BA History of Art (with a Foundation Year)


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
V35F
A-Level typical
CCC (2019/0 entry) See All Requirements
Visit Us

Video

If you've thought about going to university, but something got in the way - or if you didn't achieve the grades you needed, but are passionate about your subject - our Humanities Foundation Year programme is perfect for you.

Watch It

Video

Study Art History at UEA and learn from world-leading art experts in a setting unlike any other in the country. Immerse yourself in great works of art and join a revolution in the way we think about art around the world.

Watch It

Key facts

(Guardian University League Table 2019)

"The course leaders are passionate and helpful, and have so much wonderful knowledge to give."

In their words

Jennifer Smith, BA History of Art with Museum and Gallery Studies

Read It
Gain the skills, knowledge and confidence you need to excel in a humanities degree, with our innovative Foundation Year programme.

At UEA we believe everyone should have the chance to study at degree level. If you have a passion for your subject, but for whatever reason, don’t yet have the grades required for the three-year programme, our Foundation Year is a great choice. You’ll undertake an intensive and exciting year of study, majoring in your chosen subject and developing your study skills. We offer a rigorous but supportive teaching and learning experience, that’s also very rewarding.

When you successfully finish your Foundation Year, you’ll be perfectly placed to progress to your BA History of Art degree.

Overview

You will study with dedicated lecturers from UEA’s Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities, exploring a wide range of academic subjects including Literature, History, Philosophy, Film, Television and Media, American Studies, Politics and the History of Art.

You’ll benefit from smaller class sizes and individual tutorials, helping you to get the most out of the year. You’ll gain a sound theoretical basis for your continuing studies, as well as discovering new areas of study. You’ll be actively encouraged to develop your own scholarly interests and ideas throughout the year.

We’ll support you as you cultivate your study skills, gaining essential knowledge of many of the concepts, methods and techniques you will need in order to thrive on your degree programme. This is a very supportive programme and we’ll work closely with you to identify and work towards your own individual learning goals.

Course Structure

During your Foundation Year, you will study a mixture of compulsory and optional modules, enabling you to tailor your studies to your interests, while ensuring you develop the knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve your full potential during the rest of your degree.

In your Humanities: Techniques and Methods module you’ll discover the kinds of academic approaches and methodologies you’ll use in your degree.

In your Humanities: The Key Concepts module you’ll explore key theories and ideas in the humanities and discover how they relate to political, social, historical and cultural contexts. For example you might study ideology and myth, feminism, otherness, cultural landscapes, power and representation.

You may choose to study a module on the creative industries where you will critically investigate a range of creative areas such as television, film, media, music, publishing, fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines, among others. You’ll have the chance to explore the relationship between theory and practice in these areas. Alternatively you can choose to study a language module in place of creative industries, such as Arabic, French, Japanese, Italian or Spanish.

The remaining modules offer you a range of subject-specific options including history, literature, visual cultures, politics, and media, or you can select to continue further with a language. By studying a combination of two of these options, you will not only be able to investigate key areas of your chosen degree subject, but you will also gain an interdisciplinary perspective on it through exploring an adjacent humanities discipline. This is your opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in subjects closely tied to the rest of your degree, or even to try something new while you are on the Foundation Year. 

Teaching and Learning

Teaching

Our modules are taught via lectures, presentations, seminars and study groups, and incorporate a variety of teaching methods and study tasks to prepare you for the different types of learning and teaching you will experience during your full degree. Through seminars, interactive training sessions and supportive feedback you will be able to develop skills in areas such as essay writing, research, preparing and giving presentations, and understanding and evaluating scholarly arguments. Your Foundation Year will be taught by award-winning lecturers who are specialists in their fields, and the teaching is informed by cutting-edge subject research and a strong commitment to innovative and engaging teaching practice.

Independent study

Your Foundation Year will be an intensive course. You will need to work independently between classes to make sure you are fully prepared for seminars, study groups and assessments, and are making the most of the resources and facilities available to you at UEA. We will support you as you develop your ability to study independently in this way, cultivating skills that will be of great benefit in your degree, and later career. 

Your modules will be accompanied by detailed reading lists that direct you towards essential reading and recommended texts, chapters and articles, as well as multimedia resources. This means you can organise and prioritise your research and wider reading easily. Study materials are also available via Blackboard (UEA’s online learning platform). Specially-designed group and individual study tasks will help you to work effectively between classes.

Assessment

During your Foundation Year you will be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to explore different learning styles and become familiar with the format and expectations of degree-level assessment.

We use innovative methods to enable you to learn from your peers as well as from teaching staff, and this in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and develop into a more independent learner. For example, there is a strong emphasis on formative assessment. That means you will receive feedback on drafts of written work to help you improve. Group tutorials will also help you hone your thinking.

You will also benefit from the support of one of the course lecturers as an individual adviser throughout your programme, receiving a series of individual tutorials to ensure you are progressing well, are happy and are achieving your full potential.

After the course

Once you successfully finish your Foundation Year you will go straight on to the BA History of Art degree.

If, during the year, you discover your interests and ambitions lie elsewhere, you can also apply to switch to one of the other degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, with the approval of the Admissions Director.

Explore your options, look at our courses, and decide where you want your degree to take you.

Career destinations

Recent graduates have entered a number of fields, including:

  • Museums and art galleries
  • Commercial art galleries
  • Event management
  • Publishing
  • Journalism
  • Teaching/lecturing

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2019/0

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITIES: TECHNIQUES AND METHODS

What is university learning? How does it differ to your previous experiences of learning? How does your learning style affect the way that you approach your studies? These are the sorts of questions that you will explore, and find answers to, during this module. This module will provide you with an intensive induction to higher education, equipping you with the essential skills you'll need to reach your full potential on your chosen degree programme. Through the format of weekly seminars and study groups you will focus on developing your skills in areas such as research, essay writing, delivering presentations, teamwork, revision and exam techniques. We will guide you through your learning by using a variety of different tasks. In previous years we have held class debates, followed a learning trail through the library and run interactive research sessions. As part of this module you will create an individual, personalised learning plan in which you will assess your strengths and weaknesses. This will enable you to keep track of your development over the course of this module and beyond. By completing this module, you will know how to apply the techniques and methods you have learned, and how to continue to hone your skills to become a successful Humanities student.

HUM-3006A

20

HUMANITIES: THE KEY CONCEPTS

This interdisciplinary module gives you a broad yet detailed overview of key themes and ideas within the Humanities, and introduces a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology, power, and representation, and you will see how these concepts work in practice by considering examples taken from across the Humanities, and ranging from the classic to the popular. By studying key texts and theories you will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities, and you will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify these concepts at work in your future studies.

HUM-3005Y

40

VISUAL CULTURES

How have images communicated meaning across different societies, time periods and cultures? What meanings can be read in the built environments around us, and in the creative works of artists, film-makers and designers? And what factors affect our perception and enjoyment of the visual texts we encounter? 'Visual Cultures' will set you up with the tools to study and analyse a wide range of art, media and design, including painting, artefacts and antiquities, photography, film, television, advertising and online digital media. Lectures from academics and professionals in the field will introduce you to key concepts and theoretical positions, with past sessions exploring topics such as 'Reality vs. Surreality', 'Self-presentation and Social Media', and 'Surveillance and Power in Post-9/11 TV Crime Dramas'. Seminar sessions give you plenty of opportunity to discuss and critique the academic ideas as you apply them to visual examples, and the assessments on the module will help you develop and sharpen up your presentation and writing skills. Whatever humanities subject you specialise in, having the ability to critically analyse images and material culture, consider the impact of contexts of production and reception upon their meanings, and effectively articulate your ideas about them, will be a valuable asset. Studying this module prepares you to deploy those skills, and just might alter your perception of the world around you along the way!

HUM-3003B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. You will master the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. You are introduced to basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, if you have studied French abroad, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians, or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Meeting people. Food and drink : eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes. Please note that your current level of Greek should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds beginners' level when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The term andquot;Cultural and Creative Industriesandquot; encompasses a range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, and creative writing. By taking this module, you'll have the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that you may wish to work in. Throughout the semester, you'll critically explore a range of creative subjects (television, film, media, music, publishing - fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines - among others), with a particular focus on the complex relationship between theory and practice in the context of the cultural, political, and social frameworks that underpin the work of the cultural and creative industries. On successful completion of the module, you'll have developed the knowledge and a range of analytical skills that will enable you to understand and engage critically with a competitive cultural and creative industries environment and economy.

HUM-3007A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you will have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You will learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, if you have studied French abroad for a long time, or if you have learnt French in an informal setting (such as in your family). If you have such experience, please contact the Module Organiser as soon as possible to complete a level test..

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

You have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business. Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of knowledge in Russian that exceeds the beginners' level specified above when enrolling on this course, or you may be asked to withdraw from the module (at the Teacher's discretion). Please contact us if you're unsure.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You'll take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You'll also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure).

PPLB4023B

20

HISTORY AND SOCIETY

Dramatic changes took place in 19th-century England which still affect the way we live our lives today. Throughout this module you will explore some of the upheavals which took place, considering the impact that national trends and cultural developments had on individual households, villages, towns and regions. Through the close examination of primary source materials produced at the time, you'll look at the development of several key areas of 19th-century life in the English countryside. For example, this has included education, health and medicine, crime and punishment, changing Christian beliefs and attitudes to worship, as well as the often harsh realities experienced by rural society on a daily basis. You'll also have the opportunity to consider how the media in the 21st century, through documentaries, costume drama and celebrity shows, presents the past. You'll ask questions such as whether the time and budgetary restrictions directors and producers face create an accurate or distorted view of the way our ancestors lived. You'll also explore the ways in which sources and case studies are presented to audiences and you'll think about how this affects people's perceptions of the past. By the end of the module, you'll be able to place the 19th century within its wider context. You'll understand where many of our current ideas and reactions to various aspects of life, such as welfare and leisure, originated. And, in addition, you'll be able to assess the extent to which decisions our ancestors made in the 19th century still influence our culture and society two hundred years later.

HUM-3001B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES

What is literature? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? These are just some of the key questions you will be asking as you embark on your module. Over the course of your Literature and Humanities module, you will be introduced to a wide range of key texts and themes in literary studies. You will also be examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts (historical, political, and cultural). The module is evolving all of the time, and in the past we have covered topics such as revolutionary writing, sexuality, Postcolonialism, and Ecocriticism, and we have studied texts ranging from poetry, to graphic novels, to jazz music, and blogs. You'll also have the opportunity to develop your own academic voice as you work on your assessments which are your opportunity to showcase your best work from the module. By the end of your module, you will have developed your ability to analyse texts, be able to explain why historical and cultural contexts are so important, and construct your own critical arguments effectively. You will also be better equipped to communicate complex ideas to others and apply interdisciplinary approaches to texts, images, and film.

HUM-3004B

20

MEDIA IN PRACTICE

The impact of rapid technological change is no more apparent than in the various areas of the media#film, television, radio, podcasting, publishing and the various uses of the World Wide Web. In this module you will gain a firm understanding of these relationships while developing your academic and practical skills. You don't need to have any previous experience media production or any other experience of working with technology to take this module. You'll study the use of technology in media production and distribution, learn about the impact of social media on news production and consumption, engage in critical listening and viewing alongside the analysis of film music from a technological perspective. You'll get the chance to engage in a televised debate in the TV studio, explore citizen journalism, create podcasts to demonstrate the impact of your research in your chosen discipline and study how digital technologies and advances in the field of artificial intelligence are affecting research, media production, archiving and restoration. There'll be opportunities for extra-curricular activities too#in the past we've created podcasts for the NHS and for conferences at UEA#and we'll look at how we can be creative with storytelling.

HUM-3008B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES

This module introduces you to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage you to consider the role that politics plays in your life through the examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. If you are a Foundation Year student it will have relevance to you in its critical approach to ideology.

HUM-3002B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

Landscape, Art and Culture

Most works of art - whether objects, buildings, or performances - are designed to serve a set of purposes. How their forms and functions relate may be straightforward and practical, or complex and elusive. Through a range of case studies, presented in lectures by our staff in Art History and World Art Studies, you will examine the connections between the uses, meanings, and appearances of art, culture, space, and landscape. You will also consider how these connections may change over time, especially in the context of cross-cultural contact. The opportunity to analyse texts on your own and in discussion groups will help you understand different points of view and construct an argument supported by evidence.

AMAA4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

This module introduces you to the study of art history. You will discover what makes art history distinct as an academic discipline. By learning about the themes art historians have explored over time, and some of the methods they use to study art, you will start to understand the subject better - and to appreciate how it fits into your degree. As a seminar, this module also gives you the chance to experience the small-group discussions that are central to our teaching.

AMAA4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO GALLERY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

This module will introduce you to some of the key concepts underpinning art galleries and museums. You'll learn about the history of museums and their impact on society. You'll consider how museums and galleries today use not only their displays but also a range of activities to attract, educate, and inspire visitors. By visiting museums and galleries in Norwich as part of this module - including the Castle Museum and Art Gallery and the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts - you'll gain a real-world perspective on museums today. You will also have a chance to study galleries and museums from around the world.

AMAA4009B

20

LEARNING ON SITE: THE SAINSBURY CENTRE FOR VISUAL ARTS

In this module, you will discover the art and architecture that makes up our department's home in the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA). Designed by Lord Norman Foster and opened in 1978, this building and the Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Collection have shaped the study of Art History and World Art Studies at UEA. Through readings, group discussions, and the close study of objects in the SCVA, you will be encouraged to challenge assumptions and preconceptions about different kinds of art - from around the world, and from prehistory to the 20th century. This module will also develop your abilities in library research and academic referencing.

AMAA4007A

20

MAKERS AND MAKING

Making works of art - from objects to performances, bodies to buildings - involves a range of materials, activities and ideas. On this module, you'll learn about the physical and technical properties of different materials as well as their social, economic and symbolic significance. You'll hear from a range of experts in a series of lectures by our staff in Art History and World Art Studies. You will gain a wider perspective on how people at different times, in different cultures, have designed, crafted and created works of art - challenging narrow ideas about what (and who) an artist is. You will also develop the skills you need to write effective essays at university.

AMAA4002A

20

PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY

How do you represent a person? On this module, you will explore the genre of portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists from the ancient world to the present day. You will develop the skill of visual analysis as you consider issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. You will also continue to develop your writing skills, as we analyze works of art alongside histories and concepts of the individual self - perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

AMAA4025B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

ART IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD

Art is a resource which can be used both positively and critically to affect the contemporary world around us. It may be exploited, most obviously for its economic value, but also for broader social or political gain. You will explore these different uses of art by addressing the factors that condition our contemporary reception of art works and visual culture. You will begin by examining some of the key methodologies for interpreting art's contemporary functions, including its capacity to create contemporary identities and world-views. You will then turn to focus on the museum and gallery as spaces for these contemporary issues to emerge, before considering the same ideas at work in more quotidian ways. And, finally, you will conclude with a reflection on your own position as art historians, anthropologists, and archeologists working with art in the contemporary world.

AMAA5090B

20

THE LIVES OF OBJECTS

Your main objective in this module will be to develop your critical skills as they pertain to thinking, reading, writing and looking. To enable this, the module will fall into two main sections. In the first section, you'll focus on one particular methodology - object biographies - used in archaeology, anthropology, museum studies and art history. You'll examine this methodology in detail, breaking it down into its component sections. You'll then consider its strengths and its weaknesses, as we subject it to a thorough critical evaluation. In the second half of the module, you will study a range of theories and methodologies used in the study of material culture. In this part of the module, you will focus more broadly on what critical thinking is, both in general and within each of the four disciplines taught in the Department of Art History and World Art Studies. You'll be taught through a combination of two weekly lectures and one discussion seminar. The lectures will offer you an introduction to the relevant topic, and will end with an opportunity to discuss/debate the issues raised. During the discussion seminars, you'll consider key issues raised in preceding lectures and the weekly class readings which accompany them.

AMAA5089A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ACTION / ABSTRACTION:ART AFTER 1945

You will explore the rich history of art made after 1945, with a particular emphasis upon the problem of the relationship between the idea of art's autonomy and claims for its capacity to engage directly with social and political conditions. You will be introduced to key tendencies in art and a wide variety of artistic media made since 1945, with a (non-exclusive) focus upon Europe and North America.

AMAA5101A

20

CONTEMPORARY GALLERY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

You will examine how contemporary artists have explored the way in which contemporary galleries and museums function. Since the 1960s artists have adopted the museum as both subject and medium in their artworks. These seminars will examine how such projects impact on our idea of what galleries and museums are, how they operate, and what role they have in public life today. Throughout, key ideas regarding aesthetics, politics, memory, and audience participation will be approached by way of specific artworks and exhibitions. These sessions will be supplemented by workshops exploring art criticism, as well as a study trip to London.

AMAA5102A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART

The art of ancient Egypt has been admired (and vilified), collected, and used as a source of inspiration for centuries, from Mozart's Magic Flute to the Harlem Renaissance to the Arab Spring. You will explore a number of themes in ancient Egyptian art, including the role of artists in ancient Egypt; art and religious rituals, such as mummification; and the impact of Egyptian art in the the Enlightenment, the age of colonial and imperial expansion, and up to the present day. You will visit at least one museum collection of Egyptian art (which varies depending on museum programming), and you will be able to develop a topic of special interest to you for your written coursework.

AMAA5015A

20

MEDIEVAL BODIES

Born, bathed, dressed, worshipped, sexed, cut, bruised, ripped, split, buried: the human body offer historians a gateway onto understanding the cultures of the past. On this course you will examine several groups of objects from the visual culture of medieval Europe and the Middle East through this contemporary theoretical lens, building up a body of medieval artistic practice piece by bodily piece, and examining how the techniques and society of the medieval craftsman at once idolised and distorted the medieval body's forms. In previous years this course has also featured a study trip to museums and galleries in London to meet with curators and handle objects.

AMAA5086A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

RENAISSANCE RECONSIDERED

Fourteenth and fifteenth-century Italy was shaped by the growth of urban centres and the development of new political, social, and sacred institutions. New patrons and uses for artworks prompted a wealth of artistic activity that responded to and also forged contemporary values, beliefs and identities. Bankers, merchants, mercenaries, and religious institutions exploited the power of art and architecture to promote their professional interests, ambitions, and families. But was the Renaissance all that it seemed? We will reconsider some of the most famous (and infamous) artists and objects from renaissance Italy, questioning traditional assumptions about the nature and function of art during this period. Each week you will explore a selection of buildings, paintings, and sculpture alongside renaissance literature and modern theory, building a new and richer picture of this critical cultural moment.

AMAA5097B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN VENICE

Positioned at the hub of trade routes which spanned out across the known world, the city of Venice was a major commercial and political power during the medieval, renaissance, and early modern periods. It also grew to be one of Europe's most important centres of artistic production, with Venetian painters, sculptors, glassmakers, and architects channelling their city's diverse multiculturalism into a vast range of influential artworks. You will examine the development of art and architecture in the city from its earliest foundations through to the present day, tracing the aesthetic and urban history of what its inhabitants came to call 'La Serenissima,' the most serene city on earth. In previous years this module has featured a study trip to Venice.

AMAA5093B

20

Students must study the following modules for 30 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

On this module you will undertake a research project on a topic related to your specialised interests, in consultation with an appropriate member of ART Faculty, leading to a 9,000 word dissertation.

AMAA6112B

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS PRACTICE

This module explores a variety of practical and conceptual considerations in Gallery and Museum Studies by focusing on specific aspects of these institutional structures: from building, housing and caring for collections, to curating shows and exhibitions, and producing texts and writing criticism. You will develop your engagement with the practice of conceiving, designing and mounting exhibitions, exploring both the conceptual demands of putting on a successful show and the practical considerations involved in doing so. Finally we consider the role of interpretation and learning in galleries and museums practice, thinking also about how texts of various sorts operate in exhibitions and collections displays. The module has previously involved a study trip to London or Cambridge.

AMAA6134B

30

PUBLIC ART, PERFORMANCE AND MEMORY

Intense debates rage around monuments that represent historical figures as our most celebrated heroes. But why are our monuments epicentres of public debate and political contestation? This module examines how and why public art and performances commemorate historical events. To find answers to these questions, you'll study the monuments that remember the First World War, the Holocaust, the Slave Trade and Colonialism. But you will also be encouraged to ask how memorials makes us remember and, indeed, whether there are alternative ways of remembering. You'll study commemoration in spirit possession, pilgrimage, and popular music. Considering case studies from across the world, you will review the role of memory and commemoration in the constitution of our society. This module encourages you to consider why alternative forms of memory are required for a more just society.

AMAA6135A

30

THE GOTHIC EYE

An altarpiece is dismembered and hung on a gallery wall, an ivory comb is locked within a display case, a manuscript closed in a museum. The way in which we encounter medieval artworks today is radically different from the time of their creation. What affects the ways in which we see these works now, and how were they seen when they were first created hundreds of years ago? Is it possible to look at Gothic art through 'Gothic eyes'? Merging science, faith, philosophy, and material histories, we will explore the changing experiences of viewing medieval art. The theme of 'vision' will be our guide through the a spectrum of medieval objects drawn from across northern Europe. Each week we will investigate a different theme # such as light, mirrors, space, veils, and dreams# in relation to a set of related artworks, medieval texts, and modern theories. As the course progresses, we will turn from actual vision to imagined vision, investigating how medieval artists pictured dreams, visions, and impossible things.

AMAA6134A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ALTERNATIVE MODERNISMS

You will learn about the role of modern art in the making of India's national identity and address probing questions, notably 'When was Modernism in Indian Art?' Since the beginning of the 20th century, artists and other cultural producers in India, such as film-makers, educationalists and anthropologists, sought to dismantle the colonial concepts that once framed their histories and identities. You will explore how artists such as Nandalal Bose, Ramkinkar Baij and Rabindranath Tagore established cultural exchanges with diverse national and international communities in the early to mid 20th century. You will consider the many new artistic and cultural formations that emerged via the Bengal School and related movements, raising important questions concerning the meaning of the relationships between the local and the national, the future and the past, and the visual and the spatial. Including debates on issues as diverse as identity/difference, visual display, internationalism, cultural heritage, and the politics of representation This module is of potential interest if you have a specific interest in art history, anthropology and museum studies.

AMAA6131A

30

MAPPING WORLDS

Mapping helps us to conceive of abstract concepts in tangible visual form. Be it geographical notions of the globe and the heavens, or more complex outlines of the body, the mind, time, even history, a map helps to bound and give features to otherwise inexplicable space and knowledge. This course uses historical maps and modern theories of cartography as the jumping-off point for an in-depth investigation of the visual and imaginative cultures of Europe and the Middle East from the prehistoric and classical eras through to the Middle Ages and Renaissance. In previous years this course has also featured a study trip to museums and galleries in London to meet with curators and handle objects.

AMAA6121A

30

MODERNISM AND GENDER: FRANCE AND GERMANY 1900-1939

On this module you will study some of the most important modernist artists of the first part of the twentieth century. We will explore the work of male and female artists and also consider how gender structures representation and art practice. The module provides an opportunity to reconsider key works by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Suzanne Valadon, Hannah Hoch and Claude Cahun, amongst others.

AMAA6128A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS PRACTICE

This module explores a variety of practical and conceptual considerations in Gallery and Museum Studies by focusing on specific aspects of these institutional structures: from building, housing and caring for collections, to curating shows and exhibitions, and producing texts and writing criticism. You will develop your engagement with the practice of conceiving, designing and mounting exhibitions, exploring both the conceptual demands of putting on a successful show and the practical considerations involved in doing so. Finally we consider the role of interpretation and learning in galleries and museums practice, thinking also about how texts of various sorts operate in exhibitions and collections displays. The module has previously involved a study trip to London or Cambridge.

AMAA6134B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts

    The Sainsbury Centre is one of the most prominent university art galleries in Britain, and a major national centre for the study and presentation of art.

    Read it Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award

Entry Requirements

  • A Level CCC - for further details on how we review your application please see below.
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Highers BBCCC
  • Scottish Advanced Highers DDD
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 6 subjects at H4
  • Access Course Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC MMM. Excludes BTEC Public Services and Public Administration.
  • European Baccalaureate 60%

Entry Requirement

We welcome applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds.  If you have been out of study for the last three years and you do not have the entry grades for our three year degree, we will consider your educational and employment history, along with your personal statement and reference to gain a holistic view of your suitability for the course. You will still need to meet our GCSE English Language and Mathematics requirements.

If you are currently studying your level 3 qualifications, we may be able to give you a reduced grade offer based on these circumstances:

• You live in an area with low progression to higher education (we use Polar 3, quintile 1 & 2 data)
• You have been in care or you are a young/full time carer
• You are studying at a school which our outreach team are working closely with

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall (minimum 6.5 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

Occasionally we may you to an interview to further explore your application and suitability for the course.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS personal statement.

Special Entry Requirements

IB applicants - UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements for all applicants: GCSE English Language grade 4/C and GCSE Mathematics grade 4/C.

Course Open To

This course is open to UK and EU applicants only. Foundation courses for international applicants are run by our partners at INTO.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515