BA American Literature with Creative Writing

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American Studies at the University of East Anglia is recognised as one of the best departments in the UK. We offer our undergraduate students a broad range of courses and modules, allowing you to tailor your learning as you progress through your time with us. Most of our degrees also involve a year studying abroad. Throughout their course, our students develop skills that are highly attractive to employers.

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Key facts

(Guardian University Guide 2019)

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Understanding America in the 21st century is more essential than ever. At UEA we have one of the largest concentrations of American studies scholars in the country, covering the entirety of the field. Join us and discover new perspectives on some of the classic questions in this subject.

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"Areas i didn't think i'd be interested in completely turned around for me because of the enthusiasm of certain professors. I honestly don't think i could find a better university for my academic area than UEA"

In their words

Stephanie Watson, BA American Literature with Creative Writing.

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Come and join UEA's English Literature students as they discuss 'what makes literature live?', with a little help from T.S. Eliot and others...

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Explore the literary tradition of the world’s most influential culture while developing your own distinctive voice.

You’ll be studying in Norwich, an ideal location for this course, with its vibrant contemporary writing scene and status as a UNESCO City of Literature. You’ll also have the advantage of spending a year studying abroad, deepening your understanding of American literature, and immersing yourself in the culture of another country. As well as developing your creative practice in the department of American Studies, you’ll study at the world-leading School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, whose internationally esteemed alumni include Nobel Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro.

All of this experience will enrich your final year, during which you’ll take a series of advanced classes and write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, guided by a supervisor.

Overview

You’ll be introduced to the demands and challenges of literary creative practice. You’ll study creative writing alongside the study of American literature, helping you develop both your creative and critical abilities.

You’ll have access to UEA’s close and active links with the world of contemporary writing and publishing; a legacy of the university’s long running and highly respected courses in the writing of fiction, poetry and drama. You’ll also be able to learn about writing for the creative industries through practice-based modules and workshops covering topics such as the history and practice of American journalism and scriptwriting for the American stage and screen.

Whatever path you choose through your studies, this degree will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of how American literature has shaped the world around us. You will learn about the relationship between culture and politics, while gaining an in-depth knowledge of the forces that transform societies and forge nations. The specialised focus of American Literature with Creative Writing will give you the critical tools to better understand how culture is produced while you hone your own creative practice.

Your year abroad will give your degree even more of a cosmopolitan flavour, enhancing your understanding of your subject and presenting you with invaluable opportunities for enriching your creative writing skills from an international perspective. You’ll take modules at your host university, whilst experiencing the culture of another country first-hand. Your year abroad will increase your confidence, broaden your horizons, build your contacts and demonstrate your resilience to future employers.

Course Structure

Year 1

In your first year you’ll acquire a comprehensive historical and literary overview of the United States. You’ll analyse a series of American icons - including the Stars and Stripes, the cowboy and the prison, using them as a way to think about important issues that have shaped the American national consciousness. Through lectures and seminars you’ll also cover the often fiercely contested development of a national literature in the United States. You’ll trace the ways in which a multitude of voices – including Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and William Faulkner – have interpreted the nation.

You’ll participate in creative writing tutorials that will help you develop your creative practice and workshop your writing. Specifically, the Creative Writing and Identity module will enable you to master and employ different creative writing techniques, read and give constructive feedback on other’s work, use a writer’s notebook, and develop and revise your own creative work.

Throughout the year you’ll cultivate and hone the key academic and practical skills needed to study at university level.

Year 2

In your second year you’ll take two compulsory modules. Exceptional States: U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History is an interdisciplinary module that allows you to delve more deeply into the foundational ideas that have animated and shaped the construction of the American nation. The complementary compulsory module, American Voices, encourages you to reflect on your own creative writing. In seminars and creative writing workshops you’ll develop as a writer, reader and editor of your own and other people’s work. These modules will enhance your understanding of American literature, but also your skills as a critical reader and creative writer.

At this stage of your degree, you’ll embark on academic specialisation, meaning that the remaining credits for the year will be drawn from modules you choose run by the department of American Studies and the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing.

Year 3

You’ll spend your third year studying in another country at one of our partner universities. You could spend your year in the US, or add a comparative element to your studies by studying in Canada or the Pacific Rim countries.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

Year 4

In your final year you’ll continue to specialise, choosing modules relating to the research specialisms of academic staff within the department of American Studies and the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. In the Autumn semester, you’ll also take a specialist creative writing module oriented around an American theme.

In the second semester of your final year – guided by an academic supervisor – you’ll also complete a dissertation on a literary or creative topic of your choice.

Teaching and Learning

You’ll be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. We pride ourselves on our small group seminar teaching, which allows a greater level of discussion between academic staff and students. In seminars, you’ll learn how to listen to and critique the ideas of others, as well as how to present and defend your own arguments effectively.

You’ll acquire vital skills needed for independent learning throughout your course and have access to dedicated sessions designed to help you make the most of UEA’s state of the art library facilities. Through these sessions and your academic modules, you’ll gain the crucial research skills of uncovering resources and critically assessing sources. As you progress through your degree you’ll develop as a self-motivated researcher and independent, creative thinker.

In addition to timetabled lecture and seminar slots, each member of staff at UEA holds dedicated office hours where students can come and seek additional advice and guidance on a one-to-one basis. You’ll also be assigned an adviser who can support you through your studies by providing academic and career guidance.

During your time at UEA, you’ll be taught by academics working at the forefront of their fields. Our academics have been published widely on key issues that have shaped the development of American literature. You will also benefit from their experience as practitioners in the creative industries, and will have the opportunity to build your own network of contacts and work-related experience to further your future career.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed at the end of each semester through a mixture of coursework, portfolio work and examination. In your final year, you’ll write a dissertation on a topic of your choice with the support of your tutors. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in your second and fourth years.

For every piece of assessment that you submit you’ll receive written and verbal feedback from tutors. These comments and reflections will help you identify the methods and strategies that will improve your work and help you get the most out of your studies.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

You’ll spend your third year studying abroad. Our Year Abroad programme has been running for more than 30 years and is one of the largest in the UK for American Studies. Your time abroad will be an invaluable academic and cultural experience, one that most students consider to be the highlight of their time at university.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

After the course

As an American Literature with Creative Writing graduate, you’ll be well placed to enter a wide-range of professions. Working across disciplines, studying abroad, and undertaking in-depth research will give you key skills that are highly regarded by employers. You’ll also graduate as an expert researcher and communicator, skilled in analysing data, and good at working in a team. You will develop an understanding of the cultural forces shaping creative content, and the processes by which audiences can access it, giving you an advantage over your peers as you begin your career.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • Professional writing and Publishing
  • Law
  • Journalism
  • Marketing and advertising
  • Cultural and creative industries
  • Teaching/lecturing
  • Researcher

Course related costs

You are eligible for reduced fees during the year abroad. Further details are available on our Tuition Fee website.

There will be extra costs related to items such as your travel and accommodation during your year abroad, which will vary depending on location.

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2019/0

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICA LITERATURE II: MAKING IT 'NEW'

On this module you will learn the central currents of American Literature, from after the American Civil War, through the turn of the century and into modernism and the early 20th century, finishing at the close of World War II. You will follow the - often fiercely contested - development of a national literature, tracing the way this multitude of voices differs from place to place, from decade to decade, and from writer to writer. Writers studied on this module in past years have included: Henry James, Mark Twain, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, T.S. Eliot and William Faulkner. You will be introduced to these vibrant voices through reading and discussing short stories, novels, poetry, non-fiction and critical work. You will attend lectures, and take part in follow-up discussion-based seminars. Each week you will consider the context of the texts you read, as well as working to analyse and explain how they work on the reader and in society at large. You will encounter debates about the meaning of freedom in life and in art, what it might mean to be modern (or to refuse that modernity), about the responsibilities of citizenship to other people and to the environment, and about what it might mean to write and be read in the modern United States of America. By the end of this module you will be familiar with a wide range of late 19th century and early 20th century American texts and writers. You will learn the major movements in American literature from the fin de siecle through to the Second World War, and will be able to talk about the issues surrounding the development of a national and literary culture. Through doing this, you will improve your ability to read and analyse literary texts, to describe how language works in history and on the reader, and to identify and present new and exciting patterns in what you read.

AMAL4031B

20

AMERICAN LITERATURE I: IMAGINING AMERICA

How did American literature become American? How did literature help to shape the idea of America? This module will provide you with some answers to those questions with a thorough introduction to early American Literature. From the earliest moments of European colonization of the New World through to the bloody Civil War that Americans fought over slavery in the middle of the 19th century, you will explore the ways that a diverse group of writers helped shaped a literary culture that was distinctively American. You will encounter a rich variety of American writers and texts - travellers, novelists, poets, biographers, philosophers - and think about the role that literature played in the creation of a new nation. From puritans to politicians, from revolutionaries to romantics, from slavery to emancipation, you will explore the work of the men and women who shaped our ideas of what American Literature was, is, and might be. Each week, through lectures and seminar discussion, you will also consider the other forces that shaped these texts, and develop your ability to analyse a range of literary styles. As America was colonised, achieved independence, expanded westwards and fought a Civil War, how did American writers respond to the extraordinary tensions running through a newly born nation?

AMAL4033A

20

AMERICAN STUDIES I: READING CULTURES I

How can we understand American culture? What role has America played in shaping our day-to-day lives? How can we study the United States? By analysing a series of American icons - including as flag, the cowboy and the prison - you will develop a broad understanding of U.S. culture, as well as the values that have underpinned the construction of the American national identity. On completion of this module, you will have the skills required to research, write and edit at university level. You will be able to think critically about the United States and understand the relationship between culture and politics.

AMAS4036A

20

AMERICAN STUDIES II: IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

How has American culture been shaped by categories of race, gender, class and sexuality? How can we unpick and understand the complex experiences that shape American identity? This module will enable you to develop and expand the research methods, writing skills, and oral skills you'll have acquired in 'Reading Cultures I: American Icons'. You'll continue your exploration of the contemporary United States, you'll be introduced to the work of critical theorists, and you'll be encouraged to think about America's changing position in the world. Classes will further facilitate skills in reading, writing, analysis and independent thinking, through which you will gain the confidence and the tools necessary to be a self-supporting learner, giving you a strong academic foundation for the rest of your degree programme.

AMAS4037B

20

CREATIVE WRITING (SPRING SEMESTER)

NEW - available in 2019/0 This module is taught in workshops in which you will be producing creative writing and also reflecting on the practice of creative writing. You will be assigned to a class tutor and advised of the time and room number for your weekly class meetings. Your tutor will be a practising writer and will advise you of their office number, email address, office hours, and any arrangements for distributing work. AIMS/ LEARNING OUTCOMES The aim of this module is to get you writing prose fiction and poetry. Even if you have a preference for one genre over another, it's invaluable to have an awareness of both. At this stage it's important to experiment: not everything will come off, but you will learn from that: the awkward results of a writing exercise might contain the seeds of a later, far more successful, project. The module is designed to allow you to try things out and to this end you will not be assessed on everything that you write. Along the way you'll begin to develop an understanding of the craft elements of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. You will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, keeping notebooks, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc. All of this will allow you to develop as a writer and expand your understanding of the discipline. OUTLINE We will be doing a number of in-class exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation. On occasion we will study the work of established authors. Very often you will be asked to write about 'what you know', drawing on notebooks, memory, family stories, your sensory impressions. In both prose and poetry we will concentrate initially on generating material. In prose we will go on to look at character, dialogue, point-of-view, 'showing' vs 'telling', plotting, etc. In poetry, we will begin to explore the possibilities of pattern and form, sound, voice, imagery, 'making strange', etc. The module will be your weekly space to get ideas and words on the page and give you a sense of how you might go on to shape this material. You should equip yourself with a notebook for everyday use and a file or folder in which to keep handouts and all of your written work. You will be required to complete exercises at home and should be prepared to read your work in class. This module is exclusive to students registered on the American Literature with Creative Writing degree programme.

LDCC4016B

20

CREATIVE WRITING AND IDENTITY: TUTORIAL UNIT

How does writing relate to personal identity? Can we write what we know in order to write what we don't? To answer these questions Creative Writing and Identity introduces you to the key building blocks of the craft of creative writing: structure, characterization, dialogue, point of view, voice, among other key elements. As well as producing your own writing you will examine the craft of established contemporary American writers. You will have the chance to explore the craft of writing in a series of workshops. In each session we will look at a piece of writing illustrating a theme and do writing exercises to help you develop particular writing techniques. As the term progresses, we'll circulate and discuss your work. You'll then redraft and develop your pieces in the light of feedback received from your tutor and other students. Creative Writing and Identity will enable you to master and employ different creative writing techniques, read and give constructive feedback on other's work, use a writer's notebook, and develop and revise your own creative work.

AMAF4005A

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN VOICES

Addressing America as a nation and the experience of being American, Walt Whitman writes in 'Song of Myself': 'Do I contradict myself? Very well, I contradict myself, I am large and contain multitudes.' This module explores Whitman's comments in a selection of 20th-century American writers, and considers the literary and historical contexts of their creative literary practices. You are also encouraged to reflect on your own creative writing. What can you learn from these American writers and how might their innovations enhance your own writing practices? You will encounter a broad range of American writing from Walt Whitman to Conceptual writing. You will focus on how and why American writers have addressed notions of national and individual identity through their creative practices. You will also learn about the formal innovations of American writers in order to understand the concept of 'voice' in terms of, for example, expression, representation, protest, and subjectivity. You will learn through seminars and creative writing workshops where you will develop your skills as a writer, reader and editor of your own and other's work. You will develop as a writer and enhance your understanding of American literature, as critical reader and as creative writer. You will adopt, adapt and appropriate the stylistic and contextual concerns of pioneering American writers covered and articulate the significance of these concerns for your own creative work.

AMAL5078A

20

EXCEPTIONAL STATES: US Intellectual and Cultural History

Exceptional States is designed to allow you to grapple with some of the distinctive, some have said exceptional, ways in which Americans have viewed the world, interpreted their own society, their own past, their own literary and artistic traditions#that is, their own culture. We aim to give you a key to understanding 'the American mind', or to put it another way, American ways of thinking. It is in a sense our intention to enable you to approach your subject#whether that be your own particular topic, your own discipline, or the field as a whole#with an ability to interpret it, understand its 'Americanness', and so understand the subtle nuances often lost on outsiders. We will, in short, give you a deeper insight into America, and also into the study of America. To that extent, your intellectual journey will be taken onward another stage. You will begin to see new meanings in past events, literary texts, images, films, and so on. You will be able to reach a deeper understanding of the complexities of the United States of America.

AMAS5028A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

You will study a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the 20th century to the present day. You will wonder about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem. Through detailed examination each week of groups of related poets, you will question what constitutes an American poetics, and examine how this conception has changed over the course of the 20th century. As well as tracing a trajectory in American poetry from modernist to postmodernist modes, one of our primary concerns is also to start exploring how ideas of what an American poetry might be are inflected differently in 'mainstream' and in more avant-garde (or 'experimental') poetries. Indeed, by explicitly thinking about these differences you will pay particular attention to the ways in which ideas of nationhood, of political dissent and protest, of poetic 'groupings' and canon-formation, are instrumental in determining what we choose to see as America's representative poetry. You will gain a wide knowledge of a range of different 20th-century American poetries, as well as a strong sense of how the political, cultural and literary 'tastes' of America across the century have delivered it the sorts of poetry it deserves.

AMAL5010A

20

AMERICAN CRIME FICTION

This module explores America's fascination with fictional crime, exploring the emergence of American crime writing as a genre and the ways in which it develops out of changing understandings of American society and of social deviance within it. In the module, you will therefore examine the ways in which critics have seen the genre as both an ideological form designed to individualize social problems and, conversely, as a form of social investigation and criticism. Most particularly, you will explore the ways in which American crime fiction has articulated the tension between fantasy and realism as literary ideas, so that it concerns the confrontation between uncanny events and the application of rationality to deal with them. In other words, you will investigate the ways in which American crime fiction develops out of debates over enlightenment and scientific method, and the ways in which the genre has been discussed in relation to issues of gender and race, not only in terms of their representation but also of their production and consumption.

AMAL5038A

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Distinctive American musical styles still dominate the globe, as they have done for decades. But how did American music develop into the genres that we recognise today? How did uniquely American sounds catch the ear of listeners all over the world? You will gain a thorough understanding of the development of American music. You will focus on a number of distinctive musical traditions - from minstrelsy to blues, jazz, and country; from rock and roll to hip hop - and consider the way that they have shaped popular music today. Throughout the course, you will encounter a rich variety of music and an extraordinary range of characters, from the most famous entertainers in modern culture, to the obscure, the forgotten and the neglected. Whilst exploring the development of American music, you will also examine the ways in which its growth tells a larger story about the history of America and its people. In particular, it will give you a different perspective on the issue of race in American life. Through seminar discussion, written coursework, and group presentations, you will develop your analytical and critical abilities - whether that means your ability to think about the significance of a song and its meaning for a particular historical moment, or the way that the shifting meaning of a genre of music can tell us many things about its wider social and cultural context.

AMAS5023A

20

THEY CAME FROM OUTER-THE-CLOSET: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND PANIC IN AMERICAN FILM

With its main focus on the 20th century, this module will explore key moments of change or crisis in the century and consider the ways the panic caused by such changes is distinctly gendered and/or sexualised. It will concurrently examine gender and sexual resistance to dominant ideas of American identity and the subsequent creation and/or promotion of liberationist discourses and alternative communities. Film will provide the focus for this cultural study, and the module will range widely over a number of different genres including the western, sci-fi, detective and LGBT themed works.

AMAS5020A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ARTS AND HUMANITIES PLACEMENT MODULE

This module will provide you with the opportunity to work within a creative/cultural/charity/ heritage/media or other appropriate organisation in order to apply the skills you are developing through your degree to the working world and to develop your knowledge of employment sectors within which you may wish to work in the future. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. Having sourced and secured your own placement (with support from Careers Central), you work within your host organisation undertaking tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Taught sessions enable you to acquire knowledge of both the industries in which you are placed as well as focusing on personal and professional development germane to the sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences. If you would like to choose this module you need to attend a preparatory workshop on March 13th from 2pm - 4pm in ARTS 01.02 or March 14th from 12-2pm in SCI 3.05. A register will be taken and only students who have attended the workshop will be considered during Module Enrolment. If there are extenuating circumstances that prevent attendance at either workshop, students must email placements@uea.ac.uk in order to arrange a one-to-one preparation session. In addition to the preparatory workshop, students who enrol on this module will be required to undertake further preparatory activities prior to the module starting in the spring semester of 2020 and have secured a placement by December 11th 2019. Support will be provided throughout the duration of this process. International students interested in this module must ensure that they have appropriate CAS allocation to allow for a placement.

HUM-5004B

20

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION

Writers who want to address the contemporary scene confront a dilemma: as soon as you try to capture it on the page, you've already fallen behind the present moment. You'll explore how contemporary American writers nonetheless respond to this challenge. You'll consider the issues they identify as pressing in American culture, as well as the literary strategies used to explore those issues. As you progress in the module, you'll acquire understanding of a number of important concepts associated with contemporary American fiction, such as postmodernism, metafiction, identity, globalisation, and memory. When you've completed the module, you'll be familiar with a number of literary and cultural debates relating to contemporary American culture, and have detailed knowledge of some of the most exciting writers working today. You'll be able to explain why it is difficult to define, and write about, the 'contemporary.' And in the course of your assessed work and seminar discussions, you will develop your communication, writing, and research skills.

AMAL5079B

20

FAKE NEWS! AMERICAN JOURNALISM, HISTORY AND PRACTICE.

How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to "the news"#but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. "The news" has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media#looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5049B

20

LIVING ON THE HYPHEN: Multi-ethnic American Literatures

America has long been interpreted as the location of social possibility founded upon a desire to assimilate and negate ethnic 'others'. In this module, you'll trace and explore the literary responses of distinct 'American' cultures: including Native American; African American; Asian American; and Latin American. Through studying each distinct group of texts, you'll engage with the specific historical, cultural and political relationships between the US and each author's country of origin or national/cultural history, across the 20th and 21st centuries. You'll also make connections between these distinct groups of writers, to consider topics such as race and racism, exile, return, family, belonging, identity, language and memory, colonisation, imperialism, slavery, segregation, immigration, and illegality/invisibility, with an emphasis upon contemporary experiences. Via important multi-ethnic writers and texts, you'll explore what constitutes American literature aesthetically, temporally, geographically, and culturally, evaluate the value of the term 'multi-ethnic' and its place within American literary studies, and engage critically with questions of American literature as 'World literature'. Through seminar based discussions, you'll develop your ability to evaluate literary texts as contributions to historical revisions and debates, and also as representations of identity, belonging, the nation state, politics, and culture. You will be assessed through coursework, while gaining experience of communicating your ideas via seminar discussion and group presentation, and you'll have the opportunity to engage in peer to peer assessment practices. On successful completion of the module, you'll have the knowledge and skills to consider the diversity of American literature and the complexities of American cultural and national identity.

AMAL5077B

20

OF MICE AND KRAZY KATS: HISTORY AND ART OF AMERICAN COMICS

Are comics art? The answer is yes, and this module will show you why through an in-depth examination of American comics from early newspaper strips to contemporary graphic novels. You'll read a wide range of different comics, including the birth of superheroes, World War II propaganda comics, controversial horror comics, underground comix from the San Francisco counterculture, recent alternative comics, and the current boom in reality-based graphic novels. You'll learn about the complex history of American comics, including the specific contexts for the form's development as a mass medium and its frequent marginalisation in the cultural sphere, such as the great comic-book scare of the 1950s. In the process, you'll learn to pay special attention to form as well as content when reading comics, and will develop a critical vocabulary for evaluating the aesthetics of the form. In addition to a broad selection from the history of American comics, you'll also examine comics through different thematic perspectives, such as race, gender, and sexuality, and you'll read critical material that'll further inform your understanding of the form. You'll learn through seminars as well as through independent library study of the periods and themes that resonate the most with you, and you'll be assessed through coursework. At the end of the module, you'll have gained a deep understanding of the many historical and cultural issues that inform any appreciation of comics, and you'll have learned to consider the form as a unique and mature form of American art.

AMAS5050B

20

WE'RE HERE, WE'RE QUEER: QUEER AMERICAN LIFE AND LITERATURE, 1900-PRESENT

This interdisciplinary module would introduce students to themes in the queer experience in the 20th century US, using literary texts as sources. An emphasis would be placed on the importance of intersecting embodied experiences that map on to the queerness of the writers, including race, region, religion, class, disability, and gender. Each week's reading and discussion would focus on one key fiction or life-writing text, one alternate primary source, and one key text from the historiography of LGBTQ history in the United States, moving chronologically from 1900-2000. Students would also be asked to engage with critical and theoretical approaches to the work that further historicize and contextualize the writers' individual experiences and ideas with the wider queer history of the time. Central readings would include the work of James Baldwin, Flannery O'Connor, Jane Bowles, Rita Mae Brown, and Brontez Purnell.

AMAS5021B

20

WRITING THE AMERICAN SCRIPT

For much of the twentieth century, the screenplay was synonymous with Hollywood, the Studio System, and "The Movies"; films as brash and bold as booming American power, written by screenwriting giants, such as Preston Sturges, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Billy Wilder, Anita Loos and Paddy Chayfsky. But much of what we love about more recent American film-making has been the work of writers outside the mainstream: John Cassavetes, Joan Micklin Silver, Charlie Kaufman, Spike Lee, Nora Ephron, Quentin Tarantino, and the like. Throughout, American screenwriting has produced work as dynamic and expansive as the nation itself. In this module you will move through the high points of American scriptwriting, using scripts, texts, and creative pastiche to develop an understanding of the form. Your work may be assessed through a mix of creative and critical work, writing exercises and a complete short script. In broadly the first half of the semester you will use pastiche and other techniques to develop basic screenwriting skills. The remainder of the term will be devoted to developing and workshopping an original script. You will be introduced to the basic dramaturgy of cinematic storytelling, screenwriting form and format, and skills in pitching and story development. This module will therefore help you develop your creative capacity, your communication skills, and will help broaden your commercial awareness. Students who achieve a mark of 68%+ either in this module or Adaptation and Transmedia Storytelling are eligible to enrol on Creative Writing: Scriptwriting in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at Level 6.

AMAM5052B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (SPR)

This module is for those who want to write better poems and it enables you to really test the range of your abilities in writing poetry. You'll develop and improve your expressive and technical skills in writing poetry, and be encouraged to improve analytical awareness of both the craft elements and the wider contexts of writing poetry, and also to improve students' abilities as editors and critics of their own and other people's writing. The first half of the seminar will be exploratory and practical; we'll be using structured exercises and the writing of (mostly contemporary) published poets to consider issues like voice, persona, imagery, structure and form, with time also dedicated to sharing student work. In the second half the emphasis shifts to constructive group discussion of your own work, alongside your peers, in a workshop setting. Whether discussing published poems or our own, we will be 'reading like a writer' and discussing how poems are put together. This module is exclusive to English Literature With Creative Writing students and for other students who have achieved a mark of 68%+ (or equivalent for Visiting students) in a previous Creative Writing module. All other students should enrol on Creative Writing: Introduction (Aut) or Creative Writing: Introduction (Spring).

LDCC5007B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE FICTION (SPR)

This module will enable you to test your abilities and potential as a writer of prose fiction, building on the experience you already have in a formal creative writing environment. The first half of the course will be exploratory and practical, using structured exercises and handouts. You'll be asked to consider such issues as character, genre, voice, dialogue and point of view. In the second half, the emphasis will shift to constructive group discussion of your own work, along with that of your peers. The overall aim of this module will be to develop your expressive and technical skills in writing prose fiction, and to improve your abilities as an editor and critic of your own and other people's work. This module is exclusive to English Literature With Creative Writing students and for other students who have achieved a mark of 68%+ (or equivalent for Visiting students) in a previous Creative Writing module. All other students should enrol on Creative Writing: Introduction (Aut) or Creative Writing: Introduction (Spring).

LDCC5006B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTWRITING (SPR)

Scriptwriting develops your ability to create and understand dramatic texts, through exercises in writing drama and the analysis of a range of plays and/or film scripts. In this module you'll explore differing forms and styles and your work will receive feedback from both the tutor and your peers. Your first assignment will be a portfolio of shorter pieces, and then you'll write a play, radio drama or screenplay of up to 20 minutes length. The course is hands-on, inspiring and practical, and you'll be writing every week. You'll be invited to specialise in writing for stage/radio or film/television after you are allocated a place. Scriptwriting and Performance students take this module and the Spring module Creative Writing: Scriptwriting (Spr) as compulsory modules. Students on other programmes may take either the Autumn module or the Spring module, but not both and must have achieved a mark of 68%+ (or equivalent for Visiting students) in a previous Creative Writing module. All other students should enrol on Creative Writing: Introduction (Aut) or Creative Writing: Introduction (Spring).

LDCC5008B

20

THE WRITING OF JOURNALISM (SPR)

What kinds of writing skills produce great journalism? This question is essential to creating powerful journalism and it's a central concern of this module. The Writing of Journalism enables you to develop a critical awareness of the skills and structures involved in creating effective journalism. You'll consider a range of journalistic forms and find out how best to nurture and develop your own writing. You'll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which journalistic writing works - its contexts, its demands, and its inventiveness. This will enable us to approach journalism as a discourse with its own conventions, practices, and ideologies. This module is concerned with journalism as a practice, and a genre. As such, it involves discussion, peer-workshops, and practical experience of reading and writing news and feature articles. In addition to writing your own journalism, you will examine journalistic writing and critical work concerning the craft, in order to probe and challenge your own ideas and assumptions about the practice and production of this writing form. Rather than see the practice of journalism and the critical study of journalism as distinct activities, this module aims to engage you as critical readers and writers whose work is informed by both contexts. In so doing, you'll gain a greater understanding of the demands and conventions of journalistic writing, develop and sharpen your own work, and gain the discursive flexibility which will allow you to navigate the writing of journalism today.

LDCC5014B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD: AMERICA

A semester spent at a North American (United States or Canada) university taking an approved course of study.

AMAY5027A

60

AMERICAN STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD: AUSTRALIA

A semester spent at a university in Australia or New Zealand taking an approved course of study.

AMAY5026B

60

AMERICAN STUDIES YEAR ABROAD

A year spent at an American university taking an approved course of study.

AMAY5028Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN STUDIES DISSERTATION

You will complete an independent research project leading to a dissertation of 8,000 words to be submitted at the end of the semester. A member of American Studies faculty will supervise the dissertation.

AMAS6056B

30

CREATIVE WRITING-NARRATIVES

The course will take the form of weekly, three-hour workshops/seminars that will promote the discussion of yours and your peers' work. These group sessions will also help you to enhance your understanding of creative writing and develop your editorial and writing skills. You will have the opportunity to explore a variety of genres, including prose fiction, poetry, and various forms of creative nonfiction. In addition, in-class exercises will be set in order to encourage and galvanize the production of new work. To buttress your own writing practice with examples of different approaches to creative writing, you will also be given short pieces of exemplary contemporary American writing and criticism for close reading and discussion. Throughout the semester students are required to keep comprehensive notes of both the class discussions/workshops, and records of their own editing notes.

AMAL6025A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION AND SCRIPTWRITING

Today more films are made from adaptations than wholly original screenplays. All scriptwriters preparing for work in the business today should therefore be aware of the process and nature of script adaptation. You will explore the practice of scriptwriting, dramaturgy and story structure; and explore key theories of adaptation, from the earliest ideas of 'fidelity' to the source, to later approaches emphasising intertextuality, and the movement of narratives across media. You will examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across literary and media contexts.

AMAM6115A

30

AGEING IN AMERICA

What does it mean to grow old in American culture, which glorifies youth? This is the central concern of this module. You'll examine ways in which America's ageing population is framed as a problem, and encounter attempts to 'manage' it. You will think about why ageing is seen as something to be avoided or disguised, and engage with narratives about how it is gendered, raced, and classed. You will survey the history of ageing in America, focusing on middle and old age, and then conduct detailed analyses of contemporary literature, film, and television, addressing the literary question of 'late style' and figures like the grandparent and the cougar. Through assessed work and seminar discussions, you'll develop an informed understanding of issues relating to ageing in America. You'll enhance your communication, writing, and research skills, which will enable you to account for, and analyse, the contradictory stories told about ageing in American culture.

AMAS6037A

30

AMERICAN APOCALYPSE: TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY CLIMATE CHANGE FICTION

In the 21st century, the threat of global warming and climate change is quite literally 'game-changing.' Engaging with Naomi Klein's contention that "this changes everything," you will consider how the apocalyptic dangers of climate change are being addressed by 21st century American fiction. Climate change fiction, or 'cli-fi', has recently emerged as a distinct genre, directly responding to the dangers that global warming poses to human and non-human societies. You will consider how fiction offers us ways to assess, understand, and address the phenomenon of global warming, and the impact of humans on their environments. You will evaluate ongoing debates about the 'facts' of climate change and global warming, including the evidence being produced by scientists, and the emergence of 'climate change denial' as a feature both of popular culture and at the highest levels of government in the United States. Exploring American novels published since 2010, you will develop a broad understanding of how American climate change fiction represents the profound dangers of climate change, through its depiction of drought, flood, deforestation, species extinction, intelligent biotech, and the impact of global capitalism. Through seminar based discussion, you will gain insights into the ways that writers are engaging with the fact of climate change to shape both popular awareness and popular debates, and consider how cli-fi is imagining possible futures for human and all other life on Earth. You will be assessed through coursework, reflective reports, and student-led workshops, and gain expertise in communicating your ideas via student-led group work and seminar discussion. On successful completion of the module, you will have the knowledge and skills to assess the complexities of climate change fiction as a new literary genre, discuss the emotive reach and influence of fiction in this context, and evaluate the strategies of contemporary cli-fi writers.

AMAL6012A

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

Contemporary Native America is often visible only as a cultural stereotype, making the complexities of contemporary tribal experiences invisible within the American national narrative. In this module you will consider contemporary Native American self-representation, exploring recent Native writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, and analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions within the US. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', you'll consider the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. You'll make connections between these distinct groups of writers, to consider topics such as race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and 'home', community, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism. You'll assess how complex Federal-Indian histories are related to diverse contemporary political events such as the indigenous Idle No More movement, and the NDAPL oil pipeline controversies. You will also explore how Native writers engage with the political paradox of remaining colonised within the 'Land of the Free'. Through seminar based discussion, you will develop a broad understanding of the contemporary issues faced by Native peoples, a familiarity with the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged by Native authors, screenwriters, and directors, and insights into the ways in which Native peoples are shaping the debates around contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. You will be assessed through coursework, reflective reports, and student-led workshops, and gain expertise in communicating your ideas via student-led groupwork and seminar discussion. On successful completion of the module, you will have the knowledge and skills to assess the complexities and diversities of Native American cultural and national identity, and the literary and cinematic strategies of Native writers and filmmakers.

AMAS6027A

30

SCIENCE FICTION

Science Fiction films and television series have provided a significant focus for addressing social, cultural and political issues. You will look at the historical development of the genre, with an emphasis on situating examples of films and television programs within their historical and cultural context. The module also concentrates on issues surrounding human identity, as played out in this genre. A range of films and series episodes from both the US and UK will be screened and various clips will also be discussed in seminar.

AMAM6121A

30

SEX AND THE CULTURE WARS

This final year module would guide students through the political debates over sexuality at the heart of the US culture wars, from 1960 to present. Students would be encouraged to reflect on the way in which the intimate lives of Americans became embroiled in the moral-political battles which escalated from the 1960s onwards. This list might include: abortion, birth control, the age of consent, sex education, welfare, pornography and obscenity, gay marriage, and gay military service, among others. It would introduce students to primary source materials from both sides of the 'battle for the soul of America', from abstinence only sex education materials to DIY feminist sexual health zines. It would also introduce students to the broad historiography of the culture wars, including writing by Eileen Tyler May, Linda Gordon, Margot Canaday, and Andrew Hartman.

AMAS6066A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION AND SCRIPTWRITING

Today more films are made from adaptations than wholly original screenplays. All scriptwriters preparing for work in the business today should therefore be aware of the process and nature of script adaptation. You will explore the practice of scriptwriting, dramaturgy and story structure; and explore key theories of adaptation, from the earliest ideas of 'fidelity' to the source, to later approaches emphasising intertextuality, and the movement of narratives across media. You can examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across literary and media contexts.

AMAM6116B

30

COMICS GET REAL: GRAPHIC NARRATIVES OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY, TRAUMA, AND WAR

Why do people draw their life stories in comics form? How can trauma be represented in words and pictures? What does it mean to bear witness to horrific events graphically? Throughout this module, you'll study the recent phenomenon of reality-based American comics, which stand in sharp contrast to the form's common association with superheroes and the fantastic. In addition to discovering comics' powerful potential for representing real-life events in engaging and disturbing ways, you'll learn to analyse both form and content, and will develop a critical vocabulary for reading, thinking, and writing about comics. You'll read comics that tell a wide variety of stories anchored in real life, and from many different genres, such as autobiography, memoir, investigative journalism, and war reportage. Throughout, you'll learn to pay special attention to issues of representation, spectatorship, and the position of the artist in relation to the events depicted. You'll also study a variety of critical and theoretical material that puts these comics-specific issues in conversation with more general concerns about the ethics of representing the real world in diverse written or visual forms. You'll learn through seminars and independent study, and will be assessed through coursework including a final essay. At the end of the module, you'll be able to read reality-based as well as other comics in a transformative way, and will have gained a deep understanding of how this vibrant and upcoming cultural form creates new opportunities for representing the increasingly complex personal and geopolitical realities of the world in the twenty-first century.

AMAS6059B

30

NEW AMERICAN CENTURY: CULTURE AND CRISIS

On the eve of the twenty-first century it appeared that the United States of America was indeed entering into a new American Century with its role as global leader as strongly defined as it was a century earlier. However, the last decade and a half has been witness to a nation in turmoil and crisis, from the conflict between a universalising (Americanising) globalisation and an introspective nationalism; the war on terror and the conflicts in Afghanistan Iraq and Syria; environmental crisis and disaster; the conflict surrounding immigration and national identity, to the present financial crisis. The renewed and vigorous return to rhetoric of national 'unity' that characterised the campaign and election of Barack Obama as President of the United States in 2008, and the election of Donald J Trump in 2016, serves to highlight the historical divisions and crises of American society and underscores that contemporary America is in crisis geopolitically, economically, democratically, environmentally, and culturally. This module seeks to engage you with these areas of crisis and examine a variety of cultural responses to the America of the millennium. Through a variety of cultural texts, from literature, film and documentary, political speeches and letters, to historical texts and pop culture, we examine the ways in which these crises have been culturally and politically constructed and given particular sets of meaning.

AMAS6052B

30

STRANGE SENSATIONS: POPULAR AMERICAN WRITING IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

What did Americans read in the nineteenth century? Which American poems, novels, and plays struck a chord with readers across the globe? The answers might surprise you. This module offers you the opportunity to become familiar with a diverse variety of texts that would once have been known and loved by millions - texts, often long forgotten, that helped to define the popular culture landscape that we know today. Packed with sin, sentiment and sensation, and spanning the length of the nineteenth century, the texts on this module enthralled their audiences - and still grab the attention. You will explore their contemporary reception, consider their multimedia adaptations and the place of publishing technology in their success, examine their role in moral panics and popular crazes, and think about why so many of these extraordinarily successful texts are now forgotten, popularly and critically. You will also explore the rise of popular genres (like detective fiction and science fiction) and think about the implications of these texts for the modern entertainment world. In your coursework, you will conduct original research into this vibrant lost culture of popular literature, and help to bring some of these forgotten popular texts back into the light.

AMAL6022B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • The Lost Ones

    In the late nineteenth century, as the federal government entered the final stages of US nation building with its accompanying conquest and dispossession of Native nations, a glaring question remained unanswered: what should be done with the surviving indigenous peoples who had withstood this onslaught.

    Read it The Lost Ones
  • Trump's challenge

    Trump’s challenge to the US legal system must be taken seriously.

    Read it Trump's challenge
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award
  • Ask A Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask A Student

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB including an English Literature related subject or BBB including an English Literature related subject with an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including HL 5 English
  • Scottish Highers AAABB including an English Literature related subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC including an English Literature related subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3 including an English Literature related subject
  • Access Course Humanities & Social Sciences pathway is preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 including an English Literature module, and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM, alongside grade B in an English Literature related subject A-Level (or equivalent qualification). Excludes BTEC Public Services and Business Administration
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including 70% in an English Literature related subject

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

If you do not have an A-Level or equivalent qualification in English Literature (or English Language and Literature), once you have submitted your UCAS form we may then contact you to ask you to submit a short analysis of a passage of a literary text in support of your application.

Applicants will be asked to send in a short sample creative writing portfolio.  We ask for around five A4 pages of work which can be poetry, fiction, script or creative non-fiction (but no reviews) or a mixture of these.  

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB including an English Literature related subject or BBB including an English Literature related subject with an A in the Extended Project
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including 5 in Higher Level English.
  • Scottish Highers AAABB including an English Literature related subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC including an English Literature related subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3 including an English Literature related subject
  • Access Course Humanities & Social Sciences pathway is preferred. Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 including an English Literature module, and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM, alongside grade B in an English Literature related subject A-Level (or equivalent qualification). Excludes BTEC Public Services and Business Administration
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including 70% in an English Literature related subject

Entry Requirement

If you do not meet the academic requirements for direct entry, you may be interested in one of our Foundation Year programmes.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

 

Interviews

Most applicants will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some applicants an interview will be requested. Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry on your UCAS application.

Special Entry Requirements

Candidates who are shortlisted will be asked to provide a sample of their creative writing: we ask for around 5 pages of work, which can be poetry, fiction, script or creative non-fiction (but not reviews), or a mixture of these.

Intakes

The annual intake is in September each year.

Alternative Qualifications

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

GCSE Offer

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

 

Course Open To

UK and overseas applicants.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students (2019 entry)

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

Please complete our Online Enquiry Form to request a prospectus and to be kept up to date with news and events at the University. 

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515

Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515