BA International Relations and Modern Languages

In this globalised world, knowledge of a modern language is an increasingly important skill which greatly enhances your career prospects. Nowhere are modern languages more important than in a subject like International Relations. This course will allow you to reach graduate level standard in your chosen language (one of French, Spanish and Japanese) whilst having options to study any of the International Relations modules available in the School.

Overview

The BA in International Relations and Modern Languages offers in-depth analysis of global politics, whilst also giving you the opportunity to study a modern language to graduate level. Not only is a modern language very useful in terms of a future career, it also gives you a particular insight into the culture of another country and helps you understand that country’s foreign policy.

This course is unique in our International Relations programme at UEA in offering you a year (rather than just a semester) abroad to perfect your language skills. Students can choose whether to spend the year abroad at a university or in a work placement, or both.

In your final year, there are opportunities to further your employability skills through internships, work placements and work shadowing. Graduates can hope to get jobs in international organisations, business, marketing, media, translation, interpreting and teaching amongst many others. For further details, see our Careers and Employability pages.

Course structure

The degree programme is comprised of compulsory modules to give you a solid grounding in international relations and to improve your knowledge and skills in your chosen language, along with a range of options so you can tailor your degree to your own interests. In your language classes, you will also have sessions looking at life in France, Spain or Japan, which will help prepare you for your year abroad.

Year 1

In your first year you study two compulsory modules in International Relations, Global Politics I and II, which run sequentially across the academic year. They introduce you to the discipline of international relations and allow you to consider many of the ideas, concepts and issues central to a study of IR. You also study your chosen language.

The options in your first year are in related subjects, such as Politics, Philosophy, History and Communication Studies. You can also study a subsidiary language.

Year 2

In your second year you take the compulsory module, International Relations Theory, and continue to study your chosen language. You then choose options from a wide variety, which include Introduction to the EU, Britain and the Europe, Contemporary Japanese Society, International Politics since 1945, International Organisations, Global Political Economy, Language and Politics and Language and Society.

Year 3 (Year Abroad)

You will spend your third year in a country where your chosen language is spoken.  Many students go to one of our partner universities through an exchange agreement, but you can study academic subjects in your chosen language. You can also spend some, or all, of your year abroad at a work placement, in business, public service or a third sector organisation. See the Study Abroad section below.

Year 4

In your final year, your focus will be on developing your knowledge of international relations and cultural awareness, whilst also consolidating your advanced level of language fluency.

There is a wide variety of non-language modules to choose from, which include: EU Studies with Brussels Internship; Power over the Pacific: The American Relationship with Asia; Shifting Powers in Africa in the 21st Century; Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism; Ethics in International Relations, The Construction of News; Language and Gender; Intercultural Business Communication and Sport, Communication and Society. Many students also write a dissertation on a topic of their choice.

For further details of compulsory and optional modules we currently offer in each year of the programme, please see the Course Modules section below.

Assessment

The majority of teaching is carried out through a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. Assessment is primarily in the form of essays, oral presentations, book reviews, reports, projects, tests and examinations.

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Study Abroad

Please click here for the Study Abroad website.

For Home/EU students taking a Year Abroad the tuition fee is currently £1,350. The Year Abroad tuition fee will be subject to an annual increase. International Students are required to pay 25% of their annual tuition fee to UEA during their year Abroad and this will be calculated based on the current tuition fee for that year.

 

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

GLOBAL POLITICS 1

This module introduces students to the core theoretical approaches to understanding the dynamics of global politics, such as Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism and Critical Perspectives. It also introduces a number of core concepts for making sense of global politics, including sovereignty, the balance of power, international law, security and globalization.

PPLI4056A

20

GLOBAL POLITICS 2

This module focuses on particular issues and debates in contemporary global politics. It can be taken as a stand-alone module, but it also builds on the ideas and concepts introduced in Global Politics I. It takes in debates related to power in the international system, such as US hegemony, the rise of China and the future of the EU. It engages with security issues, such as nuclear proliferation and global terrorism. It considers ethical issues such as human rights and humanitarian intervention, as well as considering transnational problems such as global finance, the global environment and global governance.

PPLI4055B

20

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

This module introduces students to some of the key contemporary debates and issues in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations. The central theme of the module is liberal democracy, its nature, scope and potential strengths and weaknesses. We consider forces which have had an impact upon western liberal democracy - such as globalisation and the media - and examine case studies which illustrate the success and failure of liberal democracy in practice. The case studies change from year to year, but currently include Weimar Germany, Northern Ireland, Britain and the Middle East, and the US .

PPLX4052A

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

There is far more to linguistic communication than just knowing the vocabulary and grammar of a language since interpersonal communication is inseparable from culture. That is, because language is used not only to represent but also create and sustain a speaker's expectations, beliefs, attitudes, practices and moral values about the world, verbal communication always involves a high degree of "cultural business". This becomes especially apparent when communicating with native speakers of another language where different sets of cultural assumptions may lead to misunderstanding. This module aims to equip you with ways of thinking about issues which will aid you in becoming more interculturally competent in your foreign language(s). The intention is that this module will enable you to become more effective learners in the particular language culture you will encounter.

PPLC4012B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students should pick 40 credits at the relevant level of their chosen language.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH POST GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their French Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in French from post-GCSE level.

PPLF4003Y

40

JAPANESE POST-GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their Japanese Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in Japanese from post-GCSE level.

PPLJ4009Y

40

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/I

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. If you have studied French abroad and are unsure what your level is, please get in touch with the module organiser as early as possible. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) to start with. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the teacher's discretion.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/II

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. This module continues the work done in PPLF4016A, in developing students' reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on productive skills (writing/speaking). It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar which will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on productive skills and textual grammar including summary techniques. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLF4017B

20

POST A-LEVEL JAPANESE LANGUAGE 1

A course in Japanese for students with Japanese A-level, having passed Japanese Language Proficiency Test N4, or holding any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and language learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop understanding of the diversity in Japanese society. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar and vocabulary in meaningful contexts, whilst also developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLJ4057Y

40

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

A course in Spanish for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4025A

20

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/II

A course in Spanish for students who have completed Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A) or equivalent. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Grammar notions and topics for discussion are different from those in Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A).(Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers). Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4026B

20

SPANISH POST- GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their Spanish Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in Spanish from post-GCSE level.

PPLH4006Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

This module will give students an essential grounding in International Relations theory, encompassing both the foundational theories of realism and liberalism, and contemporary debates about hegemony, neo-imperialism and post-positivism. The module is structured around the positivist/post-positivist divide and starts with classical realism and neo-realism, and liberalism and neo-liberalism. It then explores the English School and constructivism before turning to more critical theories like post-colonialism, feminism and gender studies, and postmodernism.

PPLI5059A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will take 40 credits from their Honours level language.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH POST-GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of French post-GCSE I. It is co-taught with the Post A-Level French Language 1/1 and 1/2 modules. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) during the first semester, and on productive skills (writing and speaking) during the second semester. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar during the autumn semester, and on productive skills and textual grammar including summary techniques in the spring.

PPLF5006Y

40

JAPANESE POST GCSE II

This year long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of Japanese Post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLJ5014Y

40

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/I

This semester-long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second-year students of Japanese (single- or double-honours) who have previously taken Post A-Level Japanese 1/I and 1/II. In this module, students use the content- based textbook to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives.

PPLJ5155A

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/II

This module is a continuation of Modern Japanese Language Honours 2/I. In this module, students will further develop an intermediate to advanced level of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills on various topics including social and cultural aspects of Japan.

PPLJ5156B

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/I

This semester-long Spanish language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours Spanish students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post-A-Level Spanish Language I. Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLH5053A

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/II

This semester-long module is compulsory for all second-year Spanish Honours students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post A-Level Spanish language 2/I (or equivalent). Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLH5154B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/I

This French Honours language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours French students. It is designed to focus on reading, writing, semi-formal oral presentations and awareness of current affairs in French speaking countries. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. (Alternative groups will be available for seminars.)

PPLF5148A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/II

This module is the continuation of the Post A-Level French Language 2/I module and is compulsory for all second year French Honours students. There is a core element to this module which takes up the objectives of Post A-Level French Language 2/I in a translation hour (D2 or E3) and a year abroad preparation oral class. There are two additional strands. Each student will take one of these strands: i) Introduction to Interpreting (obligatory for Translation and Interpreting Double Honours students) (A3*B4), or ii) French for Business and Law (obligatory for Language with Management Studies students) (A7*A8). Students on other degree programmes will be asked to state a preference in the Autumn semester.

PPLF5149B

20

SPANISH POST GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE students and is the continuation of Spanish post-GCSE I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop intercultural competence. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish 2 for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5010Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY

This module aims to equip students with a good knowledge and understanding of contemporary Japanese culture and society through various aspects. All lectures are conducted in English.

PPLJ5012A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and international relations, the module explores a variety of themes and case studies including: gender, representation and the media, feminist methodologies and international relations, gender and IPE.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

Few areas of international politics which remain unregulated by international organisations or international norms. This module examines the historical development of international organizations and regimes, including the UN, NATO, European Union, and international financial institutions. It also assesses their design and evolution, and the extent to which their operation reflects underlying power and interest. It critically evaluates the main theories to explain cooperation between states, the role played in security, trade, finance, gender and environmental policy, and asks whether the structure of international organisation amounts to global governance.

PPLI5057A

20

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SINCE 1945

This module provides a brief historical and theoretical review of the cold war. It then goes on to look at some of the key issues of the post-cold war world. How far have international relations changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989? What are the prospects for peace, stability and prosperity now that the ideological and military struggle between the USSR and the USA is over? Has international terrorism replaced communism as the main threat to the West?

PPLI5045A

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE EUROPEAN UNION

This module examines the development, structure, nature and functions of the European Union and looks at the history and theories of European integration from the 1940s to the present day. The module concentrates on the institutions and processes which run the EU, demystifies its main policies, examines critically the role of the Euro, and assesses the positions of the member-states on the EU's constantly developing agenda. The significance of the European Union in relationship to the rest of the world, its democratic credentials and its importance for understanding politics and governance are also considered. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the European Studies with Brussels Internship' module in Year 3

PPLI5044A

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some approaches to research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, multilingualism and politeness. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest for a class presentation and the project. The module does not assume knowledge of a second language and is relevant to students majoring in political, socio-cultural and media studies as well as to language students.

PPLL5170A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BRITAIN AND EUROPE

The UK's relationship with its continental European neighbours has historically been fraught with tension and difficulty. This module investigates and attempts to explain Britain's ambivalent attitude towards European integration and considers competing visions of Britain's post-war destiny. It tracks, through examination of internal debates in the two main political parties, the UK's changing European policy from aloofness in the 1950s through the two half-hearted applications for membership in the 1960s to accession in 1973 and the development of its reputation as an 'awkward partner'. It also examines the impact of EU membership on British politics and the British political system, assesses the success of Britain's efforts to shape the EU agenda, and critically evaluates the arguments for and against British membership, including those concerning British exceptionalism. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the European Studies with Brussels Internship' module in Year 3

PPLI5058B

20

GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

IN AND OUT: THE POLITICS OF MIGRATION

This module will address the politics of migration and citizenship. It will provide students with a background to political thought on citizenship, membership and belonging. It will then examine migration at the international, state and individual levels. The international level will focus on historical movements of people (such as from Europe and Asia towards the Americas) and contemporary flows of refugees and guest workers. The state level will look comparatively at immigration and emigration policies and critically assess the logic behind them. Attention will be given to different countries in various regions for comprehensive comparative evaluation. Different types of migration will be considered, including economic (such as non-immigrant and immigrant work visas), family (such as spousal and family reunification visas) and humanitarian (refugees, asylum seekers, and special humanitarian protections). The politics of these migration categories will be foregrounded, including governmental tactics of management, how they comply or fail to comply with international human rights norms, and the foreign policy implications of humanitarian visas. Finally the individual level will consider narrative accounts of migration in order to understand policy and practice from a bottom-up and experiential perspective. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate and analyse the politics of migration as manifest in the various policies and practices.

PPLI5060B

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful, is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE (LEVEL 5)

The aim of this module is to discuss Japanese popular culture in terms of theories of social and historical analysis. The module will examine various cultural forms and practices, including manga/anime, media, and music. In doing this, students are expected to develop critical thinking about the relations between Japanese popular culture and national identity, and the role of Japanese popular culture in the contemporary world. The seminar consists of three main parts: lecture, original audio and/or video materials, and group discussion. Students contribute to group discussion every week. Seminars, reading materials, and assessments are all in English.

PPLJ5146B

20

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS (LEVEL 5)

The module looks at the linkage between language and politics, at propaganda and the (mis)representation of the world. It places particular emphasis on the acquisition of linguistic tools that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes. Presentations of the main concepts and examples are linked with practice sessions in which students have the opportunity to design and produce political texts. In addition we, use analytical exercises to test and challenge the theories of language use and the practices of politics focusing on both historical and contemporary situations and data. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to understand and engage with politics (and language itself) in a significantly different way to before.

PPLL5015B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

A compulsory year abroad for students taking one or more honours language(s). Satisfactory completion of the year abroad, as defined by the School Board, is necessary for registration in the following year.

PPLA5027Y

120

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Students who are taking an Honours language in Japanese MUST enrol on PSI-6009A and students taking an Honours language in either French or Spanish MUST enrol on PPLI6087B.

Name Code Credits

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

This module is restricted to students from PPL and HIS who are nationals of a European Economic Area (EEA) member state (UK, other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Lichtenstein), and who have undertaken a level 5 PPL EU related module. This module, PPLI6087B, will focus on preparing enrolled students for a training placement in Brussels by developing a practical understanding of how the EU works and it will provide knowledge of 'domestic' EU public affairs such as regional policy, public health, sport, business promotion, trading standards, energy and environmental policy, funding and regulation. It does NOT offer experience of foreign affairs, diplomacy or security, although broad experience of working in Brussels is an important addition to any CV. There will be seminars, workshops and briefings during the Spring Semester and the four week training placement in Brussels will be taken between Easter and late Autumn at dates set by the school and the host organisation in Brussels. The placement is optional and not tied to successful completion of the module. A substantial contribution will be made towards the costs of accommodation and travel for each placement. There are a limited number of places and selection will be by competitive interview from those eligible to apply. Selection will be based principally on the judgement of the interviewing panel of which applicants will (a) gain the most from the training placement and, (b) the extent to which candidates demonstrate real drive and commitment.

PPLI6087B

30

POWER OVER THE PACIFIC: THE AMERICAN RELATIONSHIP WITH ASIA

This module will introduce important themes in the American relationship with East Asia, at a time when the Pacific region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the American relationship with China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While this will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, the latter part of the module will consider contemporary political issues. This will require an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.

PPLI6069A

30

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 40 credits from their Honours language.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH ORAL AND WRITTEN COMPOSITION

This is an academic module designed to systematise and expand linguistic capacities through critical use of existing competence. Main activities: textual analysis, written composition, formal oral presentations. The module is compulsory for all final-year French Honours students and for second-year language and communication students identified as students with (near) native competence in French and is also open to visiting/exchange students. Taught in French.

PPLF6004A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/1

This module is compulsory for all final-year Japanese Honours students. In this module, students develop skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening at an advanced level. Various genres of reading materials will be used throughout the semester and students will also develop their presentation skills with project work.

PPLJ6010A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/II

This module, which is compulsory for all final year Japanese Honours students, aims to enhance the existing language competence to a higher standard. Main activities include formal oral presentations and research on a chosen topic which is submitted as an essay as one of the final pieces of work.

PPLJ6011B

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: ADVANCED HISPANIC STUDIES

This module develops the students' Spanish language skills at an advanced level. It fosters an understanding of various Spanish language features and develops critical cultural awareness. Specific components of grammar at a higher level are revisited, problematic areas identified for improvement and academic writing skills are further developed. The module offers the opportunity of exploring the components that control the use of language when communicating in Spanish. The oral component of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening and widening vocabulary at a higher level. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6007A

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: WORLD SPANISHES

This module offers the opportunity to develop your Spanish speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at an advanced level. The main objective is to further develop higher level language skills and raise awareness of linguistic issues to aid inclusion and immersion in Spanish-speaking countries. It covers the exploration of the varieties of the Spanish language from a linguistic point of view and the variations of the Spanish language through the analysis and identification of extracts of spoken texts. The oral element of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening skills, whilst widening vocabulary. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6006B

20

TRANSLATION (ENGLISH TO FRENCH)

This module, which is compulsory for all final year French Honours students, aims to enhance translation skills and involves English into French translation. It is also open to second-year language and communication students with (near) native competence in French and/or visiting/exchange students.

PPLF6005B

20

Students will select 50 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 20 credits from LCS modules and 30 credits from PSI modules.

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of staff. The goal is to produce an extended essay of approximately 8,000 words, which relates in-depth research on a specialist topic to wider issues in politics, media and culture, sociology and international studies. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. There is a series of lectures and workshops that all students will be expected to attend (four in the first semester, three in the second) as well as meeting their supervisor on a regular basis

PPLX6042Y

30

ETHICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

The aim of this module is to help students develop an understanding of how debates, traditions and theories of ethics have applied in international relations. The module will be broken into three main substantive areas. The first will focus on war and ethics, examining Just War theory and its development in modern warfare and humanitarian intervention. We will look at war and non-state actors, the use of drones and remote technology and the ethics of peacekeeping and peacebuilding. The second substantive area explores economics, human rights, and ethics. This will include giving attention to the role of accountability in international development and the global neoliberal political economy. This area will also consider the relationship between economics and human rights, critically examining the difference between economic rights and political rights. The final substantive area is centred around the ethics of belonging, examining authority in international relations, state sovereignty, international legal jurisdictions, human mobility, and the ethics of border controls. Students will gain comprehensive overview of ethical theories and concepts as they have been used and developed in international relations scholarship and practice.

PPLI6041A

30

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

This module is restricted to students from PPL and HIS who are nationals of a European Economic Area (EEA) member state (UK, other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Lichtenstein), and who have undertaken a level 5 PPL EU related module. This module, PPLI6087B, will focus on preparing enrolled students for a training placement in Brussels by developing a practical understanding of how the EU works and it will provide knowledge of 'domestic' EU public affairs such as regional policy, public health, sport, business promotion, trading standards, energy and environmental policy, funding and regulation. It does NOT offer experience of foreign affairs, diplomacy or security, although broad experience of working in Brussels is an important addition to any CV. There will be seminars, workshops and briefings during the Spring Semester and the four week training placement in Brussels will be taken between Easter and late Autumn at dates set by the school and the host organisation in Brussels. The placement is optional and not tied to successful completion of the module. A substantial contribution will be made towards the costs of accommodation and travel for each placement. There are a limited number of places and selection will be by competitive interview from those eligible to apply. Selection will be based principally on the judgement of the interviewing panel of which applicants will (a) gain the most from the training placement and, (b) the extent to which candidates demonstrate real drive and commitment.

PPLI6087B

30

INTERCULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (LEVEL 6)

This module prepares students to become effective communicators in intercultural settings, especially focusing on multilingual business management, multinational companies and work within multicultural teams. The aim is that the student will develop intercultural competence, a crucial skill in our globalised world. In order to acquire this, different strategies should be fostered, such as seeking commonalities with others, overcoming stereotyping and prejudice, and developing flexibility and openness. Practical activities in small groups will be held in classroom sessions, with a special focus on intercultural communication problems in business. Theoretical approaches to intercultural communication will be provided in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures and to solve intercultural conflicts in Business contexts. Some of the benefits of being aware of intercultural communication are the ability to build intercultural understanding, the promotion of international business exchanges, and the facilitation of cross-cultural adaptation.

PPLC6138A

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 6)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism).

PPLL6035A

20

POWER OVER THE PACIFIC: THE AMERICAN RELATIONSHIP WITH ASIA

This module will introduce important themes in the American relationship with East Asia, at a time when the Pacific region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the American relationship with China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While this will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, the latter part of the module will consider contemporary political issues. This will require an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.

PPLI6069A

30

SHIFTING POWERS AFRICA IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Surveying the relationship between the world's major powers and Africa, this module examines Africa's relation with and position in contemporary global politics. In contrast to the conventional approach of studying how external actors impacted on Africa's international relations, this module seeks to open up a new approach, focusing on the impact of African political actors on international politics. It does this by analysing African agency - the degree to which African political actors have room to manoeuvre within the international system and exert influence internationally, and the uses they make of that room for manoeuvre. The module is organised along themes (as opposed to the logic of covering countries) which expose a range of political, social and economic spheres of power at play in international relations. These include Rising Africa, African-Sino relations, Africa's global cities, Africa and the War on Terror, African perspectives on climate change and African foreign policy in the new millennium.

PPLI6039A

30

SPORT, COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY

Sport is now a global phenomenon. It generates billions of dollars for economies across the world, often dominates media schedules, creates global celebrities with increasing political power and patterns the lives of millions of #ordinary# participants and fans. In short, sport is a key feature of contemporary culture that can be used to study the ways in which social organisations and relations interact and are shifting in contemporary society. The ways in which sport communicates itself to society, and the ways in which athletes, and the organisations they represent, communicate, provide fertile ground for investigation. This module typically involves academics from a range of disciplinary backgrounds including American studies, economics, education, environmental studies, sociology, film and media studies, history, linguistics, and translation studies. You will consequently be able to address a wide range topics while reflecting on the ways different disciplines approach the study of sport. Topics covered usually include: globalisation of labour markets in professional team sports; intercultural communication and sport; media, globalisation and sport; sport and gender; sport and race; and sport and conflict. These topics will vary slightly from year to year. Assessment and volume of work will be commensurate with credit value.

PPLC6029B

20

TERRORISM AND COUNTER-TERRORISM

Although the term terrorism goes back to the French revolution, it was rarely employed until the 1970's. Contrast this with today when terrorism, it seems, is everywhere we look: in foreign policy decisions, military interventions, homeland security measures, legal frameworks, newspaper headlines, speeches and sermons, films and video games, and, of course, university modules such as this. In this module, we engage in a critical exploration of terrorism, counter-terrorism, and the academic field of terrorism research. We will begin by exploring the history of terrorism, and engage in debates around the definition and character of terrorist violence. Is it possible, necessary, or even desirable to separate terrorism from other forms of violence, for instance? The module will then introduce different perspectives on the causes, types and threat of non-state terrorism. This leads into an examination of a range of strategies for countering terrorism, and their political and normative implications. The module finishes by exploring the emergence and contribution of critical terrorism studies, examining issues including state terrorism, gender and terrorism, cultural representations of terrorism, and the production and influence of terrorism 'experts.'

PPLI6040B

30

THE CLASH OF FUNDAMENTALISMS

The twenty first century has been marked by terrorism and religious tensions. Underlying these tensions are competing ideologies, different world views and widespread misunderstanding. In Europe we live in an increasingly secular society where religious literacy is at an all-time low. In this module we seek to address these issues of our time. This module examines the theo-political background of Islamism, Christian and Jewish fundamentalism and its impact on global politics, religious and secular societies. The module will appeal to those seeking to understand more about religion, terrorism, security, gender, Israel-Palestine, media, Islamist thought, and the Christian right.

PPLX6025B

30

THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEWS (LEVEL 6)

The module seeks to provide an understanding of how the special cultural product we call 'news' is created. It examines the changing economic, political, legal and cultural contexts of newspaper production in a variety of media (print, web, broadcast). It presents and assesses different theories about how these contexts (or 'structures') impact on the day to day practice of journalism and the nature of the news message. An important part of the module involves tracing the reflections and refractions of these wider processes in actual news media discourse. We will use frequent practical analysis exercises to test and challenge the theories of new production and the practices of new production in today's fast-changing news environment. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to 'read' news media in a very different way to before.

PPLL6016B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.  A GCSE Grade C or grade 4 or above in either French, Spanish or Japanese is required.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading) :

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB including French, Spanish or Japanese at GCSE or A level
  • International Baccalaureate 32 including 4 in Higher Level or Standard Level French, Spanish or Japanese
  • Scottish Highers At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including French, Spanish or Japanese at Advanced Higher or Higher Level
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB including standard or advanced level French, Spanish or Japanese
  • Access Course Arts/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3. Must also hold GCSE or A-level French, Spanish or Japanese.
  • BTEC DDM in Arts/Humanities subject preferred, alongside Grade C in French, Spanish or Japanese GCSE or A-Level.
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including 70% in French, Spanish or Japanese

Entry Requirement

French, Spanish or Japanese is required at GCSE or A level to be considered for this programme. We do accept equivalent qualifications.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading) :

  • IELTS (SELT): 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in Reading and Writing with no less than 5.5 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Students will have the opportunity to meet with an academic on an Applicant Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) you have applied for.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.

We also welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

Applicants are required to have a grade C or above in GCSE or A Level French, Spanish or Japanese (or equivalent qualification).
 

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

If you have alternative qualifications that have not been mentioned above, then please contact university directly for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required have GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English Language at Grade C or above.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference.

We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Please note, there may be additional subject entry requirements specific to individual degree courses.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

______________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Political, Social and International Studies)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We already know that your university experience will be life-changing, wherever you decide to go. At UEA, we also want to make that experience brilliant, in every way. Explore these pages to see exactly how we do this…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515