BA Philosophy (with a Foundation Year)


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
V50F
A-Level typical
CCC (2019/0 entry) See All Requirements
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If you've thought about going to university, but something got in the way - or if you didn't achieve the grades you needed, but are passionate about your subject - our Humanities Foundation Year programme is perfect for you.

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Philosophy graduates leave with skills in analysis and argument, presentation and teamwork that are highly sought after in a wide range of professions. Our lecturers are highly experienced and active in research. Their specialised findings are the central focus of many taught modules, giving our students direct insight into the latest philosophical understanding and cutting-edge debates.

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Find out how studying at UEA helped Jack achieve his career goals. The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communications Studies has a lively, stimulating and welcoming atmosphere and brings together students and staff across a wide range of subjects, offering interdisciplinary teaching and research.

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Key facts

(Guardian University League Table 2019)

Gain the skills, knowledge and confidence you need to excel in a humanities degree, with our innovative Foundation Year programme.

At UEA we believe everyone should have the chance to study at degree level. If you have a passion for your subject, but for whatever reason, don’t yet have the grades required for the three-year programme, our Foundation Year is a great choice. You’ll undertake an intensive and exciting year of study, majoring in your chosen subject and developing your study skills. We offer a rigorous but supportive teaching and learning experience, that’s also very rewarding.

When you successfully finish your Foundation Year, you’ll be perfectly placed to progress to your BA Philosophy degree.

Overview

You will study with dedicated lecturers from UEA’s Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities, exploring a wide range of academic subjects including Literature, History, Philosophy, Film, Television and Media, American Studies, Politics and the History of Art.

You’ll benefit from smaller class sizes and individual tutorials, helping you to get the most out of the year. You’ll gain a sound theoretical basis for your continuing studies, as well as discovering new areas of study. You’ll be actively encouraged to develop your own scholarly interests and ideas throughout the year.

We’ll support you as you cultivate your study skills, gaining essential knowledge of many of the concepts, methods and techniques you will need in order to thrive on your degree programme. This is a very supportive programme and we’ll work closely with you to identify and work towards your own individual learning goals.

Course Structure

During your Foundation Year, you will study a mixture of compulsory and optional modules, enabling you to tailor your studies to your interests, while ensuring you develop the knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve your full potential during the rest of your degree.

In your Humanities: Techniques and Methods module you’ll discover the kinds of academic approaches and methodologies you’ll use in your degree.

In your Humanities: The Key Concepts module you’ll explore key theories and ideas in the humanities and discover how they relate to political, social, historical and cultural contexts. For example you might study ideology and myth, feminism, otherness, cultural landscapes, power and representation.

You may choose to study a module on the creative industries where you will critically investigate a range of creative areas such as television, film, media, music, publishing, fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines, among others. You’ll have the chance to explore the relationship between theory and practice in these areas. Alternatively you can choose to study a language module in place of creative industries, such as Arabic, French, Japanese, Italian or Spanish.

The remaining modules offer you a range of subject-specific options including history, literature, visual cultures, politics, and media, or you can select to continue further with a language. By studying a combination of two of these options, you will not only be able to investigate key areas of your chosen degree subject, but you will also gain an interdisciplinary perspective on it through exploring an adjacent humanities discipline. This is your opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in subjects closely tied to the rest of your degree, or even to try something new while you are on the Foundation Year. 

Teaching and Learning

Teaching

Our modules are taught via lectures, presentations, seminars and study groups, and incorporate a variety of teaching methods and study tasks to prepare you for the different types of learning and teaching you will experience during your full degree. Through seminars, interactive training sessions and supportive feedback you will be able to develop skills in areas such as essay writing, research, preparing and giving presentations, and understanding and evaluating scholarly arguments. Your Foundation Year will be taught by award-winning lecturers who are specialists in their fields, and the teaching is informed by cutting-edge subject research and a strong commitment to innovative and engaging teaching practice.

Independent study

Your Foundation Year will be an intensive course. You will need to work independently between classes to make sure you are fully prepared for seminars, study groups and assessments, and are making the most of the resources and facilities available to you at UEA. We will support you as you develop your ability to study independently in this way, cultivating skills that will be of great benefit in your degree, and later career. 

Your modules will be accompanied by detailed reading lists that direct you towards essential reading and recommended texts, chapters and articles, as well as multimedia resources. This means you can organise and prioritise your research and wider reading easily. Study materials are also available via Blackboard (UEA’s online learning platform). Specially-designed group and individual study tasks will help you to work effectively between classes.

Assessment

During your Foundation Year you will be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment.

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff, and this in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. For example, there is a strong emphasis on formative assessment. That means you will receive feedback on drafts of written work to help you improve. Group tutorials will also help you hone your thinking.

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an individual adviser throughout your programme, receiving a series of individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well, are happy and are achieving your full potential.

After the course

Once you successfully finish your Foundation Year you will go straight on to the BA Philosophy degree.

If, during the year, you discover your interests and ambitions lie elsewhere, you can also apply to switch to one of the other degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, with the approval of the Admissions Director.

Explore your options, look at our courses, and decide where you want your degree to take you.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • Law
  • Journalism
  • The Civil Service
  • Cultural industries
  • Teaching or lecturing
  • Charity and environmental work

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2019/0

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITIES: TECHNIQUES AND METHODS

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

HUM-3006A

20

HUMANITIES: THE KEY CONCEPTS

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

HUM-3005Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Meeting people. Food and drink : eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes. Please note that your current level of Greek should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds beginners' level when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The term andquot;Cultural and Creative Industriesandquot; encompasses a range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, and creative writing. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative subjects (television, film, media, music, publishing - fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines - among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of the cultural and creative industries. On successful completion of the module, you'll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

HUM-3007A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you will have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You will learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, if you have studied French abroad for a long time, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test..

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

You have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business. Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds the beginners' level specified above when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You'll take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You'll also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure).

PPLB4023B

20

HISTORY AND SOCIETY

Dramatic changes took place in 19th-century England which still affect the way we live our lives today. Throughout this module you will explore some of the upheavals which took place, considering the impact that national trends and cultural developments had on individual households, villages, towns and regions. Through the close examination of primary source materials produced at the time, you'll look at the development of several key areas of 19th-century life in the English countryside. For example, this has included education, health and medicine, crime and punishment, changing Christian beliefs and attitudes to worship, as well as the often harsh realities experienced by rural society on a daily basis. You'll also have the opportunity to consider how the media in the 21st century, through documentaries, costume drama and celebrity shows, presents the past. You'll ask questions such as whether the time and budgetary restrictions directors and producers face create an accurate or distorted view of the way our ancestors lived. You'll also explore the ways in which sources and case studies are presented to audiences and you'll think about how this affects people's perceptions of the past. By the end of the module, you'll be able to place the 19th century within its wider context. You'll understand where many of our current ideas and reactions to various aspects of life, such as welfare and leisure, originated. And, in addition, you'll be able to assess the extent to which decisions our ancestors made in the 19th century still influence our culture and society two hundred years later.

HUM-3001B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

VISUAL CULTURES

How have images communicated meaning across different societies, time periods and cultures? What meanings can be read in the built environments around us, and in the creative works of artists, film-makers and designers? And what factors affect our perception and enjoyment of the visual texts we encounter? 'Visual Cultures' will set you up with the tools to study and analyse a wide range of art, media and design, including painting, artefacts and antiquities, photography, film, television, advertising and online digital media. Lectures from academics and professionals in the field will introduce you to key concepts and theoretical positions, with past sessions exploring topics such as 'Reality vs. Surreality', 'Self-presentation and Social Media', and 'Surveillance and Power in Post-9/11 TV Crime Dramas'. Seminar sessions give you plenty of opportunity to discuss and critique the academic ideas as you apply them to visual examples, and the assessments on the module will help you develop and sharpen up your presentation and writing skills. Whatever humanities subject you specialise in, having the ability to critically analyse images and material culture, consider the impact of contexts of production and reception upon their meanings, and effectively articulate your ideas about them, will be a valuable asset. Studying this module prepares you to deploy those skills, and just might alter your perception of the world around you along the way!

HUM-3003B

20

LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES

What is literature? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? These are just some of the key questions you will be asking as you embark on your module. Over the course of your Literature and Humanities module, you will be introduced to a wide range of key texts and themes in literary studies. You will also be examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts (historical, political, and cultural). The module is evolving all of the time, and in the past we have covered topics such as revolutionary writing, sexuality, Postcolonialism, and Ecocriticism, and we have studied texts ranging from poetry, to graphic novels, to jazz music, and blogs. You'll also have the opportunity to develop your own academic voice as you work on your assessments which are your opportunity to showcase your best work from the module. By the end of your module, you will have developed your ability to analyse texts, be able to explain why historical and cultural contexts are so important, and construct your own critical arguments effectively. You will also be better equipped to communicate complex ideas to others and apply interdisciplinary approaches to texts, images, and film.

HUM-3004B

20

MEDIA IN PRACTICE

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media#film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don't need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You'll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You'll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There'll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too#in the past we've created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA#and we'll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

HUM-3008B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

HUM-3002B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from medieval or modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle. The texts you study are in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant 'for their time', but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

What am I? What kind of world am I in? How should I live my life? How can I know? Can I know? In this module, you'll grapple with fundamental philosophical questions that have great personal significance for each of us. You'll focus on perspectives from the history of modern philosophy (1650 to 1950). You'll get to debate the ideas of key thinkers, which might include Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, as well as other less well-known figures. This module will be suitable for you with or without prior experience of philosophy, and whether or not you are studying philosophy as part of your degree. It is a useful accompaniment to work in early modern history and English literature.

PPLP4063B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

You will be offered a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. You will cover a spectrum of related topics, typically including issues such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy to address these issues, you will be prepared for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from their results, adopts their methods, provokes them, comments on them, critiques them, and/or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one-week components, students will learn with academics drawn from across the institution. Each will explore case studies or more general examples (in lectures, workshops and seminars) demonstrating the impact that philosophical thought has had and continues to have on the development, methods and future direction of their own area of expertise (and vice-versa). Each of ten key subject areas are explored in this way followed by a week in which we review the lessons learned about the place of philosophy in the contemporary academy and in the wider world. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students. It provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of research - especially true at UEA - that they may wish to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other disciplines, offering, as it does, insight into philosophy's reach into other subjects including (potentially) their own major. It is assessed formatively on a weekly basis by the submission of a log-book in which the student reflects on the preceding week's teaching, followed by a final summative task in which the weekly logbooks are assembled into an essay-length submission.

PPLP4066A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

What do we mean when we say an argument is well-reasoned? What makes an argument either watertight, or unreliable? We can start to answer these questions by distinguishing between, on the one hand, the individual claims that occur in an argument and, on the other hand, the relationships between those claims (which is the argument's logical structure). During this module you'll study philosophical reasoning, looking in close detail at the role played by logical structure such that we have an argument which has not only a true conclusion, but one which is firmly supported. As a result, you'll arm yourself with indispensable tools for rigorous philosophical thought, for identifying problems in the arguments you encounter, and for defending your views effectively within and beyond academic philosophy. You'll study what we call "validity" in particular, gaining techniques for identifying valid arguments. As you discover how to break down the components of an argument, you'll sharpen your skills in argument-analysis and deepen your understanding of some key logical concepts, central to philosophy. In addition you'll master specific methods for examining validity in abstraction from natural language contexts. You'll strengthen these skills via a combination of seminars, lectures, workshops, and independent study. We'll focus heavily on practice exercises. The study of logic and reasoning will make you a better philosopher, whatever your specialism or area of interest. It will enable you to judge your own arguments and those of others more easily and effectively, and help you to organise your thoughts and communicate your ideas more effectively.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be automatically enrolled on PPLP4065B unless they request an alternative module from this list. PPLP4065B is recommended for all routes and is mandatory for those pursuing Further Philosophy, or Creative Writing as their subsidiary subject. PPLP4065B is treated as the reserve choice in case a chosen module is oversubscribed. All students are guaranteed a place on PPLP4065B. Alternative modules may be requested as follows for four of the subsidiary routes: (a) for Classical Ideas: AMAA4025B; (b) for Film Studies: AMAM4030B or AMAM4021B; (c) for Language and Culture: AMAM4030B, PPLC4012B, PPLP4067B or any language module for which the student is eligible; (d) for Gender Studies: AMAA4025B, PPLL4067B or HIS-4004B. Note that choosing one of these options will restrict your choice of route in Year 2.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

Why may politicians say that 'immigration is a problem' rather than 'immigrants are a problem' and why am I addressing you as 'you' rather than 'the students' throughout this module outline? Can there be unbiased news reporting? In this module you will explore some of these questions and how the language and images that make up our texts and interactions reflect their purpose in specific contexts. We will explore the powerful expressive means by which agency, responsibility and blame are attributed to or removed from key players in the language of media, advertising and politics. We will see how the representation of events affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the power relationship between individuals and social groups. Essentially, this module is for those who are curious about the practical impact of expressive choices in everyday written and oral communication and wish to find out more about the creative but also manipulative power of language in context (discourse). By the end of this module, you will have learnt how particular linguistic and visual patterns may be used to report, persuade or instruct. You will have acquired the skill to critically assess and challenge others' perspectives, attitudes and values but also consider more critically how you may produce or change your language to achieve your desired aims, from increasing the cohesion of your writing to producing a more engaging website. These are highly valuable skills in any work environment. In the seminars, you will be encouraged to apply the new analytical tools presented in the lecture and you will be able to select your own material for analysis for formative exercises and the final assignment so that it relates to your studies and interests.

PPLL4011B

20

FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS OF THE GREAT CIVILISATIONS

In this module you'll explore the ways in which human beings have, from time immemorial, used narratives and poetry to create their models of the universe, and to think about issues relating to mankind's place within it. You'll focus on ancient texts from a variety of major civilisations over the last four millennia, many of them still treated as living sources of wisdom and insight, spiritual guidance and moral vision. It has become customary in modern philosophy to privilege rational discourse, in prose, as the acceptable way of doing philosophy, and to imagine that to be human is to be rational. But is it irrational to explore our world and discover the deeper truths through narrative? Is that even non-rational enquiry? Might it actually be one of the key ways in which philosophy can reach and engage every human being? And might that be why all civilisations have stories and poetry as their foundational texts, not philosophical arguments? In this module you'll acquire a basic knowledge of some key texts (including Homer, key parts of the King James Bible and the Quran) that any citizen of the world should know.

PPLP4067B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire q wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

What does interpersonal communication actually involve? We will learn that interpersonal communication requires specific intercultural competences, especially when communicating with others who have different sets of assumptions that may lead to misunderstanding, even if the same language is used. This module will equip you with ways of thinking about issues such as language, (non) verbal communication, identity, intercultural interpersonal relationships and intercultural transitions. You will also learn that interpersonal communication involves a high level of self-awareness and critical understanding of issues surrounding the concept of identity. Through lectures and seminars, you will delve deeply into how you present yourself to others who are perceived to be different to you. On successful completion of the module, you will have developed greater self-awareness and sensitivity to intercultural understanding so that you are a more effective interpersonal communicator in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work, global organisations, multinational companies, foreign volunteering placements, etc. The module is delivered in the English language and you don't need to speak a foreign language to take it.

PPLC4012B

20

PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY

How do you represent a person? On this module, you will explore the genre of portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists from the ancient world to the present day. You will develop the skill of visual analysis as you consider issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. You will also continue to develop your writing skills, as we analyze works of art alongside histories and concepts of the individual self - perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

AMAA4025B

20

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY

In this module, we study some of the most original thinkers of the twentieth century, in order to reflect in unconventional ways on the ideas of human association and community as well as evaluate the loss of autonomy produced by cultural invasion and the institutionalisation of values. The basic goal of Radical Philosophy is to present you with a constellation of styles of thinking and forms of criticism that will stimulate you to examine in a rigorous way several thought-provoking perspectives on the idea of social transformation.

PPLP4065B

20

STUDIES IN FILM HISTORY

This module provides you with an introduction to the history of cinema from 1946 to 1996, as it is traditionally understood within Film Studies. It will outline important developments in global film history, which will underpin your future study. We will help you to understand some of the complex processes of historical change (e.g. technological, industrial and socio-political) that transformed cinema during the period in question and will situate particular films in the aesthetic and narrative traditions in which the films were originally made and seen.

AMAM4021B

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

We examine the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, we explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. We look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

Students will select 80 - 120 credits from the following modules:

Students will select at least 80 credits (normally 90 to 120 credits) from the following modules. The two 20 credit modules (PPLP6103A; PPLP6134B) may only be taken by students following guided option range 'Language and Culture'.

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

In this module, you'll explore a topic in philosophy that is of particular interest to you as an individual, normally based on ideas that have emerged from your work on previous modules in philosophy, or from seeing the connections between more than one area of your studies. In some cases, you might be able to pursue an area of philosophy that is not otherwise included in the undergraduate curriculum but in which we have research expertise among the full time staff (and for these areas, it may also be possible, where workloads permit, to organise a group study programme, or 'special subject', for you to work together with several other students with the same interests). When enrolling for this module, you'll need to include a second choice on your enrolment form, and you'll need to have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in your second year assessment, with good attendance and good submission of formative work in the second year. You'll need to fill in the form sent by the module organiser in advance of module enrolment, in order to secure a place on this module. You'll also need to agree a topic with a supervisor (if this is not possible, you'll need to move to a different module). NB You may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes (or 'special subjects'). Please contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after you've enrolled on the course.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

In this module, you'll explore a topic in philosophy that is of particular interest to you as an individual, normally based on ideas that have emerged from your work on previous modules in philosophy, or from seeing the connections between more than one area of your studies. In some cases, you might be able to pursue an area of philosophy that is not otherwise included in the undergraduate curriculum but in which we have research expertise among the full time staff (and for these areas, it may also be possible, where workloads permit, to organise a group study programme, or 'special subject', for you to work together with several other students with the same interests). When enrolling for this module, you'll need to include a second choice on your enrolment form, and you'll need to have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in your second year assessment, with good attendance and good submission of formative work in the second year. You'll need to fill in the form sent by the module organiser in advance of module enrolment, in order to secure a place on this module. You'll also need to agree a topic with a supervisor (if this is not possible, you'll need to move to a different module). NB You may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes (or 'special subjects'). Please contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after you've enrolled on the course.

PPLP6104B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

In this module, you will explore distinct types of interaction between philosophy and social science. We study classic philosophical works in order to shed light on theoretical frameworks in political theory; we discuss modern work in economic methodology to understand its presuppositions and its goals. Finally, we examine the problem of understanding meaningful human action, we ponder the possibility of establishing causal relations that connect social phenomena, and we reflect on the function of values in social enquiry.

PPLP6103A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

If you embarked on the relevant subsidiary theme in year 2 you may choose to take modules from this Option Range. Students will select a maximum of 30 credits, except for those following the Language and Culture guided option range, who may select up to 40 credits (if 40 credits are selected, a 20 credit philosophy module must be selected too). The modules, subject to permission from the Course Director, are as follows: (a) for Classical Ideas: LDCL6124B; LDCL6054B; LDCL6056B; LDCL6085B; LDCL6087A; (b) for Language and Culture: PPLL6137A; PPLB5039A; PPLB5040B; (c) for Gender Studies: PPLL6137A; AMMA6128B; LDCL6120A; LDCL6123B; LDCL6033B.

Name Code Credits

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you will have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You will learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Do you want to continue to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and expand your cultural knowledge of contemporary Italy? Do you want to focus on language usage rather than abstract concepts and meet Italy head on? You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and small groups; exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the Italian language. One of your main goals will be to use your language skills actively and creatively in meaningful communication. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through engaging with current topics and you will focus on different learning strategies such as using your background knowledge or doing research online. Interesting texts will help facilitate your understanding of authentic reading material and you will become familiar with different writing styles and genres as well as natural language written by and for native speakers. By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself in Italian in a more subtle way and you will understand language spoken by native speakers in a variety of different contexts, formal and informal. The simulated real-life situations will have prepared you for working, studying, or travelling in Italy or communicating with Italians whilst in this country in a social or business setting. Before starting this module you should have completed the Intermediate Italian One module or studied up to a similar level in another institution or at UEA. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLB5040B

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

Do you think gender affects the way that people speak? How do you think our language reflects gender differences in society? Do you think we can use language to create societal change? In this module, you will bring your own personal experiences to a lively critical discussion on the relationship between language and gender, putting together your own portfolio of evidence from your everyday life. You will bring your own modern-day reflections to historic studies on language and gender, starting with early 20th-century studies on how men and women use language differently, moving to 1960s sociolinguistic studies on how 'standard' language differs between women and men, and then, following the growth of the Women's Movement in the 1970s, studies on male dominance in mixed-gender talk. Finally, you will look at the recent move to reconceptualise 'gender' not as a 'fixed' phenomenon, but one that may be performed or 'interactionally achieved' in different ways in different contexts. You will bring your thoughts together in a final report, in which you will have the opportunity to reflect on the issues through your own case studies that you will collect over the course of the module. This is a 30-credit variant of PPLL6035A and it may not be taken by language and communication students.

PPLL6137A

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6087A

30

QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY

This module offers you the chance to learn about LGBTQ literature and its development in English-speaking countries, as well as approaches to queer theory, and the relationship of both literature and theory to culture and current events. This means analysing sexuality and gender and the representation of such identities in literature and society, and discussing topics such as intersectionality, the body, and heteronormativity. Authors studied may include James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Gore Vidal, and Sarah Waters, as well as children's books and young adult novels by Nancy Garden, Ellen Wittlinger, and Marcus Ewert. Authors of theoretical texts looked at may include Nikki Sullivan, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Luce Irigaray, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, and Teresa de Lauretis. Understanding how LGBTQ characters are featured in literature also helps us to see how queer people are understood in a given society in general, so you will also discuss current events and their links to literature and theory. You will look at a variety of genres in order to see how these different text types work, how they queer genre, and how they approach similar themes in different ways.

LDCL6033B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love. We will consider Plato as a poetic philosopher and Shakespeare as a philosophical poet by asking what difference the 'dramatic' form of Plato's Socratic dialogues makes to their 'ideas', and, conversely, how in Shakespeare's plays, particularising plots unfold into generalising arguments. In both cases, the concern is with how dramatic form with its special mixture of what is seen, what is said, what is known and what is enacted, can clarify perennial philosophical questions. We'll also touch on several possible mediators between Plato and Shakespeare, including Castiglione, Erasmus and Sir Philip Sidney. THIS MODULE FULFILLS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6056B

30

T. S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY POETRY

This is a 20-credit module, available to visiting/exchange students. The poetry of T.S. Eliot has a unique place in modern verse as a body of writing that combines mass popular appeal with intense intellectual challenge. The first part of your module will take you chronologically through the various stages of Eliot's Collected Poems, from the 19th-century influences that combined to produce 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' (1915) to the wartime contexts of his final major poem, Four Quartets (1935-1942). It will also offer an introduction to Eliot's literary criticism as well as to criticism written about him. The first coursework essay will take the form of an editorial commentary on a chosen poem or passage, giving you an opportunity to follow up allusions and interpretations through wider reading. The second part of your module will look more broadly at Eliot's influence as a poet, critic, and editor. Beginning with his own views of the need to reinvent poetry's cultural significance for the 20th century, you will consider the importance of Eliot's example to the next generation of modernist poets (such as W.H. Auden, W.S. Graham, Lynette Roberts) as well as later poets in Britain and Ireland (such as J.H. Prynne, Veronica Forrest-Thomson, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney) and the Americas (such as John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Octavio Paz). The final project will be a 3,000-word essay on any Eliot-related topic of the your choosing, and may take the form of a creative-critical poetry portfolio and self-commentary in response to the reading for the course.

LDCL6123B

20

THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE: TRANSLATING LOVE, DEATH AND ADVENTURE

For something to be reborn it must first die. The Italian Renaissance ('rebirth') sought to disinter the past in order to reanimate the present, but in order to do so the present had to come to terms with its loss - as Petrarch asked, 'who can doubt that Rome would rise again instantly if she began to know herself?'. How can we best understand this process of loss and reanimation? How did Renaissance writers understand it, and how did they bridge the gulf between death and rebirth? And can we do the same? In order to answer these questions, you'll examine the twin practices of imitation and translation in English responses to some of the most exciting and influential texts of the Italian Renaissance. It does so in two ways: through a sustained analysis of those practices in their diverse forms and genres (sonnets, epic, dialogue, drama), and by imitating the process of creative imitation ourselves. In other words, we step into the shoes of the Renaissance imitator. The module allows us to understand how Italian poets such as Dante, Petrarch and Ariosto responded to the classical past (and each other), and how English poets and playwrights such as Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare and Jonson responded to Italian models. By imitating the imitators - for example by writing sonnets - we gain a deeper understanding of how imitation is both a creative practice and a critical process, both a reading and a rewriting. Students are not expected or required to know any Italian in advance. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6188A

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

After the Bible, the 'Aeneid' is probably the single most important and influential work in the Western cultural tradition. For T. S. Eliot, it is the "classic of all Europe." It is also one of the most extraordinary - moving, complex, formally and philosophically subtle and ambitious - poems we have. This module is devoted to exploration of the 'Aeneid' and to its medieval reception. In the first half of the module we will look at Virgil's poem in relation to its literary models, particularly in Homer's great epics, 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey', within its own Roman (Augustan) context, and in its formal complexity. The second part attends to the medieval reception of the Aeneid: the accommodation of its challenging pagan difference and the co-option of its remarkable cultural authority within new religious, political, and literary contexts. We will explore Dante's response to Virgil's poem in the Divine Comedy alongside those of Augustine and Chaucer; we read medieval Romance reworkings of Virgil's classical epic; and we consider the variety of ways in which medieval writers looked to continue the 'Aeneid' in their own distinctive ways. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6054B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

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    As human capability reaches the point where we think we can remould the fundamentals of nature itself, what's guiding us – and how can we avoid becoming the architects of our own extinction?

    Read it Are Some Risks Too Big To Take?
  • The Precautionary Principle

    Brexit could kill the precautionary principle – here’s why it matters so much for our environment.

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  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

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  • ASK A STUDENT

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it ASK A STUDENT

Entry Requirements

  • A Level CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below.
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Highers BBCCC
  • Scottish Advanced Highers DDD
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H4
  • Access Course Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC MMM. Excludes BTEC Public Services and Public Administration.
  • European Baccalaureate 60%

Entry Requirement

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 3, quintile 1 & 2 data)
• You have been in care or you are a young/full time carer
• You are studying at a school which our outreach team are working closely with

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

Occasionally we may you to an interview to further explore your application and suitability for the course.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

IB applicants - UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements for all applicants: GCSE English Language grade 4/C and GCSE Mathematics grade 4/C.

Course Open To

This course is open to UK and EU applicants only. Foundation courses for international applicants are run by our partners at INTO.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515