BA Philosophy

Join a tradition of thought and exploration that stretches back thousands of years and get to grips with the most fundamental questions of our existence. What is there, and why? How do we know? Why does it matter? When you study philosophy, you are responding to the deep desire to know and understand, to discover and change things, and to question received opinions.

On this course, your ideas matter, and you’ll learn how to express them, defend them and act on them with confidence and clarity. These powers of analysis and deep thought will prepare you to work in an amazing range of different fields from politics, journalism and education, to publishing and advertising.

At UEA Philosophy focuses on learning to think in new ways, and questioning existing ways of doing things, so you don’t need a background in philosophy to join this degree.

Overview

On this course you will gain a strong foundation in a broad range of philosophical topics. Then you will have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your interests by selecting your own optional modules. Throughout your time with us you will cultivate your imagination, your judgment and your ability to pay careful attention to standards of argument. From the very first day of your studies, you will be immersed in philosophical themes and theories.  

You will work with lecturers and tutors who are highly regarded in some of the most exciting areas of philosophy being studied today. This means you will have access to the very latest theories and approaches in the field. 

You will have a choice of major themes, including environmental philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of language, ethics, philosophy of religion, and literature. You will explore topics from philosophy of mind to philosophy of religion, from ethics to formal logic, and a myriad connections with other subjects (from maths to creative writing). You will engage in philosophical debates with great thinkers, from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary philosophers in this ever-unfolding field. You can also choose to complement your studies by taking classes in gender studies, classical ideas, creative writing, film studies, or languages and culture.

During your studies, you will discover that philosophy is still controversial, still disputed, and still open to correction, and you will be invited to make your own suggestions. You will build up the confidence to challenge received wisdom on the basis of genuine understanding and accurate critical focus, and to speak with your own unique voice. 

Throughout the course you will hone your study and research skills as well as your ability to engage with philosophical thought and debate. One of the most effective ways to achieve this is through producing your own written work. Your tutors will help you refine your writing skills with constructive feedback and individual guidance.

See our: Study Philosophy at UEA | University of East Anglia video

Course Structure

In your first year you study a range of core modules, designed to be interesting and challenging to both beginners and those who have taken philosophy at school. You will soon be confident discussing complex ideas, presenting convincing arguments and listening with purpose.

In your second and third years, you will tailor your degree to suit your own skills and interests. You can choose from a wide selection of philosophy modules, both historical and topical. You can also complement your studies by branching out into subjects outside of philosophy. 

Year 1

Your first year is about getting the right intellectual start to your degree. In the six first year philosophy modules you will develop intellectual and practical skills essential for studying philosophy at degree level. You will quickly get to grips with logic, historical approaches, close reading of arguments, investigation of topics and problems, and exploring the connections with other disciplines. Whether you studied philosophy at school or are new to the subject, you will find these modules stimulating - this is not about covering old ground, but about thinking afresh. In the second semester there is the option to take one module in a subsidiary theme that interests you, in place of the Great Books module.

Year 2

During your second year you will choose six modules, of which at least four must be from philosophy – including one on history of philosophy (ancient or modern) and two from a range of core topics such as: Moral Philosophy; Ethics for Life; Art, Beauty and Interpretation; Epistemology and Metaphysics; Environmental Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Philosophy of History; Nietzsche and Nihilism; Phenomenology and Existentialism; The Philosophy of Wittgenstein; Ancient Philosophy; Film as Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Logic; Philosophy of Science.

If you wish, you can explore a chosen subsidiary theme, by taking one or two modules in gender studies, creative writing, languages, classical ideas or film studies. This is a good time to study a language, or you can spend a semester abroad at one of our partner universities.

Year 3

By now you will have carved out a degree that is tailored to your interests and career goals. Now you can specialise even further, by taking just four in-depth modules. There are no compulsory modules, but not more than one of your modules can be from outside philosophy (namely a module as specified for your ongoing subsidiary theme). 

You will also have the chance to write a dissertation. This is a great opportunity to hone your skills in research and independent study, as well as to immerse yourself in a topic of your choosing, all whilst benefiting from the one-to-one guidance of a specialist researcher in the School. You can also join, or even request, a ‘special subject’ module where you will conduct research alongside prominent academics.

Assessment

You will be assessed across a range of your work, including essays, substantial research projects or dissertation, and examinations. Each module will have its own combination of assessment methods. Your final result is calculated by combining the results of all of the modules which you have studied in the final two years.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Study Abroad

Get even more from your studies by spending a semester of your second year abroad at one of UEA’s partner universities. You will not only experience life in a different country and make new international connections, you’ll also make yourself even more attractive to prospective employers who value the skills of resourcefulness and resilience that studying abroad will bring you. 

Please see our Study Abroad website for further information.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module for first year students is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle, or some later Greek and Mediaeval thinker may be included. The texts are studied in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant "for their time", but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy, and students on other degrees who are taking no other philosophy modules. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores and samples the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of other academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from them, uses their results, copies their methods, provokes them, comments on them, undermines them, or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one week components, students will review (in lectures, workshops and seminars) one or two case studies or issues that bring philosophy into some kind of dialogue with each of ten key subject areas, followed by a week in which the lessons to be learned will be reviewed. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students, to provide a taster of interdisciplinary connections that they may wish to go on to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other subjects, giving them a grasp of the relevance of philosophy for all academic work, including their own major subject. It is assessed by continuous assessment, based on the student's assembled diary/log entries, to include reflections on each topic covered.

PPLP4066A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premisses and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be automatically enrolled on PPLP4065B unless they request an alternative module from this list. PPLP4065B is recommended for all routes and is mandatory for those pursuing Further Philosophy, or Creative Writing as their subsidiary subject. PPLP4065B is treated as the reserve choice in case a chosen module is oversubscribed. All students are guaranteed a place on PPLP4065B. Alternative modules may be requested as follows for four of the subsidiary routes: (a) for Classical Ideas, AMAA4025B; (b) for Film Studies, AMAM4030B, AMAM4026B; (c) for Language and Culture: AMAM4030B, PPLC4012B, PPLL4067B or any language module for which the student is eligible; (d) for Gender Studies, AMAA4025B, AMAM4026B, PPLL4067B or HIS-4004B. Note that choosing one of these options will restrict your choice of route in Year 2.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

This module focuses on the role of discourse in the structuring of social relations. Its aim is to show that the linguistic features that make up our texts and verbal exchanges reflect the purpose language is put to in a specific context. Particular consideration is given to the discourse of the media, advertising and politics and how it affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the relationship between individuals and social groups. Students are introduced to the main concepts and essential analytical tools and are encouraged to select their own material for analysis (class practice and formative exercises) on the basis of relevance to their studies and interests. This module equips students with the necessary skills to undertake their own critical analysis of any texts encountered in the course of their studies and beyond and is, therefore, suited to students majoring in political and social sciences, media and cultural studies, literature, philosophy and languages. Students attend a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar.

PPLL4011B

20

GREAT BOOKS

This module revolves around the close reading of four classic texts from the distant or the recent past, which offer profoundly original perspectives on problems that must constantly be faced and reflected upon by mankind. The specific problem we shall focus on in Spring 2017 is the opposition of liberty and oppression, seen in particular from the point of view of the relation between freedom and revolution. Our main task will be to explore a genealogy of the idea of revolution and then devote ourselves to philosophically central conceptions of revolution, beginning with Marx (and looking at his influence on thinkers and political figures such as Lenin or Rosa Luxemburg) and continuing with critics of Marx who made an effort to reconceive the very idea of revolution, notably the French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil and the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. These figures and their ideas will naturally attract a number of other texts, some philosophical and some literary (authors may include Homer, LaBoetie, Landauer, Levi, Melville, Todorov), which will be discussed to broaden the context in which our four classics can be situated and explore their theoretical resonance with other classics.

PPLP4065B

20

INTERROGATING CULTURE

This module provides an introduction to the key debates over media and cultural theory. In the process, it focuses on the key movements and theorists and covers key debates over the concept of mass culture and the mass media, structuralism and poststructuralism, high/low culture, the culture industries, and hegemony. The module will be taught by lecture and seminar.

AMAM4030B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

There is far more to linguistic communication than just knowing the vocabulary and grammar of a language since interpersonal communication is inseparable from culture. That is, because language is used not only to represent but also create and sustain a speaker's expectations, beliefs, attitudes, practices and moral values about the world, verbal communication always involves a high degree of "cultural business". This becomes especially apparent when communicating with native speakers of another language where different sets of cultural assumptions may lead to misunderstanding. This module aims to equip you with ways of thinking about issues which will aid you in becoming more interculturally competent in your foreign language(s). The intention is that this module will enable you to become more effective learners in the particular language culture you will encounter.

PPLC4012B

20

MEDIA REPRESENTATION

This module explores the roles the media plays in the formation of identities and subjectivities. It will ask students to think about the relationship between the media and social hierarchies of power, by looking at the similarities and differences of representations across media forms, genres and narratives. It will introduce students to approaches and issues including gender identities and feminist theory, otherness and post-colonialism, discourse and power, performative identity and queer theory, disability studies, posthumanism and animal studies.

AMAM4026B

20

PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY

Introducing students to portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists working in the European tradition between the fifteenth century and the present day, this module considers issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. We will analyse the works of artists from Antiquity to the Contemporary alongside histories and concepts of the individual self, perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

AMAA4025B

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, we explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. We look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

Students will select 0 - 100 credits from the following modules:

You must take at least 40 credits from this Option Range unless you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from Option Range C. If you are taking either PPLP5072A or PPLP5073B you will take modules from this and other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad.

Name Code Credits

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP5093B

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP5087A

20

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP5074B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP5168B

20

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP5166A

20

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

You must take at least 20 credits from this Option Range unless you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from Option Range C. If you are taking either PPLP5072A or PPLP5073B you will take modules from this and other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad.

Name Code Credits

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP5077A

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

'I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP5081B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP5079B

20

Students will select 0 - 100 credits from the following modules:

You will take up to 60 credits in this Options Range, unless you are taking a Semester Abroad. If you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from this options range, you will take additional modules from this and/or other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad, subject to a maximum of 100 credits from this Options Range.

Name Code Credits

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP5076A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Since at least Xenophanes, philosophers have sought to raise religion from its lower, superstitious manifestations to a fully articulate, rational expression. This effort has been pursued along distinct lines, which have led to a variety of original outcomes, e.g. a synthesis between religion and morality, the humanistic mediation of religion and atheism or the elaboration of a metaphysical picture of transcendence and existence. In this module, we shall discuss these theoretical projects, as well as their differences and lines of continuity, as they have emerged between the XVIII-th and XX-th century.

PPLP5071A

20

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - AUTUMN

The Philosophy Sector, PPL School, and HUM Faculty have various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. Arrangements for a semester abroad must have been made in advance with the PPL ERASMUS Director for Politics and Philosophy, Dr Liki Koutrakou.

PPLP5072A

60

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - SPRING

The Philosophy Sector, PPL School, and HUM Faculty have various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. Arrangements for a semester abroad must have been made in advance with the PPL ERASMUS Director for Politics and Philosophy, Dr Liki Koutrakou.

PPLP5073B

60

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

If you embarked on the relevant subsidiary theme in year 1 you may choose to take modules from this options range. Students will select 0-40 credits from this options range, subject to permission from the Course Director as follows: (a) for Classical Ideas: AMAA5098B; AMAA5105B; LDCL5071B; PPLX5051B; PPLX5064A; HIS 5002A; (b) for Creative Writing: LDCC5004B; LDCC5005A; LDCL5072A; (c) for Language and Culture: LDCL5031A; PPLL5170A; LDCL5061A or any language module for which the student is eligible; (d) for Gender Studies: PPLM5002A; LDCD5025B; LDCL5030A; LDCL5050B; HIS-5063B. You can only take 20 credits of level 4 modules in Year 2.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

Using case studies from around the Mediterranean world, this module provides a grounding in the archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Case studies range from Palaeolithic Europe, to the Neolithic of the Aegean, Cyprus, The Near East, or North Africa, depending on the expertise of the module convener. Themes include early artistic endeavour (Palaeolithic Europe), the transition from hunting to farming (Crete, the Aegean, Cyprus the Near East), the emergence of urban societies (Egypt, the Near East), climate and society (the Mediterranean).

AMAA5098B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, going back to both classical comedy (Aristophanes) and the roots of commedia dell'arte, and continuing through Moliere and Wycherley in the seventeenth-century, Goldoni in the eighteenth, Oscar Wilde and Alfred Jarry in the 1890s, and into the twentieth century with Beckett, Ionesco, Stoppard, Orton and Fo. The module ends with Richard Bean's 2011 adaptation of Goldoni in One Man, Two Guvnors. We'll study the theory, practice and politics of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique, comedy of ideas, theatre of the absurd, farce as confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic bodies, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality. There may be opportunities to view some of the plays on film and to participate in some practical workshops. The main mode is seminar discussion. Assessment is by means of a group seminar participation, a scene analysis and a longer written project. Drama students may include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5071B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 5 Creative Writing modules. The aim of the module is to get students writing prose fiction and/or poetry, using structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of work. At the outset students will be encouraged to write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. Throughout attention will be given to the work of established authors, using exemplary texts both as a basis for discussion and as a stimulus to students' own writing. Along the way students will begin to develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. They will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 5 Creative Writing modules. The aim of the module is to get students writing prose fiction and/or poetry, using structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of work. At the outset students will be encouraged to write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. Throughout attention will be given to the work of established authors, using exemplary texts both as a basis for discussion and as a stimulus to students' own writing. Along the way students will begin to develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. They will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc.

LDCC5004B

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study.

LDCL5031A

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and international relations, the module explores a variety of themes and case studies including: gender, representation and the media, feminist methodologies and international relations, gender and IPE.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some approaches to research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, multilingualism and politeness. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest for a class presentation and the project. The module does not assume knowledge of a second language and is relevant to students majoring in political, socio-cultural and media studies as well as to language students.

PPLL5170A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5025B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and early medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to the theory and methods of landscape archaeology, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and landscape in the period up to c.1100.

HIS-5002A

20

THEATRES OF REVOLT: NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN DRAMA

Beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg, this module examines the development of modern forms of drama during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, addressing modern concerns - self and society, gender, sexuality, social and class conflicts, creation and destruction, the unconscious - and deploying experimental types of theatre by a range of writers including Chekhov, Maeterlinck, Wilde, Hauptmann, Buchner and Wedekind, as well as the two seminal Scandinavians. We will be looking at versions of Naturalism, Symbolism and Expressionism as modernist modes in drama and suggesting ways in which these shape and anticipate later developments. The main mode is seminar discussion with opportunities to experience the play texts as performances. You may choose to include a performance element as part of your assessment.

LDCL5030A

20

THREE WOMEN WRITERS

The writings of Edith Wharton, Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf intersect with discourses of 'new women' and gender as well as feminism, and social and cultural history. This second level seminar develops historicist and generic understanding as well as exploring women's identity through these authors' writings, which move between realism and modernism. Special attention to just one writer is possible in the final essay. Particular attention will be given to some of Virginia Woolf's lesser known writing.

LDCL5050B

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5063B

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The module focuses on the claims of theistic religion, and on the nature of religion, including non-theistic religion. It seeks to clarify the concept of God. It also seeks to examine some of the standard arguments for and against the existence of God. In doing this, we see how some central issues in the philosophy of religion are inter-related with questions of epistemology, logic and mind. We will furthermore investigate conceptions of God which bypass the standard arguments for and against God's existence, which takes us close to the claims of Buddhism and other more or less non-theistic religions/philosophies.

PPLP6007A

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP6106A

30

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP6107A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ("special subjects") advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes (Special Subjects). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

LANGUAGE AND REALITY (ADVANCED THEMES)

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP6136A

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN (ADVANCED THEMES)

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both#including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP6125A

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP6123B

30

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP6126B

30

ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP6109B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgements and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP6035B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP6006B

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ("special subjects") advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme (Special Subject). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law    

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Highers At least one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB
  • Access Course An Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences pathway is preferred. Pass the Access course with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM, an ARTS/Humanities subject preferred
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in Reading and Writing with no less than 5.5 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Humanities and Law    

Interviews

Philosophy does not currently interview all applicants for undergraduate entry as standard, however we may interview mature students, those returning to study or applicants with alternative qualifications.  All applicants who are made an offer are given the opportunity to meet with an academic on a Visit Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) you have applied for.

Gap Year

Normally there is not a problem in deferring entry for a year. Offers are made in the usual way to applicants who ask for deferred entry.

Special Entry Requirements

There are no specific subjects that are required in order to take up Philosophy, and it is not necessary to have studied any Philosophy before. We are keen to see some arts or humanities subjects that involve academic work, including writing essays and reading texts. Good results in Mathematics, Music or Latin are also an indicator for doing well in Philosophy - because of the kind of rigour which they instil.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

If you have alternative qualifications that have not been mentioned above, then please contact university directly for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English Language at grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference.

We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Please note, there may be additional subject entry requirements specific to individual degree courses.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

______________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Philosophy)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515