BA History and History of Art

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Study Art History at UEA and learn from world-leading art experts in a setting unlike any other in the country. Immerse yourself in great works of art and join a revolution in the way we think about art around the world.

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Key facts

(Guardian University League Table 2019)

"The Sainsbury's Centre for Visual Arts is an indepensable resource for the course as it was pupose-built for the housing and teaching of Art"

In their words

Jack Sheperdson, BA History of Art

Give depth to your art history studies and colour to your history studies by combining the two disciplines. You’ll study the past in all its complexity and richness, engaging not only with textual sources but also with the art and material culture of different historical periods. This will give you a uniquely nuanced grasp of how people lived, collaborated, created and competed in the past.

On this degree you’ll benefit from a wealth of expertise in the School of History and the Art History department. You’ll study the most important periods of European history and history of art, as well as exploring the arts and history of other cultures. You might, for example, study the medieval period through documents such as the Magna Carta and monuments such as the great Gothic cathedrals, or learn about the British Empire alongside London’s Great Exhibition in which it was celebrated. Or you could explore the 20th century through the interwoven histories of modern conflicts and of modern art.

Overview

You’ll be equipped with key skills in imaginative understanding, critical thinking, and confident communication. You’ll expand and deepen your understanding of texts and artworks from a uniquely wide array of contexts while developing your intellectual and professional skills and studying with outstanding students and academics.

You’ll establish firm foundations in the related disciplines of history and art history, engaging with different documents and sources. At the same time you’ll encounter works of art at first-hand in the collections of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, which includes works of modern European art and also outstanding works from Africa, Asia and the Americas.

In your second and third years you’ll select from a range of optional modules in order to pursue your own interests in more depth. These modules are focused on particular periods and address specific topics. This will enable you, for example, to examine the 20th through the history of modern conflicts and the history of modern art.

As you progress through the course, you’ll be encouraged to engage with different methods and approaches and to develop informed views of your own. You will consolidate your independence as a scholar through the completion of a research dissertation in your final year.

Course Structure

Year 1

You’ll begin with studies of artists, artisans, makers and making. Here you’ll engage directly with artworks first-hand in order to explore different techniques and visual effects, deepening your appreciation of their different functions and meanings. At the same time you’ll be introduced to art history as a discipline and one key period of history; medieval, early modern, or modern.

In the second semester you’ll engage with some of the most crucial topics in art history, beginning with an exploration of the role of portraiture in shaping our identities. You’ll also be introduced to periods of tension and conflict in history which have in turn provoked controversies in historical debate.

Year 2

At this stage of your course you’ll be able to choose from a very wide range of historical and art historical topics and begin to tailor your studies to your own developing interests. These modules will allow you to develop more specialist knowledge of particular problems and periods. In the spring semester you’ll be invited to consider how your historical studies relate to contemporary debates about art and explore the role of galleries and museums in displaying the past in the present.

Year 3

In your final year you’ll choose three modules which involve close engagement with advanced topics in history and art history. Current modules address topics such as public art and memory, medieval mapmaking and world-making, and the revolutions in France and Russia. You’ll also write an extended essay in which you will explore a topic of your own choice through a combined historical and art-historical perspective.

Teaching and Learning

You’ll be taught by leading scholars in the field of art history and will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars and field trips.

You’ll almost always be in a seminar group of no more than 18 students which allows plenty of dialogue between tutors and students. Teaching methods vary but most sessions are organised around investigation of particular topics supported by close analysis of artworks and texts. As you progress through your course you’ll expand your knowledge, skills and understanding as you become familiar with different art practices and techniques and become accustomed to reading diverse historical sources and art historical and critical texts.

You’ll be asked to prepare material for classes which will often be developed into essays. You’ll also be given the opportunity to engage with a diverse range of relevant presentation styles such as catalogue entries and exhibition reviews.

Alongside the optional modules, in the lecture modules you’ll engage with a range of art-historical problems and methods; lectures are delivered by members of staff in the department and embrace approaches from art history, anthropology and archaeology.

As you develop specialist knowledge in your final year you’ll also begin work on a dissertation. This will enable you to refine your understanding of a particular topic and develop the independent perspective crucial to practising art history beyond university.

Assessment

You won’t be required to sit any formal examinations. Instead, you’ll be assessed on written coursework, usually in the form of essays. Your final assessment will be supported by formative assessments through which you’ll receive feedback on your work as it progresses.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

You’ll have the option to apply to study abroad for one semester of your second year. Study abroad is a wonderfully enriching life experience – you will develop confidence and resilience, while learning about another culture.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

After the course

As a History and History of Art graduate you’ll be ready for a wide range of careers in the art world, the heritage industry, academia, art publishing and other areas of business. Your experience of studying in a world-famous art museum will give you an edge.

Along with your expertise in history and history of art, you’ll graduate with excellent transferable skills including high standards of writing, research and presentation, to help with your future career in many different industries including museums and galleries, the art market and teaching.

Career destinations

Recent graduates have entered a number of fields, including:

  • Museums and art galleries
  • Commercial art galleries
  • Event management
  • Publishing
  • Journalism
  • Teaching/lecturing

Course related costs

There are some additional costs incurred by field trips, which are subsidised by the department. There are also additional costs for the optional trip to Venice in the second year.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2019/0

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts

    The Sainsbury Centre is one of the most prominent university art galleries in Britain, and a major national centre for the study and presentation of art.

    Read it Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB including a History related subject or BBB including a History related subject with an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including HL 5 History
  • Scottish Highers AAABB including a History related subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC including History related subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3 including History related subject
  • Access Course Access to Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 including a History module and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM, alongside grade B in History related subject A-level (or equivalent qualification). Excludes BTEC Public Services and Business Administration
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including 70% in History related subject

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515