BA American Studies (with a Foundation Year)


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
T70A
A-Level typical
CCC (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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The Humanities Foundation Year is an innovative programme aimed at students who need to develop their skills and knowledge in order to study on one of the prestigious degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

Taught by dedicated lecturers from the Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities, the Foundation Year offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of academic subjects including literature, history, philosophy, film, television, and Media, American Studies, Politics and the History of Art. As well as providing students with a sound theoretical basis for their continuing studies, this approach allows students to discover previously unknown areas of study, and encourages them to develop their own scholarly interests and ideas.

The Foundation Year also places a strong emphasis on the development of essential study skills and we work closely with each individual to identify and work towards their own individual learning goals.

Overview

Our innovative BA American Studies (with Foundation year) gives students the opportunity to progress on to the three year American Studies programme following successful completion of a Foundation Year.

What is the Foundation Year?

Our Foundation Year is a one-year introduction designed to equip you for undergraduate study.

It is an intensive period of study which offers an average of 18 hours per week of guided learning to help you develop a variety of key study skills which will enable you to excel as an Undergraduate.

Over the course of the year you will be introduced to a wide range of academic subjects, including literature, history, philosophy, film, television and media, American studies, politics and the history of art. You will gain essential knowledge of many of the concepts, methods and techniques you will need in order to carry out successful study in the rest of the degree programme. You will also benefit from smaller class sizes and individual tutorials which will help you to get the most out of the programme.

Is it the right course for me?

Have you thought about going to university before, but something got in the way? This is our way of helping you to get on the right track to start your career in higher education.

We recognise that our BA programmes demand high entry standards, but we also appreciate that not everyone is going to be able to achieve these at A-level, so the Foundation Year offers an opportunity to work with us for a year, majoring in the subject you would like to do at degree level, with the chance to work on your study skills to get you to the level required. It is an intensive teaching and learning experience staffed by dedicated lecturers and taught in the Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities’ building, and we aim to make sure that all our students reach the position where they will be able to get onto their chosen degree programme at UEA.

Assessment

During the Foundation Year will be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to exercise different learning styles and familiarise you with the format and expectations of assessment in Higher Education. There will be a strong emphasis on formative assessment with feedback on drafts of written work and group tutorials which will help you to clearly see how you can improve and develop, enabling you to learn from your peers as well as teaching staff. This in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and become a more independent learner.

Your progress will be monitored through individual tutorials to ensure that you are happy on the course and achieving your full potential.

After the Foundation Year

Successful completion of the Foundation Year will lead you through onto the first year of the BA American Studies degree. You need to achieve a minimum of 40% overall with a pass in all modules in order to progress on to the American Studies programme.

During your Foundation Year there is the option to switch between degree programmes with the approval of the Course Director.

Explore you options, look at our courses, and decide where you want your degree to take you.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITIES: TECHNIQUES AND METHODS

This module provides students with an intensive induction to higher education equipping them with the basic skills they will need to reach their full potential on their degree programme. Weekly seminars and study groups will help students to develop skills in areas such as research, essay writing, giving presentations, teamwork, time-management, revision and exam techniques. This module also helps students to create an individual learning plan which assesses their strengths and weaknesses and enables them to track their development over the course of the module and beyond.

HUM-0009A

20

HUMANITIES: THE KEY CONCEPTS

This interdisciplinary module will give students a broad but detailed overview of some of the key themes and ideas within the Humanities and introduce them to a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology and myth, representation and reality, psychoanalysis, feminism, otherness, power and society, trauma and testimony. By studying key texts and theories students will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities and they will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify them at work in their future studies.

HUM-0008Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-010A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language please chose one from the list below.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. It aims the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The term 'Creative Industries' encompasses a range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media, creative writing, theatre and performance, and professional writing. This module offers students the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that many may wish to work in. With a particular focus on employability, the module has been designed to allow for a creative and critical exploration of a range of creative subjects (television, film, media, music, publishing - fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines - among others). The module aims to empower students to engage effectively with a competitive Creative Industry environment and economy and acquire knowledge and a range of skills (both practical and analytical) across this range of disciplines.

HUM-0010A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of three elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the autumn semester.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

HISTORY AND SOCIETY

The module takes as its theme the development of nineteenth century Britain. We will look at the development of many key areas such as education, poverty and health and the realities of rural society. In particular, the role that faith has played in their development, either as experienced by individuals or the church as a concept. We will also consider how the media, through documentaries, costume drama and celebrity shows, present this period. The aim is to give you an insight into the importance and nature of Christian belief in rural England, and to aid an understanding of the place it played in pre-modern societies, using England as our focus.

HUM-0005B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the European Reference Framework. The module is made up of four elements: Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level/Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the European Reference Framework. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURES

This module offers a foundation-level introduction to the field of Visual Cultures, and the diverse ways in which images have communicated meaning across different societies, time periods and cultures. It provides students with a grounding in how to study and analyse a wide range of art, media and design, including painting, artefacts and antiquities, photography, film, television, advertising and online digital media. The module's teaching and learning will be carried out through two different teaching formats: 1.A weekly 1 hour long lecture which provides a detailed examination of an aspect of that week's topic. 2.A weekly 3 hour long seminar which provides an opportunity for students to discuss theoretical concepts and empirical examples in depth.

HUM-0003B

20

LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES

This interdisciplinary module introduces a wide range of narratives in a variety of formats, asking you to consider questions such as: What is literature? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? Over the course of the module, you will be introduced to key themes in literary studies, as well as examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts. You will develop your ability to analyse texts, engage with historical and cultural contexts, and develop your own critical arguments.

HUM-0004B

20

MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES

No previous experience of media production or any technical experience is required to take this module. The module will provide an introduction to the various media - related technologies. There will be both practical and taught sessions and opportunities for extra curricular activities. No previous film making, musical or programming experience will be necessary to complete the module, which will cover: The use of technology in media production and distribution#Social media, the Internet and its relationship to media#Critical listening and viewing and an introduction to the analysis of film music from a technological perspective#Debate and the media#Podcasting and citizen journalism#An introduction to the use of computers as creative tools#Digital media and the impact of digital technologies on research, media production, archiving and restoration#An introduction to interactive storytelling#Practical sessions.

HUM-0011B

20

WHAT IS POLITICS?

This module will introduce students to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage students to consider the role that politics plays in their lives through examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. It will have relevance to students across a range of Foundation Year programmes through its critical approach to ideology.

HUM-0007B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE I

Imagining America: Literature I is a level one module designed to introduce the major writers and themes of literature in the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and a two-hour seminar. Lecture Slot: Monday, 1200-12.50. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMAL4033A

20

IMAGINING AMERICA: LITERATURE II

Imagining America: Literature II is a level one module designed to expand upon an introduction to the major writers and themes of literature from the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and seminar. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMAL4031B

20

READING CULTURES I: AMERICAN ICONS

This course aims to introduce you to some of the basic tools you will need for a degree in the School of American Studies. It is designed to provide you with the skills required for the assessed work you will be doing in your other core modules; you are also encouraged to bring in questions, thoughts and examples from those other modules.

AMAS4036A

20

READING CULTURES II: IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

The module develops and expands the research methods, writing skills, and oral skills acquired in Reading Cultures I: American Icons. By continuing the exploration of contemporary American culture and introducing cultural and critical theory as a means to engage with current ideas and ideologies circulating around American cultural icons, the module will encourage exploration of America's changing position in the world. The module is intended to further facilitate skills in reading, writing, analysis, synthesis, independent thinking, and confidence as self-supporting learners in order to provide a strong foundation for work at levels 2 and 3.

AMAS4037B

20

WE THE PEOPLE: HISTORY I

The compulsory module will offer a fundamental challenge to the opening lines of the American Constitution, "We the People", and consider the question of inclusion: who did "the people" refer to and who was excluded from this term of reference? The end of the eighteenth century saw a marked shift in how people understood the political structures they lived under. Starting with an examination of revolutionary movements that were taking place throughout Europe and the Americas, this module will examine how these political upheavals shaped the history of the United States up until 1865. Lecture and seminar discussions will include the radical underpinnings of the creation of the American Constitution; the Second Great Awakening; the reconfiguration of gender identities and ideals in the post-revolutionary period; Native American resistance to white settlement during the first half of the nineteenth century.

AMAF4008A

20

WE THE PEOPLE: HISTORY II

This survey module provides students with an introduction to the broad outlines of American history from 1865 to 1945. It will follow a chronological sequence with weekly topics on the major themes and events in US history since 1865 - including African American challenges to slavery and the construction of "race" as a legal category, the Civil War as the second American Revolution and the abolition of slavery, Reconstruction; the closing of the frontier, the war of 1898, Depression, New Deal, and the World Wars to explore the impact of major political, economic, cultural, and social change in the United States.

AMAF4010B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

EXCEPTIONAL STATES: US Intellectual and Cultural History

Exceptional States is designed to allow you to grapple with some of the distinctive, some have said exceptional, ways in which Americans have viewed the world, interpreted their own society, their own past, their own literary and artistic traditions#that is, their own culture. It will give you a key to understanding 'the American mind', or to put it another way, American ways of thinking. It is in a sense intended to enable you to approach your subject#whether that be your own particular topic, your own discipline, or the field as a whole#with an ability to interpret it, understand its Americanness, and so understand the subtle nuances often lost on outsiders. It will, in short, give you a deeper insight into America, and also into the study of America. To that extent, it takes your intellectual journey onward another stage. You will begin to see new meanings in past events, literary texts, images, films, and so on. You will be able to reach a deeper understanding of the complexities of the United States of America.

AMAS5028Y

40

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

American Studies Modules

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN FRONTIERS

This module explores the ever expanding concept of 'American Frontiers'. Since Frederick Jackson Turner's influential 'Frontier thesis' of 1893, American identity has been increasingly linked to the concept of the 'frontier' which has, in more recent years, become subject to an ever-widening geography. Often referred to as the 'transnational turn,' this critical and theoretical trajectory has constantly reinvented - and multiplied - what constitutes the 'American Frontier'. From violent clashes between colonisers and Native peoples to the Space Race, from literary cosmopolitanisms to Hollywood in the South Seas, from America's own national borders to its internal racial and ethnic boundaries, to name just a few of the possible ways of thinking about the Frontier, this module considers American geographies in tandem with the critical movements that have shaped American Studies.

AMAS5045A

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Accordingly, this module will explore the history of American music - but it will also examine the way that its development tells a larger story. Focusing largely on the vernacular musical traditions we will encounter a wide range of musical styles and musicians, each of which has something vital to tell us about the shaping of America. After all, as Plato knew, "When the mode of the music changes, the walls of the city shake."

AMAS5023A

20

FILMS THAT MADE US AMERICAN: THE 1980S THROUGH THE MOVIES

The module will examine America in the1980s. It will look at youth culture, post-Vietnam revisionism and the 'remasculinization of America', yuppie culture, and the impact of both AIDS and drug addiction. Core factors of study in this module are the effects of both New Right morality upon the American socio-cultural landscape, and Ronald Reagan as postmodern president administrating to a 'celluloid America' of his own fantastic imagining. Overall, the module will offer the chance to analyse the tensions and contradictions of the decade as they were played out in both the content and structure of contemporary American film.

AMAS5019A

20

LOOKING AT PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VISUAL CULTURE IN THE USA

Photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging and fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and analysed in this module. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American culture.

AMAS5024B

20

THE COLD WAR

What was the Cold War? How did it start, where and how was it fought, and why did it last so long? This module analyses these issues by exploring the contest waged by the U.S. and Soviet Union in every corner of the globe during the twentieth century. It considers nations and peoples who aligned with the superpowers or, as was increasingly the case, with neither. It looks at the multiple ways in which this unique 'war short of total war' influenced all aspects of life, from diplomacy and politics, to economics, to culture and values, to bombs and warfare, to societal norms, to questions of race and sexuality. With attention to a range of state, private, and transnational actors, it analyses the global and international nature of the Cold War. It explores the place of the conflict amid other transformative historical narratives during the century and, finally, considers the changing ways that historians have written about the Cold War.

AMAS5044A

20

THEY CAME FROM OUTER-THE-CLOSET: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND PANIC IN AMERICAN FILM AND LITERATURE

With its main focus on the 20th century, this module will explore key moments of change or crisis in the century and consider the ways the panic caused by such changes is distinctly gendered and/or sexualised. It will concurrently examine gender and sexual resistance to dominant ideas of American identity and the subsequent creation and/or promotion of liberationist discourses and alternative communities. Film and literature will provide the focus for this cultural study, and the module will range widely over a number of different genres including the western, sci-fi, detective and LGBT themed works.

AMAS5020B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

American History and Literature Modules

Name Code Credits

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of three related poets, the module aims both to question what constitutes an American poetics, and to examine how this conception has changed over the course of the twentieth century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of its primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences the module will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. By the end of the module students should have a wide knowledge of a range of different twentieth-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMAL5011B

20

AMERICAN CRIME FICTION

This module explores both America's fascination with crime fiction, and crime fiction itself as an American genre. From its emergence in the mid-nineteenth century writings of Edgar Allen Poe, this module will investigate the ways in which American crime fiction has traced and exposed a wide range of social and cultural anxieties in America. Moving through the early twentieth century hard-boiled detective narratives of Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett and Chester Himes, and into the postmodern concerns of late twentieth and early twenty-first century writers such as James Ellroy, Patricia Highsmith, Sara Paretsky, Carl Hiaasen and Patricia Cornwell, we will examine the ways in which American crime fiction asks a series of searching and troubling questions about contemporary American society. Central to our analysis will be the ways in which crime fiction represents a range of American concerns including individualism, the 'hero', race, gender, class, regionalism, the city, and the environment.

AMAL5038B

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This module surveys the prose of some of the twentieth century's most important American women writers, writers who (or whose 'other' works) tend to disappear from reading lists that include books by women only out of duty. Along the way we will seek to interrogate the terms with which we begin: American, women and prose. Assuming that biology does not define literature, we will instead seek to understand the social pressures on these women writers, and their responses to them, in an effort to maintain the specificity, diversity and range of these women's literary pursuits.

AMAL5009B

20

Black Freedom Struggle: The Civil Rights Movement

This is the second of two modules examining the black freedom struggle in the United States. This module examines the struggle from 1865 to Black Lives Matter. Students will study the political activism of African American figures such as Sojourner Truth, Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, Mary McLeod Bethune and Angela Davis. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the race, gender and class dimensions of the 'long' civil rights movement, paying specific attention to the activism of black women organisers. Finally, the module will encourage students to think through the diverse and changing nature of the civil rights movement as black activists responded to specific political situations both within the United States and abroad.

AMAH5050B

20

Black Freedom Struggles: Slavery, 1619-1865

This is the first of two modules examining the black freedom struggle in the United States. The module will follow a chronological sequence, allowing us to trace the course of racial slavery in North America, reflecting on the roots of racism that flourished during the antebellum years and beyond. Through engaging with the developing historiography of slavery in the United States students will gain a deeper understanding of contemporary (then and now) debates concerning race and racial identity as well as American slavery per se. We will be interrogating various sources found in the Morgan Reader alongside representations of slavery in novels, cinema, and oral histories.

AMAH5043A

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

The purpose of this module is to expose students to a range of prose works by important contemporary American writers. In particular, we will be concerned with some of the key concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, including the definition of the contemporary: postmodernism; metafiction; historiography; postcolonialism; and memory.

AMAL5011A

20

LIVING ON THE HYPHEN: Multi-ethnic American Literatures

America has long been interpreted as the location of social possibility founded upon a desire to assimilate and negate ethnic 'others'. This module traces the literary responses of distinct 'American' cultures: including Native American; African American; Asian American; and Latin American. Each group of texts engage with the specific historical, cultural and political relationships between the US and each author's country of origin or national/cultural history, across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include race and racism, exile, return, family, belonging, identity, language and memory, colonisation, imperialism, slavery, segregation, immigration, and illegality/invisibility, with an emphasis upon contemporary experiences.

AMAL5077A

20

THE BEATS AND THE LIMITS OF WRITING

On this module we will explore Beat literature, tracing its origins in American rebellion and avant-garde experimentation, and the subsequent impact of the Beats on American literature and culture. We will examine how the Beats developed a counterculture which both engaged with and struggled against the limits of writing, identity, and society in mid-century America. Through close readings of texts and a sustained examination of key critical concepts, we will not only develop an understanding of the Beats in context, but also interrogate the limits of Beat literature itself through critical reflection on the tensions of race, gender, and "consensus culture" which surround and inform Beat writing.

AMAL5076A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

American Studies Modules

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN VIOLENCE

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this module explores key themes in the history, theorisation, and representation of violence in the United States. In particular, the module will consider America's seemingly "exceptional" relationship with violence.

AMAS6049A

30

GENDER IN AMERICAN CULTURE

The aim of this module is to think about democracy in the United States through a gendered lens. The Declaration of Independence declared that "all men were created free and equal", but throughout the history of the United States certain social groups have been denied their rights to citizenship and democracy. Therefore this module will be focusing upon the ways in which gender has been central to the construction of citizenship and democracy in the US. These concepts are critical elements in the formation of a modern American identity, and this module will provide a broader understanding of this distinctive feature of American history and society.

AMAS6032B

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

This module considers Native American writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors within the United States respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', this module considers the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. Topics include race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and notions of 'home', community, dialogue, postcolonial theory in its application to those who remain colonised, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism.

AMAS6027B

30

NEW AMERICAN CENTURY: CULTURE AND CRISIS

On the eve of the twenty-first century it appeared that the United States of America was indeed entering into a new American Century with its role as global leader as strongly defined as it was a century earlier. However, the last decade and a half has been witness to a nation in turmoil and crisis, from the conflict between a universalising (Americanising) globalisation and an introspective nationalism; the war on terror and the conflicts in Afghanistan Iraq and Syria; environmental crisis and disaster; the conflict surrounding immigration and national identity, to the present financial crisis. The renewed and vigorous return to rhetoric of national 'unity' that characterised the campaign and election of Barack Obama as President of the United States in 2008 serves to highlight the historical divisions and crises of American society and underscores that contemporary America is in crisis geopolitically, economically, democratically, environmentally, and culturally. This module seeks to engage with these areas of crisis and examine a variety of cultural responses to the America of the millennium. Through a variety of cultural texts, from literature, film and documentary, political speeches and letters, to historical texts and pop culture, this module examines the ways in which these crises have been culturally and politically constructed and given particular sets of meaning.

AMAS6052B

30

POPULAR MUSIC AND THE CITY

This module will examine the relationship between popular music and its social context by concentrating on several music forms such as the blues, soul, hip hop, funk, dancehall, Afrobeat, and Afro-Brazilian. Readings will focus on: (1) concepts such as audiences, the music industry, cultural infrastructure, the African Diaspora, youth culture, and race; (2) processes such as urbanization, demographic change, globalization, and the politicization of popular music.

AMAS6035B

30

TEAM USA: America and the Vietnam War

This module will explore the relationship of the war in Vietnam to US culture, history and politics. It will place the war within the discourse of US cultural values, from questions of American colonialism to an exploration of the iconography of the war, and it will further examine how the war has had a dynamic and long-lasting series of effects upon the US.

AMAS6051B

30

THE AMERICAN BODY

This module reads the changing values, presentations and representations of the body that move through and construct American culture. This module will involve pairing theoretical perspectives with current and historical ideas of the body to allow us to interrogate intellectual and popular meanings assigned to and played out through the body, reading particular moments in American writing, art, photography and popular forms for the things they might tell us about corporality and self presentation, but also about the wider structures of the social and cultural environment. We will engage with canonical debates about race, gender, sexuality and ideas of 'representation', but also with categories that cut across and through these modes of reading - with the normal and the ideal, ideas of illness and wellness, ability and disability, of the organic and the machine, of the body under servitude, or under punishment, and with the whole idea of embodiment in itself. This module - like all other modules at this level - requires a substantial, regular, reading commitment.

AMAS6040A

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

American History and Literature Modules

Name Code Credits

AFRICAN AMERICANS AND EMPIRE

This module examines the nature of the black freedom struggle in the United States. Historically denied full citizenship rights in the United States, African Americans often looked abroad in their fight against racial prejudice. Seminars will explore how and why black Americans forged transnational alliances that challenged racism on a local and a global level. Covering the connections between African Americans and movements for racial justice in Europe, Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and beyond, the module will explore the global political outlook of prominent black figures such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Claudia Jones and Barack Obama.

AMAH6041A

30

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMAL6007A

30

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMAL6024B

30

CALIFORNIA DREAMING: NOVELS OF THE GOLDEN STATE

This module looks at the ways in which California has represented itself, or been represented, in fiction. Beginning with the 'first' published Californian novel of 1854, The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, the Celebrated California Bandit, we will trace the development of the Californian novel into the early twenty-first century. One particular interest is the ways in which Californian novels engage with, dissect, and critique notions of California as a 'dream' or ideal/idyll; and we will explore how novelists address crucial, and often contentious, historical moments in Californian history. Topics include settlement and 'removal'; migration and immigration; corporate interests and 'big business'; Los Angleles as the City of Dreams; and 'global' California. Writers will include some or all of the following: Mary Austin, T C Boyle, Joan Didion, Chester Himes, Frank Norris, Kem Nunn; John Rollin Ridge, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Helena Maria Viramontes, Nathaniel West, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

AMAL6044A

30

IMAGINING THE PACIFIC

This module considers the ways in which American literature has represented the opening up of Pacific space from the early nineteenth century to the present. From Melville's adventures on whaling vessels throughout the Pacific, to Pearl Harbour and anxieties about Japanese presence in and beyond the borders of the United States, to writing by contemporary Asian-American and Pacific authors, the texts on this course chart the ways in which the Pacific Ocean and its peoples have contributed to, created, and contested American national narratives. The module will develop students' insights into issues of U.S. national history and cultural geography, and deepen their engagement with current theories of nationalism and transnationalism as a frame for reflection on their studies abroad. At its heart a course in American literature, students will encounter an array of different genres of writing, including novels, travel narratives, poetry, short stories, and memoirs.

AMAL6042B

30

NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORIES IN TWENTY FIRST CENTURY PERSPECTIVE

Indian Halloween costumes, reservation casino wealth, Washington Red Skins, Cowboy and Indian Alliance, powwow, Truth and Reconciliation Commissions, and the Native tourist industry are just some of the contemporary topics that will be analysed to open this module's explorations and discussions of the histories of Native Americans within the context of United States' settler colonialism. A wide range of sources will be studied: traditional written texts; photographs; art; fashion; advertisements; museums displays. Students will learn the techniques to conduct these analyses, and to participate in current historical debates, evaluate the historiography, and define their own topic for the written assessment.

AMAH6005B

30

THE US SUPREME COURT, 1900-TODAY: The Rights Revolution

The 20th Century saw a major expansion in the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and society. Changing understandings of individual rights and liberties spurred a constitutional revolution in areas of civil rights and individual freedoms. Legal and social changes occurred alongside changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to fundamentally alter the way many Americans related to each other and to the government. Following World War Two the Court became increasingly active in areas of public policy, deciding cases involving freedom of speech, religion and the press, campaign finance, gun control and the right to bear arms, the rights of criminal suspects and defendants, same-sex marriage, abortion, and the death penalty, among many others. This module introduces students to the role and operation of the Court as well as to the historic events it has been involved with since the early 20th Century. From repeatedly striking down New Deal legislation in the 1930s to halting the recount of votes in Florida in the 2000 election, from holding the state had no responsibility for the protection of individuals in the first two decades of the 20th Century to expanding understandings of "equal protection of the laws" in the second half of the century, the module will encourage students to consider the role of law in shaping and influencing American history and politics, as well as asking how and why the Court ruled in particular ways. Through a combination of Court opinions and academic studies, students will be asked to consider key issues in 20th and 21st Century US history and the role of the law and Constitution in shaping them. Students are challenged to consider how understandings of key legal "rights" have changed over time and what this tells us about the Court, the Constitution, and about American society more broadly.

AMAH6040B

30

US INTERVENTIONISM, THE CIA AND COVERT ACTION

Covert intervention represents the most controversial aspect of U.S. foreign relations. No group has been as closely associated with this activity - historically and in the population imagination - than the Central Intelligence Agency. To what extent is this clandestine dimension to international affairs consistent with official, overt policies of the U.S. government? Or is it the best example of American imperialism? How do we come to understand covert action campaigns? This module introduces the main conceptual and historical debates to covert action as a tool of U.S. foreign policy. In so doing it considers the institutions and processes behind covert action, especially the role of the CIA, in the attempt to secretly shape events abroad. It also analyses the mediums that narrate and explain American interventionism and covert action. This will provide a fuller and richer understanding of the U.S. place in the international system during the twentieth century, its relationship to other states and non-state actors, and discussions about American identity and the nation's role in the world.

AMAH6009A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level CCC
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC
  • Irish Leaving Certificate CCCCCC or 6 subjects at H3
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass 45 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC MMM
  • European Baccalaureate 60%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 7 overall (with a minimum of 6.5 in each component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Course Open To

UK and EU applicants only.

  • A Level CCC including English Literature or History
  • International Baccalaureate 28 points
  • Scottish Highers At least one Advanced Higher preferred in addition to Highers
  • Scottish Advanced Highers CCC
  • Irish Leaving Certificate CCCCCC
  • Access Course Arts/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 credits at Level 3 including English Literature or History modules
  • BTEC MMM, an ARTS Humanities subject preferred alongside a GCE A-level or equivalent in English Literautre or History
  • European Baccalaureate 60% overall

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS (SELT): 7 overall (with a minimum of 6.5 in each component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirements. Please contact us for further information.

GCSE Offer

All applicants are required to have a minimum of 5 GCSE's including GCSE English language and Mathematics (or equivalent) at a minimum of Grade C.

Course Open To

This course is open to UK and EU applicants only. Foundation courses for international applicants are run by our partners at INTO.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

______________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for International Students.

Scholarships

We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

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    Next Steps

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