BA Drama and Creative Writing (2020 Entry)


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Full Time
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Degree of Bachelor of Arts



A-Level typical
BBB (2020/1 entry) See All Requirements
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Drama allows you to combine a strong practical emphasis with the study of the theory, history and social significance of drama, complemented by detailed study of dramatic literature and aspects of visual and technical design.

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"THE BEST THING ABOUT THE DRAMA COURSE AT UEA IS THE VARIETY OF OPPORTUNITIES ON OFFER AND THE CHOICE THAT IS GIVEN TO THE STUDENTS.”

In their words

Josie Dale-Jones, BA Drama

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"Being at UEA was top; i was able to learn from my talented peers and from the remarkable lecturers in a supportive atmosphere where creativity was nurtured"

In their words

Matt Milne, BA Drama

This unique degree unites UEA’s strengths in creative writing and in drama to immerse you in all aspects of the reading, writing and staging of plays.

You will study creative writing for theatre, cinema, television and radio – while exploring the practice, criticism and history of dramatic literature and performance. Your writing will be enriched by an awareness of theatrical and literary traditions from around the globe.

Alongside your modules in scriptwriting, you’ll take applied drama modules and you’ll have full access to our professionally equipped 200-seat Drama Studio. This firm grounding in acting, directing, and all other aspects of practical stagecraft will enable you to graduate as a scriptwriter with an instinctive feel for the world of theatre and performing arts.

Overview

At UEA, you’ll be doing three things: writing plays and screenplays, reading them, and performing them too. Each of these activities enhances and enriches the others. Your writing is improved by mastering the ins-and-outs of theatrical performance, while you become better able to analyse dramatic language by writing it yourself. You’ll develop a better understanding of yourself as a writer by mastering the best of traditional and contemporary drama.

Our scriptwriting masterclasses will develop your writing skills. You’ll discover the formats, conventions and techniques of scriptwriting for different forms. You’ll learn by writing scenes and short scripts, offering critiques of each other’s work, and by working closely with other drama students.

Throughout your degree you will gain hands-on experience by participating in production and practical project work. You’ll have the keys to our professionally equipped 200-seat Drama Studio, giving you the chance to control everything in your own productions. You’ll also have access to performance and placement opportunities, including a creative industries internship in your second year, which involves a work placement in a drama-producing organisation or environment.

You’ll encounter an astonishing array of drama and a wealth of performance styles, from naturalism to non-Western traditions. You’ll engage with major theoretical and directorial approaches, from Aristotle to Artaud, from Stanislavsky to physical theatre. And you can examine the use of theatre and performance – by the state, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners – to solidify or challenge structures of power.

You’ll also benefit from our highly regarded student run Minotaur Theatre Company, which gives you the chance to gain additional performance, technical and scriptwriting experience.

Course Structure

Year 1

Your first-year module Scriptwriting and Performance sets up a conversation between writing, doing, and thinking, which continues throughout your degree. You’ll experiment with a wealth of new techniques in dramatic writing while also taking advantage of developmental acting exercises. You’ll develop your practical and technical skills further on the Applied Drama and Technical Skills module. You’ll then encounter rich traditions of dramatic writing in the Introduction to World Dramatic Literatures module. You’ll explore another medium in Analysing Film and unite theory and practice in Theatre: Theory and Performance. Your practical work on the stage culminates in the Postwar British Drama module.

Year 2

In your second year, you’ll extend and refine your scriptwriting skills in the Creative Writing: Scriptwriting modules across the whole year, where you learn how to write for stage/radio and film/television. Alongside this you’ll have an array of opportunities for practical dramatic work. For example, you can take an internship, engage in outreach work, take modules to build your performance skills for stage and screen, or take an innovative module on the director, the actor and the script. You can also choose to study journalism or publishing, or choose modules in literary, film or cultural criticism.

Year 3

By your third year you will have found your voice as a playwright. The keystone of this year is your Creative Writing Dissertation where, with one-to-one support from your supervisor, you’ll produce a substantial script for stage, screen or radio. Alongside this you can choose from a range of options, either throwing yourself into the third year Drama Production, pursuing an individual drama project, focusing intensively on dramatic literature (via modules on drama and literature, or contemporary drama and film), broadening out into other literary realms, or studying creative work in the media industries.

Teaching and Learning

At the heart of your degree will be the Scriptwriting workshop. Based on our pioneering and world-famous Creative Writing MA degrees, a series of workshops runs over a whole semester. The first half of the series is devoted to building up your fluency as a writer through writing exercises. In the second half, you work intensively on a longer script, which you share with your peers and your seminar leader (a practising scriptwriter) to get the benefit of their collective feedback. You also improve your own skills of critique and editing by learning how to give feedback on your peers’ writing.

You will hone your drama skills through workshops, seminars, and technical classes, as well as through your own directing and performance. You might find yourself learning how to work with text as an actor, experiment with different directorial theories, or develop skills in devising plays.

Literary criticism is taught through lectures and seminars. Lectures offer larger frameworks to help you get to grips with the texts you’re reading. In a literary seminar, you might be working intensively with passages of text to understand and interpret their language, or you might be grappling with how a broad theoretical concept can help us get to grips with a challenging text.

You’re guided throughout by our academics who together combine a unique range of skills in the history, theory, performance and writing of all kinds of drama. They’re here to give you feedback on your writing and performance and to steer your learning in workshops and seminars.

Your tutors’ guidance doesn’t stop when the seminar ends. Each member of staff at UEA dedicates specific hours each week to one-to-one meetings with students, when you can come and seek additional advice and feedback. You’ll also be assigned an adviser who supports you through your time as a Drama and Creative Writing student by providing guidance on your growth as a performer and writer and where those skills might take you in your career.

Assessment

Our BA modules in drama, creative writing and English literature do not have written exams. Each of the modules you take has its own assessment; your final degree classification is made up of the marks you receive in your second and third years.

Your degree is assessed in two ways: by what you write (submitted coursework) and by your practical work in acting, performance and directing (which is observed and marked). Your writing can take many forms. As a scriptwriter, you’ll submit both portfolios of shorter pieces of original scriptwriting and single, more developed, longer pieces. You’ll also be writing critical essays on drama and literature, and you might venture into pieces of creative criticism too (where your own creative writing embodies the critical ideas you’ve been learning).

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

You have the option to apply to study abroad for one semester of your second year. Studying abroad is a wonderfully enriching life experience – you will develop confidence and adaptability, and will have the chance to deepen your understanding of drama, scriptwriting and performance while learning about another culture. At UEA, you will also be surrounded throughout your degree by the many students we welcome from around the world to study with us.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

After the course

Some graduates go into careers in film, drama, radio and scriptwriting. Recent graduates from our drama degrees include the actor Matt Smith (famous for his portrayal of Doctor Who and his leading role in The Crown), the presenter of the Radio 1 Breakfast Show, Greg James, and the playwright Tom Morton-Smith (whose 2015 play Oppenheimer was performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company). For others, this degree is a stepping-stone towards careers in the arts, media, publishing, politics, charities and NGOs, teaching and the commercial sector.

Our Careers Service is here to support you in launching your career by advising with CV writing, internships, and much more. Every year we run an event, Working with Words, which gives current students the chance to meet and hear from successful UEA alumni from across the creative industries.

UEA also has its own in-house student publishing project, Egg Box, along with many other exciting initiatives that give you opportunities to turn your love of writing and performance into a foundation for your future career.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • Scriptwriting
  • Theatre and film
  • Journalism
  • Media
  • Teaching
  • Publishing

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2020/1

Year 1

Core Modules (120 credits)

 
Description Credits
SCRIPTWRITING AND PERFORMANCE 20
INTRODUCTION TO WORLD DRAMATIC LITERATURES 20
APPLIED DRAMA AND TECHNICAL SKILLS 20
THEATRE: THEORY AND PERFORMANCE 20
POSTWAR BRITISH DRAMA 20
ANALYSING FILM 20
 

Year 2

In Year 2 students take 120 credits in total

Compulsory Modules (40 credits)

Description Credits
CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (AUT) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR) 20
 

Options Range A

Students who are abroad in the Spring Semester or who select LDCD5020B: Creative Industries Research Internship are exempted from LDCC5008B: Creative Writing: Scriptwriting (Spr). Students who select either LDCD5019A/5020B Creative Industries Research Project must normally also select one of the LDCD5014A/5014B Creative Industries Research Internship modules. Students will select 40-80 credits from the following modules:

 
Description Credits
CONTEMPORARY MEDIASCAPES 20
ANIMATION 20
RESEARCHING MEDIA 20
FILM THEORY 20
GENDER AND THE MEDIA 20
FILM GENRES 20
RECEPTION STUDIES 20
THE HOLLYWOOD STUDIO SYSTEM 20
DOCUMENTARY 20
THEORISING TELEVISION 20
WRITING THE AMERICAN SCRIPT 20
CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (AUT) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (AUT) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR) 20
CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR) 20
THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (AUT) 20
THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR) 20
CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (AUT) 40
CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH INTERNSHIP (SPR) 40
PERFORMANCE SKILLS: THE ACTOR AND THE TEXT 20
DRAMA OUTREACH PROJECT 20
CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (AUT) 20
EXPERIMENTS IN PERFORMANCE 20
CREATIVE INDUSTRIES RESEARCH PROJECT (SPR) 20
POLITICAL THEATRE 20
AUDIO DRAMA: THE THEATRE OF THE MIND 20
DEVISED PERFORMANCE 20
PRACTICAL FILM MAKNG AND PERFORMANCE 20
THE DIRECTOR, THE ACTOR AND THE SCRIPT 20
MUSIC AND THEATRE 20
FEMINIST THEATRES 20
SPECIAL TOPIC IN DRAMA 20
ADAPTATION: SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE AND SCREEN 20
CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE 20
EUROPEAN LITERATURE 20
ROMANTICISM 1780-1840 20
AUSTEN AND THE BRONTES: READING THE ROMANCE 20
EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING 20
SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION 20
MODERNISM 20
FROM PUSHKIN TO CHEKHOV: NINETEENTH-CENTURY RUSSIAN FICTION 20
THREE WOMEN WRITERS 20
GOODBYE TO BERLIN? LITERATURE & VISUAL CULTURE IN WEIMAR GERMANY 20
I AM 20
WRITING THE WILD 20
READING AND WRITING TRANSLATIONS 20
READING AND WRITING IN ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND 20
MEDIEVAL WRITING 20
PUBLISHING (AUT) 20
PUBLISHING (SPR) 20
VICTORIAN WRITING 20
WORDS AND IMAGES 20
CONTEMPORARY FICTION 20
SHAKESPEARE 20
COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA 20
LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY 20
READING AND WRITING CONTEMPORARY POETRY 20
THE SHORT STORY (AUT) 20
THE SHORT STORY (SPR) 20
THE WRITING OF HISTORY 20
EMPIRE AND AFTER: GLOBALIZING ENGLISH 20
ERASMUS EXCHANGE: AUTUMN SEMESTER 60
ERASMUS EXCHANGE: SPRING SEMESTER 60
LITERATURE STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD (SPRING) 60
FICTIONS OF HISTORY 20
FAKES, FRAUDS AND HOAXES 20
WAR LIVES: WRITING BRITAIN IN WORLD WAR II 20
WATCHING YOUR LANGUAGE 20

 

Options Range B

Students will select 0-40 credits from the following modules:

 
Description Credits
AMERICAN ART AND AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY 1900-1950 20
INDIGENOUS ARTS AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES 20
MATERIAL WORLDS 20
THE LIVES OF OBJECTS 20
ART IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 20
ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN VENICE 20
RENAISSANCE RECONSIDERED 20
ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD 20
CONTEMPORARY GALLERY AND MUSEUM STUDIES 20
Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865 20
BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLES: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT 20
LIVING ON THE HYPHEN: Multi-ethnic American Literatures 20
CONTEMPORARY MEDIASCAPES 20
ANIMATION 20
RESEARCHING MEDIA 20
FILM THEORY 20
GENDER AND THE MEDIA 20
FILM GENRES 20
RECEPTION STUDIES 20
THE HOLLYWOOD STUDIO SYSTEM 20
DOCUMENTARY 20
THEORISING TELEVISION 20
WRITING THE AMERICAN SCRIPT 20
WRITING THE AMERICAN SCRIPT 20
AMERICAN MUSIC 20
THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD 20
THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 1066 TO 1600 20
LATIN FOR HISTORIANS 20
ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND, C. 400-1066 20
LATER MEDIEVAL EUROPE 20
FROM HASTINGS TO THE HUNDRED YEARS WAR: NORMAN AND PLANTAGENET ENGLAND 1066-1307 20
FROM AGINCOURT TO BOSWORTH: ENGLAND IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES 20
THE RISE AND FALL OF BRITISH POWER 20
THE BRITISH WORLD 20
NAPOLEON TO STALIN (and beyond): THE STRUGGLE FOR MASTERY IN EUROPE 20
MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990 20
IMPERIAL RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY, 1861-1945 20
THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY 20
HERITAGE AND PUBLIC HISTORY 20
CONSPIRACY AND CRISIS IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD 20
EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE: WARRIORS, SAINTS AND RULERS 20
THE FIRST BRITISH EMPIRE 20
PROPAGANDA 20
TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN, 1914 TO THE PRESENT 20
FRANCE FROM THE ENLIGHTENMENT TO THE BELLE ÉPOQUE 20
HISTORY OF MODERN ITALY 20
WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR 20
WOMEN, POWER, AND POLITICS (I): ISABEL OF CASTILE TO MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT 20
TUDOR ENGLAND 20
STUART ENGLAND 20
HISTORY OF NORWICH 20
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR 20
INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR 20
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR 20
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR 20
INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR 20
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR 20
THE FRENCH LANGUAGE TODAY 20
INTRODUCTION TO THE EUROPEAN UNION 20
POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY 20
CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY 20
LANGUAGE AND POLITICS 20
LANGUAGE IN ACTION 20
LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY 20
GENDER AND POWER 20
POLITICAL VIOLENCE & CONFLICT: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES 20
MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE 20
THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY 20
DIGITAL MEDIA AND SOCIETY 20
MIND AND LANGUAGE FOR SECOND YEARS 20
PHILOSOPHY MEETS THE ARTS (SECOND YEAR MODULE) 20
ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY FOR SECOND YEARS 20
KEY THINKERS AND TEXTS FOR SECOND YEARS 20
WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 20
STATES, INSTITUTIONS AND CITIZENS 20
POLITICS IN THE USA 20
 

Year 3

Options Range A

Students who choose not to take LDCD6007A: Drama Production (Year 3) are strongly advised to take their compulsory Creative Writing Dissertation in the Autumn Semester, i.e. LDCC6003A. Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

 
Description Credits
CREATIVE WRITING DISSERTATION (AUT) 30

Options Range B

Students will select 90 credits from the following modules:

 
Description Credits
GENDER AND GENRE IN CONTEMPORARY CINEMA 30
INVESTIGATING AUDIENCES 30
ADAPTATION AND SCRIPTWRITING 30
CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPT-WRITING 30
DRAMA PRODUCTION (YEAR 3) 60
DRAMA DISSERTATION 30
DRAMA DISSERTATION 30
DRAMA PROJECTS 30
CONTEMPORARY DRAMA AND FILM 30
TRAGEDY 30
SPECIAL TOPIC IN DRAMA 30
THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING 30
DRAMA AND LITERATURE: THE QUESTION OF GENRE 30
LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (AUT) 30
LITERATURE DISSERTATION: POST-1789 (SPR) 30
WRITING LIFE: BIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE NON-FICTION 30
QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY 30
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 30
CHAUCER 30
VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC 30
SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE 30
LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (AUT) 30
LITERATURE DISSERTATION: PRE-1789 (SPR)/td> 30
MEDIEVAL MONSTROSITIES 30
LYRIC 30
LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES 30
THE CONTESTED PAST: LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY 30
TRAVEL LITERATURE 30
THE ART OF EMOTION: LITERATURE, WRITING AND FEELING 30
T.S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH CENTURY POETRY 30
THE BUSINESS OF BOOKS 30
THE ART OF MURDER 30
FEMINIST WRITING 30
WRITING RELIGION IN THE AGE OF JOHN MILTON 30
CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY 30
URBAN VISIONS: THE CITY IN LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE 30
THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL 30
MINOR LITERATURES: RESISTANCE, RADICALISATION AND READING 30
FROM KAFKA TO SEBALD: ASPECTS OF 20TH CENTURY 'GERMAN' WRITING 30
REALITY BITES: CREATIVE NON-FICTION AND CULTURAL HISTORY 30
GLOBAL MODERNISMS 30
GHOSTS, HAUNTING AND SPECTRALITY 30
BANNED BOOKS 30
AFTER NATURE: LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS 30
DARK ROMANTICISM: THE GOTHIC INHERITANCE 30
RACE, WRITING AND IDENTITY IN POST-WAR BRITAIN 30
LITERATURE AND SCIENCE 1660-1750 30
NEW NARRATIVE 30
WRITING VERNACULAR, WRITING VOICE 30
STORIED BODIES: GENDER, SEXUALITY, WRITING AND THE VISUAL AT THE FIN DE SIÈCLE 30
RENAISSANCE OBSCENITIES 30
CULTURES OF SUBURBIA 30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

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Entry Requirements

  • A Level BBB or ABC including Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject or BBC including Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject with an A in the Extended Project.
  • International Baccalaureate 31 points including Higher Level 5 in English or Theatre Studies
  • Scottish Highers AABBB including Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC including Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject.
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 2 subjects at H2, 4 subjects at H3 including Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject.
  • Access Course Humanities & Social Sciences pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Merit in 45 credits at Level 3 including an English Literature or Theatre Studies module.
  • BTEC DDM in an Arts/Humanities subject (usually Performing Arts) accepted. BTEC Public Services and BTEC Business Administration are not accepted.
  • European Baccalaureate 70% with 70% in Drama/Theatre Studies/English Literature related subject.

Entry Requirement

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in each component

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

If your application tells us that you're capable and enlivened by your chosen course, we will invite you to a one-to-one workshop with an academic. This is a chance to meet us, discuss the course and work on a monologue from a play you love, giving you a taste of what it would be like to study Drama here at UEA. Workshops take place on Applicant Days and include opportunities to look around the campus, view accommodation, meet current students, talk to staff members and find out more about what happens here. You'll be asked to bring a monologue that you enjoy so that you can work on it together with an academic. We'll also talk about your current studies, extra-curricular interests and the theatre that excites you.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Special Entry Requirements

We will request a sample of your creative dramatic writing, which could be a monologue, duologue, a couple of scenes or a short film. In your workshop, we’ll discuss your script with you, giving you a taste of what it would be like to study here.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students (2019 entry)

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515