BA Media and International Development

This unique degree programme will allow you to immerse yourself in the world of media, communication and international development and study the complex relationship between them. How do charities and other development organisations communicate about famine, poverty, and developing countries, and what effects does this have on public attitudes? Why do only some humanitarian crises make it onto our TV screens and what effect does this have on government policy? How important is press freedom and freedom of speech in promoting democracy and economic growth? What is the impact of social media in developing countries - do Facebook and Twitter facilitate citizens' engagement with politics or do they actually undermine genuine political participation? These are just some of the key questions and problems that you will explore.

Overview

This innovative degree will allow you to study both media and international development and the relationship between them, making this degree programme unique within the UK.

It is designed to meet the growing demand for those who wish to pursue a career in the media to have an international outlook and for those who wish to pursue a career in international development to understand how the media works. Students will be particularly well prepared for careers in NGO communications, development journalism, humanitarian communication and media development.

The media are important to all aspects of international development, from promoting mass mobilisation and political participation to facilitating the flow of information locally, nationally and internationally. The media is also central to encouraging charitable donations, promoting democracy and human rights, and in delivering public health messages during emergencies.

You will benefit from the combined teaching expertise of the School of International Development alongside Film, Television and Media Studies and Political, Social and International Studies. This interdisciplinary teaching also allows for a unique range of choice and specialisation, enabling you to choose from a variety of modules linked to both international development and the media, such as Development in Practice; Development Work Experience; Gender and the Media; Political Communication, Media, Globalisation and Culture; Politics and International Development; Wars and Humanitarian Crises; and Women, Islam and the Media.

Students will have the opportunity to engage with cutting-edge academic material and to critically reflect on key issues in a variety of settings: lectures, workshops, and film screenings.

Enhance your employability

With a strong focus on project design and management skills, as well a media production and analysis, this course will allow you to develop key skills which enhance your employability.

The compulsory third year module - Media Production for Development - includes technical skills in photography, audio and video production as well as editorial approaches to storytelling. This two week intensive practical based module is co-delivered by Duck Rabbit, a specialised digital production and training company with clients including Oxfam, The Guardian, BBC World Service and Medecins Sans Frontieres.

The optional third year module - Development in Practice - provides practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace.

If you choose the 'with overseas experience' course variant, you will have the opportunity to take part in an overseas development work placement, gaining invaluable experience and applying the theory you have learnt in a professional environment. In recent years, students have gone on media-related placements with Inter Press Service in New York and Video Volunteers in Goa, for example.

We regularly invite external speakers to come and talk to students about the everyday complexities of reporting on poverty and/or humanitarian crises. We have recently had talks from leading practitioners at Save the Children, BBC Media Action, The Public Media Alliance and the Department of International Development (DFID), as well as from freelance journalists and film-makers.

Students on this course also have the option of signing up to additional professional skills courses organised by the department. Recent media-related sessions have included Participatory Photography, run by PhotoVoice and Filmmaking for Development, run by Postcode Films.

Course structure

Year 1

In the first year you will be begin to critically engage with contemporary debates and issues in both media and international development. Core modules will help establish essential knowledge in subjects including Analysing Film and Television; Introduction to Development Studies; and Media, Society and Power.

The final core module - Humanitarian Communication - will critically review how journalists and international development actors communicate about poverty and humanitarian crises through the media. Drawing on case studies ranging from the Ethiopian famine in the 1980s to Kony 2012 and #BlackLivesMatter, we will explore changing trends in humanitarian communication. Key topics will include media representations of Africa, 'pornography of poverty' in charity appeals, the role of celebrities in international development, and the impact of social media on global activism. This module also contains a number of workshops focused on relevant practical skills such as blogging, writing a press release, and the basics of photography.

You will also have the opportunity to tailor your studies according to your own interests by choosing from a range of optional modules including introductions to Political Communication; Media Representations; Human Geography, Environment, Anthropology; and the Economics or Politics of Development.

Year 2

In the second year you will have the opportunity to develop further skills in research methods and choose modules about specific regions of the world, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. In addition to further international development modules about Economics, Politics, Geography, Environment and Anthropology, you can also choose to take modules specifically concerned with Gender and Education. Popular optional modules relating to media include Media, Globalisation and Culture; Politics and Media; Gender and the Media; and New Media and Society. Finally, you can also study a range of foreign languages at this stage, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German and Spanish.

The one compulsory module in this year - Communication for Development - seeks to explain the role of media and communications within development. How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies.

Year 3

All final year students will write a dissertation on a subject of their choosing - related to media and international development - which is supervised by a relevant member of staff. The optional modules students can choose from include Wars and Humanitarian Crises; Development in Practice; Women, Islam and the Media, and a foreign language.

The first core module - Media Production for Development - delivered as a two week intensive module at the end of the second year, gives students the opportunity to learn practical production techniques required for storytelling. The second core module - International Media and Communication - explores issues such as global news production, political propaganda, public diplomacy and the role of media in international situations of conflict and war.

As part of your third year you will have the opportunity take part in a work placement in the UK or overseas. If you decide to stay at the University, alongside your dissertation you will also have the opportunity to study modules such as ‘Wars, Humanitarian Crises and Aid’ or study a foreign language.

Assessment

A combination of coursework and written examinations is used to support your learning. Coursework typically consists of two of the following in any one module: an essay, an assessed presentation, an analysis or review, a practical or experimental assignment or a blog. The final year dissertation is highly weighted and is the most significant opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate your skills in interdisciplinary analysis in a self-motivated study.

What next?

A degree in Media and International Development opens doors to a diverse range of career options. There is a vast array of organisations that value knowledge and skills related to international development - from government agencies and the United Nations, to private sector companies and consultancy firms, to the many hundreds of large and small non-government organisations that focus on development and humanitarian work. Our Life after DEV brochure explains the opportunities for employment in the development sector, where many of our students now work. 

Equally, though, many of our alumni have also gone to work in the media. Recent graduates of our undergraduate degrees have become freelance film-makers, photographers and travel writers and even set up their own production companies. The director of Bend It Like Beckham (2002) and Bride and Prejudice (2004), the CEO of the Public Media Alliance, the Founding Director of the Rockhopper TV and the Senior Strategic Partner Manager for Sub-Saharan Africa at Google, are all alumni.

There are also numerous career paths which combine both media and international development such as NGO communications, development journalism, humanitarian communication and media development. Recent graduates of our Master's degree in Media and International Development, for example, have gone on to work in media/communications roles in BBC Media Action, the British Council, Care International, Farm Radio International, Greenpeace, Hope International, Inter Press Service, Oxfam, Raleigh International, The Institute of Development Studies, The Open Society Foundation, The Wellcome Trust, the United Nations, UNICEF, Wateraid and the Women's Refugee Commission.

Finally, other graduates have used the academic and transferable skills gained from our degrees for careers in business, the voluntary and public sector, education, and academia.

Course convenors

The convenors of this degree are Dr Ludek Stavinoha and Dr Martin Scott. We are both passionate about teaching and learning more about the role that communication plays in promoting positive social change. Please check out our respective people pages to find out more about our research interests and get in touch if you have further questions.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

ANALYSING TELEVISION

This module explores the many ways television has been examined, explored, understood, and used. It focuses particularly on the specifics of the medium; that is, how television is different from (and, in some ways, similar to) other media such as film, radio, and the internet. Each week will focus on a particular idea which is seen as central to the examination of television. The medium will be explored as an industry, as a range of texts, and as a social activity. While drawing on some examples from other countries, the primary focus will be on British television; similarly while some history will be explored, the main focus will be contemporary television.

AMAM4010A

20

HUMANITARIAN COMMUNICATION

This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as NGOs. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as 'pornography of poverty', as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of 'post-humanitarian' communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging, writing a press release, and the basics of photography.

DEV-4008B

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress. This module is reserved for students on BSc(Hons) Environmental Geography and International Development.

DEV-4006A

20

MEDIA, SOCIETY AND POWER

This module introduces first year students to the main theories of mass communications and provides them with the key skills of academic reading and writing. Students will reflect on the importance of reading for academic research and learn how to assess and discuss the relevance and impact of milestones in mass communications theory from the nineteenth century to the present. The module explores theoretical approaches to media content, production, regulation and reception, including key themes such as freedom of speech, public sphere and political economy.

PPLM4054A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

This module fundamentally deals with ideas about the power of the media and the ways that various political actors use that power. It will examine this in terms of how political actors use the media in political communications. Student will cover ideas about media effects, branding in politics, and soft power in international relations, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties and resistance or civic movements. These will be discussed in relation to the roles of journalists and public opinion, communications in elections, as well national building and branding and the communication of transnational actors. Students will get practical experience analysing and producing communication strategies.

PPLM4001B

20

MEDIA REPRESENTATION

This module explores the roles the media plays in the formation of identities and subjectivities. It will ask students to think about the relationship between the media and social hierarchies of power, by looking at the similarities and differences of representations across media forms, genres and narratives. It will introduce students to approaches and issues including gender identities and feminist theory, otherness and post-colonialism, discourse and power, performative identity and queer theory, disability studies, posthumanism and animal studies.

AMAM4026B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an introduction to political concepts and frameworks that are central to the study of international development. Through studying theoretical approaches students will gain the foundations required to critically evaluate contemporary development debates and development policy and practice.

DEV-4009B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

Students acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. A variety of skills can be acquired - interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, computerised data analysis, report writing, etc. Assessment is via two individual research reports, one quantitative and one qualitative, the data being either provided to students or collected by them as part of a collaborative piece of primary research. This module is compulsory for students taking degrees in Politics and Society, Culture and Media. These two group of students will be taught in separate streams, and the material in each will be tailored to their subject-specific needs.

PPLX5047A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEF or above, ie, if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods, this module examines the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities. The module explores both theoretical and methodological issues and covers theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. It explores a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

The module introduces students to the role of media and communications in processes of globalisation with a particular focus on questions of cultural change. It discusses the cultural implications of global media images and cultural products by exploring audience practices and media representations in different contexts. The first weeks of the module introduce the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation. The rest of the module discusses and assesses these approaches by critically exploring the connections between global media products and cultural transformation; changes and continuities in audience practices around the world; and the potential of media representations to transform social interaction across geographical borders.

PPLM5003B

20

NEW MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the "network society"; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media. .

PPLM5053A

20

POLITICS AND MEDIA

Media is an inescapable part of contemporary political life. This module examines the many dimensions of media's political involvement. We start with arguments about media power, and then go on to look at questions of media bias, before turning to the ways in which political communication has changed (and is changing). We look at the role of the state in using and controlling media and the new techniques of media management. This leads to a discussion about media effects. We end by asking what is meant by a democratic media and how new media are changing the relationship between politics and media. This module links closely to Level 6 modules such as International Communication and Politics and Popular Culture.

PPLM5001B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II

A continuation of post A-Level German I consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading of texts and discussion of relevant topics. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German', depending on student interest and enrolment.) Not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4021B

20

RECEPTION STUDIES: HISTORY, THEORY AND TRANSCULTURAL CONTEXTS

This module will introduce students to the key theoretical frameworks and approaches within the tradition of reception studies. It will offer a critical exploration of the main debates and studies that have shaped the field, exploring both historical and contemporary contexts of media reception. In particular, in will consider the transcultural circulation of media, and the issues that arise when film, television and other media transfer between cultures with significantly different values and modes of reception. The module will encourage students to critically evaluate existing reception studies and equip them with the tools necessary to undertake their own small-scale reception study.

AMAM5035A

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, this module explores the relationship between media culture and social identities. Discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, it critically reflects upon the relationship between media culture and social power and considers how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and should be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption.

PPLM5042B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, running stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing and participation in workshops count towards assessment. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - journalism practices.

LDCC5013A

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

The Writing of Journalism is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. By examining different types of writing involved in a range of journalism, including short news stories, running stories, online journalism, reviews, and feature writing (including interviewing), we will identify and develop the skills needed to produce these. In addition to writing journalism themselves, students will examine journalistic writing and critical work about issues in the writing of journalism to probe and challenge their own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of journalism. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this course aims to engage students as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, students will gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen their own work, and gain the discursive flexibility to navigate the writing of journalism today. The module demands a high level of participation, as it is based on discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. Regular writing and participation in workshops count towards assessment. Due to the nature of this module, students who work in English as a second or foreign language should meet LDC's EFL score of 6.5. All prospective students are advised that the module involves weekly work to develop effective - and professional - journalism practices.

LDCC5014B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 2: Microeconomics

Economics for Development II (Microeconomics) introduces students to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5016A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 3: Macroeconomics

The course introduces students to the main macroeconomic issues of development. The first part of the unit covers long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, while the second part focuses on short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The unit will be a combination of theory and evidence/discussion, relating theoretical arguments with recent macroeconomic phenomena, such as the recent global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change. More specific topics include the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, long-term economic growth, gender, institutions, and physical, human and natural capital.

DEV-5017B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology modulewhere disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The course involves a residential field course. Students have a choice between a trip within the UK or overseas. Current overseas locations include Chile and India. Extra charges apply for the overseas trips and the locations are subject to change. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BA GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS, THOUGH STUDENTS ON OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMMES ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-5016B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This political analysis for development module focuses on core principles in politics and their application to development analysis, covering topics that include power and resistance, states and nations, citizenship and justice, violence and non-violence, democratisation and electoral systems and the role of the media. The various topics will be taught with intensive reference to theory but also integrated with empirical material, both historical and contemporary in nature. It is taught through a combination of lectures, facilitated reading groups, video sessions and student-led seminars.

DEV-5008B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investiages the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

Students must study the following modules for 70 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA and COMMUNICATION

IN TAKING THIS MODULE YOU CANNOT TAKE PPLM6097A Students are advised that they should ideally have previously taken a media-related module before choosing this one. This module explores media and communication at the international level and focuses on the major issues in international communication within the contemporary global society. Combining theory and empirics, it explores how the media address regional and global issues beyond the nation-state, global media infrastructure, international flow of information, global news production, the role of media in international situations of conflict and war, political propaganda, public diplomacy, and the transnational media cultural consumption. By successfully completing this module, students will be able to understand the role of media and communication in global society and critically evaluate the process of international communication in the political, social and cultural aspects of contemporary world.

PPLM6043A

30

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and the module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Economics of Development (DEV-5012Y). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, global labour issues and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of WHC is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool, including territorial solutions to violent conflicts and the establishment of power-sharing arrangements.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

JAPANESE FILM: NATIONAL CINEMA AND BEYOND

This module explores the concept of Japanese cinema in relation to national, transnational and global discourses and seeks to reframe discussions of modern and past Japanese filmmaking. We will examine a variety of Japanese films and the ways in which they interact with the history, techniques and culture of Japan. We will also consider the social and commercial nature of Japanese filmmaking, including the ways in which Japanese films circulate the globe.

AMAM6087A

30

TEENAGE KICKS: MEDIA, YOUTH AND SUBCULTURE

This module will address the historical development of the commercial youth market and introduce key debates relating to young people and their uses of mainstream and underground media. It will examine a range of theoretical approaches to youth culture, subculture and post-subculture, employing case studies of popular and alternative music, club culture, film, television, subcultural style and new digital technologies. It will address questions of ideology, identity and representation, most significantly issues of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and encourage students to discuss how cultural interests and practices are used to construct individual and group identities. It will focus primarily on the British post-war context - highlighting the influence of American popular culture, Black Diaspora and technological transformation on British youth - but will also examine young people's media use and subcultures in other national and transnational contexts. The emphasis will be on analysing the extent to which cultural power is negotiated and resisted through shared media consumption and subculture formation

AMAM6072A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

GCSE Offer

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32
  • Scottish Highers AABBB one Advanced Higher preferred
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB (acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications)
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB
  • Access Course Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM in a relevant subject
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Intakes

The School’s annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

Candidates with equivalent qualifications are encouraged to apply, or contact the Admissions Office for further information.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International Students webpage.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English Language GCSEs at grade C or above.

Assessment

Key factors used to assess an application include:

  • Past and future achievement in examinations
  • Academic interest in the subject
  • Personal interests and extra-curricular activities
  • The reference

All applications are considered on their own individual merits.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Development)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515