BA History


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Full Time
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Degree of Bachelor of Arts



A-Level typical
BBB (2020/1 entry) See All Requirements
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Imagine reading the first ever work of a Christian woman, examining Henry VIII’s armour, or considering the social and political power of African American jazz. This is just a glimpse of the sort of primary material you will come face-to-face with on a History degree at UEA.

You will be able to pursue your passion for the past as you learn from world experts, debating the very latest research and studying primary sources in a region that is steeped in history. As you develop your understanding of the unfolding history of humanity, you will also cultivate a more critical awareness of the problems of the present. You will grow your research and analytical skills, and learn to develop and communicate your own ideas. You’ll graduate with a host of skills that will be invaluable in the workplace or for postgraduate study.

Overview

History at UEA is taught by experienced, internationally renowned academics. Our modules are inspired by their research interests and expertise, so your learning will be at the forefront of the historical debate. We have particular strengths in British, European, Russian and Soviet history, the Atlantic world, the Middle East and Landscape.

Whether you’re interested in all areas of historical study or looking forward to developing new specialisms, in your second and third years you will be able to tailor your degree by choosing from a huge range of optional modules. And you’ll be able to broaden your horizons even further with modules from other disciplines including English literature, languages and politics.

Whichever path you choose, you’ll develop a knowledge of the deep connections between history, memory and the past and the present. You will learn to explore and understand the forces that shape the modern world, be they political, economic, social or cultural. You will come to understand how knowledge is constructed and manipulated – how history is written – and you will engage with its interpretation and debate.

Course Structure

Year 1

Your first year will give you a solid foundation in the main periods in British and European history. Compulsory modules will cover British and European history from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, and you’ll also be introduced to more specialist historical themes, such as witchcraft. In our History, Controversy and Debate module you’ll explore established methodologies and theories of historical enquiry. Through all of these you’ll develop your skills in research, analysis and debate.

Year 2

In year two you’ll be given the option to specialise in your historic focus or keep it broad. You’ll have access to a wide range of modules offered by the School of History, covering topics ranging from medieval history to the late 20th and early 21st century.

There are no compulsory modules this year, so it’s completely flexible and will allow you to tailor your learning to the topics that most interest you, all the while honing your skills of academic enquiry and argument.

You can also choose to study abroad in your second year, learn a new language, and/or broaden your studies by taking modules chosen from those offered by other disciplines in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

Year 3

In your final year you’ll specialise even further and master the intellectual skills required of a historian. You’ll select one specialist subject from a range that typically includes topics such as Henry VIII, Stalin and Stalinism, and Sixties Britain. Each subject will be led by an academic currently researching the specific area – so it’s like reading their books before they’ve been written. In addition to your chosen area of focus you’ll study two advanced modules, covering subjects such as the crusades, the medieval outlaw in history, and legend and youth in modern Europe. Alternatively, you could opt to take just one advanced module and also write a dissertation on a historical topic of your choice, subject to meeting the relevant criteria.

Teaching and Learning

Our academics are leading historians, and are hugely enthused by their research and experience. This translates directly into their superb teaching, which will be delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars.

Our academic staff’s research interests span the early Middle Ages to the modern era and include topics such as landscape history, social and cultural history, gender history, ecclesiastical history, and political and diplomatic history. The Centre of East Anglian Studies, the first regional centre of its kind, is also located within the School. You can find out more about the specialisms and current research projects of the experts you will study with by viewing our staff profiles. Through our lectures you’ll discover the key methods, ideas and issues of historical enquiry, and you’ll take part in focused study in seminars. You’ll learn how to listen to and critique the ideas of others, as well as how to present and defend your own ideas. We believe one of the best ways to learn is by doing, so selected modules will include interesting and thought-provoking field trips, where you’ll consider history in a real-world setting.

Past trips have included:

Our academics are leading historians, and are hugely enthused by their research and experience. This translates directly into their superb teaching, which will be delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Our academic staff’s research interests span the early Middle Ages to the modern era and include topics such as landscape history, social and cultural history, gender history, ecclesiastical history, and political and diplomatic history.

The Centre of East Anglian Studies, the first regional centre of its kind, is also located within the School. You can find out more about the specialisms and current research projects of the experts you will study with by viewing our staff profiles. Through our lectures you’ll discover the key methods, ideas and issues of historical enquiry, and you’ll take part in focused study in seminars. You’ll learn how to listen to and critique the ideas of others, as well as how to present and defend your own ideas. We believe one of the best ways to learn is by doing, so selected modules will include interesting and thought-provoking field trips, where you’ll consider history in a real-world setting. Past trips have included: 

  • The Field of Battle at Agincourt
  • Henry VII’s Chapel at Westminster
  • Abbey
  • Blickling Hall
  • Osborne House
  • Rome

Independent study

Designed to achieve a balance between independent thinking and taught study skills, our course will help you develop into a self-motivated learner, an expert researcher and an analytical thinker. And you’ll receive guidance and constructive feedback throughout to help you improve. Much of your course will be devoted to independent research at our state-of-the-art library, as well as to writing essays and completing practical work and projects. Evidence-based analysis will help you develop accuracy and precision in your written work, and self-directed study will instil the confidence, time management and organisational abilities that will serve you well in your working career.

Academic support

Based in Student Support Services, our Learning Enhancement Team will help you get the most out of your studies and ensure you’re achieving your full potential. Their support covers: Study skills, including reading, note-taking and presentation skills Written skills, including punctuation and grammatical accuracy Academic writing, including how to reference Research skills, including how to use the library Critical thinking and understanding arguments Revision, assessments and examination skills, including time management If you have additional support needs due to disabilities such as sensory impairment, or learning difficulties such as dyslexia, please talk to Student Support Services about how they can help.

Assessment

You will be assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, for some modules, examination results. Within each module you’ll have the chance to test your skills with practice or ‘formative’ assessments, which could take a variety of forms, such as presentations, reviews and source analyses. Your final year will be assessed through a combination of coursework and document work, along with examinations and an extended essay on your specialist subject.

Feedback

You’ll receive feedback from tutors on your practice assignments to help you improve your work before your final formal or ‘summative’ assignments. And we’ll strongly encourage you to discuss your feedback with academic staff.

Study abroad or Placement Year

Experiencing a different culture today can give you a new perspective on the past, so studying abroad is a fantastic way to enhance your history degree. You’ll have the option to spend a semester abroad in your second year, selecting from a broad range of partner institutions. Your time abroad will be an invaluable academic and cultural experience, one that many students consider to be the highlight of their time at university. You’ll develop skills that you’ll use throughout your career, which are coveted by employers.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

After the course

History graduates have the world at their feet. As well as your subject-specific skills and knowledge, you will develop a range of transferable skills and qualities, including communication skills, team working, leadership, self-management, and sophisticated digital literacy. Such attributes open up a wide variety of professions and careers. History at UEA has a proven track record of leading to careers in law, finance, local government and administration, the heritage and tourism sector, the Civil Service, political lobbying, non-governmental organisations, teaching, think-tanks and many more besides. Or you could further your research by going on to postgraduate study.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • The Civil Service
  • Political lobbying
  • Museum curating and heritage
  • Teaching
  • Finance
  • Postgraduate study

Course related costs

The cost of individual field trips will vary, and all such trips are optional.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2020/1

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

HISTORY, CONTROVERSY AND DEBATE

This module challenges you to reflect on the nature of history: what it means for historians; what it means for the wider public and contemporary society; and what it has meant in the past. You'll explore the key approaches to the study of history and the conduct of historical research. You'll consider how historians have written history in the past and how they engage with it in the present; the relevance and challenges of sources and evidence; how historians present their interpretations, and the ways in which they debate amongst themselves. You'll come away with an understanding that history is rarely about the 'right' answer, but rather a series of ways of understanding and interpreting the past. You'll focus in particular on historical debate and how you can effectively analyse and interpret it. Through a mixture of both historical interpretation and historiography, you'll develop key study and transferable skills.

HIS-4009B

20

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY MODERN HISTORY

An introduction to key themes in early modern history, such as: gender, rebellion, religious conflict, the reformation, warfare, state formation, and other key aspects of the period 1500-1750.

HIS-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL HISTORY

This module is designed to provide an introduction to medieval history. We survey the history of medieval Europe, including England, from c.1000 to c.1300, and also examine some archaeology, literature, art, and architecture from the period. We also aim to introduce you to a range of primary sources, including some of the physical remains which can be found in East Anglia.

HIS-4001A

20

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN HISTORY

You will gain a wide-ranging introduction to the political, social and economic transformation of Britain and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the First World War. Among the themes, you will consider industrialisation and its impact, revolution and reform, nationalism and imperialism, gender and society, great power relations, the impact of war and the collapse of the old Europe in 1917-18.

HIS-4003A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

HUMAN RIGHTS, DIGNITY AND GLOBAL JUSTICE

The objective of this module is to understand how human rights developed as a global and transnational idea and set of practices in the post-1776 period. The module looks at the emergence of human rights as a set of ideas from their conception in the eighteenth century, through the development of political rights and humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, through to the United Nations of Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and into the post World War Two period of decolonisation and sustainable development goals. In the seminar discussion, we will focus on key texts, examine crucial political events and follow the ideas of important thinkers.

HIS-4011B

20

THE AGE OF EXTREMES: EUROPE 1918 - 2001

This module conveys the rich complexity of twentieth-century Europe, encouraging you to look afresh at the period. In hindsight, the epithet 'age of extremes' best describes the contradictory characteristics of a century during which total war and genocide were accompanied by growing humanitarianism, state health care and the advance of human rights. Naturally, developments during the first decades of the twenty-first century have forced historians to reconsider and revise once-accepted narratives about European modernization. Just as the trend toward increasing integration, harmonization and homogenization seems questionable in light of the crisis of the European Union; Islamism and Islamophobia believe the idea that modernization resulted in secularization and tolerance. Similarly, the demonstrable power of international finance and supranational assemblies counters narratives of popular empowerment through the triumph of representative democracy. The lectures examine themes in their respective chronological contexts: the age of catastrophe; the age of the post-war 'economic miracle'; and the making of contemporary Europe. Rather than dwelling on familiar aspects of the century that you may have previously studied, the module will also expose you to the history of Europe after 1945, Central and Eastern Europe, and developments in the US and colonies that shaped the continent. Instead of focusing narrowly on high politics, international relations and warfare, the module also aims to allow you to re-examine the century through the study of the history of population movements, land uses, urban planning and attitudes toward the past.

HIS-4006B

20

THE CATASTROPHIC FOURTEENTH CENTURY

The fourteenth century represents a major watershed in the course of global history, and the major contours of change are explored through this outline study of events in England between c.1300 and c.1400. Foremost among those changes stands the Black Death of 1348-9, which is now recognised as the worst single catastrophe in documented history. The second plague outbreak of 1361-2 represents the second greatest health crisis of the second millennium. The pathogen that caused both epidemics has the dubious honour of being the worst killer in history. It is still present in five continents of the world, and, if antibiotics do become ineffectual during the course of our own century, then the Black Death will represent the greatest pathogenic threat to humanity. Historians have long debated whether the Black Death was a major turning point in history or a mere accelerator of trends already in motion. Part of the difficulty in assessing its impact is that it was just one of a number of major catastrophes to strike during the fourteenth century. The others were the Great Famine of 1315-17, the worst famine of the last millennium; the great cattle epizootic of 1318-19, the worst livestock disease of the millennium; and the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, the worst civil uprising in English history. Modern science has cast new light upon the causes of these extreme epidemics and famines, and in doing so has revealed the dramatic instability of the climate as world temperatures cooled and the Little Ice Age began. Catastrophes of this magnitude and frequency reveal to the historian a great deal about human society, its beliefs and responses, and the resilience of its institutions. This was also a period of political turmoil. In 1326 Edward II was the first king to be removed violently from the throne since Harold in 1066, and a similar fate befell Richard II in 1388. Both were murdered subsequently. Despite these catastrophic events, English kings waged war as if nothing had happened and the English government greatly extended its powers to regulate the life of ordinary people in new and contentious ways. The foundation stones of modern state finance and labour legislation were laid in the fourteenth century. Central institutions of English life#such as the pub and the magistrate#also emerged. Catastrophes create opportunities, too, and the English response to those opportunities was markedly different to many other parts of Europe. At the start of the century, its society, economy and political institutions all lagged behind developments in the leading regions of Europe. At the end of the century, however, England was one of the regions diverging from the rest of the continent and taking the first tentative steps towards modernity. Some historians argue that women's work and marriage patterns were transformed after the Black Death, and the modern nuclear family emerged. This module provides you with an entertaining, fresh and fascinating introduction to medieval history, whilst revealing how some of the most significant institutional features of modern Britain began to take shape during this period. The assessment regime includes a group presentation to encourage collaboration with other first year historians.

HIS-4010B

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

You will examine the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, you will explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. You will look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4012B

20

Students must study the following modules for credits:

Name Code Credits

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students should consult with the Study Abroad coordinator before choosing a Semester Abroad module.

Name Code Credits

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 400-1066

The Anglo-Saxon period spanned 600 years from the end of Roman Britain to the Norman Conquest. It was a period of turmoil, seeing waves of immigration, the clash of peoples and religions, and kingdoms jockeying for control. Out of this crucible, England emerged. This is the story of how it came to be. Using contemporary sources, you will learn to handle evidence and reconstruct the worldview of people who lived over a thousand years ago. Anglo-Saxon history teaches you to go a long way with little evidence; to use your imagination to fill in the gaps. Whether it's new to you or something you've studied before, you'll achieve a deeper and richer understanding of how the nation was formed. Via lectures, seminars and private study, you'll discover the Romans, Saxons and Vikings; the strange treasure they left behind; the cryptic and conflicting chronicles (learning to read between the lines), and debates we still haven't resolved today. Developing your powers of argumentation, you'll run into questions with no certain answer. Building with fragmentary evidence will boost your creativity, and you'll encounter ancient artefacts. (Trips have included West Stow Anglo-Saxon village and Norwich Castle Museum.) At the end of the module you'll command an overview of how England came into being. You'll also have built your ability to see other people's points of view, even if they lived a thousand years ago. This is a crucial ability whether in personal or professional relationships. Also learning to argue with evidence as fragmentary as the evidence we'll explore, will hone your problem-solving skills to an unusual degree.

HIS-5005A

20

BETWEEN EAST AND WEST: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY SINCE 1890

The beginning of the twentieth century witnessed a period of immense instability and change with the emergence of the United States as an international actor in the West and the Japanese break from the Chinese sphere of influence in the East. This was underpinned by technological developments, the expansion of global empires, extreme economic dislocation and two global wars. You will examine the conduct and content of the foreign policies of the major powers from the 1890s, with the Sino-Japanese War and the Spanish-American War, to the Japanese occupation of Asia. This will include assessing the interplay of the political, military, economic, strategic and cultural forces that shaped the beginning of the twentieth century and which continue to resonate in the contemporary world.

HIS-5065A

20

BRITISH INDIA: EMPIRE, NATION AND THE PEOPLE IN SOUTH ASIA

This module explores the enduring historical ties between South Asia and Britain, and how these ties have fundamentally shaped the history of both these regions. Between the mid eighteenth and mid twentieth centuries, much of South Asia was part of the British Empire and was referred to as British India. Today, South Asia (which includes India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) plays a significant role in international politics and globalisation. Marked by intense ethnic, ecological and linguistic diversity, South Asia is home to the world's largest constitutional democracy, as well as the world's second largest population. This course is an introduction to the major themes in the history of British India. It does not assume prior knowledge and familiarises students with key events in the development of British rule in the region and its impact in shaping the emergence of modern South Asia. We will examine major social, economic, cultural and political developments in the subcontinent during the British period, including British early military conquests, the enactment of social and agrarian reforms, the Mutiny of 1857, the rise of anti-imperial nationalism and the Indian National Congress, Hindu/Muslim communal tensions, Gandhian politics, the establishment of a constitutional democracy in India, the partition of the subcontinent, the end of British rule and the formation of modern India and Pakistan. The module draws on a wide variety of primary sources including historical tracts, reports, memoirs, fictions (all in English) as well as maps, podcasts and a rich visual archive; it does not require students to have knowledge of Indian languages. Students will also be exposed to the flourishing secondary literature on British India, and to the central debates within this scholarship. They will learn to evaluate the processes through which British rule was established and legitimised in South Asia, and to analyse how different groups of Indians responded to and were impacted by British rule. The module will equip students to assess the emergence and consequences of British imperial rule in South Asia. It will also inspire students to connect historical events in South Asia with developments in Britain and the wider imperial world.

HIS-5074A

20

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE: WARRIORS, SAINTS AND RULERS

You'll explore the experiences and fortunes of the peoples of the western peninsula of Eurasia between the rule of the Emperor Constantine I in the 330s and the call to crusade in the 1090s. At the beginning of the period, the lands centred on the Mediterranean and much of its hinterland were situated within the Roman Empire. Yet, within three hundred years, this empire had disintegrated and been replaced by a number of successor states, ruled by competing dynasties. These states included Visigothic Hispania, Vandal Africa, and Merovingian Francia. Another#in fact, the longest lived of all the successor states#was the eastern empire centred on Constantinople, long known to historians as 'the Byzantine empire'. By the close of the 7th century, many of these states had themselves been conquered by Arabic and African warriors committed to the new religion of Islam and been incorporated in the Caliphate centred on the city of Damascus#an empire which easily rivalled the might, spread, and power of Rome before its own collapse and fission in circa 1000. What Islamic rulers could do, so too could Christian ones. In 800 the son of a Frankish usurper, Charlemagne, was crowned emperor of the West. The actions and ambitions of this emperor were as formative and as formidable in the history of 9th and 10th century Europe as those of Napoleon in the 18th and 19th. The heirs and successors of Charlemagne#whether Frankish, Ottonian, or Scandinavian#were long compelled to negotiate his legacy and memory. By the 11th century, even the Roman pontiffs, now advancing a new programme of reform and renewal, were looking to situate themselves in relation to his Salian successors. The summons to liberate Jerusalem and rescue the Greek empire in the east, carefully tailored to the aspirations of the new elites of Francia and Catalonia, was perhaps the most explosive strategy advanced by these Roman pontiffs. This module is thus broad in chronological scope, covering more than eight hundred years, and extensive in geographical range, taking us from the Atlantic to the Euphrates, from the Atlas Mountains to the North Sea. In the course of this journey we'll meet many warriors, saints, and rulers, both female and male.

HIS-5042A

20

GEORGIAN BRITAIN AND IRELAND

In this survey of Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1830, we will examine relations between the nations inhabiting these islands, imperial war and state formation, new approaches to scientific knowledge and nature, the rise of the novel and new aesthetics in art, architecture and material culture, gender roles and sexuality, consumption, work, crime, justice, the Industrial Revolution, urban life, and the impact of revolution abroad on Irish politics and reform throughout the United Kingdom. Our detailed examination may include studies of prostitution in reality and in works of fiction like Fanny Hill and Moll Flanders; the careers and work of writers including Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Tobias Smollett, William Blake and Jane Austen; the first performance of Handel's Messiah in Dublin; the parks of Capability Brown; Samuel Johnson's Dictionary; John Wesley and Methodism; divorce law in England and Scotland; the life and career of Thomas Hawkins, the Cornish mine-owner who was an inspiration for Poldark; early cotton mills and factories; child labour; the Peterloo Massacre; Britain's first Prime Minster Robert Walpole; the War of Jenkins Ear; the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745; the Black Act; British and Irish participation in the Wars of the American Revolution, the French Revolution and Napoleon; Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin; union with Ireland and Catholic Emancipation.

HIS-5075A

20

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

What shapes our view of history and heritage? How do we balance academic approaches with the need to engage an audience? How do we assess the significance of historic buildings and sites? On this module you'll explore these questions by studying the ways in which history is presented in the public sphere, in museums and galleries, at heritage sites and historic buildings, in the media and online. Through lectures, seminars and field trips you'll gain an understanding of different current approaches to history and heritage, exploring themes such as the role of museums, the commemoration of historic events and the development of digital heritage.

HIS-5026A

20

JAPAN IN MODERN TIMES

In just a few decades Japan emerged from its feudal and isolationist condition and became a thriving capitalist nation-state with imperialist ambitions on the world's stage. From the mid-nineteenth century onwards, the country re-invented itself, combining the strength of its traditions with Western models of government, economic management, social structure and culture. Samurai gave way to elite bureaucrats; a skilled industrial workforce gradually displaced the peasantry; education expanded with remarkable speed and new infrastructure transformed the physical landscape. New patterns of daily life, social tensions and cultural aspirations accompanied these changes. The aggressive expansionist policy and authoritarianism of the 1930s precipitated the country into a war with devastating consequences, only for Japan to resurrect itself as a global industrial power and stable democracy in the post-war era. This module examines this process of transformation from circa 1850, when Western powers pressured Japan into opening to international trade, to the oil shock of the 1970s that brought an end to Japan's high growth phase. You will pay attention to the intellectual and cultural trends that informed Japan's development, and investigate concepts such as revolution, national identity, civilizational discourse, late imperialism, and historical memory. You will also explore social and economic change as reflected in lived experience, for example in farms and villages at the turn of the century; on the home front during the Russo-Japanese War; in bustling cities during the Taisho era; in colonial outposts before and during the Pacific War; and in occupied Japan afterwards.

HIS-5066A

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

We will introduce you to German history in the twentieth century, which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this module you will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024A

20

THE FIRST BRITISH EMPIRE

Between the sixteenth and the early nineteenth centuries, the English crossed the oceans and claimed territory on every continent other than Antarctica. This module surveys the creation and growth of British Empire, examining its origins and its impact on an array of peoples. In the context of studying how the empire spread and functioned, we will consider the varied experiences of Africans, Native Americans, Aboriginal Australians, Protestant refugees from the continent of Europe, the peoples of India, the Irish, and British settlers across the globe. The complex, intimate, and often violent interactions of these groups led to ideological battles pitting loyalism against republicanism, for example, and imperial "civilization" against an array of indigenous cultural revivals. At first glance these struggles may seem to place the British against the subject peoples of their empire, but on closer examination it becomes apparent that they fractured nearly every population within the imperial domains. The creative energy of the British Empire stemmed in large part from collaborations between British groups and individuals and segments of their purported imperial subjects in building, reforming, or in some cases seeking to destroy the structures of imperialism

HIS-5045A

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

On this module you'll study the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Anglo Saxon period. You'll learn to identify and interpret key landscape features from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages before moving on to study Roman and Anglo Saxon landscapes. Lectures, seminars and field trips will provide you with an introduction to the approaches and sources used by landscape historians and landscape archaeologists. You'll develop your understanding of landscape history through the study of key sites such as Stonehenge, Hadrian's Wall and Sutton Hoo. The chronological approach of the module will provide you with an understanding of long term landscape change, telling the story of the English landscape from prehistory to the eve of the Norman Conquest.

HIS-5002A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

You will examine Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the mid-twentieth century. During this module, you will consider the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of global war. You will also investigate the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to managing decline.

HIS-5011A

20

TUDOR ENGLAND

The Tudors are England's most famous royal dynasty. This module seeks to move beyond the traditional stories of Henry's turbulent marriages and Elizabeth's stunning victory over the Spanish Armada. You'll gain a better understanding of the change and turmoil the Tudor century caused, not just to the monarchs themselves but to the lives of their subjects, the everyday people of England. Beyond establishing a strong chronological knowledge of the 16th century and its religious upheavals, the module will consider issues of gender; the changing construction of the social order; the importance and developing role of local elites; problems caused by poverty and dearth; and the position of England within Britain itself and within Europe.

HIS-5067A

20

VICTORIAN BRITAIN

You'll examine what made Victorian Britain different, both the past and the present. Starting in 1837 you'll study what made Victorian society different as the world's first industrial society, how the early Victorians challenged the aristocratic political system by campaigning for fought for greater democracy through the working-class Chartist movement, bringing the country close to revolution; and how the middle class anti-Corn Law League successfully battled for free trade and cheap bread. You'll also look at the many efforts to improve the condition of the people through social reform and philanthropy. You'll also look at the mindset of the Victorians, including religious belief, phrenology and Darwinism. As Britain became more stable and prosperous, you'll study political modernisation and the emergence of two titanic political leaders, Gladstone and Disraeli, who shaped British politics as we still know it; but you'll also see how the Irish Home Rule and British Labour movements made their mark and why women failed to gain the vote in this period. Towards the end of the module you'll look at the local, asking how different was Norwich by 1901, and the global, asking how did the British empire, in particular, the Boer war, influence British politics, culture, and society. Finally we will ask what Queen Victoria contributed to making nineteenth-century Britain 'Victorian'.

HIS-5012A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students should consult with the Study Abroad coordinator before choosing a Semester Abroad module.

Name Code Credits

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5069B

20

ANATOMY OF A CITY: PARIS, 1682-1815

Through this module, you will encounter the largest, most dynamic city in the wealthiest and most populous nation in eighteenth-century Europe. Against a backdrop of France's fraught politics between the age of Louis XIV and the Revolutionary-Napoleonic era, you will gain an intimate sense of Paris as a changing urban space that provided a stage for radical experimentation in everything from art and fashion through to high finance and luxury lifestyles. You will grasp how Paris during the enlightenment functioned at different levels, from the removal of garbage to enforcement of justice. This module will involve delving into a rich variety of textual and visual sources alongside extant material evidence from the city itself.

HIS-5066B

20

ARTS AND HUMANITIES PLACEMENT MODULE

This module will provide you with the opportunity work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Career Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences.

HUM-5004B

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

You will explore one of the most turbulent and dynamic periods in English history: c.1400-1485. In addition to exploring the narrative of events as it unfolded chronologically you will also learn about topics such as: theories of medieval kingship, the relationship between church and state, the relationship between England and Continental Europe, medieval warfare, chivalry and knighthood, the relationship between national and local concerns, and the opportunities for people of all genders to participate in political struggle. You will have the opportunity to read a wide range of primary sources as well as considering key historiographical debates. Upon completion of the module, you should have a more nuanced understanding of the exercise of power in the 15th century and how the deeds and decisions of those in charge impacted the lives of people further down the social spectrum. You should also have honed your skills in primary source analysis and historiographical scrutiny.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM HASTINGS TO THE HUNDRED YEARS WAR: NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND 1066-1307

This module examines a critical period in English History. We begin with the Conquest of England by the Normans and look at the ways in which as a consequence England was drawn into European affairs. The midpoint is the loss of those continental lands in 1204 and the Magna Carta crisis of 1215. We then explore the domination of Britain by the English kingdom and end with the start of England's next great European adventure, The Hundred Years War.

HIS-5007B

20

FROM STALIN TO PUTIN: THE LONG SHADOW OF THE WAR

World War II and the immense sacrifices the Soviet people made in defeating Nazism left multiple long-lasting legacies that shaped the multi-ethnic Soviet and post-Soviet Russian state, society and economy. This module aims to give you a better understanding of the state of contemporary Russian politics, society and economy through detailed historical enquiry of Russia's path since 1945. It is divided into two main parts: in part one you will examine key periods of post-war Russian history in chronological order, and in the second part you will look more closely at key contemporary in their historical perspective. These will include the question what it meant to be Soviet and its legacy; geopolitical imperatives, which only recently led Putin to invade Crimea; identity politics and historical commemoration; the transition of the economy from a planned economy to a market economy; and the complex mutations and adaptations of power structures in Russia that gave birth to Putin's 'managed democracy'.

HIS-5065B

20

GLOBAL HEALTH HISTORIES: FROM COLONIAL MEDICINE TO INTERNATIONAL HEALTH AND BEYOND

This second-year level 5 module offers students a broad overview of key themes, developments, and arguments in the history of global health and medicine, from its roots in nineteenth-century European empire through twentieth-century decolonisation and into our present postcolonial moment of global health. This course does not assume prior knowledge either of the history of medicine, or of world history and the history of colonialism and decolonisation, but is organised broadly chronologically so that students gain a solid grounding in sweeping changes over time in the history of global health. This module equips students to make sense of the contemporary global health landscape. What is the relationship between power and medicine? In what ways have colonial medicine and international health been shaped by issues of race and gender? What role did western medical knowledge play in controlling and governing imperial peoples and landscapes? How was western medicine appropriated, resisted and reimagined by the colonised peoples? How deeply rooted are today's international health organisations and practices in the colonial period? How far can we talk of global health and medicine today as 'decolonised' or 'postcolonial'? How do histories of health and medicine intersect with global political events - European imperialism and decolonisation, the First World War or the Cold War - with which students are already familiar? While offering students an opportunity to engage with wide-ranging geographical locations - from mental illness in Algeria and quarantine practices in Australia, to conceptions of hygiene in Chinese treaty ports and the role of mosquitoes in transmitting malaria in South Asia - this course will also interrogate the relationship between terms like the global, the international, and the colonial. In doing so, it will familiarise students with the most recent debates in the historiography. The module will introduce and orient students within the field of histories of medicine, a field unfamiliar for most. It will introduce them both to the diversity of approaches - from institutional and intellectual histories to social and cultural histories - that historians of medicine can take, and to key methodological and ethical questions in the history of medicine. Students will be encouraged throughout to reflect on these ethical/methodological questions, as they pertain to particular themes or periods: for instance, whether the medical subject of the past has a right to anonymity today or whether the voices of the colonised subjects are acknowledged enough in histories of colonial medicine. These methodological and ethical questions will complement the focus on themes and developments in the global history of medicine and health. The core lectures would deal with the relationship between colonialism and medicine; decolonisation and the emerging twentieth-century visions of international health led by the founding of international health organisations; and questions of global health in the post-colonial world such as the medical policing of international borders in relation to migration and ethnicity. Key themes which run throughout the module include questions around power and resistance, gender and race, migration and globalisation, the environment and the body. While a wide-range of primary sources - case files, medical publications, the reports of imperial and international health organisations, visual archives - will be used throughout the course to allow students to deepen their engagement with the themes and questions at the heart of this module, the focus will be on grounding students in a flourishing secondary literature, and equipping them to evaluate critically central debates within this scholarship.

HIS-5073B

20

HISTORY OF MODERN ITALY

Since the unification of the states of the Italian peninsula, the history of modern Italy has been the subject of intense historical debate. Modern Italy has often been cast as a 'weak' state and 'fragile' nation, riven by particularism and by competing secular and religious ideologies, 'economically backward', less successful than its national neighbours, and 'the least of the Great Powers'. More recent historiography has sought to challenge or modify these perceptions in a number of ways, and this module examines modern Italian history from unification to present day, in the light of these ongoing historiographical debates. a) Italian nationalism, the process of Italian unification and the attempts to create national unity after 1870; b) The relationship between socio-economic change and political development in Liberal Italy; c)The impact of the First World War on Italian society and politics; e)The nature of the Fascist regime and its impact on Italian society; f)The radicalisation of the regime, its racial policies and the quest for Empire; g)Italy's role in World War II, the reasons for the collapse of the Fascist regime, and the emergence of civil war. h) Italian history since 1945

HIS-5060B

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN (and beyond): THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War and its end with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War period.

HIS-5017B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module introduces you to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. You'll consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. The module is structured chronologically, starting with the development of propaganda during World War I and finishing with a consideration of propaganda in the 21st century.

HIS-5050B

20

SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD (SPRING SEMSTER)

This module offers History students the opportunity to spend the Spring semester of their second year studying abroad, either in a European university, as part of the ERASMUS scheme, or in a selected North American or Australian university approved by the School's Director of Teaching.

HIS-5071B

60

STUART ENGLAND

We will explore the dramatic century of Stuart rule in England. This 'century of revolution' included the union of the English and Scottish crowns, the dramatic upheaval of the civil wars, and the continued political instability that led to the birth of political parties and the Glorious Revolution. While exploring these political themes we will also consider developments such as: the birth of modern news culture, crowd politics, civil society and coffee shops, the origins of empire, state formation, and the emergence of England as 'a nation of shop keepers' and Europe's great 'constitutional monarchy'.

HIS-5067B

20

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600

You'll examine the development of the English countryside during the Middle Ages. You'll discuss the nature of rural settlement, high status buildings and landscapes and 'semi-natural' environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

We will look at the modern history of the Middle East, primarily concerning the political history of the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. Our aim is to encourage you to think critically about historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/imperialism, the role of culture and identity, and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

The Great War transformed domestic expectations and ushered in an age of Mass Democracy and economic hardship. After 1945 the welfare state and full employment saw rising affluence, accompanied by the emergence of youth cultures, a sexual revolution and new forms of radicalism and identity politics. The economic crisis of the 1970s sped-up deindustrialisation whilst the neoliberalism of Thatcher and her successors deepened inequalities and stoked nationalist sentiment. We explore the social, political and economic history of these tumultuous years.

HIS-5057B

20

WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR

We will explore female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. We will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes, and will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5063B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Possibility to take modules from a defined choice in PPL, LDC, HUM and AMA, including languages in Autumn. 40 credits may taken outside HIS at level 5 only if all 40 credits are from language modules (i.e. those starting PPLB) Students should consult with the Study Abroad coordinator before choosing a Semester Abroad module.

Name Code Credits

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 400-1066

The Anglo-Saxon period spanned 600 years from the end of Roman Britain to the Norman Conquest. It was a period of turmoil, seeing waves of immigration, the clash of peoples and religions, and kingdoms jockeying for control. Out of this crucible, England emerged. This is the story of how it came to be. Using contemporary sources, you will learn to handle evidence and reconstruct the worldview of people who lived over a thousand years ago. Anglo-Saxon history teaches you to go a long way with little evidence; to use your imagination to fill in the gaps. Whether it's new to you or something you've studied before, you'll achieve a deeper and richer understanding of how the nation was formed. Via lectures, seminars and private study, you'll discover the Romans, Saxons and Vikings; the strange treasure they left behind; the cryptic and conflicting chronicles (learning to read between the lines), and debates we still haven't resolved today. Developing your powers of argumentation, you'll run into questions with no certain answer. Building with fragmentary evidence will boost your creativity, and you'll encounter ancient artefacts. (Trips have included West Stow Anglo-Saxon village and Norwich Castle Museum.) At the end of the module you'll command an overview of how England came into being. You'll also have built your ability to see other people's points of view, even if they lived a thousand years ago. This is a crucial ability whether in personal or professional relationships. Also learning to argue with evidence as fragmentary as the evidence we'll explore, will hone your problem-solving skills to an unusual degree.

HIS-5005A

20

BETWEEN EAST AND WEST: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY SINCE 1890

The beginning of the twentieth century witnessed a period of immense instability and change with the emergence of the United States as an international actor in the West and the Japanese break from the Chinese sphere of influence in the East. This was underpinned by technological developments, the expansion of global empires, extreme economic dislocation and two global wars. You will examine the conduct and content of the foreign policies of the major powers from the 1890s, with the Sino-Japanese War and the Spanish-American War, to the Japanese occupation of Asia. This will include assessing the interplay of the political, military, economic, strategic and cultural forces that shaped the beginning of the twentieth century and which continue to resonate in the contemporary world.

HIS-5065A

20

BRITISH INDIA: EMPIRE, NATION AND THE PEOPLE IN SOUTH ASIA

This module explores the enduring historical ties between South Asia and Britain, and how these ties have fundamentally shaped the history of both these regions. Between the mid eighteenth and mid twentieth centuries, much of South Asia was part of the British Empire and was referred to as British India. Today, South Asia (which includes India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) plays a significant role in international politics and globalisation. Marked by intense ethnic, ecological and linguistic diversity, South Asia is home to the world's largest constitutional democracy, as well as the world's second largest population. This course is an introduction to the major themes in the history of British India. It does not assume prior knowledge and familiarises students with key events in the development of British rule in the region and its impact in shaping the emergence of modern South Asia. We will examine major social, economic, cultural and political developments in the subcontinent during the British period, including British early military conquests, the enactment of social and agrarian reforms, the Mutiny of 1857, the rise of anti-imperial nationalism and the Indian National Congress, Hindu/Muslim communal tensions, Gandhian politics, the establishment of a constitutional democracy in India, the partition of the subcontinent, the end of British rule and the formation of modern India and Pakistan. The module draws on a wide variety of primary sources including historical tracts, reports, memoirs, fictions (all in English) as well as maps, podcasts and a rich visual archive; it does not require students to have knowledge of Indian languages. Students will also be exposed to the flourishing secondary literature on British India, and to the central debates within this scholarship. They will learn to evaluate the processes through which British rule was established and legitimised in South Asia, and to analyse how different groups of Indians responded to and were impacted by British rule. The module will equip students to assess the emergence and consequences of British imperial rule in South Asia. It will also inspire students to connect historical events in South Asia with developments in Britain and the wider imperial world.

HIS-5074A

20

Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865

Race is central to the history of the United States. The conversations about race in 21st century America have their origins in a system of slavery that developed from the early colonial period. This module excavates these roots and thereby enables you to look to current conversations and understand where these began. You will follow a chronological sequence on the module, allowing us to trace the course of racial slavery in North America from its inception in 1619 through to its abolition in 1865. You will consider the roots of racism in the colonial era that strengthened during the antebellum years and beyond and consider their relationship with racial slavery. You will engage with the developing historical scholarship of slavery in the United States, gaining a deeper understanding of contemporary (then and now) debates concerning race and racial identity. Employing a range of resources including written and visual primary sources, oral histories, cinematic depictions, and nineteenth century novels, will allow you to see the networks of power articulated though race and ideas of "otherness". You'll learn through a mixture of seminars and self-directed study, often working with artefacts or source materials in seminars to enable you to think collectively about their meanings. Assessment will be entirely through coursework. The study of slavery in the United States will make you a better historian, whatever your area of interest. Concepts of race and ideas of "otherness" are so central to the study of history in the 21st century that the techniques and strategies of analysis employed on this module will enable you to think about the arguments of others more effectively and also position yourself within those debates.

AMAH5043A

20

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE: WARRIORS, SAINTS AND RULERS

You'll explore the experiences and fortunes of the peoples of the western peninsula of Eurasia between the rule of the Emperor Constantine I in the 330s and the call to crusade in the 1090s. At the beginning of the period, the lands centred on the Mediterranean and much of its hinterland were situated within the Roman Empire. Yet, within three hundred years, this empire had disintegrated and been replaced by a number of successor states, ruled by competing dynasties. These states included Visigothic Hispania, Vandal Africa, and Merovingian Francia. Another#in fact, the longest lived of all the successor states#was the eastern empire centred on Constantinople, long known to historians as 'the Byzantine empire'. By the close of the 7th century, many of these states had themselves been conquered by Arabic and African warriors committed to the new religion of Islam and been incorporated in the Caliphate centred on the city of Damascus#an empire which easily rivalled the might, spread, and power of Rome before its own collapse and fission in circa 1000. What Islamic rulers could do, so too could Christian ones. In 800 the son of a Frankish usurper, Charlemagne, was crowned emperor of the West. The actions and ambitions of this emperor were as formative and as formidable in the history of 9th and 10th century Europe as those of Napoleon in the 18th and 19th. The heirs and successors of Charlemagne#whether Frankish, Ottonian, or Scandinavian#were long compelled to negotiate his legacy and memory. By the 11th century, even the Roman pontiffs, now advancing a new programme of reform and renewal, were looking to situate themselves in relation to his Salian successors. The summons to liberate Jerusalem and rescue the Greek empire in the east, carefully tailored to the aspirations of the new elites of Francia and Catalonia, was perhaps the most explosive strategy advanced by these Roman pontiffs. This module is thus broad in chronological scope, covering more than eight hundred years, and extensive in geographical range, taking us from the Atlantic to the Euphrates, from the Atlas Mountains to the North Sea. In the course of this journey we'll meet many warriors, saints, and rulers, both female and male.

HIS-5042A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media and sociology, politics and cultural studies, you will explore the relationship between feminist theory and activism.

PPLM5002A

20

GEORGIAN BRITAIN AND IRELAND

In this survey of Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1830, we will examine relations between the nations inhabiting these islands, imperial war and state formation, new approaches to scientific knowledge and nature, the rise of the novel and new aesthetics in art, architecture and material culture, gender roles and sexuality, consumption, work, crime, justice, the Industrial Revolution, urban life, and the impact of revolution abroad on Irish politics and reform throughout the United Kingdom. Our detailed examination may include studies of prostitution in reality and in works of fiction like Fanny Hill and Moll Flanders; the careers and work of writers including Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Tobias Smollett, William Blake and Jane Austen; the first performance of Handel's Messiah in Dublin; the parks of Capability Brown; Samuel Johnson's Dictionary; John Wesley and Methodism; divorce law in England and Scotland; the life and career of Thomas Hawkins, the Cornish mine-owner who was an inspiration for Poldark; early cotton mills and factories; child labour; the Peterloo Massacre; Britain's first Prime Minster Robert Walpole; the War of Jenkins Ear; the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745; the Black Act; British and Irish participation in the Wars of the American Revolution, the French Revolution and Napoleon; Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin; union with Ireland and Catholic Emancipation.

HIS-5075A

20

HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY

What shapes our view of history and heritage? How do we balance academic approaches with the need to engage an audience? How do we assess the significance of historic buildings and sites? On this module you'll explore these questions by studying the ways in which history is presented in the public sphere, in museums and galleries, at heritage sites and historic buildings, in the media and online. Through lectures, seminars and field trips you'll gain an understanding of different current approaches to history and heritage, exploring themes such as the role of museums, the commemoration of historic events and the development of digital heritage.

HIS-5026A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

JAPAN IN MODERN TIMES

In just a few decades Japan emerged from its feudal and isolationist condition and became a thriving capitalist nation-state with imperialist ambitions on the world's stage. From the mid-nineteenth century onwards, the country re-invented itself, combining the strength of its traditions with Western models of government, economic management, social structure and culture. Samurai gave way to elite bureaucrats; a skilled industrial workforce gradually displaced the peasantry; education expanded with remarkable speed and new infrastructure transformed the physical landscape. New patterns of daily life, social tensions and cultural aspirations accompanied these changes. The aggressive expansionist policy and authoritarianism of the 1930s precipitated the country into a war with devastating consequences, only for Japan to resurrect itself as a global industrial power and stable democracy in the post-war era. This module examines this process of transformation from circa 1850, when Western powers pressured Japan into opening to international trade, to the oil shock of the 1970s that brought an end to Japan's high growth phase. You will pay attention to the intellectual and cultural trends that informed Japan's development, and investigate concepts such as revolution, national identity, civilizational discourse, late imperialism, and historical memory. You will also explore social and economic change as reflected in lived experience, for example in farms and villages at the turn of the century; on the home front during the Russo-Japanese War; in bustling cities during the Taisho era; in colonial outposts before and during the Pacific War; and in occupied Japan afterwards.

HIS-5066A

20

LGBT AND BEYOND: SEXUAL CULTURES, QUEER IDENTITIES, AND THE POLITICS OF DESIRE

How do notions of gender and sexuality shape culture, and how are in turn our understanding and experiences of gender and sexuality shaped by cultural production? How important are other times, places and identifications - associated with class, race, ethnicity - to these understandings and experiences? And to what extent can a film, an image, a testimony, or a place capture such complexity? Addressing these questions from an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of the module is to explore the ways in which gender and sexuality are constituted through a broad array of experiences, practices, and cultural products. The module focuses on issues raised in classical and contemporary research in history, politics, media, cultural studies and visual cultures such as: representation and cultural production; subjectivity; identity; identification; bodies and embodiment; performance and performativity; among others. Overall, by exploring theory in conjunction with queer cultural production that explores questions of power, identity, and desire across different racial, national, and cultural landscapes, the module aims to problematise how gender and sexuality are not stable identities or classifications but are instead processes involving normalisations, hierarchies and relations of domination that can be challenged, troubled and/or queered.

HUM-5007A

20

MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990

We will introduce you to German history in the twentieth century, which was characterised by various radical regime changes and territorial alterations. Topics include German world policy and nationalism in the late imperial period; imperialism and expansionism during the First World War; the challenges of modernity in the Weimar Republic; the rise of Hitler and the formation of the Nazi empire in Europe; the post-war division of Germany and the legacy of the Third Reich; the nature of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) dictatorship and the problem of West German terrorism; as well as the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. Special attention will be given to questions of nationalism and national identity, issues of history and memory, and Germany's role in Europe and the world. On completion of this module you will have developed a solid understanding of one of the most dramatic periods of German history when the country oscillated between the two extremes of war and repression, on the one hand, and the return to peace and democracy, on the other.

HIS-5018A

20

POLITICS IN THE USA

The election of Donald Trump as President in 2016 has radically changed US politics. Yet to fully understand the current times, contemporary American politics needs to be put into context. This module covers the historical themes that exist in US politics from the eighteenth century to the present day. The emphasis will be on modern political history and contemporary politics, but this will be underpinned by a knowledge of the political philosophy at the time of the formation of the United States, the governmental structures, and political developments over historical time.

PPLX5164A

20

THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

This module analyses the emergence, development and end of the Cold War. In doing so it examines political, ideological and legal aspects of conflict between and within states, issues of sovereignty, nuclear strategy and arms control, as well as peacekeeping and non-violent resistance. Alongside political developments, themes such as everyday life, culture, sport and the existence of alternatives during the Cold War era will also be considered.

HIS-5024A

20

THE FIRST BRITISH EMPIRE

Between the sixteenth and the early nineteenth centuries, the English crossed the oceans and claimed territory on every continent other than Antarctica. This module surveys the creation and growth of British Empire, examining its origins and its impact on an array of peoples. In the context of studying how the empire spread and functioned, we will consider the varied experiences of Africans, Native Americans, Aboriginal Australians, Protestant refugees from the continent of Europe, the peoples of India, the Irish, and British settlers across the globe. The complex, intimate, and often violent interactions of these groups led to ideological battles pitting loyalism against republicanism, for example, and imperial "civilization" against an array of indigenous cultural revivals. At first glance these struggles may seem to place the British against the subject peoples of their empire, but on closer examination it becomes apparent that they fractured nearly every population within the imperial domains. The creative energy of the British Empire stemmed in large part from collaborations between British groups and individuals and segments of their purported imperial subjects in building, reforming, or in some cases seeking to destroy the structures of imperialism

HIS-5045A

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

On this module you'll study the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Anglo Saxon period. You'll learn to identify and interpret key landscape features from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages before moving on to study Roman and Anglo Saxon landscapes. Lectures, seminars and field trips will provide you with an introduction to the approaches and sources used by landscape historians and landscape archaeologists. You'll develop your understanding of landscape history through the study of key sites such as Stonehenge, Hadrian's Wall and Sutton Hoo. The chronological approach of the module will provide you with an understanding of long term landscape change, telling the story of the English landscape from prehistory to the eve of the Norman Conquest.

HIS-5002A

20

THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER

You will examine Britain's expansion and decline as a great power, from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the mid-twentieth century. During this module, you will consider the foundations of British power, the emergence of rivals, Britain's relationship with the European powers and the USA, and the impact of global war. You will also investigate the reasons for Britain's changing fortunes, as it moved from guarding the balance of power to managing decline.

HIS-5011A

20

THE WRITING OF HISTORY

What makes a good history essay? What makes a good literary critical essay? How are they different? How do the disciplines of History and English Literature approach argument and evidence, narration and description? What are the generic, formal and stylistic expectations that govern academic writing in each of these disciplines? Some version of these questions will have occurred to any student attempting to meet the assessment criteria in a university degree. They are perhaps particularly pressing for students studying both literature and history, where somewhat different approaches are required by each discipline. This module brings historians, literary critics and creative writers into a multi-disciplinary conversation designed to explore the tensions as well as the continuities between history and literary studies. By asking faculty members from the two schools to investigate similar territory from contrasting perspectives, you will explore how very similar subjects and sources can be treated differently by different disciplines (and by different methodological orientations within those disciplines). Historians, literary critics and creative writers will give guest lectures that describe and analyse their research process and writing practice. There will also be some more theoretically driven weeks where the work of key philosophers and theorists of history and literature will be read and discussed. You are encouraged to reflect on your own approach to the writing of history and literary criticism and will have the opportunity to learn reflexive writing. The summative assessment asks you to analyse a source text using the resources of both disciplines, and then to write a reflexive essay positioning your own approach in relation to other historians and critics studied on the module.

LDCL5077A

20

TUDOR ENGLAND

The Tudors are England's most famous royal dynasty. This module seeks to move beyond the traditional stories of Henry's turbulent marriages and Elizabeth's stunning victory over the Spanish Armada. You'll gain a better understanding of the change and turmoil the Tudor century caused, not just to the monarchs themselves but to the lives of their subjects, the everyday people of England. Beyond establishing a strong chronological knowledge of the 16th century and its religious upheavals, the module will consider issues of gender; the changing construction of the social order; the importance and developing role of local elites; problems caused by poverty and dearth; and the position of England within Britain itself and within Europe.

HIS-5067A

20

VICTORIAN BRITAIN

You'll examine what made Victorian Britain different, both the past and the present. Starting in 1837 you'll study what made Victorian society different as the world's first industrial society, how the early Victorians challenged the aristocratic political system by campaigning for fought for greater democracy through the working-class Chartist movement, bringing the country close to revolution; and how the middle class anti-Corn Law League successfully battled for free trade and cheap bread. You'll also look at the many efforts to improve the condition of the people through social reform and philanthropy. You'll also look at the mindset of the Victorians, including religious belief, phrenology and Darwinism. As Britain became more stable and prosperous, you'll study political modernisation and the emergence of two titanic political leaders, Gladstone and Disraeli, who shaped British politics as we still know it; but you'll also see how the Irish Home Rule and British Labour movements made their mark and why women failed to gain the vote in this period. Towards the end of the module you'll look at the local, asking how different was Norwich by 1901, and the global, asking how did the British empire, in particular, the Boer war, influence British politics, culture, and society. Finally we will ask what Queen Victoria contributed to making nineteenth-century Britain 'Victorian'.

HIS-5012A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Possibility to take modules from a defined choice in PPL, LDC, HUM and AMA, including languages in Autumn. 40 credits may taken outside HIS at level 5 only if all 40 credits are from language modules (i.e. those starting PPLB) Students should consult with the Study Abroad coordinator before choosing a Semester Abroad module.

Name Code Credits

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? Why has it been, and continues to be, involved in every corner of the globe? You will be offered a critical introduction to understanding the history of U.S. foreign relations. You will explore the key themes and traditions that have informed America's approach to international affairs, from foundational ideas in the 18th and 19th centuries to increasing influence in the 20th and 21st centuries. In addition to analysing traditional political and diplomatic issues, you will consider the link between foreign and domestic policies, and the role of various state and non-state actors that have shaped America's actions abroad. You will work with original primary sources, the latest secondary literature, and a range of cultural and political texts including speeches, newspapers, and editorial cartoons. This broader consideration of foreign relations history engages important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, and the "international" and "cultural" turns - and connects them to emerging trends in the fields of American history and international relations. As a result, you will gain a detailed understanding of the history of U.S. foreign relations and the legacies that continue to shape debates about America's role in the world today.

AMAH5051B

20

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

This module offers a critical introduction to understanding America's role in the world. It provides historical and political analyses of U.S. foreign relations, looking at the themes and traditions that have shaped America's increasing influence in global affairs during the twentieth century up to the present day. From the war of 1898 to the conflicts of the early twenty-first century, it examines how and why the U.S. relationship to the world has changed. Has the United States helped or harmed the rest of the world during its rise to world power? In discussing foreign relations, the course analyses political and diplomatic elites, but also, the role of foreign actors and private organisations, from religious groups to citizen organisations to NGOs, in defining America in the world. It also engages with important contemporary trends in the historiography of U.S. foreign policy - regarding race, gender, modernization, and the 'cultural turn' - and connects these to emerging trends in the fields of American Studies and international relations.

HIS-5069B

20

ANATOMY OF A CITY: PARIS, 1682-1815

Through this module, you will encounter the largest, most dynamic city in the wealthiest and most populous nation in eighteenth-century Europe. Against a backdrop of France's fraught politics between the age of Louis XIV and the Revolutionary-Napoleonic era, you will gain an intimate sense of Paris as a changing urban space that provided a stage for radical experimentation in everything from art and fashion through to high finance and luxury lifestyles. You will grasp how Paris during the enlightenment functioned at different levels, from the removal of garbage to enforcement of justice. This module will involve delving into a rich variety of textual and visual sources alongside extant material evidence from the city itself.

HIS-5066B

20

ARTS AND HUMANITIES PLACEMENT MODULE

This module will provide you with the opportunity work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Career Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences.

HUM-5004B

20

BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLES: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

The African American freedom struggle did not begin or end with the civil rights protests of the 1950s -1960s. Since the demise of slavery, black activists have been forcefully demanding racial equality. From 1865 to the present day, African Americans have not only asserted their rights as citizens, but have demanded an end to economic injustice, while questioning the actions of the U.S. government both at home and abroad. This module examines black political and cultural protest in the United States over the course of the 'long' civil rights movement. Covering the period from the first years of black freedom following the Civil War to the emergence of Black Lives Matter, you will learn about the breadth and diversity of African American activism. You will challenge popular narratives of the civil rights movement and uncover the radical impulses that have animated the freedom dreams of black America. You will cover how African Americans responded to disenfranchisement, racial violence and economic inequality. You will also learn about the lives of key figures in the black freedom struggle such as Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Marcus Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune, Stokely Carmichael and Angela Davis. Ultimately, through the study of primary sources and secondary texts, you will grapple with the complexity of black political thought and develop a detailed understanding of how African Americans counteracted white supremacy. On successful completion of this module you will have a broad understanding of the major trends in African American political and cultural history from the nineteenth century to the present day. You will able be able to clearly articulate how African Americans have shaped our understanding of the American nation, democracy and the meaning of human rights. Finally, through the close study of a range of cultural and political texts including autobiographies, speeches, newspapers and film, you will develop key analytical skills that are vital to the interdisciplinary study of history and politics.

AMAH5050B

20

FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES

You will explore one of the most turbulent and dynamic periods in English history: c.1400-1485. In addition to exploring the narrative of events as it unfolded chronologically you will also learn about topics such as: theories of medieval kingship, the relationship between church and state, the relationship between England and Continental Europe, medieval warfare, chivalry and knighthood, the relationship between national and local concerns, and the opportunities for people of all genders to participate in political struggle. You will have the opportunity to read a wide range of primary sources as well as considering key historiographical debates. Upon completion of the module, you should have a more nuanced understanding of the exercise of power in the 15th century and how the deeds and decisions of those in charge impacted the lives of people further down the social spectrum. You should also have honed your skills in primary source analysis and historiographical scrutiny.

HIS-5009B

20

FROM HASTINGS TO THE HUNDRED YEARS WAR: NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND 1066-1307

This module examines a critical period in English History. We begin with the Conquest of England by the Normans and look at the ways in which as a consequence England was drawn into European affairs. The midpoint is the loss of those continental lands in 1204 and the Magna Carta crisis of 1215. We then explore the domination of Britain by the English kingdom and end with the start of England's next great European adventure, The Hundred Years War.

HIS-5007B

20

FROM STALIN TO PUTIN: THE LONG SHADOW OF THE WAR

World War II and the immense sacrifices the Soviet people made in defeating Nazism left multiple long-lasting legacies that shaped the multi-ethnic Soviet and post-Soviet Russian state, society and economy. This module aims to give you a better understanding of the state of contemporary Russian politics, society and economy through detailed historical enquiry of Russia's path since 1945. It is divided into two main parts: in part one you will examine key periods of post-war Russian history in chronological order, and in the second part you will look more closely at key contemporary in their historical perspective. These will include the question what it meant to be Soviet and its legacy; geopolitical imperatives, which only recently led Putin to invade Crimea; identity politics and historical commemoration; the transition of the economy from a planned economy to a market economy; and the complex mutations and adaptations of power structures in Russia that gave birth to Putin's 'managed democracy'.

HIS-5065B

20

GLOBAL HEALTH HISTORIES: FROM COLONIAL MEDICINE TO INTERNATIONAL HEALTH AND BEYOND

This second-year level 5 module offers students a broad overview of key themes, developments, and arguments in the history of global health and medicine, from its roots in nineteenth-century European empire through twentieth-century decolonisation and into our present postcolonial moment of global health. This course does not assume prior knowledge either of the history of medicine, or of world history and the history of colonialism and decolonisation, but is organised broadly chronologically so that students gain a solid grounding in sweeping changes over time in the history of global health. This module equips students to make sense of the contemporary global health landscape. What is the relationship between power and medicine? In what ways have colonial medicine and international health been shaped by issues of race and gender? What role did western medical knowledge play in controlling and governing imperial peoples and landscapes? How was western medicine appropriated, resisted and reimagined by the colonised peoples? How deeply rooted are today's international health organisations and practices in the colonial period? How far can we talk of global health and medicine today as 'decolonised' or 'postcolonial'? How do histories of health and medicine intersect with global political events - European imperialism and decolonisation, the First World War or the Cold War - with which students are already familiar? While offering students an opportunity to engage with wide-ranging geographical locations - from mental illness in Algeria and quarantine practices in Australia, to conceptions of hygiene in Chinese treaty ports and the role of mosquitoes in transmitting malaria in South Asia - this course will also interrogate the relationship between terms like the global, the international, and the colonial. In doing so, it will familiarise students with the most recent debates in the historiography. The module will introduce and orient students within the field of histories of medicine, a field unfamiliar for most. It will introduce them both to the diversity of approaches - from institutional and intellectual histories to social and cultural histories - that historians of medicine can take, and to key methodological and ethical questions in the history of medicine. Students will be encouraged throughout to reflect on these ethical/methodological questions, as they pertain to particular themes or periods: for instance, whether the medical subject of the past has a right to anonymity today or whether the voices of the colonised subjects are acknowledged enough in histories of colonial medicine. These methodological and ethical questions will complement the focus on themes and developments in the global history of medicine and health. The core lectures would deal with the relationship between colonialism and medicine; decolonisation and the emerging twentieth-century visions of international health led by the founding of international health organisations; and questions of global health in the post-colonial world such as the medical policing of international borders in relation to migration and ethnicity. Key themes which run throughout the module include questions around power and resistance, gender and race, migration and globalisation, the environment and the body. While a wide-range of primary sources - case files, medical publications, the reports of imperial and international health organisations, visual archives - will be used throughout the course to allow students to deepen their engagement with the themes and questions at the heart of this module, the focus will be on grounding students in a flourishing secondary literature, and equipping them to evaluate critically central debates within this scholarship.

HIS-5073B

20

HISTORY OF MODERN ITALY

Since the unification of the states of the Italian peninsula, the history of modern Italy has been the subject of intense historical debate. Modern Italy has often been cast as a 'weak' state and 'fragile' nation, riven by particularism and by competing secular and religious ideologies, 'economically backward', less successful than its national neighbours, and 'the least of the Great Powers'. More recent historiography has sought to challenge or modify these perceptions in a number of ways, and this module examines modern Italian history from unification to present day, in the light of these ongoing historiographical debates. a) Italian nationalism, the process of Italian unification and the attempts to create national unity after 1870; b) The relationship between socio-economic change and political development in Liberal Italy; c)The impact of the First World War on Italian society and politics; e)The nature of the Fascist regime and its impact on Italian society; f)The radicalisation of the regime, its racial policies and the quest for Empire; g)Italy's role in World War II, the reasons for the collapse of the Fascist regime, and the emergence of civil war. h) Italian history since 1945

HIS-5060B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. It begins by introducing the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

PPLM5003B

20

NAPOLEON TO STALIN (and beyond): THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE

This module deals with the rivalries of the Great Powers from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the onset of the Cold War and its end with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We shall be examining topics such as the Vienna system; the Crimean War; Italian and German unification, the origins of the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War period.

HIS-5017B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

PROPAGANDA

This module introduces you to the history and theory of propaganda, and its role in society. You'll consider what constitutes and defines propaganda. Focusing on the 20th century, we examine propaganda in a range of political settings, both totalitarian and democratic, in the local context of the relationships of power and communications. The module is structured chronologically, starting with the development of propaganda during World War I and finishing with a consideration of propaganda in the 21st century.

HIS-5050B

20

STUART ENGLAND

We will explore the dramatic century of Stuart rule in England. This 'century of revolution' included the union of the English and Scottish crowns, the dramatic upheaval of the civil wars, and the continued political instability that led to the birth of political parties and the Glorious Revolution. While exploring these political themes we will also consider developments such as: the birth of modern news culture, crowd politics, civil society and coffee shops, the origins of empire, state formation, and the emergence of England as 'a nation of shop keepers' and Europe's great 'constitutional monarchy'.

HIS-5067B

20

THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600

You'll examine the development of the English countryside during the Middle Ages. You'll discuss the nature of rural settlement, high status buildings and landscapes and 'semi-natural' environments.

HIS-5003B

20

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST

We will look at the modern history of the Middle East, primarily concerning the political history of the region as well as relations between Middle Eastern countries and Western powers. Our aim is to encourage you to think critically about historical processes of state formation, the legacy of colonialism/imperialism, the role of culture and identity, and the significance of natural resources and economic factors.

HIS-5048B

20

TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

The Great War transformed domestic expectations and ushered in an age of Mass Democracy and economic hardship. After 1945 the welfare state and full employment saw rising affluence, accompanied by the emergence of youth cultures, a sexual revolution and new forms of radicalism and identity politics. The economic crisis of the 1970s sped-up deindustrialisation whilst the neoliberalism of Thatcher and her successors deepened inequalities and stoked nationalist sentiment. We explore the social, political and economic history of these tumultuous years.

HIS-5057B

20

VISUALISING RACE IN THE USA

Using still photographs, this module will explore how representations of race are produced and circulate in the USA. The main focus will be on Indigenous Americans and African Americans, along with other racialized groups. The module aims to introduce students to strategies and techniques for exploring and analysing photographs and, more specifically, using the visual record to study and illuminate the racial history of the USA. Viewed here as sites of historical evidence, photographic portraits, family albums, monuments, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging, fashion photos, are just some of the images that we will "read" and evaluate. We will explore how visual texts can contribute to our understanding of race (often inseparable from nationhood, class, sexuality, identity) in the USA. The invention of photography changed ways of looking and seeing, from the nineteenth century up to the present day. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. Students will gain skills and techniques to enable them to recruit photographs as evidence, for work in this and future modules. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of race in the USA. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary. A grounding in American history would be beneficial.

AMAH5057B

20

WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR

We will explore female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. We will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes, and will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5063B

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Students must select one 60 credit Special Subject module.

Name Code Credits

APPEASEMENT AND WAR: BRITAIN AND THE DICTATORS, 1935-1945

The decade from 1935 to 1945 was one of the most tumultuous in global history. In this module, you'll examine Britain's peacetime diplomacy and wartime strategy, as it responded to three totalitarian powers: Germany, Italy and Japan. The policy of 'appeasement' adopted by the Baldwin and Chamberlain governments remains hugely controversial, and the subject of vigorous debate. Britain's role in the global war that erupted in 1939 has, similarly, fascinated historians ever since. In the autumn semester, you'll explore the foreign policies adopted by Britain's 'National' Government, from Baldwin's victory in the 1935 election to the outbreak of war in September 1939. You'll consider why and how these policies were adopted, the wider political and economic context within which policy was made, and the national and international consequences. In the spring semester, you'll examine Britain's wartime role in the context of grand strategy and international politics. In addition to considering topics such as Churchill's 'finest hour', we'll spend some time examining the operation of the Grand Alliance and the series of wartime conferences between Britain and its allies. Throughout, you will explore the rich historiography of the period, and examine its complexities. We'll draw upon a wide range of primary documentation, which will provide the basis of debate and discussion.

HIS-6072Y

60

COMMUNISM AND NATIONALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA

You will begin with a search for the origins of the Yugoslav idea, before turning to the Kingdom's formation in 1918. The turbulent interwar years provide the indispensable backdrop to the second, communist, Yugoslavia. You shall explore the course of the Second World War and the bitter fighting between fascists, nationalists and communists which resulted in victory for Tito's partisans. After 1945, they built a state which took an independent path to communism and survived until 1991. Yugoslavia then fragmented into ethnically homogenous states. In some cases this transition was largely peaceful, but wars in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo witnessed bloody fighting and ethnic cleansing. You will look at the role of individuals, such as Slobodan Milosevic, and end by assessing the international community's response to the crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia.

HIS-6032Y

60

FRENCH REVOLUTION, , 1789-1804

The French Revolution destroyed age-old cultural, institutional and social structures in France and beyond. Yet, in their attempt to regenerate humanity, the revolutionaries were creative as well as destructive, creating a new political culture with far-reaching implications. This special subject will provide an opportunity to study different aspects of the Revolution in depth. You will become familiar with the Revolution's key political turning points and personalities from Maximilien Robespierre to Napoleon Bonaparte. But a great part of this special subject will be devoted to exploring the artistic, cultural and intellectual dimensions of this eventful period. In doing so, you will master the art of interpreting and contextualizing a variety of different kinds of primary sources, such as caricatures, constitutions, legislative decrees, philosophical tracts, artisan memoirs and private letters.

HIS-6089Y

60

HENRY VIII: THE MAKING OF A TYRANT?

The reign of Henry VIII was a major turning point in English history, and 'bluff King Hal' continues to horrify and fascinate us in equal measure. We use the preoccupations, ambitions, and character of Henry VIII as a route into the political, religious and cultural changes of this tumultuous period. Starting with the acclaimed young king, his Spanish bride, Katherine of Aragon, and his consummate minister, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the module works chronologically and thematically through to the declining years of Henry VIII's reign, when a paranoid, obese and cruel monarch presided over an irrevocably changed religious and political landscape. It examines in detail the divorce crisis, the establishment of the Church of England, the Henrician Reformation, the politics and factionalism of the Court, war and foreign policy, magnificence, and opposition to the king, and engages with the intense historiographical debates on all of these issues. The module considers some of the most colourful personalities in English history - Wolsey, More, Boleyn, Cromwell, and Cranmer - as well as structures, and the falls of Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell are given particular attention. Finally, the module draws on material culture, art history, literature, film, and even dress, as well as relying on the more usual documentary sources, such as the State Papers.

HIS-6035Y

60

JAPAN'S FIRST MODERN CENTURY, 1868-1968

In 1968, Japan astonished the world by overtaking West Germany as the world's second largest capitalist economy. It was easy to forget that two decades earlier the nation lay in ruins, defeated by the Allies in WWII. And a mere century before, in 1868, Japan had been a samurai-ruled feudal backwater, forced open by western gunboat diplomacy and under threat of colonisation. How did this East Asian nation attain its impressive position in the modern world in such a short time? In this module, we will explore Japan's modern history through its formative exchanges with the outside world. By looking at a wide variety of primary sources - media reports, government documents, memoirs, autobiographies, travelogues, and others - we will explore the transnational encounters that shaped Japan's modern society, economy, culture and ideas. We will retrace the nation's often bumpy transition from tradition to modernity in the late nineteenth century; the humiliations and anxieties vis-a-vis the "great powers"; the appeal of foreign "dangerous thoughts" to home-grown dissidents; the impact of imperialist ideologies following the European "Age of Empire"; the militarist revolt against party politics in the 1930s; the harsh reality of war both at home and overseas; the post-WWII recovery and alliance with the United States; and the subsequent refashioning of Japan's place in the world. By examining Japan's links with North America, Western Europe, Russia and the Soviet Union, and East and South East Asia, we will analyse how flows of ideas, people and goods helped shape the nation as we know it today.

HIS-6088Y

60

THE DEVIL'S BROOD: THE ANGEVIN KINGS OF ENGLAND (1154-1225)

This Special Subject focuses on the lives and actions of three of the most charismatic rulers in twelfth- and early thirteenth-century Western Europe. We begin by an examination of the creator of the Angevin dynasty, Henry fitz Empress, who, by the time he was twenty-one, dominated more than half of the kingdom that was to become France as well as being king of the English. Henry was a successful military commander; in England, he was the creator of the English common law and a centralising administration. And it was of him that St Bernard is supposed to have declared 'he came from the Devil and he will go to the Devil'. His son and successor, Richard the Lionheart, was one of the greatest knights of his age as well as being a crusader and successful military commander who seemingly placed the Angevin dynasty on a solid footing. After these two great makers of aristocratic empire, the third ruler of the dynasty almost brought the whole edifice crashing down. King John lost the continental lands, and by the time of his death, his lands were being ravaged by a foreign prince, his barons were in revolt having gathered themselves behind a document we know as Magna Carta, and his dynasty on the verge of extinction. This Special Subject has at its core the story of the creation and near destruction of this dynasty; and seeks further to examine the politics, culture, and society of the lands over which the Angevin dynasty held sway. This was an age of profound intellectual, religious, and political change, and studies will be set within this wider context. You will be expected to become familiar with the primary sources in translation and to be aware of current historiographical debates.

HIS-6027Y

60

THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1450 TO 1950

On this module you'll explore how 500 years of change shaped the modern landscape. You'll study the development of rural and urban landscapes in the post-medieval period and see how a landscape approach can shed light on wider social, political and economic changes. In seminars you'll use a wide range of contemporary documents, including maps and paintings alongside written sources, to examine key aspects of landscape change in the period c.1450-1950 and to identify shifts in the way the landscape was represented and perceived. Each week you'll explore a different topic relating to key themes such as the development of country house architecture and garden design, the evolution of urban landscapes and the transformation of the working countryside. A number of field trips will take place throughout the year to give you first-hand experience of relevant sites and landscapes.

HIS-6026Y

60

THE REIGN OF LOUIS THE FAT: WAR, MURDER, and THE WRITING OF HISTORY IN EARLY TWELFTH-CENTURY FRANCE

This module offers students the chance to explore and examine in detail the reign of Louis VI, who ruled as king of the Franks from 1108 until his death in 1137. The life and rule of this king was characterised by some of the most dramatic events of medieval European history: the insurrection of the burgess community of Laon and the murder of leading members of the household of the bishop of Laon in 1112; the incessant campaigning for control of key castles in the Seine basin throughout the 1110s and 1120s; the combination of war and peace-making with the king-duke of the English and Normans and with other leading princes of northern Francia in 1116-1120; the invasion of the emperor of the Romans in 1124; the murder of Charles, count of Flanders in 1127 and the subsequent struggle for his lands and territories; and the death of the king's nominated son and co-ruler in the streets of Paris in 1131. A theme of this module is survival#the survival of a king against all the odds. Louis VI was by no means the most skilful and most successful of the western princes ruling in the early twelfth century west. But by the time he was buried in the abbey church of St Denis#then in the process of being converted into one of the premier architectural masterpieces of the Latin West#he and his faithful men had staked out claims for the rights and reach of Frankish kings and established the foundation for the emergence of a more enduring and more ambitious style of kingship. How Louis and his men survived in the face of such mighty challenges and how they secured these small, but significant, victories are some of the key questions of this module. At the heart of this module are three contemporary narrative texts#perhaps three of the most remarkable examples of historical writing produced over the course of the middle ages. The first is the uita of Louis composed by Suger, abbot of St Denis#a man of many parts, with a formidable commitment to his abbey's status and landholding. This text is unlike any other life of a king. The second text is the Monodies (or Autobiography) composed by the monk, Guibert of Nogent. This fascinating work of autobiography and history (it is neither one nor the other) provides the most detailed account of the insurrection in Laon as well as a discursive, gossipy, and revealing insight into one man's perception of his own childhood, monastic career, and circle of friends. The third key text will be Galbert of Bruges's exceptionally detailed account#in what has been described as an almost journalistic narrative#of the murder of Charles, count of Flanders, and the subsequent war for his territory. Students will be required to explore the genesis, composition, structure, and purpose of all three texts and will be encouraged to make their own judgements about their function and design. They will also be required to examine these texts within the context of other evidence#the evidence of royal charters, episcopal uitae and acta, material items, coins, church design, and castle archaeology. Their close reading of these texts will allow them to explore such essential themes as the status and active role of aristocratic women; the ideals and operation of kingship; the workings of regnal and elite politics; the forms and functions of contemporary historical writing; and the nature of castle warfare and military campaigning. A sample seminar schedule might look like this: 1.Early twelfth-century Francia: contexts and coordinates 2.Abbot Suger and the construction of a secular uita 3.Murder and insurrection in Laon 4.The castle war and the tyrant Thomas de Marle 5.Henry, king of the English and duke of the Normans 6.The invasion of Henry V, emperor of the Romans 7.The assassination of Charles, count of Flanders 8.The war for Flanders 9.The rise and fall of Etienne de Garlande and his clan 10.Ruling a kingdom 11.A new kingship? Key Readings: #Suger, The Life of Louis VI, trans. R. Cusimano and J. Moorhead (Washington, D.C., 1992). #Guibert de Nogent, Monodies, trans. J. Rubenstein (London, 2011). #Galbert of Bruges, The Murder, Betrayal, and Slaughter of the Glorious Charles, Count of Flanders, trans. J. Rider (2013). #Galbert of Bruges, trans. J. B. Ross (New York, 1967). #Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History, ed. and trans. M. Chibnall, 6 vols, OMT (Oxford, 1968-1980). #Recueil des actes de Louis VI roi de France (1108-1137), ed. J. Dufour, 4 vols, CDHF (Paris, 1992-1994). #T. N. Bisson, The Crisis of the Twelfth Century. Power, Lordship, and the Origins of European Government (Princeton, NJ, 2009). #Galbert of Bruges and the Historiography of Medieval Flanders, ed. J. Rider and A. Murray (Washington, D.C, 2009). #L. Grant, Abbot Suger of St Denis: Church and State in Early Medieval France (London, 1998). #J. Rubenstein, Guibert of Nogent: Portrait of a Medieval Mind (London and New York, 2002). #J. A. Green, Henry I, King of England and Duke of Normandy (Cambridge, 2009).

HIS-6099Y

60

THE THIRD REICH

In this module you'll study the history of the Third Reich from an international and comparative perspective through the extensive use of primary sources. You'll examine the origins and the rise of National Socialism, the seizure and consolidation of power, the nature and political structure of the dictatorship, and the transformation of German society under Nazi rule, but you'll focus in particular on foreign policy and the impact of the regime's policies on Europe and the world. You'll explore Nazi Germany's relationship with other autocracies and right-wing forces in Europe, German geopolitical thought and the role of the Foreign Office, the formation and administration of the Nazi empire, issues of collaboration and resistance in occupied territories, combat motivation and war crimes of ordinary soldiers, the importance of non-German perpetrators of the Holocaust, the German home front and the effects of Allied aerial bombings, the various plans for a post-war Europe and the problem of ethnic cleansing both before and after 1945.

HIS-6028Y

60

WE ARE NOT AMUSED: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF QUEEN VICTORIA

This special subject focuses on the life and times of Queen Victoria. You will start by exploring Queen Victoria's public and private life. You will examine in detail her political and diplomatic influence, and her experiences as a wife and mother. Drawing on a wide and expansive range of primary sources, including Queen Victoria's own journals and letters, you will seek to piece together the personality and ideology of the woman who ruled Britain for 63 years. Using Queen Victoria's reign as a backdrop, you will also consider a number of the key political, social and cultural changes Britain witnessed in the 19th century. Seminar topics will include: Queenship; Constitutional Monarch; Imperialism; Religion; Womanhood; Patriotism; and Republicanism. You will conclude by examining the perceptions of Queen Victoria and her reign in the 20th and 21st century.

HIS-6070Y

60

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION IN HISTORY

This module offers you the opportunity to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words on a topic approved by the School. For you to be considered for this module you will have achieved an aggregate of 68% across the Level 5 Autumn semester modules.

HIS-6022Y

30

FIELDWORK IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

Fieldwork is a key part of landscape history and this module will give you hands-on practical experience of a range of landscape survey methods. Our fieldwork week takes place during the summer and will provide you with training in various survey techniques that can be applied to earthworks and buildings. Your surveys will form the basis for site drawings and a research project on the site we have surveyed. Seminars and field trips take place in the autumn semester and will cover topics such as drawing earthwork plans and carrying out original research using archive maps and documents. By the end of the module you will be able to recognise and interpret historic landscape features in the field and use a combination of survey work and original research to understand them.

HIS-6017A

30

GOSSIP, RUMOUR AND REBELLION IN ENGLAND, 1300 - 1700

Much like twenty-first-century Britain, England in 1300-1700 had a problem with 'fake news': rumours could threaten kings, start rebellions, and ruin the reputations of individuals in their communities. In this thematic module, we shall consider the role that gossip and rumour played in a changing society rocked by the Black Death, the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation, popular riots, and the arrival of the printing press. We shall also place the England of 1300-1700 in a broader conceptual context, using it to evaluate anthropological and sociological arguments about why humans gossip. How did people establish what was 'true'? And did gossip tend to subvert authority, or to further disempower already marginalised individuals? The module stands at the intersection of political, social, cultural, and religious history, and will address topics ranging from the Peasants' Revolt and English Revolution to tavern culture and sex scandals. Students will analyse court records, popular ballads, and literature from the period, as well as consider how urban space in late medieval and early modern Norwich facilitated or checked the spread of rumour. Preliminary List of Topics: 1. Introduction: Gossip and Rumour as Topics of Academic Study 2. Social Structures: Town, Village, Parish 3. Written and Oral Culture: Speech, Song, Manuscript, Print 4. Sex, Gender, and Misbehaviour 5. Nationality and Xenophobia 6. Prophecy, Heresy, and Religious Dissent 7. Rumours about Royals 8. New Spaces to Gossip: Tavern, Alehouse, Coffeehouse 9. Gossip as History? Rumour in Chronicles and History Plays 10. Rumour and Rebellion 11. Kett's Rebellion, Gossip, and Urban Space: Student-Led Walking Tour of Norwich

HIS-6102A

30

GRAND STRATEGY

This module examines the theory and practice of grand strategy in historical and contemporary contexts from a variety of analytical perspectives. It defines grand strategy as 'the calculated relation of means to large ends'. It focuses on how parts relate to the whole in whatever an individual, a corporation or a nation might be seeking to accomplish. The strategists considered range over some two and a half millennia. Some represent the best thinking and writing on this subject; others exemplify success and failure in the implementation of grand strategy.

HIS-6082A

30

IMPERIALISTS, PASHAS and REVOLUTIONARIES: IRAQ, 1914-2003

This module explores the eventful and troubled history of modern Iraq. Taking its starting point in the nineteenth century, when Iraq was part of the Ottoman Empire, the module explores how the country came under British tutelage following the Great War and how it subsequently experienced a turbulent history as various political actors sought to wrest control of the newly established state. The module pays special attention to key moments when the course of Iraq's history changed, such as wars, military coups, and revolutions, but also periods in between when society returned to some sort of normality. It will particularly focus on the rise of political ideologies, especially Arab nationalism, and its local counterpart, Iraqi nationalism - but also other ideologies such as socialism, communism and Ba#thism. Saddam Hussein's domination of the country (1979-2003) is also an important element of the module.

HIS-6020A

30

Nationalism in Europe since 1789: Shaping Identities in the Age of Modernity

You will examine in depth the history of nationalism in Europe from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. The central theme is the relationship between the rise and development of nationalism and the shaping of images and discourses about Europe. You will consider and compare the strength of nationalism to the weakness of Europeanism in order to improve your historical understanding of identity formation processes in the modern age. In this sense, it does not consider the nation and Europe as being one the denial of the other, but as forces interacting in complex ways and, in given instances, feeding upon one another. Centred on this theoretical concern, you will be offered a broad survey of the history of nationalism from the Age of Enlightenment to the European integration process, explaining how it has developed into a mass movement and an ideology affecting so deeply the life of millions of individuals across Europe. The perspective used will be that of the cultural historian and the historian of ideas and ideologies. A variety of different primary sources - including pictures, novels, private correspondence, newspaper articles, political tracts and pamphlet, history books, films, songs, etc. - will be used to highlight, on the one hand, the ambiguities of modern nationalism, to explain its quasi-religious nature and explore its strength and resilience. On the other hand, they will help us investigate how and to what extent discourses about Europe affected, after the Second World War, one of the greatest projects of political engineering ever attempted, highlighting the economic success of EU integration and considering its incapacity to create a strong attachment to EU institutions. The module is interdisciplinary in nature. While it is essentially addressed to historians, especially if you are interested in cultural history and in the history of ideologies, it also considers sociological issues and topics that would appeal if you are interested in politics.

HIS-6019A

30

SLAVERY IN THE EARLY MODERN ATLANTIC WORLD

This module begins by surveying African, Native American and European labour regimes in the fifteenth century in order to establish a foundation for studying the transformations that followed European imperial expansion and the inauguration of the transatlantic slave trade. We will examine the process of enslavement in Africa, North America, and the Mediterranean; the ransom, exchange and sale of captives; and the development of slave markets in the European colonies in the Americas. We will study childhood and family life in various enslaved communities; the material lives of slaves and the rise of distinct cultures within the African diaspora. We will compare the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, French and British Empires with regard to the practice of slavery. We will also trace patterns of slave resistance, escapes, rebellions, and the creation of maroon communities. The semester will end with an examination of the tangled international politics surrounding the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade and the end of plantation slavery across the Atlantic World.

HIS-6081A

30

TEACHING HISTORY

This module will help you prepare for a career in History teaching. Through a blend of vocational and academic delivery, you will develop appropriate specialist, technical, and transferable skills. You will learn about different pedagogical approaches to teaching History and an understanding of the requirements for a career in teaching. You will be offered support to arrange teaching observations; a necessary precondition for a PGCE application. Teaching History will also enable you to design learning activities and accompanying materials and to deliver these to your peers in a friendly environment.

HIS-6097Y

30

THE VIKING WORLD c.700-c.1000

The study of the Vikings has undergone a revolution in the last decades. Long viewed as a disruptive force in Christian Europe, recent scholarship has argued that the Vikings were a positive catalyst for economic and social change. This module looks at the Vikings at home - in Scandinavia, examining society and state formation, and asking what prompted the first Viking raids on the English and Frankish kingdoms. It will explore Viking religion and culture, and look at the impact of Christianity upon the Scandinavian kingdoms. The impact of the Vikings away - in England, Ireland, Francia and Iceland - is examined from the point of view of early medieval warfare and the defence against the Vikings, Viking settlement in England and Iceland, and crucial role played by the Vikings in initiating urbanisation in Ireland. The Viking world will be studied as a transnational network and the module will look at not only the impact of the Vikings on Europe but also the effect of interactions with Christian kingdoms upon the Vikings. Students will study a wide range of sources - literary and narrative sources from England and Francia, Viking poetry and sagas, and the evidence of archaeology and art history. Preliminary List of Topics: 1. Introduction: The Historiography of the Vikings - raiders or traders? 2. Scandinavia before the Viking Age 3. Raiding and Trading - the Vikings in Europe 4. Viking Society 5. Viking Settlement - Britain and Iceland 6. Visit to the Castle Museum , Norwich 7. Viking Religion - paganism and the conversion to Christianity 8. Viking Kingdoms - State Formation in Scandinavia 9. International Networks - Viking Trade in Europe and beyond 10. Viking Culture - Literature and Art 11. Round up and conclusion - the Vikings as an international catalyst for change in early medieval Europe

HIS-6103A

30

VICTORIAN UNDERWORLDS

You will be introduced to the darker side of life in Victorian Britain. Though this was undoubtedly a period of economic prosperity, not everyone shared in the gains. You will look at those who, for reasons of poverty or 'deviance' were confined to the margins. Topics include the criminal and insane, gender and insanity, prostitution, drink, slums, the London Irish, and Jack the Ripper. By looking at the margins and the misfits, we will seek to gain a deeper understanding of British society in the 19th century.

HIS-6026A

30

WORKING IN HERITAGE

You will be provided the opportunity to undertake a work placement with an employer in the historic environment sector. You will be responsible for arranging your own placement, with assistance from the module organisers where required. During the Spring semester, you will build on the experience of your placement through practical seminars, field trips and sessions with external speakers currently working in the sector. These will provide you with an understanding of the career paths available in this field and an opportunity to reflect on how the skills and knowledge you have gained during your degree can be transferred to a range of historic environment and heritage roles.

HIS-6013Y

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CAMPS IN HISTORY AND MEMORY: THE 20TH CENTURY IN DETENTIONS, MIGRATIONS, AND EXPLOITATION

The late philosopher Zygmunt Bauman called the 20th century 'a century of camps'; for him, camps were testing grounds for totalitarian regimes. In this module, we will study the history of the violent last century through the unique lens of camps: concentration camps, forced labour camps, POW camps, refugee camps, and others. Through diverse material selected for the course, we will analyse the well-known events of the 20th century by looking at camps as places of detention, indoctrination, re-education, labour exploitation, and extermination. This unique angle provides insights into the politics of great totalitarian powers, as well as their models for organising and governing society and interacting with other nations of the world. Camps did not appear out of nowhere; each place of detention was part of an institutional network driven by divergent aims: to contain, correct, re-educate, punish. We will study these networks within their historical contexts, using diverse materials specific to each case. Also, a study of camps cannot be limited to camp walls and barbed wire; while static themselves and built to limit people's movements, camps were ironically dependent on the movements of people from place to place. Thus a study of camps inevitably involves the study of forced migrations. To acquaint you with the less studied side of global, regional and transnational interactions, this module will use a variety of sources, analyses, and methods in order to make sense of international regimes of detention, control, and punishment.

HIS-6104B

30

CONTESTING THE PAST: REPRESENTATION AND MEMORY

In this module, you will explore how the past is constantly constructed and reconstructed in the present. In the first part of the module we will consider how mnemonic processes are created, by who, and for what purpose. Commemoration, memorialisation, and visual representations form a key part of this process. In the second part of the module, we will study the ways in which individuals and groups remember and how this often differs from official or mediated discourses. In the third and final part, we will explore various 'memory conflicts' and their present day consequences. Throughout, film, photography, visual and audio media, and oral history will form key components of our studies.

HIS-6077B

30

DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES

In medieval England, death and what lay beyond were constantly visible. Parts of the landscape were given over to the dead: there were barrows, haunted by the pagan dead; cemeteries for the Christian dead; and lonely hermitages, whose occupants spoke with the dead. 'King Death', shown as a skeleton with spear or bow, would strike down the living at any age. Ghosts wandered forth from the grave, and vivid images of the dead were painted in churches, haunting churchgoers every Sunday, dancing before their mind's eye in their dreams. Visions of the dead were not uncommon, and sometimes they made such demands on the living that the latter spent their lives serving them. Studying death, you will learn about the impact of this universal and timeless fear, and you'll discover the role of belief systems in combating deep anxieties that are part of the human condition. The module is designed as much for beginners as it is for those who have studied medieval history before. Through lectures, seminar discussion, and private study, you'll develop an understanding of beliefs about death and the otherworld in medieval England; how medieval people prepared for death; how ghosts and the undead irrupted into their world; the role of those who served the dead or acted as mediators between the dead and the living; demons, the evil dead and saints (the holy dead); and how death was represented in medieval art. Our trip around East Anglian churches explores tombs and wall paintings. At the end of module, you'll have gained the capacity to reflect on human belief systems; and by studying death you'll also discover strategies for coping with the fears which have accompanied life in every age and culture.

HIS-6052B

30

DISSERTATION IN HISTORY

This module offers you the opportunity to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words on a topic approved by the School. For you to be considered for this module you will have achieved an aggregate of 68% across the Level 5 Autumn semester modules.

HIS-6022Y

30

RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION 1905-1921

More than a century after Lenin's Bolsheviks proclaimed the world's first socialist revolution in Petrograd, the events of 1917 retain their power to fascinate, inspire, bewilder and repel. How can we understand the Russian revolution, why did it happen, and what did it mean for the people who made and lived through it? On this module we'll use a range of sources, including contemporary documents, newspaper reports, and memoirs - some translated specially for this module - to answer these questions. We start with the run-up to the revolutionary events of 1905, when the whole empire was convulsed with strikes, uprisings and armed clashes. We then take the story through the Tsarist regime's attempt to shore up its authority through limited constitutionalist concessions, before looking at World War One and the fall of the monarchy. We'll look in detail at what happened in 1917 and why - not only in the Russian heartland but also in certain non-Russian parts of the empire. Finally, we'll examine the civil war and why the Reds won. Throughout, we put the story in its historical, political and geographical context, always with an eye to its impact on later developments up to today. By understanding the events of a century ago, you'll gain insights into the Russia of today and the troubled and turbulent post-Soviet area. You'll also gain invaluable experience of carrying out in-depth independent research and presenting your findings.

HIS-6004B

30

TEACHING HISTORY

This module will help you prepare for a career in History teaching. Through a blend of vocational and academic delivery, you will develop appropriate specialist, technical, and transferable skills. You will learn about different pedagogical approaches to teaching History and an understanding of the requirements for a career in teaching. You will be offered support to arrange teaching observations; a necessary precondition for a PGCE application. Teaching History will also enable you to design learning activities and accompanying materials and to deliver these to your peers in a friendly environment.

HIS-6097Y

30

THE FIRST WORLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY

We will explore the impact of the First World War on European and non-European states, societies, and cultures. Our aim is to broaden and deepen the students' knowledge by introducing some of the lesser known aspects of the conflict, such as the campaigns on the Eastern front, in Africa, or the Middle East. Students will investigate the role and perception of colonial troops in the European theatre of war and examine the war efforts of countries such as Italy, Serbia, the Ottoman Empire, and Australia. Further topics to be discussed include alliance politics and the role of neutral states, psychological effects of 'industrialised slaughter', atrocities against non-combatant civilians, captivity and occupation, state propaganda and the spiritual mobilisation of intellectuals, as well as processes of social change with regard to home and family life, ethnicity and class. We will draw on a wide range of primary sources, including poems, paintings, and film. In their coursework, students will have the opportunity to study more specific issues, such as naval and aerial warfare, British military strategy, civil-military relations in democratic and autocratic states, medical innovations, the war experiences of children, or questions of memory and commemoration.

HIS-6051B

30

THE ISRAEL-PALESTINE CONFLICT: A HUNDRED YEARS OF WAR?

This course offers students the opportunity to engage critically with a wide range of issues relating to the Arab-Israeli question as it has developed since the late nineteenth century into the present day. The history of the Arab-Israeli question is both complex and deeply contested, and students will be exposed to a range of perspectives and methodological reflections by historians of the conflict, with the intention of gaining a greater appreciation of the practical and conceptual challenges of 'doing' the history of such a divisive and contemporary subject. The course does not assume prior knowledge, and grounds students in the historical development of the Arab-Israeli question, familiarising them with key events in this history like the Balfour Declaration, the 1948, 1967, and 1973 wars, the Oslo peace process, and the first and second intifadas. As well grounding students in the overarching political narrative and equipping them to assess the reasons for the longevity and seeming intractability of the conflict, this course also adopts a thematic approach in order to introduce students to some of the more recent and interesting developments in the scholarship. In the second half of the term, students will engage the Arab-Israeli question through consideration of more specific themes: the uneasy place of Palestinian citizens of Israel, Arab Jews, and Druze in this history; life in the divided city of Jerusalem; and the politics of LGBT+ rights in contemporary Israel-Palestine.

HIS-6101B

30

THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE

'The mother of our own': that was how nineteenth-century historian Jacob Burckhardt described the culture of the Renaissance in Italy. Without a doubt the Italian Renaissance remains one of the most celebrated movements in European cultural history, a byword for 'genius', with a place in public consciousness so dominant for so long as to be intimidating, and surely ripe for questioning. To our modern eyes, the Italian Renaissance can look distinctly strange. Humanists saw in the reform of the language they spoke and wrote the path to a reform of society. Painting sought to attain the status of literature, and, along with its 'sister arts', sculpture and architecture, grappled with the competing urges to emulate antiquity and imitate nature. Scholars and even priests aimed to get closer to the One through the esoteric philosophy that they believed had come to them from Ancient Egypt and could even be found in hieroglyphs. Citizens and statesmen reconsidered their fate as soldiers and subjects, as the Italian peninsula became the battlefield of Europe at the same time as it influenced the culture of an entire continent. Cities alternately incorporated and rejected communities of Greeks, black Africans, and Jews. Meanwhile, writers sought to understand and explain the contemporary political problems they faced through the study and writing of history. Students will grapple with this fascinating and contradictory period (c. 1330 - c. 1550) through the treatises and histories of Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and Vasari, the verses of Petrarch, and the letters of Catherine of Siena. They will encounter Ideal Cities, courtly sprezzatura (effortless nonchalance), and the works of such artists as Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. A visit to the National Gallery in London is sure to be a highlight of this module.

HIS-6098B

30

WORKING IN HERITAGE

You will be provided the opportunity to undertake a work placement with an employer in the historic environment sector. You will be responsible for arranging your own placement, with assistance from the module organisers where required. During the Spring semester, you will build on the experience of your placement through practical seminars, field trips and sessions with external speakers currently working in the sector. These will provide you with an understanding of the career paths available in this field and an opportunity to reflect on how the skills and knowledge you have gained during your degree can be transferred to a range of historic environment and heritage roles.

HIS-6013Y

30

Important Information

The University makes every effort to ensure that the information within its course finder is accurate and up-to-date. Occasionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, informing students and will also keep prospective students informed appropriately by updating our course information within our course finder.

In light of the current situation relating to Covid-19, we are in the process of reviewing all courses for 2020 entry with adjustments to course information being made where required to ensure the safety of students and staff, and to meet government guidance.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level BBB or ABC including a History related subject or BBC including a History related subject with an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points including HL5 in History
  • Scottish Highers AABBB including a History related subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC including a History related subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3 including a History related subject
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3 including a History module. Humanities or Social Sciences pathway preferred.
  • BTEC DDM alongside grade B in History related subject A-level (or equivalent qualification). Excludes BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services and BTEC Business Administration.
  • European Baccalaureate 70% including 70% in a History related subject

Entry Requirement

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants.
  • A Level BBB or ABC including History or BBC including History and an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points including HL5 in History
  • Scottish Highers AABBB including History
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC including History
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3 including History
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3 including 12 credits in History.
  • BTEC DDM alongside grade B in A-Level History (or equivalent qualification). Excludes BTEC Public Services, BTEC Uniformed Services and BTEC Business Administration.
  • European Baccalaureate 70% including 7 in History

Entry Requirement

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

 Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading): 

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 5.5 in all components) 

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list

 

INTO University of East Anglia  

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study: 

  

INTO UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree: 

 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time. 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application. 

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year. 

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level. 

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. 

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants. 

 

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support 

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here: 

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds.  

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates. 

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option. 

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The application allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it is sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges. 

The Institution code for the University of East Anglia is E14. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University.  

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515 

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515