BA American and English Literature

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American Studies at the University of East Anglia is recognised as one of the best departments in the UK. We offer our undergraduate students a broad range of courses and modules, allowing you to tailor your learning as you progress through your time with us. Most of our degrees also involve a year studying abroad. Throughout their course, our students develop skills that are highly attractive to employers.

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"Many employers have expressed interest in my year abroad at interview, and I now feel more independent, experienced and ready for anything"

In their words

Kirsten Irving, American Studies Graduate who spent her year abroad at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana

This degree allows you to study both the American and English literary traditions, side by side. You will learn what makes American literature, and through that the United States itself, distinctive.

You will come to understand how Americans have expressed their sense of identity through literature, defining their nation in the process. Norwich is the ideal city in which to study English literature. It is a UNESCO City of Literature, rich in heritage and with a vibrant contemporary writing scene.

You will also gain a first-hand appreciation of American literature during your year abroad in the United States, or perhaps you will choose to add a further comparative dimension to your understanding by opting to study in Canada or to spend one semester of your year abroad in Australia, New Zealand, or Hong Kong.

All of those experiences will enrich your final year, during which you will take a series of advanced classes and write a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Overview

The BA American and English Literature is a four-year degree programme offering a distinctive emphasis on the literature of the United States, alongside the study of English literature. The degree combines the study of American and English literature within a framework which allows you to develop and pursue areas of particular interest.

The third year of this degree programme is spent abroad, providing you with an invaluable academic and cultural experience, one that most students consider to be the highlight of their time at university. You will spend the majority of the third year studying in America or Canada - with the option of spending a semester in Australia, New Zealand, or Hong Kong. This opportunity allows you to appreciate American and English literature from a different perspective; furthermore some institutions will provide you with internship placements in organisations such as publishers, newspapers and TV stations. See the “Study Abroad” section below for more details.

Course Structure

Your degree programme may contain compulsory or optional modules. Compulsory modules are designed to give you a solid grounding, optional modules allow you to tailor your degree.

The course modules section below lists the current modules by year and you can click on each module for further details. Each module lists its value (in credits) and its module code, a year of study is 120 credits. 

Assessment

Assessment takes place at the end of each semester through coursework, and at the end of each year by examination. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice with the support of your tutors, therefore is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and four.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Study Abroad

What We Offer

We offer every one of our undergraduate students enrolled on a four year degree programme the opportunity to study abroad during their third year at one of forty-eight universities across the US and Canada – from New England to California, Alaska to Louisiana, Vancouver to Montreal.

Our Year Abroad programme has been running for over 30 years and is the largest in the UK for American Studies. Students are able to study in the US or Canada for a full year, or choose to split the year between North America, Hong Kong and Australasia (where we currently have 20+ partner institutions), and so experience American Studies from a Pacific Rim point of view, as well as the Atlantic perspective gained while at the University of East Anglia.

For more information please see the Study Abroad website.

Why do a Year Abroad?

Study abroad is a unique educational opportunity that can enhance your studies, but can also demonstrate a range of skills and provide key experiences that are sought by employers. Studying abroad can provide students with increased self-awareness, the ability to adapt to new situations, as well as an increased understanding of different cultural perspectives. Spending time studying overseas also allows students to demonstrate the ability to work and communicate in different cultural contexts, skills that are of vital importance to a range of international employers.

Studying abroad also provides an opportunity to meet new people and experience new things that can have a positive effect on a student’s academic progression. Students often return to UEA after their year abroad with a new sense of confidence and enthusiasm for their subject. Having experienced different teaching methods and subjects, students are also able to bring a range of new skills and perspectives into he classroom during their final year of study.

To find out more about our student experiences of overseas study you can read the following blog entries about studying at Temple University and the University of Western Ontario by our current students Kitty MacKay and Ainsley Bowmer.

Fees

The advantage of our exchange programme is that you do not pay tuition to your exchange institution. These costs are covered by the tuition fees you pay here, and moreover, for the year you are overseas you only pay a percentage of your standard tuition fee (currently 15 per cent for Home/EU students and 25 per cent for international students)*.

Accommodation costs must be paid and vary in each institution.
*Please note that fees are subject to annual review.

Our Partner Institutions

See the map below for a full list of our current partner institutions. Please note that these agreements are reviewed and renewed periodically. In addition to this, we consistently form exchange agreements with new institutions across the US, Canada, Australasia and Hong Kong:

Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICA LITERATURE II: MAKING IT 'NEW'

This module will provide you with a thorough introduction to American Literature from the after the American Civil War, through the turn of the century and into modernism and the early twentieth century, up to the close of World War II.

AMAL4031B

20

AMERICAN LITERATURE I: IMAGINING AMERICA

American Literature I: Imagining America is a level one module designed to introduce the major writers and themes of literature in the United States. For this module there will be a weekly lecture and a two-hour seminar. Lecture Slot: Monday, 1200-12.50. Further information on the timing of the seminar can be found in the published timetable.

AMAL4033A

20

AMERICAN STUDIES I: READING CULTURES I

This course aims to introduce you to some of the basic tools you will need for a degree in the School of American Studies. It is designed to provide you with the skills required for the assessed work you will be doing in your other core modules; you are also encouraged to bring in questions, thoughts and examples from those other modules.

AMAS4036A

20

AMERICAN STUDIES II: IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

The module develops and expands the research methods, writing skills, and oral skills acquired in Reading Cultures I: American Icons. By continuing the exploration of contemporary American culture and introducing cultural and critical theory as a means to engage with current ideas and ideologies circulating around American cultural icons, the module will encourage exploration of America's changing position in the world. The module is intended to further facilitate skills in reading, writing, analysis, synthesis, independent thinking, and confidence as self-supporting learners in order to provide a strong foundation for work at levels 2 and 3.

AMAS4037B

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY 1

This is the main introductory module to the study of literature. It aims to help new students to read historically, by offering a range of models of the relationship between literature and history, explored through the study of selected historical and literary moments. The module is taught by a weekly lecture, with an accompanying seminar.

LDCL4008A

20

LITERATURE IN HISTORY II

'Realism' is a key term in understanding the relationship between literary texts and historical reality. The term originated in the nineteenth century, the high period of a certain kind of realist novel that Colin MacCabe called the 'classic realist text'. Yet this nineteenth century novel is only one influential form of realism among many. This module investigates the varieties of realism by exploring the multifarious and innovative ways in which writers have exploited a variety of literary forms with the aim of producing the impression of a faithful representation of historical reality. In so doing, it encourages students to think past a culturally ingrained notion of the nineteenth-century novel as a kind of literary norm, or default setting. For one thing, the nineteenth-century novel was in itself highly diverse, more so than this normative model would allow. But more than that, the impulse to get closer to 'reality' always begs questions such as 'the reality of what?', 'whose reality?' and 'the whole of reality? or, if not, which bit of it?'. Realist impulses have often pulled writers in different directions, suggesting a plurality of different formal strategies. Students will learn to identify the different rhetorical and formal devices that writers across the centuries have used to create realist effects.

LDCL4019B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

EXCEPTIONAL STATES: US Intellectual and Cultural History

This is a compulsory module for all students on an American Studies related degree programme. The module offers foundational understanding in US intellectual thought and culture from the roots of democracy coming out of the Enlightenment through to the contemporary moment of globalisation and biopolitics. In short the module maps-out the US from its origins in the European imagination to its current position in a globalised world. It address such important questions as: Does the US have a distinctive culture? What of the melting-pot? How has the diversity of ethnic, racial, gender, class, and religious identities shaped US intellectual and cultural history? How have the concepts and practices of related disciplines such as history, sociology, economics and literary criticism influenced US intellectual and cultural life? Should we speak of cultural imperialism? How has capitalism and its various political-economic and cultural critiques shaped the US? And how can the study of intellectual and cultural history help us understand the dynamics of power?

AMAS5028Y

40

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Please select 20 credits from each semester.

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY FICTION

This module aims to take an open snapshot of different modes of writing in the recent British scene, not a post-war history of the novel. We'll concentrate on more adventurous examples of contemporary fiction, looking at specific aspects of form and style, and thinking about how such aspects speak to broader matters of history and ideology. We'll also consider also what it might mean to be or to call oneself contemporary.

LDCL5069B

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study. Covering the work of writers as various as Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Derrida, Eve Sedgwick and Gayatri Spivak, and exploring structuralist, feminist, queer and post-colonial theories amongst others, this module engages with ideas and ways of thinking which you will find helpful throughout your degree.

LDCL5031A

20

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING

The eighteenth century was a time of great literary experimentation in which many new genres emerged, including the periodical essay, the mock-epic, the ballad opera, and the novel. These genres took shape within a commercial revolution that transformed both what it meant to be an author and what it meant to be a reader. In this module you will see how writers like Joseph Addison, Alexander Pope and John Gay created works that both participated in and criticized the culture of commerce. You will explore the fictions created by writers like Henry Fielding and Samuel Richardson, who developed very different versions of the novel in competition and conversation with one another. You will also examine how writers such as Samuel Johnson, Frances Burney, and Olaudah Equiano navigated the new possibilities for authorship that were opening up in the period. In this module you are invited to become an "eighteenth-centuryist" and to make imaginative connections between the exciting range of genres that emerged in this century and the culture that produced them.

LDCL5041A

20

EMPIRE AND AFTER: GLOBALIZING ENGLISH

Today, literature in English is produced in many countries across the world and English increasingly enjoys a status as a 'global' language. This module will explore how this situation came about by placing the development of English literary traditions both in the British Isles and elsewhere into the long historical context of the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with canonical works by British writers from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth and into the twentieth centuries, the module will then consider literary and political responses to the experience of empire and colonization by writers from South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australasia, and the Americas. It will explore how 'English Literature' has been shaped on a global scale by global historical forces, and how different the history of the English literary tradition looks when placed alongside and in counterpoint to these 'other' writings in English. The module will discuss the writings of Daniel Defoe, Joseph Conrad, Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, Amitav Ghosh, Kate Grenville and J.M Coetzee amongst others. The module will introduce you to the theoretical and conceptual apparatus of postcolonial literary studies and to some of the key frameworks for understanding the formation of the modern world, such as race and racism, nations and nationalism, colonial discourse and postcolonial theory, and how gender and sexuality were pivotal in the formation of colonial and post-colonial identities.

LDCL5079A

20

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

This module examines examples of twentieth-century European writing (all read in translation). Rather than (merely) place writers in their national contexts, we will deal with topics, issues and formal experiments that complicate, sometimes transcend, national boundaries. In fact we will interrogate what 'European' might mean in relation to literature - where are the borders? Are continental Europeans fundamentally 'other'? And if so, how does this otherness manifest itself aesthetically, thematically, tonally and formally? We'll look at how writers from different countries frequently challenge the conventions of genre and the conventions of reading and interpreting. Among a range of important innovations (or continuities), we may explore varieties of 'European' modernism, New Objectivity, the absurd, the nouveau roman, noir, or magical realism. We will also ask how European writers have responded to the challenges, upheavals and catastrophes of the twentieth century and how they deal with the ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within Europe. The module includes a weekly lecture. Assessment is by means of an individually chosen project (3500 words) which is supported by individual and group tutorials, a dedicated guidance session and a formative proposal.

LDCL5033B

20

MODERNISM

Modernism revolutionised the arts worldwide and peaked in the period between 1918 and 1939. We will focus on modernist literature written in English in this period, studying in detail such major authors as Ezra Pound, H.D., William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf. Djuna Barnes, Dorothy Richardson, and others. There will be close attention to the radical experiments they conducted with language and form in their attempts to plumb the depths of consciousness. We will trace their origins in earlier literary movements such as Symbolism, Imagism, Aestheticism, and Impressionism, and explore their kinship with foreign literary movements such as Dada and Surrealism. You will be encouraged to do your own research, extending your reading of authors beyond the assigned syllabus material and drawing on the resources of the Modernist Magazines Project. Modernism invented modern methods of criticism and there will be a particular emphasis on the close reading of poetry and poetic prose. A study of modernism is essential for understanding all twentieth century literature and this module is highly recommended for any students wishing to take any modules in twentieth-century literature at Level 6.

LDCL5045A

20

ROMANTICISM 1780-1840

Romantic Literature is often thought of as poetry, primarily work by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Bryon. But the signs and forms of Romantic sensibility can also be found in a much broader constituency of writing practice: the novel, letter writing, the essay, political and aesthetic theory, and writing of all kinds taken as social critique. This module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars.

LDCL5034B

20

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WRITING: RENAISSANCE AND REVOLUTION

This module introduces you to the poetry, drama and prose of one of Britain's most exciting and turbulent periods of cultural, political and intellectual transformation: the seventeenth century. The module works through lectures, which establish larger questions we might ask of the week's material, and seminars, in which we close read passages of texts together intensively. We begin in the early-seventeenth century by exploring the ways English writing was transformed by its encounters with classical texts and by religious experience, before turning to explore women writers' complicated relationship to early-modern literary culture. In the module's second half, we ask how literary forms were transformed by the extraordinary upheavals of the English civil war and the execution of the monarch. Throughout, we learn how knowledge of the circumstances of texts' publication and readership can help us to interpret literature. Authors we study include famous figures such as Ben Jonson, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton (including a look at his masterpiece, Paradise Lost), as well as many lesser-known writers, including women like Lucy Hutchinson and Amelia Lanyer, and Norwich's greatest writer, Thomas Browne. You will have the chance to read translations of several of the classical authors (including Horace and Martial) who influenced them. The module includes a visit to the Norfolk Heritage Centre (in the centre of Norwich) to see their remarkable collection of seventeenth-century books.

LDCL5042A

20

SHAKESPEARE

The aim of this lecture-seminar module is to help you become a better reader of Shakespearean drama. He was writing between about 1590 and about 1610; obviously his plays speak to us over a great cultural distance, and we can find fresh ways of reading them by exploring the theatrical, generic and historical frameworks in which they were written and staged. The lectures, then, will introduce a range of contexts, and the seminars will seek to turn them to account in the reading of the dramatic texts themselves.

LDCL5070B

20

VICTORIAN WRITING

This module aims to equip you with a knowledge of writing from across the nineteenth century, in a variety of modes (fiction, poetry, science, journalism, cultural criticism, nonsense). We will examine authors such as George Eliot, Tennyson, Dickens, Darwin, Arnold, Charlotte Bronte, and the Brownings. You will thus develop an awareness of how different kinds of writing in the period draw on, influence, and contest with each other. Likewise, you will acquire a sense for the cultural, political and socio-economic contexts of nineteenth-century writing, and some of the material contexts in which that writing took place (serial publication, popular readership, periodical writing, public controversy).

LDCL5067B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADOLESCENCE IN AMERICAN CULTURE POST-1950

This module will suggest that there is a preoccupation with adolescence in postwar and contemporary American culture, and will explore why this is the case. It will do so by introducing students to representations of adolescence in various disciplines, focusing particularly on literature, film, psychoanalysis and cultural studies. Questions to be explored will include: What is 'American' about adolescence? How do representations of adolescence vary according to factors such as gender, race and region? Is there a particular discipline or artistic form which is especially suited to depictions of adolescence?

AMAS5025A

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Accordingly, this module will explore the history of American music - but it will also examine the way that its development tells a larger story. Focusing largely on the vernacular musical traditions we will encounter a wide range of musical styles and musicians, each of which has something vital to tell us about the shaping of America. After all, as Plato knew, "When the mode of the music changes, the walls of the city shake."

AMAS5023A

20

AMERICAN RADICALS

The module traces the history of the radical political activism in the U.S. from the late nineteenth century to the 1980s. It shows how radicals, while often marginal or ostracised in the United States, assumed pivotal roles as effective organizers in mass movements dedicated to class, race, gender and sexual equality. Classes cover the trade union movement, feminist politics, the black freedom struggle as well as the gay liberation struggle.

AMAS5046A

20

LIVING ON THE HYPHEN: Multi-ethnic American Literatures

America has long been interpreted as the location of social possibility founded upon a desire to assimilate and negate ethnic 'others'. This module traces the literary responses of distinct 'American' cultures: including Native American; African American; Asian American; and Latin American. Each group of texts engage with the specific historical, cultural and political relationships between the US and each author's country of origin or national/cultural history, across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include race and racism, exile, return, family, belonging, identity, language and memory, colonisation, imperialism, slavery, segregation, immigration, and illegality/invisibility, with an emphasis upon contemporary experiences.

AMAL5077A

20

THE COLD WAR

What was the Cold War? How did it start, where andhow was it fought, and why did it last so long? This module analyses these issues by exploring the contest waged by the U.S and Soviet Union in every corner of the globe during the twentieth century. It considers nations and peoples who aligned with the superpowerd or, as was increasingly the case, with neither. It looks at the multiple ways in which this unique 'war short of total war' influenced all aspects of life, from diplomacy and politics, to economicd, to culture and values, to bombs and warfare, to societal norms, to questions of race and sexuality.

AMAS5044A

20

THEY CAME FROM OUTER-THE-CLOSET: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND PANIC IN AMERICAN FILM

With its main focus on the 20th century, this module will explore key moments of change or crisis in the century and consider the ways the panic caused by such changes is distinctly gendered and/or sexualised. It will concurrently examine gender and sexual resistance to dominant ideas of American identity and the subsequent creation and/or promotion of liberationist discourses and alternative communities. Film will provide the focus for this cultural study, and the module will range widely over a number of different genres including the western, sci-fi, detective and LGBT themed works.

AMAS5020A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

This module provides a broadly chronological view of American poetry from the start of the twentieth century to the present day. It wonders about what the consequences might be if we consider seriously Emerson's claim (made in 1844), that America might be seen as a poem.

AMAL5011B

20

AMERICAN CRIME FICTION

This module explores both America's fascination with crime fiction, and crime fiction itself as an American genre. From its emergence in the mid-nineteenth century writings of Edgar Allen Poe, this module will investigate the ways in which American crime fiction has traced and exposed a wide range of social and cultural anxieties in America. Moving through the early twentieth century hard-boiled detective narratives of Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett and Chester Himes, and into the postmodern concerns of late twentieth and early twenty-first century writers such as James Ellroy, Patricia Highsmith, Sara Paretsky, Carl Hiaasen and Patricia Cornwell, we will examine the ways in which American crime fiction asks a series of searching and troubling questions about contemporary American society. Central to our analysis will be the ways in which crime fiction represents a range of American concerns including individualism, the 'hero', race, gender, class, regionalism, the city, and the environment.

AMAL5038B

20

AMERICAN FRONTIERS

This module explores the ever expanding concept of 'American Frontiers'. Since Frederick Jackson Turner's influential 'Frontier thesis' of 1893, American identity has been increasingly linked to the concept of the 'frontier' which has, in more recent years, become subject to an ever-widening geography. Often referred to as the 'transnational turn,' this critical and theoretical trajectory has constantly reinvented - and multiplied - what constitutes the 'American Frontier'. From violent clashes between colonisers and Native peoples to the Space Race, from literary cosmopolitanisms to Hollywood in the South Seas, from America's own national borders to its internal racial and ethnic boundaries, to name just a few of the possible ways of thinking about the Frontier, this module considers American geographies in tandem with the critical movements that have shaped American Studies.

AMAS5045B

20

AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

The purpose of this unit is to expose students to a range of works by American women writers in the 20th century. We will looks at some of the best known women writers in the American tradition, as well as works or writers you are not likely to encounter in other units, because either the author or the work is sidelined.

AMAL5009B

20

DOING IT YOURSELF: PUNK AND AMERICA

This module encourages students to consider how Punk#as a musical genre, an aesthetic, and as a subculture#may be perceived as a vital part of a longstanding American tradition of self-reliance and innovation. This interdisciplinary module attempts to define Punk and considers what it means to be Punk by examining its influence on music, poetry, and fiction. The module also explores the socio-political implications of Punk in terms of gender, sexuality, and community, and questions Punk's role in an increasingly globalised world.

AMAS5042B

20

LOOKING AT PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND VISUAL CULTURE IN THE USA

This module aims to introduce students to strategies and techniques for analysing photographs and, more specifically, uses the visual record to study and illuminate the history of the USA. Viewed here as sites of historical evidence, photographic portraits, family albums, anthropological illustrations, lynching postcards, advertisements, food packaging, fashion photos are just some of the pictures that will be "read" and evaluated. Students will explore how visual texts can contribute to an understanding of nationhood, class, race, sexuality and identity in the USA, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century. Opening sessions will focus on ways of "reading" visual texts. [No previous experience of working with images is necessary]. Most of the semester will be devoted to analysing how photographic images both reflect and contribute to constructions of American identities and culture.

AMAS5024B

20

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

The legacy of the American Revolution reverberates throughout American history and culture. In addition to representing the nation's beginnings, the events and ideas of the revolutionary era have fundamentally shaped the way Americans think about themselves, their nation, and their history. Politics, law, popular culture, and literature have all drawn on the legacy of the American Revolution. But what exactly is that legacy and how has it been used? This module introduces students to the history of the American revolutionary era, from the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763, through war against the British, writing the Constitution, to the election of Thomas Jefferson in the "revolution of 1800". The Revolution affected nearly all aspects of American life, including the political economy of slavery, gender relations, economic development, and the pace and pattern of the expansion of white settlement, all of which will be discussed in the module. The module will also consider the extent to which the history of the Revolution is accurately (or otherwise) represented in contemporary discussions and ask what such representations might tell us about contemporary American politics and society.

AMAS5048B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD: AMERICA

A semester spent at an American university taking an approved course of study. Restricted to students on American Studies 4 year programmes.

AMAY5027A

60

AMERICAN STUDIES SEMESTER ABROAD: AUSTRALIA

A semester spent at an Australian university taking an approved course of study. Restricted to students on 4 year programmes.

AMAY5026B

60

AMERICAN STUDIES YEAR ABROAD

A year spent at an American university taking an approved course of study. Restricted to students on 4 year American Studies programmes. For students on programmes:U1T700401, U1TQ73401, U1TW76401, U1T7W8401, U1V238401, U1V2L2401, U1TW76401.

AMAY5028Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 30 credits:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN STUDIES YEAR ABROAD DISSERTATION

Final year dissertation involving research into a specific issue or topic in American culture, society, history or literature. Restricted to students on the 4 year American Studies degree programmes. Topics will already have been approved on the basis of dissertation proposals submitted during the year abroad.

AMAY6036B

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CHARLES DICKENS: BEYOND REALITY

Charles Dickens has been described, and cherished, as one of the great chroniclers of the panorama of mid-Victorian society. At the same time, much modern criticism has rightly emphasised what a strange and innovative writer he is, less a documentary social realist than an early practitioner of what might now be called 'magical realism'. This module will examine works from across Dickens's writing career, in a variety of different modes - fiction, journalism, drama, and public speaking - reading them not only in the context of Dickens's times, but also in the context of how other writers in those times dealt with comparable questions. As a result, students will be able to develop their larger interests in the relationships between social reality and its literary representations, in a module which combines in-depth study of Dickens with a broader engagement with theories of realism.

LDCL6136A

30

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

This module offers students the chance to learn about children's literature and its development. It starts with the history of children's literature, looking at its use as a pedagogical tool, moving through Aesop's fables, fairy tales, Mother Goose, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and examining other authors who may include A.A. Milne, Dr. Seuss, Roald Dahl, Sherman Alexie and Patrick Ness, amongst others. The course looks at issues of genre and content as well as historical context. Theoretical readings on children's literature are also closely engaged with, possibly including work by Perry Nodelman, Jack Zipes. Maria Nikolajeva, and others. By studying the development of children's literature, this module also analyses the development of the concept of childhood in Western society. This module also includes presentations and a writing workshop.

LDCL6038A

30

GHOSTS, HAUNTING AND SPECTRALITY

From Defoe's True Relation of Mrs Veal's posthumous visit to her friend Mrs Bargrave through the classic English ghost stories of MR James to the ghosts in the machine of modern media, the ghost, shade, revenant or spectre continues to haunt human imagination. Subtle shadings of the spectre materialise at different times, in different contexts - materialised reminder of unquiet remains; manifestation of memory or the unconscious; physiological disturbance; psychical stain. These undecidable and ambivalent presences, or uncanny sensations of hauntedness, will be explored in this module. Writers studied on the module might include Daniel Defoe, M.R. James, Henry James, Margaret Oliphant, May Sinclair and Susan Hill. The module will draw on studies mapping the development of the belief in ghosts (Sasha Handley's Visions of an Unseen World) and exploring the cultural history (Andrew Smith's The Ghost Story 1840 - 1920). It will also consider critical engagements, such as Jacques Derrida's Specters of Marx and Jodey Castricano's Cryptomimesis.

LDCL6160A

30

LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVES

While the term 'narrativa' in Spanish is often used to denote fiction it is not restrictive to the genre. The aim of this module is to explore the core of storytelling that underpins Latin American literature and which surfaces in various forms of writing from the 'microrelato' to the short story, the prose poem as well as the 'rewriting' exercise/critical appraisal, such as Alejandra Pizarnik's The Bloody Countess. A further aspect of this module is to attempt to disentangle the web of literary influences woven into some of these Latin American narratives as well as to trace the itinerary of these influential threads as they travelled from the South of the American continent to other literatures. As the editors of Issue 113 of Granta have stated 'who would have imagined fifteen years ago that writings of the outcast Chilean Roberto Bolano who washed ashore in Barcelona via Mexico, would exercise so wide an influence on writers in Spain, Latin America and across the world?' And yet, Bolano's literary output is unthinkable without Borges, just as the Colombian Juan Gabriel Vasquez's Secret History of Costaguana is inconceivable without Conrad's Nostromo. Readings will include works by Borges, Cortazar, Bolano, Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Clarice Lispector, Alejandra Pizarnik, Valeria Luiselli, amongst others.

LDCL6093A

30

LITERATURE AND DECONSTRUCTION

In an interview with Derek Attridge, Jacques Derrida describes literature as 'this strange institution which allows one to say everything'. This module explores the writings of Derrida and related thinkers alongside a range of literary texts, including works by Keats, Ali Smith, Shakespeare and Joyce. Through wide-ranging seminar discussions, we will think about the strangenesses of literature, look at the ways in which it is an 'institution' and consider the kinds of freedom - of speech, writing and thinking - it permits. Our aim throughout will be to establish the possibilities for literary criticism opened up by deconstruction, and also to think about how deconstruction might give us ways to think about what is taking place in the world and - sometimes - in our own lives too. The module is open to everyone, but may be of particular interest to those who studied critical or cultural theory in the second year. The second assignment will permit you to experiment with the form of your own critical and theoretical writing.

LDCL6048A

30

MADNESS AND MEDICINE: WOMEN'S WRITING IN THE REGENCY

This module will study late 18th-century and early 19th-century writings in the context of scientific and medical innovation. We consider whether it may be appropriate to view the work of novelists such as Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen and Mary Shelley as a response to, and even a protest against these newly (or, more correctly, nearly) professionalised, male-dominated worlds. These women writers often concern themselves with the 'consumers' as well as the providers of the services offered by these professions; this module considers why that might be and how this kind of contextualisation might impact upon our readings of their work.

LDCL6042A

30

NERVOUS NARRATIVES

'We all say it's nerves, and none of us knows what it means', says a character in Wilkie Collins' 1860 novel, The Woman in White. Our aim is to think about how a discourse of the 'nerves' - the 'nervous temperament' and nervous illness - can be both so pervasive culturally and so slippery in its meaning. This interdisciplinary module takes you from the late 17th century, when the concept of 'neurologie' first emerged, to the 21st century, linking literary, medical and philosophical writing to explore the representation of the 'nerves'. The historical range of the module is not meant to imply a transhistorical understanding of nervous illness or temperament, but rather will enable us to analyse the historically specific nature of the nervous body and what it is made to mean, culturally, within different contexts. In this way, we will be working with issues as diverse as religious 'enthusiasm', hysteria and hypochondria, sensibility, sensation, fear of modernity, manliness and effeminacy, shell-shock, PTSD and the concepts of the healthy or fragile body of the nation. Spanning time and genre, the literary texts studied will take us from the earliest, Jonathan Swift's satire, A Tale of a Tub (1704) up to the contemporary: Siri Hustvedt's novel, What I Loved (2003) and her analytical memoir, The Shaking Woman, Or, A History of My Nerves (2010).

LDCL6046A

30

THE ART OF MURDER

Crime, like death, has always been with us, yet it was only in the nineteenth century that de Quincey proposed considering murder as one of the fine arts and Poe established many of the central tenets of crime fiction with his 'tales of ratiocination'. Currently, crime fiction is the most bought, and read, literary genre and one diverse enough to include 'whodunits'; Baker Street's most notable resident; the genteel amateur detectives of the 'Golden Age'; hard-boiled thrillers; noir; psychological fiction and even the post-modern iterations of anti-detective fiction. Narratives about crime and criminals, detection and sleuths (not forgetting the violence and victims) can be both conservatively formulaic and radically diverse. It can articulate dangerous and disturbing transgressions against society (the crime) while also revealing the ideological forces of law (what constitutes a crime) order (the various detective figures) and the systems of justice and ill-justice (courts and punishment, state and government) with which a society protects and proscribes itself. Crime fiction is also concerned with interpreting clues, discovering secrets and solving enigmas, much in the way that critical theory investigates and analyses literary texts. This module aims to explore key texts and writers in the development of crime fiction as well as examining critical and theoretical responses to such texts. It will allow students to respond both creatively and critically to the concerns of, and thinking about, this diverse genre.

LDCL6130A

30

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS: NONSENSE AND MODERN WRITING

It's widely recognised that modernist literature is characterised by a revolution of the word. Less widely recognised, and little explored, is the relationship between modernist linguistic experimentalism and literary nonsense, as practised by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, and others. This course will begin with these well-known nonsense writers and explore their roots in seventeenth and eighteenth-century nonsense, and parallels to Emily Dickinson, before going on to examine some of the adventures in language of major modernist and postmodernist writers. Modernist and postmodernist authors studied are likely to include the Joyce of Finnegans Wake, early Auden, Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath, John Ashbery and some surrealist writers. We will also conduct our own games with the dictionary and with contemporary discourse. This is not a course on children's literature, but on some very challenging modern literature, mostly poetry. It should appeal to those who take a childish pleasure in wordplay and fantasy. You will need to enjoy uncertainty and have good close-reading skills. There will be opportunities for creative writing of nonsense and creative writers are encouraged to take the module. To do this module you must have studied Modernism, Critical Theory, or one of the 2nd year Creative Writing modules, unless you obtain a waiver from the lecturer.

LDCL6015A

30

URBAN VISIONS: THE CITY IN LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE

This interdisciplinary module explores the idea and representation of 'the city' through a range of writings (fiction, poetry, essays, theory), visual (painting, photography, film) and occasionally other sensory material (sound, smell), spanning from the mid-19th to the 21st century and focused on two great capitals of modernity, Paris and London. In this period, the growth of the great European cities created a new and diverse set of environments and possibilities. Utopias, dystopias, sites of ruin and construction of all kinds; what different, contradictory or coherent versions of urban experience do these texts and images offer? What kinds of writing, art, discourses and attitudes do cities seem to generate? Was modernism 'an art of cities'? How do textual and pictorial techniques intersect, for example, in the case of Impressionist art and writing, Surrealism and Situationist provocations, or street art and photography? In the company of the flaneur (or flaneuse?), the detective and other urban wanderers, we'll explore aspects such as space, place, urban being and time, love and eroticism, hauntings, memory and the presence of the past, the individual and the crowd, the role of consumer capitalism, nature and the natural, psychogeography, and the pressures, preoccupations and thrills peculiar to urban living. Writers to be studied vary and may include Balzac, Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Baudelaire, Zola, Gissing, Conan Doyle, Andre Breton, Virginia Woolf, Maureen Duffy, Iain Sinclair, Peter Ackroyd, Zadie Smith and China Mieville alongside a selection of theorists, poets, artists and photographers and a selection of city films. Assessment is individually designed and there is scope to work in both critical and creative-critical modes, and to incorporate visual material.

LDCL6138A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ALIENS, OUTSIDERS, AND EXPATS:WRITING AMERICA OUTSIDE IN

The Module engages contemporary writing by expatriates and outsiders in the United States. Considering novels by expatriate writers from Australia, Britain, India, and Nigeria alongside writing by authors from states and protectorates beyond the bounds of the continental United States (Guam, Hawaii, Samoa), this module considers how such writing has imagined key American events, eras, and cultural practices from "the outside in." Authors may include Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Peter Carey, Sia Figiel, Brandy Nalani McDougal, Craig Santos Perez, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, and Kirsten Tranter among others.

AMAL6049A

30

AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This module aims to introduce students to the fascinatingly wide and diverse area of American autobiography. It takes a broadly chronological structure in order to introduce key narratives and writers in the history of American autobiography, and will also enable students to engage with important theoretical debates influencing how we might understand autobiography - debates which can perhaps best be described as attempting to determine what is at stake in writing, reading and defining the autobiographical 'I'. Questions to be explored will include: What do we mean by autobiography? Why is it so difficult to define autobiography? What is 'American' about autobiography?

AMAL6007A

30

COMICS: AN AMERICAN ART

This module introduces students to the American art of comics, comic strips, and graphic novels. Tracing the form's development from its inception in the popular newspapers of the end of the 19th century through the birth of the comic book, the underground comix revolution of the counterculture years, the birth of the graphic novel, and the current boom in autobiographical comics by women, the course will give students a broad understanding of the many cultural and formal issues surrounding the form.

AMAL6048A

30

NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING AND FILM

This module considers Native American writing and film as sites of cultural and political resistance, analysing the ways in which a diverse range of Native authors, screenwriters and directors within the United States respond to contemporary tribal socio-economic and political conditions. Taking popular ideas of 'the Indian', this module considers the ways in which stereotypes and audience expectations are subverted and challenged. Topics include race and racism, indigeneity, identity, culture, gender, genre, land and notions of 'home', community, dialogue, postcolonial theory in its application to those who remain colonised, and political issues such as human rights and environmental racism.

AMAS6027A

30

THE AMERICAN BODY

This module reads the changing values, presentations and representations of the body that move through and construct American culture. This module will involve pairing theoretical perspectives with current and historical ideas of the body to allow us to interrogate intellectual and popular meanings assigned to and played out through the body. We will reade particular moments in American writing, art, photography and popular forms for what they can tell us about corporality and self-presentation, and also the wider structures of the social and cultural environment in the United States.

AMAS6040A

30

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN GOTHIC

American fiction began in the period of the European Gothic novel, which thus marked the American tradition from the first. In this seminar module we will establish the meaning of gothic conventions and consider their persisting effects in American fiction.

AMAL6024B

30

EXPLODED FORMS: POST WORLD WAR II AMERICAN FICTION

America post World War II is marked by great optimism and conversely an extreme sense of foreboding over the absurd conditions of life. Picking up the threads of the transatlantic discussions between continental philosophy and American fiction making, this module explores the connection between American society, literature and experimentation in the decades immediately following World War II. Authors studied may include, Joseph Heller, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, Kurt Vonnegut, Ishmael Reed, Norman Mailer, Joyce Carol Oates, Hunter S Thompson, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Robert Coover for example.

AMAL6050B

30

GO WEST! HISTORIES AND CULTURES OF THE AMERICAN WEST

The American West occupies both a geographical and social place within US history along with a place in the mythic ideals of America. From the of the law of gunfighter to the promise of the Californian gold-rush to the gay pastoral of Brokeback Mountain, the West has proved to be a site of often violent transformation and liberation. This module will explore the West as both history and myth. As an interdisciplinary module on the West, study may include historical narratives, popular literature, song, comic-books and film.

AMAS6055B

30

NEW AMERICAN CENTURY: CULTURE AND CRISIS

On the eve of the twenty-first century it appeared that the United States of America was indeed entering into a new American Century with its role as global leader as strongly defined as it was a century earlier. However, the last decade and a half has been witness to a nation in turmoil and crisis, from the conflict between a universalising (Americanising) globalisation and an introspective nationalism; the war on terror and the conflicts in Afghanistan Iraq and Syria; environmental crisis and disaster; the conflict surrounding immigration and national identity, to the present financial crisis. The renewed and vigorous return to rhetoric of national 'unity' that characterised the campaign and election of Barack Obama as President of the United States in 2008 serves to highlight the historical divisions and crises of American society and underscores that contemporary America is in crisis geopolitically, economically, democratically, environmentally, and culturally. This module seeks to engage with these areas of crisis and examine a variety of cultural responses to the America of the millennium. Through a variety of cultural texts, from literature, film and documentary, political speeches and letters, to historical texts and pop culture, this module examines the ways in which these crises have been culturally and politically constructed and given particular sets of meaning.

AMAS6052B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Discrim-inations

    How did the South African anti-apartheid movement inspire African Americans in their fight for freedom from racial inequality? Dr Nicholas Grant explores the history of international opposition to racism to find out the answer.

    Read it Discrim-inations
  • The Lost Ones

    In the late nineteenth century, as the federal government entered the final stages of US nation building with its accompanying conquest and dispossession of Native nations, a glaring question remained unanswered: what should be done with the surviving indigenous peoples who had withstood this onslaught.

    Read it The Lost Ones
  • #ASKUEA

    Your University questions, answered

    Read it #ASKUEA

Entry Requirements

  • A Level AAB including English Literature
  • International Baccalaureate 33 points including 5 in Higher Level English. If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Highers Only accepted in combination with Scottish Advanced Highers.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BBC including English Literature. A combination of Advanced Highers and Highers may be acceptable.
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 4 subjects at H2, 2 subjects at H3 including English Literature
  • Access Course Distinction in 36 credits at Level 3 including English Literature modules, and Merit in 9 credits at Level 3. Humanities or Social Sciences pathway preferred. Other pathways are acceptable, please contact the University directly for further information.
  • BTEC DDD, alongside grade B in A-level English Literature. BTEC Public Services is not accepted.

Entry Requirement

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Students will have the opportunity to meet with an academic on an Applicant Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) for which they have applied.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.

Deferred Entry

We also welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We welcome a wide range of qualifications - for further information please email admissions@uea.ac.uk

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International webpages.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515