BA Modern Language (3 year option with a semester abroad)

All our language degrees are particularly distinctive because of the emphasis that our expertise in translation and language issues, and in intercultural communication, bring to the modules we offer. Our Modern Languages (3 year) programme allows you to study French or Spanish or Japanese to a high level of competence in conjunction with a range of these modules.

You will develop all the essential language skills with native speaker lecturers at every stage of your degree, while learning about the various cultures. By exploring a range of exciting contemporary materials, you will become a proficient communicator in the target language with advanced knowledge of the cultures.

You will also develop your ability to develop and present sophisticated arguments in English and in your second language, a key employability skill; as are the tremendous flexibility and adaptability you acquire on a semester spent abroad for which we prepare you fully. 

Overview

This programme allows you to study French, Japanese or Spanish to a high level of competence. This three-year variant is for those who have obtained A grade at A level or its equivalent in the language. To complement your core language learning, you can choose to study translation issues, or the way language itself works in society and the media. Alternatively, you can take the opportunity to acquire or enhance a subsidiary language.

The language learning element of your degree will involve translation from and into English, reading and listening comprehension, précis and paraphrase work, the study of different styles and registers, lexical exercises and oral work.

Since presentation skills are vital in the contemporary work environment, you will also focus on vocal and physical projection, developing poise and managing nerves. You will also develop the skills of speaking from notes, improvisation, and being able to structure arguments coherently.

In all of these activities, the materials we use are contemporary rather than literary or historical. Alongside developing language competence, you will learn about the role of language and translation in today’s global communication networks.

The spring semester of your second year is spent abroad at a university in a country where your honours language is spoken.

Watch ourStudy Language and Communication Studies at UEA video

Year 1

You will spend at least half your time studying your honours language. This will include work on French, Japanese or Spanish culture and society. Alongside this, you will take the compulsory module ‘Introducing Intercultural Communication’ and study modules that will expand your knowledge of the cultures and societies of the countries where the language you are studying is spoken with modules such as ‘Introduction to Japanese Popular Culture’ or ‘French Language in Action’ or learn about communication across cultures with ‘Language, Culture and Interpersonal Communication’.  

Year 2 (with a semester abroad)

Core honours language study makes up at least one third of your study in your second year. You will also be able to choose from a wide range of optional modules complementing your own interests. The spring semester of your second year will be spent at a university in a country where your chosen language is spoken. This is a fantastic opportunity for you to be immersed in the language, become familiar with what it is like to study abroad and to boost your employability. You will be advised and supported by our study abroad coordinators to ensure you spend your semester at the partner university which offers the most relevant taught subjects for you. 

Our university exchange partners include:

France Spain/Mexico/Chile Japan
Université Blaise Pascal Clermont-Ferrand Universidad de Alicante Akita International University
Université de Corse Pasquale Paoli Universidad de Alcalá de Henares Gakushuin University
Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier III Universidad Castilla La Mancha  (Ciudad Real campus) Hokkaido University
Université de Lorraine - Nancy Nebrija Universidad - Madrid International Christian University
Faculté de Traduction et d'Interprétation - Université de Genève   Kansai University
Université de Nice Universidad de Granada Kobe College
ISIT - Institut de management et de communication interculturels - Paris Universidad Pablo Olavide Sevilla Meiji University
Universite Jean Moulin Lyon III Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Meiji-Gakuin University
Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour Universidad de Salamanca Okayama University
Université Toulouse le Mirail Universidad de Zaragoza Ritsumeikan University
  Universidad de Murcia Ryukoku University
  Universidad de Guadalajara Waseda University
  Universidad ORT Uruguay Yokohama National University
  Universidad de Concepción, Chile Sophia University (Japan)

Year 3 

In your final year, core honours language modules will again make up at least one third of your study. You will develop your proficiency in the language with modules such as ‘French Oral and Written Composition’ in which you will refine your expression and gain greater sophistication and control, ‘World Spanish’ which includes the study of varieties of Spanish across the world or ’Japanese honours 3’ which will develop your writing and presentation skills. You will be able to choose from a wide range of optional modules which will allow you to apply your skills to real-life professional activities such as ‘Introduction to Conference Interpreting’ and ‘Technological Tools for Subtitling and Dubbing’, or will allow you to engage in research on a topic tailored to your own interests through our ‘Dissertation in Language and Culture’ module.

Assessment

Assessment is by a mixture of written and spoken coursework and exams. Final degree classification is split between the second and final years with the semester abroad assessed on a pass/fail basis.

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Study Abroad

Students who are enrolled on 3-year programmes in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities have the option of applying to study abroad at one of UEA’s Partner Universities, for one semester of the second year. Please see our Study Abroad website for further information and criteria.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCING INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

This module provides an environment for language and communication students to visit key themes in the study of language, culture and intercultural communication. Presentation will be via a variety of lectures, workshops and seminars. Students are assessed on their performance in 'Language and Culture Workshops' which are aimed at developing transferable skills in the domains of enterprise and engagement. Students are encouraged to work on their own projects in groups and they get involved in all aspects of project realisation, such as planning, organisation, presentation, leadership, team work, and decision-making. The workshops are particularly envisaged as a platform for enhancing employability prospects of students. AVAILABLE ONLY TO FIRST YEAR LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION STUDENTS. NB: NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING OR ERASMUS STUDENTS

PPLC4001A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 40 credits in one language only.

Name Code Credits

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/I

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. If you have studied French abroad and are unsure what your level is, please get in touch with the module organiser as early as possible. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) to start with. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the teacher's discretion.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/II

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. This module continues the work done in PPLF4016A, in developing students' reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on productive skills (writing/speaking). It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar which will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on productive skills and textual grammar including summary techniques. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLF4017B

20

POST A-LEVEL JAPANESE LANGUAGE 1

A course in Japanese for students with Japanese A-level, having passed Japanese Language Proficiency Test N4, or holding any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and language learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop understanding of the diversity in Japanese society. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar and vocabulary in meaningful contexts, whilst also developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLJ4057Y

40

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

A course in Spanish for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4025A

20

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/II

A course in Spanish for students who have completed Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A) or equivalent. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Grammar notions and topics for discussion are different from those in Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A).(Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers). Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4026B

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

If students take a PPLB4* or PPLB5* (subsidiary language) in Semester 1, it must be followed by the continuation PPLB4* or PPLB5* module in Semester 2. Students must take one module relating to their target language. Students must take one module from SEM1 and two from SEM2.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

AN INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE IN LATIN AMERICA

From Salsa to Samba, football to fiesta, Candomble to Capoeira, telenovelas to Tex Mex: Latin American popular cultures combine indigenous, African and European elements in unique ways found nowhere else on earth. In this module, we will examine the origins of a number of Latin American popular cultural forms, the contexts in which they are enjoyed, and the significance they have for Latin Americans. The module is divided into two parts: the first focuses on the historical and social processes which have shaped modern Latin America, while the second examines specific forms of popular culture including popular music genres, popular art, film, media, television and football. The module aims to elucidate the historical, religious, social and political factors that have shaped modern Latin America, and to examine the meanings that Latin Americans themselves attach to popular cultural forms in the region. Note: you do NOT need to speak Spanish or Portuguese to take this module.

PPLH4004B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

This module focuses on the role of discourse in the structuring of social relations. Its aim is to show that the linguistic features that make up our texts and verbal exchanges reflect the purpose language is put to in a specific context. Particular consideration is given to the discourse of the media, advertising and politics and how it affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the relationship between individuals and social groups. Students are introduced to the main concepts and essential analytical tools and are encouraged to select their own material for analysis (class practice and formative exercises) on the basis of relevance to their studies and interests. This module equips students with the necessary skills to undertake their own critical analysis of any texts encountered in the course of their studies and beyond and is, therefore, suited to students majoring in political and social sciences, media and cultural studies, literature, philosophy and languages. Students attend a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar.

PPLL4011B

20

FRENCH LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 4)

This module is for students who have A-Level French or equivalent. It is designed to increase your confidence in speaking French in public via the transferable skill of oral performance while enabling you to further your knowledge of French culture and society. You will study and practise delivery of an oral text in a number of forms such as news reports, documentary voice-overs, speeches, interviews, songs, stage and film performance texts. The summative assesment will involve the preparation and delivery of an agreed oral text as well as an essay. The formative assessment will involve a practice performance as well as a portfolio including a task for a preparation to the essay work.

PPLF4002B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

This module introduces students to some of the key contemporary debates and issues in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations. The central theme of the module is liberal democracy, its nature, scope and potential strengths and weaknesses. We consider forces which have had an impact upon western liberal democracy - such as globalisation and the media - and examine case studies which illustrate the success and failure of liberal democracy in practice. The case studies change from year to year, but currently include Weimar Germany, Northern Ireland, Britain and the Middle East, and the US .

PPLX4052A

20

INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE (LEVEL 4)

The aim of this module is to discuss Japanese popular culture in terms of theories of social and historical analysis. The module will examine various cultural forms and practices, including manga/anime, media, and music. In doing this, students are expected to develop critical thinking about the relations between Japanese popular culture and national identity, and the role of Japanese popular culture in the contemporary world. The seminar consists of three main parts: lecture, original audio and/or video materials, and group discussion. Students contribute to group discussion every week. Seminars, reading materials, and assessments are all in English.

PPLJ4007B

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

There is far more to linguistic communication than just knowing the vocabulary and grammar of a language since interpersonal communication is inseparable from culture. That is, because language is used not only to represent but also create and sustain a speaker's expectations, beliefs, attitudes, practices and moral values about the world, verbal communication always involves a high degree of "cultural business". This becomes especially apparent when communicating with native speakers of another language where different sets of cultural assumptions may lead to misunderstanding. This module aims to equip you with ways of thinking about issues which will aid you in becoming more interculturally competent in your foreign language(s). The intention is that this module will enable you to become more effective learners in the particular language culture you will encounter.

PPLC4012B

20

MEDIA, SOCIETY AND POWER

This module introduces first year students to the main theories of mass communications and provides them with the key skills of academic reading and writing. Students will reflect on the importance of reading for academic research and learn how to assess and discuss the relevance and impact of milestones in mass communications theory from the nineteenth century to the present. The module explores theoretical approaches to media content, production, regulation and reception, including key themes such as freedom of speech, public sphere and political economy.

PPLM4054A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

ERASMUS SEMESTER ABROAD

A compulsory semester abroad for students taking an Honours language programme in three years. Assessment will be in the foreign institution. This module is also available to other students on a 3-year programme who wish to pursue a period of study in a foreign university. Only available to students with Grade 'A' at A-Level in French or Spanish.

PPLA5028B

60

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 20 credits in one language only.

Name Code Credits

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/I

This semester-long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second-year students of Japanese (single- or double-honours) who have previously taken Post A-Level Japanese 1/I and 1/II. In this module, students use the content- based textbook to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives.

PPLJ5155A

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/I

This semester-long Spanish language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours Spanish students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post-A-Level Spanish Language I. Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLH5053A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/I

This French Honours language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours French students. It is designed to focus on reading, writing, semi-formal oral presentations and awareness of current affairs in French speaking countries. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. (Alternative groups will be available for seminars.)

PPLF5148A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY

This module aims to equip students with a good knowledge and understanding of contemporary Japanese culture and society through various aspects. All lectures are conducted in English.

PPLJ5012A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 5 Creative Writing modules. The aim of the module is to get students writing prose fiction and/or poetry, using structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of work. At the outset students will be encouraged to write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. Throughout attention will be given to the work of established authors, using exemplary texts both as a basis for discussion and as a stimulus to students' own writing. Along the way students will begin to develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. They will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT)

WW84 STUDENTS TAKE THIS MODULE AND THE SPRING MODULE (LDCC5008B) AS COMPULSORY MODULES. STUDENTS ON OTHER PROGRAMMES MAY TAKE EITHER THE AUTUMN MODULE OR THE SPRING MODULE, BUT NOT BOTH. This module develops students' abilities to create and understand dramatic texts. Methods include structured exercises in writing drama and the exploration and analysis of a range of plays. Students may specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television.

LDCC5002A

20

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION ACROSS BORDERS

Since humans evolved a sense of identity, group belonging, and hierarchy, our relationships with our neighbours have been constantly changing as we compete over resources and space. This module explores intercultural 'incidents' between different countries/kingdoms/socio-cultural groups across time and the response to these 'incidents' from the different perspectives of the groups involved. The analysis of these incidents will involve not only examining the resultant action stemming from the 'incident', but also how the 'incident' is reflected in the written sources and media of the different cultural-groups. This will allow students to better understand cultural responses to events, and begin to assess the role of propaganda, censorship and the role of the Media in changing or defining a cultural group's response to such an event. Each week students are introduced to a different incident and given opportunities for class discussion. They are expected to make their own contribution by researching a particular area of interest. This module equips students with the necessary skills to undertake their own critical analysis of any texts encountered in the course of their studies and beyond and is, therefore, suited to students not only majoring in intercultural communication, but also political and social sciences, media and cultural studies, and languages. Students will attend a 2 hour seminar for this module each week.

PPLC5172B

20

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN PRACTICE

This module explores how students can become more informed and engaged global citizens by developing their competences for democratic culture. The overarching aim is to explore the wide-ranging terminology relevant to intercultural communication with a focus on personal experiences and visual media. The teaching offers a balance between practice and theory and classroom sessions include group work activities that explore the application of theories to real-life contexts, analysis of case studies and public lectures. The intention is that this module will enable students to become more effective intercultural mediators in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work and volunteering placements.

PPLC5168A

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some approaches to research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, multilingualism and politeness. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest for a class presentation and the project. The module does not assume knowledge of a second language and is relevant to students majoring in political, socio-cultural and media studies as well as to language students.

PPLL5170A

20

LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 5)

This module deals with the ways in which people use language to communicate in real life and it addresses some of the questions you may have wondered about if you are curious about the way language works in practice. It is concerned, for example, with the way in which simply speaking certain words ('I do') actually changes the state of social play. Questions addressed include: what are people doing when they engage in 'conversation'? Why is communication still problematic even when I am fluent in a foreign language? How does a word like 'this' refer to different things? How do we create implied meanings without actually saying what we mean? The main theoretical concepts are introduced and illustrated and ample opportunity is then given to the students to contribute and discuss their own examples to show how the concepts apply in different situations and in different cultural/linguistic environments. This module is relevant not only to language students but also to those students who are generally interested in communication.

PPLL5019A

20

NEW MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media. .

PPLM5053A

20

SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 5)

This module is an introduction to aspects of subtitling and dubbing in different media and multimedia contexts (television, radio, cinema, world wide web), and to issues associated with these activities in the age of globalisation. A range of materials and processes will be considered (e.g. film subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, subtitling and dubbing in news reports or documentaries, subtitling and dubbing in the context of multimedia localisation) to investigate key features and concerns involved in transposing text across communication channels, media, forms and codes. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with PPLT6020A.

PPLT5022A

20

THE FRENCH LANGUAGE TODAY

This module provides an introduction to selected aspects of contemporary French, from words to sentence level and types of variation. The aim is to build on existing knowledge of French to discover the range of uses and varieties across the French-speaking world. We will for example study differences between French spoken in Africa and in France, compare spoken French in different social contexts, or study French journalistic writing. Aspects that we will get acquainted to as tools to describe and discuss features of French include phonetics/phonology, morphology and etymology, gender, collocations, syntax, tense and aspect, modality, spoken and written French, non-standard French and other registers. Material studied include newspaper articles, television and radio programmes, film dialogues, interviews, among many types. A-Level French or equivalent is essential. Teaching and assessment are in English.

PPLF5005A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, running stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing and participation in workshops count towards assessment. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - journalism practices.

LDCC5013A

20

TRANSLATION ISSUES ACROSS MEDIA (LEVEL 5)

This module is particularly relevant to language and translation students, but will appeal to students from across the University with an interest in language issues associated with the globalisation of communication and the media. It considers a range of materials (texts and their translations, multilingual publications and packaging, film subtitles, dubbed soundtracks, IT-mediated text) to explore issues involved in the transposition and translation of (spoken and written) text into other media and other languages across different genres. Taught in English. Receptive knowledge of one other language in addition to English required. Taught with PPLT6032A. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT5031A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 40 credits in one language only.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH ORAL AND WRITTEN COMPOSITION

This is an academic module designed to systematise and expand linguistic capacities through critical use of existing competence. Main activities: textual analysis, written composition, formal oral presentations. The module is compulsory for all final-year French Honours students and for second-year language and communication students identified as students with (near) native competence in French and is also open to visiting/exchange students. Taught in French.

PPLF6004A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/1

This module is compulsory for all final-year Japanese Honours students. In this module, students develop skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening at an advanced level. Various genres of reading materials will be used throughout the semester and students will also develop their presentation skills with project work.

PPLJ6010A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/II

This module, which is compulsory for all final year Japanese Honours students, aims to enhance the existing language competence to a higher standard. Main activities include formal oral presentations and research on a chosen topic which is submitted as an essay as one of the final pieces of work.

PPLJ6011B

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: ADVANCED HISPANIC STUDIES

This module develops the students' Spanish language skills at an advanced level. It fosters an understanding of various Spanish language features and develops critical cultural awareness. Specific components of grammar at a higher level are revisited, problematic areas identified for improvement and academic writing skills are further developed. The module offers the opportunity of exploring the components that control the use of language when communicating in Spanish. The oral component of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening and widening vocabulary at a higher level. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6007A

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: WORLD SPANISHES

This module offers the opportunity to develop your Spanish speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at an advanced level. The main objective is to further develop higher level language skills and raise awareness of linguistic issues to aid inclusion and immersion in Spanish-speaking countries. It covers the exploration of the varieties of the Spanish language from a linguistic point of view and the variations of the Spanish language through the analysis and identification of extracts of spoken texts. The oral element of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening skills, whilst widening vocabulary. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6006B

20

TRANSLATION (ENGLISH TO FRENCH)

This module, which is compulsory for all final year French Honours students, aims to enhance translation skills and involves English into French translation. It is also open to second-year language and communication students with (near) native competence in French and/or visiting/exchange students.

PPLF6005B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED TRANSLATION (FRENCH TO ENGLISH)

This module is designed for final-year French Honours students. It is an advanced course based on the Institute of Linguists' Diploma in Translation. The subject areas will be general translation with annotation, advertising, science or technology, and literature. Activities will also involve formative translation and revision in limited time, with the aim to develop both academic and employability skills. At this level it will also include presentations on a range of relevant translation topics.

PPLT6023A

20

DISSERTATION IN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (AUTUMN)

This module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of faculty. The goal is to produce an extended essay of 5,000 - 6,000 words (written in English) based on in-depth research into a specialist topic related to wider issues in language and communication studies. The appointed research supervisor will be allocated time to conduct individual tutorials with each of their supervisees. These tutorials will give students an opportunity to seek guidance on their projects, whilst also giving supervisors an opportunity to provide guidance and feedback on structure, approach, presentation, sources, initial drafts, time-management issues, etc. The dissertation topic must be agreed with the module organiser by the end of week 1. There is no specific timetable slot, and therefore time-management and planning will be especially important during this module as it is your responsibility to arrange and attend meetings with your supervisor. This module will be useful preparation for those interested in pursuing post-graduate studies. The aims of this module are: To enable students to undertake an independent piece of research under supervision. To improve skills in written presentation and research. To provide an opportunity to reflect upon how studies might be continued at postgraduate level.

PPLC6002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO CONFERENCE INTERPRETING

This module is offered to final year undergraduates with no prior formal interpreting training. Its aim is to equip students with conference interpreting skills as well as to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge in order to improve their ability to reflect on the process of interpreting in a multicultural world. The course is taught in a Sanako digital language laboratory and consists of 4 hours of contact time per week. The module covers on-sight, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting skills as well as the non-verbal elements of importance to communication such as pitch, intonation, body language etc. The content of the module includes topics such as human rights, peace processes as well as racism and xenophobia in the context of intergovernmental organisations such as the EU and the UN. The skills based approach of this course provides effective academic learning and has high employability credentials as it develops transferable skills in demand in the professional world such as good concentration, active listening, flexibility, confidence and self-presentation. Although students will practice interpreting from Spanish, French or Japanese into English and from English into Spanish, French or Japanese, they will be assessed on interpreting into their mother tongue.

PPLT6024A

20

LANGUAGE CONTRASTS AND TRANSLATION (LEVEL 6)

This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the key language contrasts relevant in the process of translation and provides a study platform offering a solid theoretical background for select aspects of linguistic knowledge that is relevant to applied translation, including discussion of translation choices, errors in translation stemming from language contrasts or methodology in research and professional work. It will focus on those aspects of various languages that are similar to English as well as those that are different in order to reveal the points of language-driven facilitation in translation as well as language-induced obstacles together with strategies on how to surmount them. An introduction to the basic linguistic terminology relevant for applied translation will be the starting-blocks point. The topics covered include the central grammatical categories (articles, modifiers, word-order, etc.) in the languages that the students are working on. Students will be encouraged, often on examples of their own selection, to make their own inference and check-list of points where the languages they work on differ based on the different. Essential research techniques that are of consequence for translation choices (e.g. the use of corpora frequencies to detect the specifics of use for words, constructions and sentences in different languages) will be introduced, enabling more efficient and justified translation choices in different multilingual scenarios (commercial, legal, scientific, and others). This module is also a springboard for potential MA cohort, especially for the MA in Applied Translation Studies (MAATS) and MA in Forensic Linguistics and Translation (MAFLANT).

PPLT6030A

20

SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 6)

This module is an introduction to aspects of subtitling and dubbing in different media and multimedia contexts (television, radio, cinema, world wide web), and to issues associated with these activities in the age of globalisation. A range of materials and processes will be considered (e.g. film subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, subtitling and dubbing in news reports or documentaries, subtitling and dubbing in the context of multimedia localisation) to investigate key features and concerns involved in transposing text across communication channels, media, forms and codes. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with PPLT5022A

PPLT6020A

20

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: AN INTERNATIONAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH

The primary goal of this module is to provide a novel on-site experience in England at UEA for University of California undergraduates who major or minor in English, in linguistics, in various foreign languages, and in other related disciplines, although it is also available to UEA students on Language and Communication courses. The module gives a broadly based and modern perspective on the English language suitable for a wide range of students. No background is required in either English or linguistics, but the module will be taught in such a way as to be appealing to specialists and non-specialists alike. It will include some traditional elements that exemplify the history of English and its consequences for the modern English word stock, for sound-spelling inconsistencies, and so on, exploiting the proximity to local sites of interest for Anglo-Saxon, Early Norman and Shakespeare's England. In particular, it will have a strong international focus, examining English as a global language, the learning of English as a second language, and English as a language type compared with other languages. The practical consequences of global English, for translation, for the internet, and for learning will be explored. A further modern aspect of this module is its interdisciplinarity. It combines insights and methods from historical linguistics, language typology, grammatical analysis, language use and processing, and language learning, all of which will be presented in an accessible way appropriate for a broad audience. The module will include applications of English and of comparative linguistics, especially to problems of language learning and translation, and to English language issues that arise in forensic linguistics, ie, in language and the law.

PPLE6031A

20

TRANSLATION ISSUES ACROSS MEDIA (LEVEL 6)

This module is particularly relevant to language and translation students, but will appeal to students from across the University with an interest in language issues associated with the globalisation of communication and the media. It considers a range of materials (texts and their translations, multilingual publications and packaging, film subtitles, dubbed soundtracks, IT-mediated text) to explore issues involved in the transposition and translation of (spoken and written) text into other media and other languages across different genres. Taught in English. Receptive knowledge of one other language in addition to English required. Taught with PPLT5031A. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT6032A

20

TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE

This module introduces you to some of the most important theories of translation, and explores how these can help (or hinder) the translator by shedding light on the effects of intercultural transfer of meaning. The seminars (weeks 1-9) examine the various ways of thinking about fundamental concepts such as 'equivalence' and 'culture' in translation, including lexical and textual equivalence, cultural and pragmatic equivalence, and the ethical and political role of the translator; we will also take a comparative approach to the structure and functioning of texts in different language-cultures, exploring problems such as register, terminology, genre-marking and information flow

PPLT6139A

20

TRANSLATION WORK EXPERIENCE (LEVEL 6)

The module builds on partnership with public services locally and abroad to give home and visiting/exchange students the opportunity to work jointly on professional translation briefs (e.g. translation from, and into English, of information for local museums or museums in France or Spain). Work involves translating to specifications, background research and product delivery/presentation. Assessment is by a variety of means including a critical report. Module open subject to availability of briefs - a back-up module choice is essential. One hour per week timetabled. Other commitments including Level 3 tutorials to be arranged. This module is only available to students on Honours language programmes or to PPL visiting students.

PPLT6019A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION IN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (SPRING)

This module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of faculty. The goal is to produce an extended essay of 5,000 - 6,000 words (written in English) based on in-depth research into a specialist topic related to wider issues in language and communication studies. The appointed research supervisor will be allocated time to conduct individual tutorials with each of their supervisees. These tutorials will give students an opportunity to seek guidance on their projects, whilst also giving supervisors an opportunity to provide guidance and feedback on structure, approach, presentation, sources, initial drafts, time-management issues, etc. The dissertation topic must be agreed with the module organiser by the end of week 1. There is no specific timetable slot, and therefore time-management and planning will be especially important during this module as it is your responsibility to arrange and attend meetings with your supervisor. This module will be useful preparation for those interested in pursuing post-graduate studies. The aims of this module are: To enable students to undertake an independent piece of research under supervision. To improve skills in written presentation and research. To provide an opportunity to reflect upon how studies might be continued at postgraduate level.

PPLC6003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SERVICE INTERPRETING

This module is offered to final year undergraduates with no prior formal interpreting training. Its aim is to equip students with public service interpreting skills as well as to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge in order to improve their ability to reflect on the process of interpreting as a multicultural world. For students also enrolled on the Autumn semester Introduction to Conference Interpreting module, it will provide the opportunity to hone their skills whilst introducing new topics in different settings, such as liaison interpreting during a police interview. This course in a Sanako digital language laboratory and consists of 4 hours of contact time per week. The module covers on-sight, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting skills as well as the non-verbal elements of importance to communication such as pitch, intonation, body language, etc. The content of the module focuses on medical and legal settings. The skills based approach of this course provides effective academic training and has high employability credentials as it develops transferable skills in demand in the professional world such as good concentration, active listening, flexibility, confidence and self-presentation. Students will be assessed on interpreting both into and out of their mother tongue. It is essential that students are at native speaker level in at least one of the following languages: English; Spanish, French or Japanese.

PPLT6028B

20

SPECIALISED TRANSLATION (SPANISH)

A module in the translation of specialised texts of various types such as economic, journalistic, scientific, literary, and technical. This module is also open to second-year PPL language and communication students with (near) native competence in Spanish and/or visiting/exchange students.

PPLT6025B

20

SPORT, COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY

Sport is now a global phenomenon. It generates billions of dollars for economies across the world, often dominates media schedules, creates global celebrities with increasing political power and patterns the lives of millions of #ordinary# participants and fans. In short, sport is a key feature of contemporary culture that can be used to study the ways in which social organisations and relations interact and are shifting in contemporary society. The ways in which sport communicates itself to society, and the ways in which athletes, and the organisations they represent, communicate, provide fertile ground for investigation. This module typically involves academics from a range of disciplinary backgrounds including American studies, economics, education, environmental studies, sociology, film and media studies, history, linguistics, and translation studies. You will consequently be able to address a wide range topics while reflecting on the ways different disciplines approach the study of sport. Topics covered usually include: globalisation of labour markets in professional team sports; intercultural communication and sport; media, globalisation and sport; sport and gender; sport and race; and sport and conflict. These topics will vary slightly from year to year. Assessment and volume of work will be commensurate with credit value.

PPLC6029B

20

TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR SUBTITLING AND DUBBING (LEVEL 6)

This module provides first-hand experience of subtitling and dubbing. There will be an opportunity to become familiar with software used for interlingual and intralingual subtitling and dubbing at professional level while undertaking practical exercises involving cueing, text compression and segmentation, respecting time and space constraints and conforming to conventions of good practice. The different types of technological tools used for audiovisual translation at professional and amateur levels will be explored, analysed and assessed. Selected film/TV series/documentary extracts in several languages will be used. Practical activities will present participants with the challenges posed by the interplay of audio, image and text. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLT6027B

20

THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEWS (LEVEL 6)

The module seeks to provide an understanding of how the special cultural product we call 'news' is created. It examines the changing economic, political, legal and cultural contexts of newspaper production in a variety of media (print, web, broadcast). It presents and assesses different theories about how these contexts (or 'structures') impact on the day to day practice of journalism and the nature of the news message. An important part of the module involves tracing the reflections and refractions of these wider processes in actual news media discourse. We will use frequent practical analysis exercises to test and challenge the theories of new production and the practices of new production in today's fast-changing news environment. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to 'read' news media in a very different way to before.

PPLL6016B

20

TRANSLATION (JAPANESE)

This module is designed to introduce final year Japanese Honours students to the study and practice of translation to and from Japanese. Materials translated will include a range of text from different media, from general to semi-specialised content. Students will also be given an insight into professional practice and aspects of the translation industry.

PPLT6142B

20

TRANSLATION AND ADAPTATION (LEVEL 6)

* Please note that this module does NOT include a practical translation component. The aim of this module is to consider the processes of adaptation in a range of media and the issues associated with them from a theoretical and a practical point of view. In particular, it will attempt to establish where the boundary lies between the two terms, translation and adaptation, in different contexts. We will devote our time to the exploration of types of film adaptations in different genres and students will present case studies from recent articles in a variety of areas: fidelity, adaptation for the theatre, adapting from books to video games, adapting queerness in short stories, ideology and children's stories adapted for films. It is open to students who do not have a foreign language. Assessment commensurate with level. Taught with PPLT5024B.

PPLT6021B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAB including grade A in French, Japanese or Spanish
  • International Baccalaureate 33 points including 6 in HL French, Japanese or Spanish
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAB including grade A in French, Japanese or Spanish
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAABB including grade A in French or Spanish or 4 subjects at H1, 2 at H2 including H1 in French or Spanish
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 36 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 9 credits at Level 3. An ability to demonstrate language proficiency at GCE A-Level grade A standard in French, Japanese or Spanish is required
  • BTEC DDD alongside a GCE A-Level or equivalent in French, Japanese or Spanish
  • European Baccalaureate 80% including 85% in French, Japanese or Spanish

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level. 

A GCE A-level in French, Japanese or Spanish is required at grade A.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.
  • A Level AAB including French or Spanish at grade A
  • International Baccalaureate 33 overall including HL French or Spanish at grade 6 or above
  • Scottish Highers At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAB including French or Spanish at grade A
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAABB
  • Access Course Arts/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 36 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 9 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDD, an ARTS/Humanities subject preferred. Also required, GCE A-Level or equivalent grade A or above in French or Spanish
  • European Baccalaureate 80% overall

Entry Requirement

It is generally expected that you should have at least a Grade A at A Level, or its equivalent, in the language that you intend to take at honours level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

Language and Communication Studies does not currently interview all applicants for undergraduate entry as standard, however we do offer the opportunity to meet with an academic individually on an Applicant Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) you have applied for. Some candidates with non-standard qualifications, or who have been out of full-time education for some time, may be invited to attend for interview.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken a gap year.

We also welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have GCSE Mathematics and English at Grade C or above.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Language and Communication Studies)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515