts? What is the relationship between the act of reading and the act of writing? How is a literary text influenced by other texts? You'll also become confident in carrying out your own textual experiments and trying out a range of creative rewriting exercises on existing texts. In this you might explore modes of adaptation and translation, try out different ways of writing to constraint, play literary-generative games such as cut-up technique, as well as undertake a variety of textual interventions and experiments. You'll be encouraged to hack existing literary texts and rewrite them to your own purpose. You'll take texts apart and put them back together differently. Through specially-designed writing exercises you will gain new insights into a variety of approaches to writing and literature. Your encounters with literary-theoretical texts will likewise cast new light on the writing process and the ways in which the text produced relates to textual theories. By the end of the module you'll have gained a keen understanding of how texts work. This will make you a better reader and writer. You'll also become confident in stepping back and thinking about your own writing critically.

LDCL4020B

20

Students will select 80 - 120 credits from the following modules:

You must take at least 80 credits from this Option Range. If you are taking a semester abroad as part of this range, you will take modules from this and other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad.

Name Code Credits

ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY FOR SECOND YEARS

How can we avoid environmental catastrophe? How can philosophy help? The relationship between human beings and the natural world is the basis of everything we are and yet we do not seem to have found a way to avoid destruction, degradation and potential catastrophe. In this module we will examine various ways in which philosophy can examine our relationship with the natural world and contribute to the fight to protect the planet. Topics may include the ethics of climate change; value theory and nature; human-animal relationships; the ways science, art and politics affect our relationships with the natural world. This module will cover a selection of these topics, and you may wish to continue the course by taking the complementary Level 6 module in your third year.

PPLP5177B

20

ETHICS FOR SECOND YEARS

What is morality? And in what ways does it impinge on our lives, in deciding what to do? There are issues relating to ethics that are theoretical and meta-ethical, about what kind of judgements are being made and what is their basis in fact or in some realm of values; there are normative issues, about how, if at all, a theory can help to predict or decide what a person ought to do or which dispositions are commendable; and there are practical issues, about the real dilemmas of life and death, about fairness, love and compassion, as we face them in the world, and not just in imaginary "trolley-problems". To complete a course in ethics you would want to explore all these aspects of the subject, and during this module you'll engage with a selection of these, focusing either on the theoretical aspects, including attention to some major historical figures, or more on practical ethics. This module can be taken as a stand-alone module, but you are also encouraged to enrol for the complementary Level 6 module, which will be available in your third year, so as to compile a more complete study of the whole range of these topics.

PPLP5174B

20

EXISTENTIAL PHILOSOPHIES (SECOND YEAR MODULE)

How can we make sense of the vast and complex world we are plunged into at birth? What happens when we become alienated from the world and its everyday meaning? If there is no absolute meaning assigned to human life by divine authority, does life have any meaning at all? Are we absolutely free to make sense of the world in any way we choose? Does death present an ultimate limit to human existence and freedom? Existential philosophers have grappled with these questions and in the process developed new ways of thinking about art, science, politics, divinity and every aspect of human life. Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the key founders of existential philosophy and his work began an important tradition that influenced thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. This module will focus either on the explosive work of Nietzsche himself or on the existential tradition he inspired, so you may also wish to take the complementary module at level 6, in your third year, in order to cover both aspects of the subject.

PPLP5180B

20

KEY THINKERS AND TEXTS FOR SECOND YEARS

The history of philosophy, from ancient times to our own, is richly studded with exciting and innovative thinkers, whose ideas still spawn a vast volume of research and reflective criticism. These great minds are our partners in many fascinating slow-motion dialogues that extend over decades, centuries and even millennia. We converse with them about some of the most significant issues in the field. In this module you'll join in this discussion by taking part in seminars focused on reading and discussion of some more of the original texts (in English translation, if that is not the original language), under the guidance of a research expert in the field. Texts will be selected by the seminar leader, to complement your other second and third year modules, and will not include precisely the same texts as are included elsewhere in the philosophy Honours programme. Rather we'll aim to focus on thinkers whose work is insufficiently addressed in the other modules. Examples of thinkers that will be most likely to appear in the seminars for this module include Plato, Aristotle, the Presocratic Philosophers, Ancient Sceptics, Enlightenment thinkers such as David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Rene Descartes, George Berkeley, thinkers from early Analytic philosophy, early or late Wittgenstein, Simone Weil or Iris Murdoch. During this module you'll be taught in a seminar/reading group style, with each group meeting on a weekly basis for twelve weeks. One or more such seminar groups may meet, depending on student enrolments and staff availability, and each group will be reading a different text or texts, from a different period or school of thought. You'll be enrolled into whichever group interests you most (you'll need to say which one you want to attend when you sign up for the module). Seminar groups will run with a minimum of ten students in the group: if you choose a group with less than 10 participants, you'll be offered a choice of a different seminar group or a different module. This is a free-standing module that can be taken by itself. However, by taking this module in year 2, and the complementary Level 6 module in year 3, you can create a two semester course, exploring a selection of historical thinkers and adding a fitting supplement to the topical modules that you'll be taking over these two years.

PPLP5179A

20

KNOWLEDGE SCIENCE AND PROOF FOR SECOND YEARS

Epistemology examines what knowledge is. Science is concerned with the acquisition of secure knowledge, and philosophy of science considers what counts as science, what objects the scientist knows about, and what methods can be used to attain such knowledge; logic uses formal tools to investigate different forms of reasoning deployed to acquire knowledge. You will be given an opportunity to explore a selection of these areas of philosophy, through teaching informed by recent and ongoing research: which ones will be explored on this occasion will be selected in the light of the lecturers' current research interests and their general appeal.

PPLP5175B

20

MIND AND LANGUAGE FOR SECOND YEARS

In this module you will be invited to engage with some of the key issues that figure in Philosophy of Mind and in Philosophy of Language, and to identify the interconnections between the two. Some major thinkers in the field, both recent and from earlier periods of the Western canon of philosophy, will be studied, and chosen set texts may be selected for close attention as relevant. Topics might include the mind-body problem, the nature of mind and its relation to the brain, issues connected with meaning and understanding, how (if at all) language governs, limits or facilitates thought, and the relation between language and the things about which we use it to talk. By taking this module in your second year you will explore a selection of these topics. A further selection of these topics is available in the complementary Level 6 Mind and Language module, which you can take in your third year.

PPLP5173A

20

PHI SEMESTER ABROAD MODULE

Students often say that spending a semester abroad expands their horizons and improves their career prospects. You will be able to judge this claim for yourself by completing this module. You'll experience a different educational culture and develop new perspectives on learning. Assessed formatively and summatively by the host university and on successful completion of the semester abroad, you'll have developed the knowledge and skills to study in a foreign academic environment with more confidence. Assessment will be in the foreign institution and you might be assessed via different methods depending on the institution you attend. I.Eligibility criteria You must achieve above 40% in all modules in your first year with an overall aggregate of 55% in Year 1. The 55% progression requirement in Year 1 for students intending to take a semester abroad in the spring semester of their second year must be achieved at the first attempt. If you are referred to reassessment, you will not be permitted to undertake a semester abroad. If you are eligible for compensation and meet the progression requirement with the compensated mark, you may undertake the semester abroad. You are required to comply with General Regulation 13 (Attendance, Engagement and Progress) in the autumn semester of your second year to undertake a semester abroad in spring Year 2. Details of this regulation can be found here https://portal.uea.ac.uk/documents/6207125/7465906/Section+3+General+Regulations+for+Students.pdf If you fail to meet the requirements for the semester abroad, you will be transferred off the single semester module. If you fail to meet the requirements for eligibility in your first year assessments, then you will be transferred to your reserve modules. If you do not meet the criteria of attendance, engagement and progress in the first semester of your second year, your semester abroad arrangements will be cancelled. In the event that you are found to have infringed the academic code of conduct during your first year, or during the first semester of your second year, you will be ineligible for the semester abroad. This would include (but is not limited to) engaging in plagiarism, collusion or cheating. II.Getting ready to study abroad January - March of Year 1: Let your Hub know you intend to study abroad in the spring of Year 2 when you complete online module enrolment. March - May of Year 1: Once you find out where you have been provisionally allocated, investigate which modules you could take abroad. September - December of Year 2: Attend the meeting with your Study Abroad Academic Coordinator and finalise your module choice in consultation with your UEA Adviser to complete the learning agreement. III.Academic requirements You must register for a full-time course of study (the number of actual modules will vary by institution and depends on the academic year system as well). NB: Failure to enrol full time could result in ineligibility to return to UEA. Additionally, less than full time enrolment will jeopardise your visa status. You must take responsibility for registering for a full time course of study at your host university. You need to do this in consultation with your UEA Adviser. Further details of the paperwork you will need to complete are available from the Study Abroad Office. You must select appropriate modules at the host university in consultation with your UEA Adviser. You must take full responsibility for having your learning agreement approved and signed by your UEA Adviser/Study Abroad Academic Coordinator. You must submit your learning agreement to the Study Abroad office (studyabroad@uea.ac.uk) within the first week of your semester abroad. III. Extenuating Circumstances Factors (personal or medical) that are affecting your ability to maintain your academic performance abroad should be brought to the attention of your host university and your UEA Adviser who will provide guidance on the options open to you. Guidance can also be sought from the Arts Hub. IV. Interrupting your studies If, for any reason, you need to withdraw from your host university, you must notify UEA Study Abroad Office and your Study Abroad Academic Co-ordinator immediately. You will then need to apply for permission from UEA to take a break in your studies. You will be liable for payment of fees in accordance with the published cut-off dates: https://portal.uea.ac.uk/planningoffice/tuition-fees. Students will be required to pay back any scholarship or funding received, as well as any outstanding debts incurred at the Semester Abroad institution (such as accommodation).

PPLP5171B

60

PHILOSOPHY MEETS THE ARTS (SECOND YEAR MODULE)

Philosophy has much to say about the arts, and much to learn from them. In this module you will have a chance to explore some aspects of this relationship. Some issues that arise fall into what we would call aesthetics and the philosophy of art: we can ask about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation, and we can investigate the views of many past thinkers on these matters. On the other hand, we can also use art to illuminate philosophy, and for this purpose we have chosen to focus primarily on cinema (while "literature and philosophy" investigates similar questions in connection with literature"). This module will focus on one or other of these two aspects of the encounter with beauty and the arts, but you may also wish to take the complementary module at level 6, in your third year, in order to cover both aspects of the subject.

PPLP5176B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AND POLITICS FOR SECOND YEARS

History and politics are inseparable because human societies and communities develop and transform historically. Philosophical thinking about society and community requires us to question deep assumptions about the human good and how we form ideas about that good over time. Does history show that we have made political progress? What does 'progress' even mean? How should we think about our social understanding of the past? Does your historical situation limit your political horizons or your political culture limit your historical understanding? Is it in the person or the community that should not be divided, i.e. that is 'in-dividual'? What kind of understanding, what kind of methods are involved in the disciplines of history and politics? Can philosophy ground a political system, and, if so, which political system(s) does philosophy ground? These are some of the question you'll address in dialogue with key thinkers of history and politics, such as Hegel; Marx; Collingwood; Simone Weil; Arendt and Rawls.

PPLP5167A

20

RELIGION AND WORLD PHILOSOPHIES FOR SECOND YEARS

Religion is a phenomenon that is hard to define, and yet clearly integral to the entire history of human existence and across many cultures. Traditional philosophy of religion as practised in the modern Western philosophical tradition tends to focus on Christian belief and classical theism, yet there are also strong traditions of philosophy in other cultures with other religious traditions, such as the Islamic and Jewish thinkers who were at least as important as the Christian ones in the history of Medieval thought, and philosophy in Classical India and China has links with other non-Christian traditions such as Buddhism and Hindu thought.

PPLP5168A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

You can choose none or one or two modules from this Option Range. These options allow you to continue with, your chosen theme (Themes A to E). If you take two modules they must both belong to the same theme. Students on all pathways may take HUM-5004B as one of their two modules from this option range, but should seek (where possible) a placement relevant to the chosen pathway. Students are normally expected to continue to follow the same theme in successive years, when choosing modules outside philosophy, but variations are permitted where there are good reasons. You are always free to revert to Theme A. The specified modules for each theme are as follows (A) Further Philosophy: take further modules from Options Range A, and not more than one module from PPLX5064A; LDCL5072A; HIS-5073A; HIS-5072B; HUM-5004B; (B) Classical Ideas: AMAA5098B; AMAA5105B ; LDCL5061A, LDCL5072A, PPLX5064A, HIS 5002A; HIS-5073A; HUM-5004B (C) Creative Writing: LDCC5004B or LDCC5005A; LDCL5072A; HUM-5004B (D) Languages and Cultural Diversity: AMAA5004B; DEV-5001A, LDCL5031A; LDCL5079A, PPLL5170A; LDCL5061A, LDCL5079A, LDCL5084A, HUM-5004B or any language module for which the student is eligible; (E) Gender Studies: DEV-5001A, AMAS5020A, AMAM5031A, PPLM5002A; LDCD5058B; LDCL5030A; LDCL5050B, LDCL5085B; HIS-5063B, HIS-5064A; HUM-5004B (F) Film Studies: AMAM5030A, AMAS5020A, HUM-5004B. Note: you must not take more than 20 credits of Level 4 modules in Year 2. Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Education and Critical Thinking, Globalisation and The Environment. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades! Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Time and Sleep, World Population and Urbanisation and Tourism. You will be assessed midterm, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading, and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material, and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades! Please note that you should not have a level of English that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB5044B

20

ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

Using a range of case studies from the Mediterranean World, this module introduces you to some of the most significant themes and debates in the archaeology of the Mediterranean and archaeology more generally. Case studies will be drawn from a range of time periods and will address 'the big themes' in archaeology, such as cultural transmission, cultural development, societal collapse, trade and exchange, conflict, migration, empire and expansion, the emergence of urban societies, climate and society and ritual and religion. Often more than one theme will be included in a case study and the aim will be to understand how they relate to each other. For example, how does conflict or climate change contribute to migration or societal collapse?

AMAA5098B

20

ARTS AND HUMANITIES PLACEMENT MODULE

This module will provide you with the opportunity to work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Careers Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences. If you would like to choose this module you need to attend a preparatory workshop on March 13th from 2pm - 4pm in ARTS 01.02 or March 14th from 12-2pm in SCI 3.05. A register will be taken and only students who have attended the workshop will be considered during Module Enrolment. If there are extenuating circumstances that prevent attendance at either workshop, students must email placements@uea.ac.uk in order to arrange a one-to-one preparation session. In addition to the preparatory workshop, students who enrol on this module will be required to undertake further preparatory activities prior to the module starting in the spring semester of 2020 and have secured a placement by December 11th 2019. Support will be provided throughout the duration of this process. International students interested in this module must ensure that they have appropriate CAS allocation to allow for a placement.

HUM-5004B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while travelling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, if you have studied French abroad for a long time, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Meeting people. Food and drink : eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes. Please note that your current level of Greek should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business? Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds beginners' level when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds the beginners' level specified above when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol on Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol on Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You'll take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You'll also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure).

PPLB4023B

20

CONTEMPORARY MEDIASCAPES

You'll be provided with an understanding of media access, production, participation and use/consumption. Module content is organised around notions of space and place, thereby enabling engagement with issues including: globalisation/the global; national media and media systems; regional and local media; community and 'grassroots' media, domestic and 'personal' media. Over the course of the module, you'll develop an understanding of the range and reach of media and the multiplicity of factors determining how, when and where populations are enabled to access and participate in media activities. Parallel to the above will be an exploration, through selected case study examples, of media and cultural policy issues, spaces/places of media production as well as a critical engagement with questions of power in relation to these. The module also adopts a contemporary focus by incorporating debates about the role and potential of digital media and communications technologies in enabling new forms of media production, distribution and participation.

AMAM5020A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

Have you ever wondered what it means to write creatively? Or how you might articulate what Zadie Smith calls 'your way of being in the world'? Together we'll address these questions. You'll explore the work of some of the finest writers in the world, while also receiving clear guidance on how you might bring shape to the promptings of your imagination. This module will get you writing prose fiction and/or poetry. While there is no single, authorised way to write, there are things worth knowing about. You'll discover some of these things in class; others you'll pick up through being alert to what you have read and the way in which it functions. The most important thing, however, is to discover your own way of doing things. What drives you to capture a certain moment, or tell a certain story in a certain way? That's what we'll be aiming for. Along the way you'll develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts - while acquiring the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, drafting, and submitting to deadlines. You'll be guided through a series of themes and concepts that go to the heart of creative writing, from voice and structure, to imagery and form. You'll generate material throughout the course, both through guided exercises and private study. Very often you'll be asked to write about 'what you know', drawing on notebooks, memory, family stories, your sensory impressions. In prose you will go on to look at such things as character, dialogue, point-of-view, 'showing' versus 'telling', plotting, etc. In poetry, there will be an exploration of the possibilities of pattern and form, sound, voice, imagery, and rhythm. By the end of the course you'll have developed a body of work to call your own and a sense of what it means and what it takes to write seriously.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

Have you ever wondered what it means to write creatively? Or how you might articulate what Zadie Smith calls 'your way of being in the world'? Together we'll address these questions. You'll explore the work of some of the finest writers in the world, while also receiving clear guidance on how you might bring shape to the promptings of your imagination. This module will get you writing prose fiction and/or poetry. While there is no single, authorised way to write, there are things worth knowing about. You'll discover some of these things in class; others you'll pick up through being alert to what you have read and the way in which it functions. The most important thing, however, is to discover your own way of doing things. What drives you to capture a certain moment, or tell a certain story in a certain way? That's what we'll be aiming for. Along the way you'll develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts - while acquiring the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, drafting, and submitting to deadlines. You'll be guided through a series of themes and concepts that go to the heart of creative writing, from voice and structure, to imagery and form. You'll generate material throughout the course, both through guided exercises and private study. Very often you'll be asked to write about 'what you know', drawing on notebooks, memory, family stories, your sensory impressions. In prose you will go on to look at such things as character, dialogue, point-of-view, 'showing' versus 'telling', plotting, etc. In poetry, there will be an exploration of the possibilities of pattern and form, sound, voice, imagery, and rhythm. By the end of the course you'll have developed a body of work to call your own and a sense of what it means and what it takes to write seriously.

LDCC5004B

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

What is literature? What makes it what it is? How should we go about reading it and what should we be reading for? How has 'English literature' emerged as an academic discipline? And how can we justify the study of that discipline today? These are some of the questions you'll explore, as, across the course of this module, you examine the theory and practice of literary criticism from the late-nineteenth century to the present. In doing this you'll not only engage with the rich, complex and provocative work of literary critics and theorists - including deconstructive, feminist, post-colonial and queer theorists - but also of some of the thinkers and writers who have influenced them: such as Marx, Freud and Saussure. You will therefore encounter some of the most important and exciting thinkers of the modern period, acquiring an understanding of developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, and tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study. This is a module you will find helpful throughout your degree.

LDCL5031A

20

EARLY MODERN EUROPE: FROM HUMANISM TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT

What is the source of knowledge and authority? Is it the Ancients; is it Divine Revelation; is it Reason? Covering almost 300 years (c. 1500-c.1800), this module is bookended by Erasmus's call to return 'to the [ancient] sources' and Kant's challenge to 'dare to know!' (sapere aude - itself an ancient quotation). Questions of knowledge and authority, and their shifting location, were crucial in the early modern world. They will guide us though our exploration of the period's most significant developments, discoveries, and debates: the revival of Antiquity; the Reformation and Confessionalisation; the proliferation of the printing press and rise of print culture and the Republic of Letters; the European discovery of the Americas; the Scientific Revolution; the articulation of republican and absolutist ideologies; (Neo-)Classicism and Baroque; the Age of Enlightenment; and others. The arts (literature, fine art, theatre, music) will be amongst our main sources of evidence, and we will discuss the paintings of Raphael and Rubens and the operas of Monteverdi and Mozart, both for what they tell us about other developments and about transformations in the arts themselves.

HIS-5073A

20

EMPIRE AND AFTER: GLOBALIZING ENGLISH

Today, literature in English is produced in many countries across the world and English increasingly enjoys a status as a 'global' language. In this module you will explore how this situation came about by placing the development of English literary traditions both in the British Isles and elsewhere into the long historical context of the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with canonical works by British writers from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth and into the twentieth centuries, you will then consider literary and political responses to the experience of empire and colonization by writers from areas such as South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australasia, and the Americas. You will explore how 'English Literature' has been shaped on a global scale by global historical forces, and how different the history of the English literary tradition looks when placed alongside and in counterpoint to these 'other' writings in English. You will then discuss the writings of authors such as Daniel Defoe, Joseph Conrad, Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, Amitav Ghosh, Kate Grenville and J.M Coetzee amongst others. The module will introduce you to the theoretical and conceptual apparatus of postcolonial literary studies and to some of the key frameworks for understanding the formation of the modern world, such as race and racism, nations and nationalism, colonial discourse and postcolonial theory, and how gender and sexuality were pivotal in the formation of colonial and post-colonial identities.

LDCL5079A

20

FEMINIST THEATRES

What was the feminist theatre movement and what does it mean for you now as a writer, theatre maker and/or scholar? Feminist Theatre allows you to explore key feminist theatre makers from the Suffrage movement to the present, focusing on radical companies and writers of the 1970s and 1980s. Combining seminars and practical workshops, you will investigate what feminist historiography is and how you can engage creatively with archives. The module invites you to draw on a lineage of feminist ideas and methods to consider and challenge the continued under representation of women in theatre (and beyond). Assessment will be part analytical and part creative or creative-critical work, with an option to create a performance. All welcome! No need to identify as a woman or feminist to take part.

LDCD5058B

20

FILM THEORY

You will explore aspects of film theory as it has developed over the last hundred years or so, encompassing topics including responses to cinema by filmmaker theorists such as Sergei Eisenstein and influential formulations of and debates about realism and film aesthetics associated with writers and critics such as Andre Bazin, Siegfried Kracauer, Rudolf Arnheim and Bela Balazs. You'll study the impact of structuralism, theories of genre, narrative and models of film language; feminist film theory and its emphasis on psychoanalysis; theories of race and representation; cognitive theory; emerging eco-critical approaches; post-structuralist and post-modern film theory. You'll be taught by lecture, screening and seminar. You'll work with primary texts - both films and theoretical writings - and have the opportunity to explore in their written work the ways in which film theories can be applied to film texts.

AMAM5030A

20

FREEDOM - THE HISTORY OF A DREAM

The idea of freedom is one of the cornerstones of modern European political thought. And yet, few ideas, in the history of early-modern and modern Europe, have been more misused, misunderstood, and manipulated. The aim of this module is to offer a survey of the different meanings that the idea has acquired between the seventeenth and the nineteenth century. The history of the Age of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Restoration will be central to this module. You will consider the ideas and works of several authors, including Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Mill, etc# and their readings of the events they witnessed. You will also consider the relationship between ideas of freedom and other crucial notions - justice, community, nation, etc# But, above all, you will pay attention to the ambiguity underlying its various meanings. With reference to the latter point, two main issues will be particularly significant. First, if freedom can only exist if there are limits to it (G.W.F. Hegel), then how have those limits been established? Second, since freedom can never be given by others but must always be taken from them (Hannah Arendt), then the question is to what an extent the use of violence has been deemed legitimate in the pursuit of freedom in European history? Concerns as these will be central to our seminars and lectures. This module does not require a knowledge of political philosophy or political theory.

HIS-5072B

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

DEV-5001A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

PPLM5002A

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

You'll examine the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities, providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods You'll explore both theoretical and methodological issues and cover theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. You'll explore a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

HE SAID, SHE SAID: GENDER AND PERSPECTIVE IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION

This module asks: -How does gender affect our perception of the world? -Why is it important to critique ideas of gender at this point in history? -How does the perceived gender of an author affect our interpretation of their work? -How does our own gender affect how we write and interpret fiction? -What about the intersection of gender and race? Gender and sexuality? -How does our position on the axis of oppression and privilege affect our personal experience and our ability to write from the perspective of those with intrinsically different experience? -How does our position on the axis of oppression and privilege affect our ideas of authenticity? -In a time of human social and political upheaval, is all art inherently political?

LDCL5085B

20

INDIGENOUS ARTS AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

You will begin by analysing what is meant by Indigenous arts and peoples. In particular, we shall consider the link between the anthropology of art and Indigenous identity. The inter-disciplinary approach continues, by examining issues related to the interpretation of indigenous arts in wide-ranging geographic and cultural contexts from North America, to India and Australia. It then questions Indigenous peoples' engagement with notions of ethnicity and heritage, as well as the formation of an 'Indigenous media' through film-making.

AMAA5004B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successful completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire q wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY

Do accents define us? Do we need to change how we speak depending on who we are speaking to? Is language sexist? These are key questions to consider when think about sociolinguistics, the study of language and society. After all, Language is a powerful thing, an aspect of human behaviour that both defines and reflects the cultural norms of different societies. Our aim is to provide an introduction to sociolinguistics and throughout the module you will discover a wealth of different approaches to analysing language in relations to many different social variables, such as class, gender or social distance. You'll gain a firm grounding in sociolinguistic frameworks, methods and concepts, and also learn how to communicate linguistic ideas, principles and theories by written, oral and visual means. You'll begin with an overview of the field of sociolinguistics and key social variables. You'll then delve deeper, uncovering core concepts such as dialectology, Code-switching, genderlects, language policy, multilingualism, and interpersonal dynamics. By looking at the different methods and types of evidence used by sociolinguists, you'll become proficient in the different ways of working in this fascinating subject. Learning will be through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study. Seminars will include practical opportunities to practice your skills in linguistic analysis. You'll be assessed though coursework (100%), but will present your research for your coursework during the module as part of the formative assessment. The module is open to anyone interested in learning more about sociolinguistics, and you do not need to be studying a language to take this module - just have an interest in language and how we use it. On successful completion of the module, you'll have the knowledge and skills to take your understanding of language and society, and how we communication and interpret this communication, and apply it to many different areas of study. You'll develop your research, writing and presentation skills. And you'll be able to communicate your ideas more effectively, putting your thinking to the test by sharing it with others.

PPLL5170A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, including a lecture from the module convener, plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. This module is compulsory for English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

READING AND WRITING TRANSLATIONS

How do we convey the experience of one language and culture in the words of another? What is at stake intellectually, artistically, and politically in translation? This module will provide you with a descriptive vocabulary for the analysis of literary translation and an introduction to key theoretical explanations of what happens when we translate. You'll study translations from a range of historical periods, genres and languages. In the past, we have worked on authors such as Alexander Pushkin, Pablo Neruda, Adonis, Thomas Mann, and Knut Hamsun. Theories have included the classic controversies of St. Jerome and Vladimir Nabokov as well as debates about cultural equivalence and political issues such as the representation of the foreign. The module is taught by seminar where we engage with translation in a variety of ways, for example comparing different translations of a single text, translating the Bible from multiple languages into English, rewriting existing translations, and studying draft manuscript translations of a novel by Georges Perec. Assessment is by summative coursework for which you can either produce a comparative analysis of existing translations or an original translation with commentary. On successful completion of this module you'll be able to describe the linguistic and stylistic features of a variety of texts as well as critically assess and apply different theories of translation. A thorough reading knowledge of another language besides English is advisable, but not essential.

LDCL5061A

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll learn the concepts and debates that are fundamental to social anthropology, and their relationships with development and change. The teaching methods on this module include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. Topics you'll cover include economic anthropology, ecological anthropology, personhood, embodiment, the anthropology of talk, identity and gender, cultural rights, technical change and the anthropology of development.

DEV-5004A

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

On this module you'll study the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Anglo Saxon period. You'll learn to identify and interpret key landscape features from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages before moving on to study Roman and Anglo Saxon landscapes. Lectures, seminars and field trips will provide you with an introduction to the approaches and sources used by landscape historians and landscape archaeologists. You'll develop your understanding of landscape history through the study of key sites such as Stonehenge, Hadrian's Wall and Sutton Hoo. The chronological approach of the module will provide you with an understanding of long term landscape change, telling the story of the English landscape from prehistory to the eve of the Norman Conquest.

HIS-5002A

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by a range of writers including Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Oscar Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments, including modern adaptations and re-imaginings of the plays. The main mode is seminar discussion with opportunities to experience the play texts as performances. You may choose to include a performance element as part of your assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

THEY CAME FROM OUTER-THE-CLOSET: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND PANIC IN AMERICAN FILM

With its main focus on the 20th century, this module will explore key moments of change or crisis in the century and consider the ways the panic caused by such changes is distinctly gendered and/or sexualised. It will concurrently examine gender and sexual resistance to dominant ideas of American identity and the subsequent creation and/or promotion of liberationist discourses and alternative communities. Film will provide the focus for this cultural study, and the module will range widely over a number of different genres including the western, sci-fi, detective and LGBT themed works.

AMAS5020A

20

THREE WOMEN WRITERS

'I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.' Virginia Woolf wrote these words in A Room of One's Own, her polemical essay about women and fiction. Woolf suggests that historically women have been reticent about openly declaring themselves as writers. Elsewhere in the piece she argues that literary language itself is unfit for women's use and that women's writing is distinct, undervalued and hampered by women's social, economic and political history. This module puts Woolf's assertions to the test. In this module you'll read the work of Woolf and two of her contemporaries, for example, Katherine Mansfield and Edith Wharton. You'll explore their writing in its historical and cultural context and you'll think about how it may or may not have influenced later thinking about the position of women. You'll consider whether or not you think their writing was innovative and what relevance it might have for us today. Each week you'll read a work by one of the three writers on the module alongside a short piece of critical writing, either contemporary with the main text or an extract from a later time that in some way engages with the themes of the week's central text. You'll learn through close reading, class discussion and independent study. Each week there'll be opportunities for members of the group to present their ideas and research on either the main or the critical text - work that can be developed in your summative assessment which will consist of one essay submitted towards the end of the semester. Your growing knowledge and understanding of the concerns and debates that were current at the time the texts were written will enable you to unlock some of the preoccupations that can lie hidden beneath the visible surface of these women's writing. These books were written at the turn of the twentieth century, but by the end of the module you'll not only be able to assess their impact in their own time but also discuss just how significant they are to society today.

LDCL5050B

20

WATCHING YOUR LANGUAGE

We all know our own language, but a great deal of that knowledge is automatic: we're not aware of what we know. This module uses an assortment of concepts, exercises and texts to develop a more precise consciousness of the way language is used. It will exploit the resources of the Oxford English Dictionary to see how individual words grow and change their meanings. It will ask what 'standard English' is, and why some writers choose to deviate from it. It will explore the idea that language may be corrupted, with disastrous political effects. And it will look at some historical attempts to control words, including current debates about the language of prejudice and hatred. Literary texts will include George Orwell's 1984 and Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker. Critical materials will include extracts from M.M. Bakhtin, Victor Klemperer, Raymond Williams, Deborah Cameron. Written work will consist of short reports and analyses, some of them drawing on students' own experience of language in use.

LDCL5084A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

In this second year module you will examine in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, and have shaped the ways in which we think about politics even today, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. You will also compare their work thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions. The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key primary texts and will enable you to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at 3rd year undergraduate level, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at first year level. The module is taught by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, supported by private study of your own, and you will be assessed by coursework, usually a combination of an essay and a portfolio which reflects on your reading and seminar performance throughout the semester.

PPLX5064A

20

WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR

You will explore female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. You will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes, and will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5063B

20

WOMEN, POWER, AND POLITICS (I): ISABEL OF CASTILE TO MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

You will examine the issue of gender in European history, between 1500 and 1750. Using a variety of written and visual sources, and including a comparative element, you will focus on the following themes: definitions of femininity and masculinity; marriage, family and life cycles; queens and queenship; honour and sexual identities; charity and welfare; women and work; material culture; women in the new world; education and learning; early feminists.

HIS-5064A

20

Students will select 80 - 120 credits from the following modules:

Students will select all or most of their modules from this range (minimum 80 credits, but normally 90 to 120 credits). Students following the guided option range D, 'Language and Culture', must take the 20 credit module (PPLP6103A) if they are taking 20 credit variants of modules in Options Range B. All other students should take a minimum of 90 credits, chosen from the 30 credit modules.

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

In this module, you'll explore a topic in philosophy that is of particular interest to you as an individual, normally based on ideas that have emerged from your work on previous modules in philosophy, or from seeing the connections between more than one area of your studies. In some cases, you might be able to pursue an area of philosophy that is not otherwise included in the undergraduate curriculum but in which we have research expertise among the full time staff (and for these areas, it may also be possible, where workloads permit, to organise a group study programme, or 'special subject', for you to work together with several other students with the same interests). When enrolling for this module, you'll need to include a second choice on your enrolment form, and you'll need to have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in your second year assessment, with good attendance and good submission of formative work in the second year. You'll need to fill in the form sent by the module organiser in advance of module enrolment, in order to secure a place on this module. You'll also need to agree a topic with a supervisor (if this is not possible, you'll need to move to a different module). NB You may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes (or 'special subjects'). Please contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after you've enrolled on the course.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

In this module, you'll explore a topic in philosophy that is of particular interest to you as an individual, normally based on ideas that have emerged from your work on previous modules in philosophy, or from seeing the connections between more than one area of your studies. In some cases, you might be able to pursue an area of philosophy that is not otherwise included in the undergraduate curriculum but in which we have research expertise among the full time staff (and for these areas, it may also be possible, where workloads permit, to organise a group study programme, or 'special subject', for you to work together with several other students with the same interests). When enrolling for this module, you'll need to include a second choice on your enrolment form, and you'll need to have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in your second year assessment, with good attendance and good submission of formative work in the second year. You'll need to fill in the form sent by the module organiser in advance of module enrolment, in order to secure a place on this module. You'll also need to agree a topic with a supervisor (if this is not possible, you'll need to move to a different module). NB You may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes (or 'special subjects'). Please contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after you've enrolled on the course.

PPLP6104B

30

ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY FOR THIRD YEARS

How can we avoid environmental catastrophe? How can philosophy help? The relationship between human beings and the natural world is the basis of everything we are and yet we do not seem to have found a way to avoid destruction, degradation and potential catastrophe. In this module we will examine various ways in which philosophy can examine our relationship with the natural world and contribute to the fight to protect the planet. Topics may include the ethics of climate change; value theory and nature; human-animal relationships; the ways science, art and politics affect our relationships with the natural world. This module will cover a selection of these topics. It can be taken as a stand-alone module or, if you took the associated Level 5 module in your second year, you can add a new focus to your work in this area by taking this third year one as well.

PPLP6145B

30

ETHICS FOR THIRD YEARS

What is morality? And in what ways does it impinge on our lives, in deciding what to do? There are issues relating to ethics that are theoretical and meta-ethical, about what kind of judgements are being made and what is their basis in fact or in some realm of values; there are normative issues, about how, if at all, a theory can help to predict or decide what a person ought to do or which dispositions are commendable; and there are practical issues, about the real dilemmas of life and death, about fairness, love and compassion, as we face them in the world, and not just in imaginary "trolley-problems". To complete a course in ethics you would want to explore all these aspects of the subject, and during this module you'll engage with a selection of these, focusing either on the theoretical aspects, including attention to some major historical figures, or more on practical ethics. If you took the complementary Level 5 module last year, you can complete the Ethics course in your third year by taking this module as well, or you can take this as a stand-alone module.

PPLP6142B

30

EXISTENTIAL PHILOSOPHIES (THIRD YEAR MODULE)

How can we make sense of the vast and complex world we are plunged into at birth? What happens when we become alienated from the world and its everyday meaning? If there is no absolute meaning assigned to human life by divine authority, does life have any meaning at all? Are we absolutely free to make sense of the world in any way we choose? Does death present an ultimate limit to human existence and freedom? Existential philosophers have grappled with these questions and in the process developed new ways of thinking about art, science, politics, divinity and every aspect of human life. Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the key founders of existential philosophy and his work began an important tradition that influenced thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. This module will focus either on the explosive work of Nietzsche himself or on the existential tradition he inspired, so if you have already taken the complementary module at level 5 in your second year, you can also take this in order to cover both aspects of the subject, or it can be taken as a stand-alone module.

PPLP6146B

30

KEY THINKERS AND TEXTS FOR THIRD YEARS

The history of philosophy, from ancient times to our own, is richly studded with exciting and innovative thinkers, whose ideas still spawn a vast volume of research and reflective criticism. These great minds are our partners in many fascinating slow-motion dialogues that extend over decades, centuries, and even millennia. We converse with them about some of the most significant issues in the field. In this module you'll join in this discussion by joining a seminar focused on reading and discussion of some more of the original texts (in English translation, if that is not the original language), under the guidance of a research expert in the field. Texts are selected by the seminar leader, to complement your other second and third year modules, and will not include precisely the same texts as are included elsewhere in the philosophy Honours programme. Rather we'll aim to focus on thinkers whose work is insufficiently addressed in the other modules. Examples of thinkers most likely to appear in the seminars for this module include Plato, Aristotle, the Presocratic Philosophers, Ancient Sceptics, Enlightenment thinkers such as David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Rene Descartes, George Berkeley, thinkers from early Analytic philosophy, early or late Wittgenstein, Simone Weil or Iris Murdoch. During this module you'll be taught in a seminar/reading group style, with each group meeting on a weekly basis for twelve weeks. One or more such seminar groups may meet, depending on student enrolments and staff availability, and each group will be reading a different text or texts, from a different period or school of thought. You'll be enrolled into whichever group interests you most (you'll need to say which one you want to attend when you sign up for the module). Seminar groups will run with a minimum of ten students in the group: if you choose a group with less than 10 participants, you'll be offered a choice of a different seminar group or a different module. This is a free-standing module that can be taken by itself. However, if you took the complementary module for second years at Level 5, then adding this module in your third year will allow you to thereby create a two-semester course, and to explore a wider selection of historical thinkers, as a fitting supplement to the topical modules that you'll have taken over these two years.

PPLP6146A

30

KNOWLEDGE SCIENCE AND PROOF FOR THIRD YEARS

Epistemology examines what knowledge is. Science is concerned with the acquisition of secure knowledge, and philosophy of science considers what counts as science, what objects the scientist knows about, and what methods can be used to attain such knowledge; logic uses formal tools to investigate different forms of reasoning deployed to acquire knowledge. You will be given an opportunity to explore a selection of these areas of philosophy, through teaching informed by recent and ongoing research: which ones will be explored on this occasion will be selected in the light of the lecturers' current research interests and the general appeal of these interests.

PPLP6143B

30

MIND AND LANGUAGE FOR THIRD YEARS

In this module you will be invited to engage with some of the key issues that figure in Philosophy of Mind and in Philosophy of Language, and to identify the interconnections between the two. Some major thinkers in the field, both recent and from earlier periods of the Western canon of philosophy, will be studied, and chosen set texts may be selected for close attention as relevant. Topics might include the mind-body problem, the nature of mind and its relation to the brain, issues connected with meaning and understanding, how (if at all) language governs, limits or facilitates thought, and the relation between language and the things about which we use it to talk. By taking this module in your third year you will explore a selection of these topics. If you took the complementary Level 5 Mind and Language module in year 2, you can complete the course by taking this module in your third year, so as to cover the full range of topics, or you can take this one as a stand-alone module.

PPLP6141A

30

PHILOSOPHY MEETS THE ARTS (THIRD YEAR MODULE)

Philosophy has much to say about the arts, and much to learn from them. In this module you will have a chance to explore some aspects of this relationship. Some issues that arise fall into what we would call aesthetics and the philosophy of art: we can ask about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation, and we can investigate the views of many past thinkers on these matters. On the other hand, we can also use art to illuminate philosophy, and for this purpose we have chosen to focus primarily on cinema (while the module "Literature and Philosophy" investigates similar questions in connection with literature"). This module will focus on one or other of these two aspects of the encounter with beauty and the arts, so if you have already taken the complementary module at level 5, in your second year, you can also take this in order to cover both aspects of the subject, or it can be taken as a stand-alone module.

PPLP6144B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AND POLITICS FOR THIRD YEARS

History and politics are inseparable because human societies and communities develop and transform historically. Philosophical thinking about society and community requires us to question deep assumptions about the human good and how we form ideas about that good over time. Does history show that we have made political progress? What does 'progress' even mean? How should we think about our social understanding of the past? Does your historical situation limit your political horizons or your political culture limit your historical understanding? Is it in the person or the community that should not be divided, i.e. that is 'in-dividual'? What kind of understanding, what kind of methods are involved in the disciplines of history and politics? Can philosophy ground a political system, and, if so, which political system(s) does philosophy ground? These are some of the question you'll address in dialogue with key thinkers of history and politics, such as Hegel; Marx; Collingwood; Simone Weil; Arendt and Rawls.

PPLP6138A

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

In this module, you will explore distinct types of interaction between philosophy and social science. You will study classic philosophical works in order to shed light on theoretical frameworks in political theory; discuss modern work in economic methodology to understand its presuppositions and its goals. Finally, you will examine the problem of understanding meaningful human action, you ponder the possibility of establishing causal relations that connect social phenomena, and you reflect on the function of values in social enquiry.

PPLP6103A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

In this module, you will explore distinct types of interaction between philosophy and social science. You will study classic philosophical works in order to shed light on theoretical frameworks in political theory; you will discuss modern work in economic methodology to understand its presuppositions and its goals. Finally, you will examine the problem of understanding meaningful human action, ponder the possibility of establishing causal relations that connect social phenomena, and reflect on the function of values in social enquiry.

PPLP6128A

30

RELIGION AND WORLD PHILOSOPHIES FOR THIRD YEARS

Religion is a phenomenon that is hard to define, and yet clearly integral to the entire history of human existence and across many cultures. Traditional philosophy of religion as practised in the modern Western philosophical tradition tends to focus on Christian belief and classical theism, yet there are also strong traditions of philosophy in other cultures with other religious traditions, such as the Islamic and Jewish thinkers who were at least as important as the Christian ones in the history of Medieval thought, and philosophy in Classical India and China has links with other non-Christian traditions such as Buddhism and Hindu thought.

PPLP6139A

30

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Subject to satisfactory progress, you may take the specified options from this range, if you embarked on the relevant subsidiary theme in year 2 and met the requirements to continue with that theme. Students are normally expected to continue to follow the same theme in successive years, when choosing modules outside philosophy, but variations are permitted where there are good reasons. You are always free to revert to Theme A. Students will select a maximum of 30 credits, except for those following Theme A (Further Philosophy) or Theme D (Languages and Cultural Diversity), who may select up to 40 credits (i.e. 2 x 20 credits). If you are taking 2 x 20 credits from this range, you must also select the 20 credit philosophy module PPLP6103A from option range A. The specified modules for each theme are as follows: (A) Further Philosophy: take further modules from Options Range A, or not more than 40 credits from PPLX6044B/PPLX6048B PPLX6041A/PPLX6066A, PPLX6097B/PPLX6098B, LDCL6048A, LAW-6018B; (B) Classical Ideas: AMAA6121A, LDCD6106A; LDCL6054B; LDCL6056B; LDCL6085B; LDCL6087A, LDCL6188A; (C) Creative Writing: LDCL6164B, LDCL6170A, LDCC6003A, LDCC6004B. (D) Languages and Cultural Diversity: AMAA6137A, PPLL6035A/PPLL6137A, PPLX6072B/PPLX6073B, or any level 5 language module for which you are qualified. (E) Gender Studies: PPLL6137A; AMAA6128A, AMAM6062B, LDCL6132B; LDCL6033B; LDCL6180B. (F) Film Studies: AMAM6062B, AMAM6119B. Note that the Creative Writing dissertation is open only to students who have qualified by achieving the requisite mark in the Second year Creative Writing module, and submitting an approved proposal. Note: You must not take more than one Level 5 module in Year 3.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Education and Critical Thinking, Globalisation and The Environment. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades! Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Time and Sleep, World Population and Urbanisation and Tourism. You will be assessed midterm, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading, and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material, and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades! Please note that you should not have a level of English that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB5044B

20

AFTER NATURE: LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS

Where do debates in environmentalism, cultural geography and literary criticism meet? What does contemporary literature have to tell us about our relationship with space, place, landscape, nature, rurality, ecology, and even a 'sense of planet'? On this module you will encounter a range of post-war and contemporary forms, from poetry, short stories, the novel, and literary non-fiction to visual art, the radio essay and film. Each will offer fresh and surprising ways of thinking about a range of different contemporary environments and about our place in a changing world. We will consider in what ways literary genres and traditions have helped to create and produce our understanding of geography in the past and how recent literary works have reworked some of these genres and traditions to mark contemporary changes. We will consider, for example, how authors since the environmental crisis have engaged with/inherited/reworked early modern chorography, the Romantic travelogue, the naturalist's journal, and the rural essay. To what new ends are these forms put in an uncertain and unstable modern world? Among others, the course will explore work by Alice Oswald, Rana Dasgupta, Tim Robinson, Kathleen Jamie, Patrick Keiller, J.G. Ballard, and Robert Macfarlane. It will also include trips to investigate the nature writing holdings at UEA's British Archive for Contemporary Writing. Assessment will give you the opportunity to, initially, create your own critical or creative radio essay/podcast (formative) and, later, develop a deeper knowledge of one of the week's themes, building your own critical (or creative non-fiction) project around it (5,000 word summative). While there are no pre-requisites, this module complements and develops themes explored on level 5 'Writing the Wild' and level 6 'Urban Visions: The City in Literature and Visual Culture'.

LDCL6164B

30

ANIMALS ON SCREEN

What happens to the study of television, film, and other forms of media if we take into account the representation of animals? Throughout this module you will discover, critique, engage with, and apply multiple frameworks useful for thinking about the functions animals fulfil within media. In doing so, you will critique the hitherto human-centric nature of the majority of academic thinking, and explore why thinking about animals matters. You'll cover a wide range of theoretical and practical approaches for discussing animals and human-animal relationships. For example, human-animal studies and critical animal studies are relevant interdisciplinary approaches, and you'll also explore topics such as posthumanism. Key to the module are debates about representation, and you will examine a variety of television programmes, films and other media, to unearth how animals are used in different kinds of culture. This will also map onto debates about genre with, for example, discussion of how human-animal hybrids are represented in science fiction, or the multitude of animals that appear in children's culture. The module will enable you to examine representations more thoroughly and with more nuance. It will also encourage you to think about the implications of animal representations in media, in terms of debates such as animal welfare and environmentalism.

AMAM6119B

30

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT IRAQ AND IRAN

Ancient Mesopotamia, what is now Iraq and parts of Iran, is recognisable today by two of its most impressive and powerful cultures, the Sumerians and the Assyrians. Situated between the Euphrates and the Tigris Rivers, Mesopotamia remained largely autonomous for nearly 3000 years, during which time its power and influence over neighbouring regions ebbed and waned. At the heart of Mesopotamian society was competence and skill in a broad range of arts and crafts, but it is most famous for being the world's first literate society. Along with writing, the glue of Mesopotamian society was cultic practice and religious belief, most visibly attested to in the art of temples and burials. At all periods art was fundamental to Mesopotamian culture; it coloured their rituals and beliefs, it was integral to their writing system, and was used in both politics and warfare. You will explore the significance of artistic practice in the development of Mesopotamian society.

AMAA6137B

30

BETTER WORLDS? UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More's Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas - often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform.

PPLX6041A

30

BETTER WORLDS? UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More's Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas - often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform. This module is a 20-credit version of PPLX6041A Better Worlds? Utopias and Dystopias.

PPLX6066A

20

CREATIVE WRITING DISSERTATION (AUT)

This is an advanced level module which is for final year CW minors. The module allows students an opportunity to write a substantial short story (approximately 6000 words) or drama script (60 pages) or collection of poems (15-25 poems, totalling between 270 and 290 lines) and to develop an understanding of their own motivations, influences and processes through the production of a reflective self-commentary (2000 words). This module aims to encourage independent learning and the initiation and development of new creative material in a way that provides a grounding in the disciplines necessary both for postgraduate research and the professional practice of writing. Students must be on the English Literature with Creative Writing course OR have received a mark of 68%+ in a previous creative writing module AND have a project proposal approved by the module convenor as well as a faculty member.

LDCC6003A

30

CREATIVE WRITING DISSERTATION (SPR)

This is an advanced level module which is for final year Creative Writing minors. The module allows students an opportunity to write a substantial short story (approximately 6000 words) or drama script (60 pages) or collection of poems (15-20 pages) and to develop an understanding of their own motivations, influences and processes through the production of a reflective self-commentary (2000 words). This module aims to encourage independent learning and the initiation and development of new creative material in a way that provides a grounding in the disciplines necessary both for postgraduate research and the professional practice of writing. Students must be on the English Literature with Creative Writing course OR have received a mark of 68%+ in a previous creative writing module AND have a project proposal approved by the module convenor as well as a faculty member.

LDCC6004B

30

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

You'll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You'll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you'll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you'll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth's natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

PPLX6097B

30

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

You'll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You'll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you'll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you'll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth's natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

PPLX6098B

20

ENGLISH ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS

Do you need help in organising your writing and expressing your thoughts clearly? Would you like to gain the tools and confidence to write more clearly and fluently, leading to better grades and greater satisfaction with your work? In this module you will learn how to structure academic essays and how best to write logically organised paragraphs. You will have practice in summarising and paraphrasing material from sources that you have read to ensure you can capture the essential points of a writer's argument and avoid any form of plagiarism. This will include help with ways to manage the referencing of sources. There will be a focus on vocabulary throughout the course and you will be set tasks to direct you to appropriate academic language; and you will have help in using a range of cohesive devices to link ideas within and between paragraphs. It is also likely that the class will need some remedial work on a specific area of grammar occasionally, and the tutor will allow time in class to deal with such issues. Naturally, you will be required to complete weekly homework assignments in addition to any reading and writing you do in the classroom, and you will receive regular feedback. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. This module is not open to native or near-native speakers of English and would not be suitable for International students who have already had considerable experience in English essay writing. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the general level of the module may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5045B

20

FEMINIST WRITING

We are witnessing an upsurge in feminist activism which some claim is forming the fourth wave of feminism. It is timely then to reconsider how feminist writing (literary texts, literary theory, and literary criticism) has helped to shape, influence, and articulate debates about gender, sexuality, and society in the past and how contemporary feminist writing is continuing to be part of that conversation now. You'll have the opportunity to read and analyse some of the most influential feminist literary texts and literary theory. Writers studied on the course may include Margaret Atwood, Henrik Ibsen, Angela Carter, Jean Rhys, Jeanette Winterson, Sylvia Plath, Virginia Woolf, Ali Smith, Beyonce, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. You'll study the ways in which feminist criticism and theory (including Kristeva, Cixous, bell hooks, Haraway, and Butler) has reshaped the canon, challenged the ways literature is taught as well as making us consider what literature can, might and ought to be. Feminism has also exacted different forms of writing and challenged dominant modes of representation. We will take a particularly close look at the relationship between feminism and the gothic, the short story, and experimental writing. Assessment will be by course work and project and you'll be assessed in both critical and creative modes. Students of all genders are equally welcome.

LDCL6132B

30

GENDER AND GENRE IN CONTEMPORARY CINEMA

This module offers an overview of critical and theoretical approaches to gender and genre in film and television, focusing particularly on North American media, over the last decade. Topics explored may include: the articulation and development of postfeminism in film and television; popular and independent film; feminism and authorship; media responses to the political and cultural contexts of postfeminism; responses to the recession; race and the limits of feminist representation; motherhood and fatherhood; representations of queerness. The module is taught by seminar, tutorial and screening.

AMAM6062B

30

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic is for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. In this module you will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic I, this module offers you lively dialogues, varied texts and exercises, plus fascinating cultural insights. You will cover a wide variety of topics such as leisure, news and media, arts and cinema, as well as an end-of-unit focus on the geography, culture and dialects of major Arab countries. The course has three contact hours per week. Alternative slots may be available depending on enrolment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Beginners II) this module is for you. This module will enable you to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. You will consolidate at a higher level, specific aspects of the language. The emphasis will lie on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst you will develop knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. You will enhance your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: discuss/read and write on the following Topics: Leisure/culture/sports Travel/Car Hire Meeting people (2) (formal-informal)/Receive a guest/visitor Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Intermediate I ) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You will also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Staying with a Greek host Solving Problems Making Complaints Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you will have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You will learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Do you want to continue to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and expand your cultural knowledge of contemporary Italy? Do you want to focus on language usage rather than abstract concepts and meet Italy head on? You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and small groups; exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the Italian language. One of your main goals will be to use your language skills actively and creatively in meaningful communication. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through engaging with current topics and you will focus on different learning strategies such as using your background knowledge or doing research online. Interesting texts will help facilitate your understanding of authentic reading material and you will become familiar with different writing styles and genres as well as natural language written by and for native speakers. By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself in Italian in a more subtle way and you will understand language spoken by native speakers in a variety of different contexts, formal and informal. The simulated real-life situations will have prepared you for working, studying, or travelling in Italy or communicating with Italians whilst in this country in a social or business setting. Before starting this module you should have completed the Intermediate Italian One module or studied up to a similar level in another institution or at UEA. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is an intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. You will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or do you want to enhance your career opportunities? You will continue to build upon what you have learnt in Intermediate Japanese I. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successful completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

JURISPRUDENCE

Students undertake directed reading on main currents of legal philosophy. This module does not have formal lectures.

LAW-6018B

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

Do you think gender affects the way that people speak? How do you think our language reflects gender differences in society? Do you think we can use language to create societal change? In this module, you will bring your own personal experiences to a lively critical discussion on the relationship between language and gender, putting together your own portfolio of evidence from your everyday life. You will bring your own modern-day reflections to historic studies on language and gender, starting with early 20th-century studies on how men and women use language differently, moving to 1960s sociolinguistic studies on how 'standard' language differs between women and men, and then, following the growth of the Women's Movement in the 1970s, studies on male dominance in mixed-gender talk. Finally, you will look at the recent move to reconceptualise 'gender' not as a 'fixed' phenomenon, but one that may be performed or 'interactionally achieved' in different ways in different contexts. You will bring your thoughts together in a final report, in which you will have the opportunity to reflect on the issues through your own case studies that you will collect over the course of the module.

PPLL6137A

30

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

Do you think gender affects the way that people speak? How do you think our language reflects gender differences in society? Do you think we can use language to create societal change? In this module, you will bring your own personal experiences to a lively critical discussion on the relationship between language and gender, putting together your own portfolio of evidence from your everyday life. You will bring your own modern-day reflections to historic studies on language and gender, starting with early 20th-century studies on how men and women use language differently, moving to 1960s sociolinguistic studies on how 'standard' language differs between women and men, and then, following the growth of the Women's Movement in the 1970s, studies on male dominance in mixed-gender talk. Finally, you will look at the recent move to reconceptualise 'gender' not as a 'fixed' phenomenon, but one that may be performed or 'interactionally achieved' in different ways in different contexts. You will bring your thoughts together in a final report, in which you will have the opportunity to reflect on the issues through your own case studies that you will collect over the course of the module.

PPLL6035A

20

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, the thinker and writer Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. If you are interested in the strangenesses of literature, in the workings of institutions, in democracy and the freedom to say 'everything' - and if you are prepared to read and think hard - then this is the module for you. Together, we'll explore the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, from the c16th to the contemporary, and our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by what Derrida calls 'deconstruction'. Deconstruction isn't just - or even mainly - a theory, but names the strange things that can happen when we really read, think, write and live. To pay attention to deconstruction, as Derrida does, is to be sensitive to aspects of the world and of texts that can't be summed up, assimilated into a neat argument, tidied away. It is at once to read for arguments, for themes and for structures, and to register the 'force of dislocation' which means that these aren't the last word, that texts can't be closed off, that reading must carry on. To stick with deconstruction is to remain hospitable to elements of 'otherness' or 'strangeness' within the familiar, within what we think we know. Deconstruction gives us ways to think about what is taking place in the world and - sometimes - in our own lives too. . The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to you if you studied critical or cultural theory in the second year. In keeping with deconstruction's inventive spirit, you'll have the opportunity to experiment with the form of your own critical and theoretical writing.

LDCL6048A

30

LITERATURE AND SCIENCE 1660-1750

What is science? What is scientific language? Did you know that there was no such thing as a scientist until 1833? We're accustomed to thinking of literature and science as separate disciplines - science deals with cold hard facts, literature with the imaginary and fictional - but to the occupants of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, such a distinction would have been strange and unfamiliar. On this module, you'll investigate how the current separation between literature and science came about. You'll explore the social, cultural, and ideological imperatives that secured the dominance of science in intellectual discourse; you'll examine how notions of scientific objectivity emerged; and you'll discover how the new and allegedly more 'rational' knowledge produced by scientific practice was received by its first audiences. You'll read a variety of texts, ranging from advocates of the new science (such as Thomas Sprat, part founder of the Royal Society in 1660, and Richard Bentley, proponent of later Newtonian philosophy); to early modern scientific writing (such as Robert Hooke, who famously described a fly's eye seen through a microscope, and Robert Boyle, whose experiments with a bird inside an air pump became one of the most well known images of the enlightenment); to literary estimations of the value (or otherwise) of scientific knowledge. This module will provide you with a sense of historical perspective, and an understanding of the kinds of agenda implicit in the modern claim that STEM subjects make the humanities seem both impracticable and unprofitable. This module fulfills the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6170A

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6087A

30

MAPPING WORLDS

Mapping helps us to conceive of abstract concepts in tangible visual form. Be it geographical notions of the globe and the heavens, or more complex outlines of the body, the mind, time, even history, a map helps to bound and give features to otherwise inexplicable space and knowledge. This course uses historical maps and modern theories of cartography as the jumping-off point for an in-depth investigation of the visual and imaginative cultures of Europe and the Middle East from the prehistoric and classical eras through to the Middle Ages and Renaissance. In previous years this course has also featured a study trip to museums and galleries in London to meet with curators and handle objects.

AMAA6121A

30

MODERNISM AND GENDER: FRANCE AND GERMANY 1900-1939

This module addresses modernism in the first part of the twentieth century. It explores the work of male and female artists and also considers how gender structures representation and art practice. The module provides an opportunity to reconsider key works by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Suzanne Valadon, Hannah Hoch and Claude Cahun, amongst others.

AMAA6128B

30

MULTICULTURALISM

This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination may include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offence. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

PPLX6072B

30

MULTICULTURALISM

This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination will include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offence. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

PPLX6073B

20

QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY

This module offers you the chance to learn about LGBTQ literature and its development in English-speaking countries, as well as approaches to queer theory, and the relationship of both literature and theory to culture and current events. This means analysing sexuality and gender and the representation of such identities in literature and society, and discussing topics such as intersectionality, the body, and heteronormativity. Authors studied may include James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Gore Vidal, and Sarah Waters, as well as children's books and young adult novels by Nancy Garden, Ellen Wittlinger, and Marcus Ewert. Authors of theoretical texts looked at may include Nikki Sullivan, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Luce Irigaray, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, and Teresa de Lauretis. Understanding how LGBTQ characters are featured in literature also helps us to see how queer people are understood in a given society in general, so you will also discuss current events and their links to literature and theory. You will look at a variety of genres in order to see how these different text types work, how they queer genre, and how they approach similar themes in different ways.

LDCL6033B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love. We will consider Plato as a poetic philosopher and Shakespeare as a philosophical poet by asking what difference the 'dramatic' form of Plato's Socratic dialogues makes to their 'ideas', and, conversely, how in Shakespeare's plays, particularising plots unfold into generalising arguments. In both cases, the concern is with how dramatic form with its special mixture of what is seen, what is said, what is known and what is enacted, can clarify perennial philosophical questions. We'll also touch on several possible mediators between Plato and Shakespeare, including Castiglione, Erasmus and Sir Philip Sidney. THIS MODULE FULFILLS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6056B

30

STORIED BODIES: GENDER, SEXUALITY, WRITING AND THE VISUAL AT THE FIN DE SIECLE

This interdisciplinary module investigates the interweaving of literature and visual culture in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, focused on Britain and France, and paying particular attention to the ways in which gender, sexual and working identities, bodies and relationships are depicted, performed, disrupted, questioned and sometimes radically reimagined. The writers and artists at work in this period produced a rich stew of aesthetic and literary innovation, often experimental and provocative in tone, style and subject matter. The cultural movements which are combined under the general heading of the 'fin de siecle', including Symbolism, Aestheticism and Decadence, also contributed to the development of modernism and this module is intended as an opportunity for students who wish to extend their studies from the Level 5 Victorian Writing and Modernism modules and to explore both interdisciplinary and creative-critical opportunities. We will examine different kinds of writing (novels, short fiction, drama, essays, experiments in art criticism, science and pseudo-science) and art (painting, photography, early film), as well as dance and performance.

LDCL6180B

30

T.S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY

The poetry of T.S. Eliot has a unique place in modern verse as a body of writing that combines mass popular appeal with intense intellectual challenge. The first part of your module will take you chronologically through the various stages of Eliot's Collected Poems, from the 19th-century influences that combined to produce 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' (1915) to the wartime contexts of his final major poem, Four Quartets (1935-1942). It will also offer an introduction to Eliot's literary criticism as well as to criticism written about him. The first coursework essay will take the form of an editorial commentary on a chosen poem or passage, giving you an opportunity to follow up allusions and interpretations through wider reading. The second part of your module will look more broadly at Eliot's influence as a poet, critic, and editor. Beginning with his own views of the need to reinvent poetry's cultural significance for the 20th century, you will consider the importance of Eliot's example to the next generation of modernist poets (such as W.H. Auden, W.S. Graham, Lynette Roberts) as well as later poets in Britain and Ireland (such as J.H. Prynne, Veronica Forrest-Thomson, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney) and the Americas (such as John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Octavio Paz). The final project will be a 3,000-word essay on any Eliot-related topic of the your choosing, and may take the form of a creative-critical poetry portfolio and self-commentary in response to the reading for the course.

LDCL6122B

30

THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE: TRANSLATING LOVE, DEATH AND ADVENTURE

For something to be reborn it must first die. The Italian Renaissance ('rebirth') sought to disinter the past in order to reanimate the present, but in order to do so the present had to come to terms with its loss - as Petrarch asked, 'who can doubt that Rome would rise again instantly if she began to know herself?'. How can we best understand this process of loss and reanimation? How did Renaissance writers understand it, and how did they bridge the gulf between death and rebirth? And can we do the same? In order to answer these questions, you'll examine the twin practices of imitation and translation in English responses to some of the most exciting and influential texts of the Italian Renaissance. It does so in two ways: through a sustained analysis of those practices in their diverse forms and genres (sonnets, epic, dialogue, drama), and by imitating the process of creative imitation ourselves. In other words, we step into the shoes of the Renaissance imitator. The module allows us to understand how Italian poets such as Dante, Petrarch and Ariosto responded to the classical past (and each other), and how English poets and playwrights such as Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare and Jonson responded to Italian models. By imitating the imitators - for example by writing sonnets - we gain a deeper understanding of how imitation is both a creative practice and a critical process, both a reading and a rewriting. Students are not expected or required to know any Italian in advance. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6188A

30

TRAGEDY

You will look at the long history of tragedy in an effort to understand what, if anything, allows us to call both Oedipus Rex and Death of a Salesman tragedies. We will begin with the age-old question of what is the difference between tragedy in "real life" and on stage. Our answers to this question will help us isolate what it is that makes a performance specifically tragic rather than "merely" dramatic, moving, emotional. Our first readings will focus on the ancient Greeks, the inventors of tragedy, and the religious, artistic, and political circumstances that helped create this genre. Throughout the semester we will repeatedly return to the Greeks to see how more modern tragedies adapted or rejected their notions of the tragic and created new tragic criteria particular to their own time and place. We will look at the ways in which ancient tragic notions of personal responsibility are affected by new ideas about mental health, socioeconomic pressure, nature, and Christianity. Also, as we see tragedy moving into different media, such as opera, the novel, and film, we will examine the ways in which the different media of music, prose, and cinema affect the tragic effect. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCD6106A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Are Some Risks Too Big To Take?

    As human capability reaches the point where we think we can remould the fundamentals of nature itself, what's guiding us – and how can we avoid becoming the architects of our own extinction?

    Read it Are Some Risks Too Big To Take?
  • The Precautionary Principle

    Brexit could kill the precautionary principle – here’s why it matters so much for our environment.

    Read it The Precautionary Principle
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award
  • ASK A STUDENT

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it ASK A STUDENT

Entry Requirements

  • A Level CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below.
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Highers BBCCC
  • Scottish Advanced Highers DDD
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H4
  • Access Course Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC MMM
  • European Baccalaureate 60%

Entry Requirement

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 3, quintile 1 & 2 data)
• You have been in care or you are a young/full time carer
• You are studying at a school which our outreach team are working closely with

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

Occasionally we may you to an interview to further explore your application and suitability for the course.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

IB applicants - UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements for all applicants: GCSE English Language grade 4/C and GCSE Mathematics grade 4/C.

Course Open To

This course is open to UK and EU applicants only. Foundation courses for international applicants are run by our partners at INTO.

  • A Level CCC
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Highers BBCCC
  • Scottish Advanced Highers DDD
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H4
  • Access Course Pass 45 credits at level 3. Humanities and Social Sciences pathway preferred.
  • BTEC MMM
  • European Baccalaureate 60%

Entry Requirement

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 3, quintile 1 & 2 data)
• You have been in care or you are a young/full time carer
• You are studying at a school which our outreach team are working closely with

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

 

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

This course is open to UK applicants only. Foundation courses for international applicants are run by our partners at INTO.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515