PG Certificate Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy


Attendance
Part Time
Award
Postgraduate Certificate



This course has been designed for qualified counsellors and psychotherapists who wish to extend their expertise into the area of focusing-oriented and experiential psychotherapy.

Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy derives from the work of Eugene Gendlin, a close colleague of Carl Rogers. The course is intended to:

-familiarise students with the distinctive thinking and procedures of focusing-oriented psychotherapy
-enable students to incorporate these procedures into their own therapy practice
-provide an historical understanding of the development of the focusing-oriented approach in relation to the development of other schools of therapy
-enable students to relate the experiential approach to the different schools of psychotherapy as traditionally conceived
-enable students to make use of focusing in their own personal and professional development

Overview

The Postgraduate Certificate in Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy has been designed for qualified counsellors and psychotherapists who wish to extend their expertise into the area of focusing-oriented  and experiential psychotherapy.

This programme (60 credits at Masters Level) provides experiential training and a grounding in the theory of focusing-oriented therapy. There is a growing interest world-wide in this form of psychotherapy, but opportunities for training have until now been very limited.

A basic knowledge and understanding of person-centred therapy is assumed, but the course is also open to practitioners who have trained in other traditions, and who wish to integrate the focusing/experiential dimension into their own practice.

Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy

Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy derives from the work of Eugene Gendlin, a close colleague of Carl Rogers. It is a form of therapy which belongs in the humanistic tradition, and more specifically within the tradition of client-centred and experiential psychotherapy. It has deep roots in both client-centred therapy and in phenomenology. The central emphasis is on the experiencing process of the client and on ways in which the therapist can help the client to relate to their experiencing of their situation. Focusing is a naturally occurring process which can be cultivated by training and then incorporated into work with clients. A central theme of focusing-oriented therapy is that any therapeutic procedure is likely to be more effective if conducted in a manner which constantly relates that procedure to the client’s immediate experiencing, that is, if the procedure is ‘focusing-oriented’.

Aims of the Course

The Postgraduate Certificate in Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy course is intended:

  • to familiarise students with the distinctive thinking and procedures of focusing-oriented psychotherapy
  • to enable students to incorporate these procedures into their own therapy practice
  • to provide an historical understanding of the development of the focusing-oriented approach in relation to the development of  other schools of therapy
  • to enable students to relate the experiential approach to the different ‘schools’ of  psychotherapy as traditionally conceived
  • to enable students to make use of focusing in their own personal and professional development

Course Structure

The teaching input for this part of the Course will take place over six weekends between September and May.  The weekends will involve approximately twelve hours input, six hours each on Saturdays and Sundays.  The sessions will include both theoretical input and experiential learning.  Participants will be expected to work in focusing partnerships in the period between sessions (such partnerships may be conducted by telephone, if necessary).

Course Content

It is envisaged that the Course will include most of the following topics:

(a)  Theoretical

General  focusing theory

This part of the course provides the basic theory of focusing-oriented psychotherapy. It covers themes such as
-  the historical relationships between client-centred therapy, experiential therapy and focusing
- the basic concept of  the ‘felt sense’ and the ways in which it is distinguished from emotions, imagery and ordinary physical sensations
- process difficulties such as ‘intellectualising’, ‘externalising’ and ‘overwhelm’
- therapist procedures for engendering process steps - the concepts of  ‘implying’,  ‘carrying-forward’, ‘handle-words’, ‘clearing a space’. 
- Gendlin’s ‘six steps’ and focusing as a taught procedure
- bringing Focusing into therapy sessions
- the theory of the relationship between experiencing and concepts

Theoretical aspects of  personality change and specific experiential processes

This part of the course develops focusing theory in several ways
- the theory of specific process blocks such as conflicts and the suppression of experiencing
- theoretical approaches to the ‘inner critic’
- the self and ‘parts’ of the self; 'disidentification’
- objections to focusing-oriented psychotherapy
- the research and evidential basis for focusing-oriented psychotherapy

(b) Experiential

The central experiential processes of focusing

This part of the course covers
- experiential work in listening and ‘reflection’
- initial work in focusing partnerships
- work with finding a felt sense
- looking at how process steps come
- learning to ‘be with’ a felt sense
- learning to be aware of the body sense
- practice in using Gendlin's six focusing steps
- practice in focusing guiding
- practice in role-play

Experiential working with specific processes

This part of the course is designed to develop more specific skills in focusing-oriented therapy:
- working with the ‘inner critic’
- working with conflicts and experiential suppression
- experientialised versions of the empty chair and two-chair techniques
- experientialised working with cognitive-behavioural procedures
- working with dreams

Teaching Methods

  • lectures and seminars
  • group discussion, involving issues taken from students’ own work and from the literature
  • reading and discussion of selected material from the literature
  • role-plays to illustrate applications of the principles
  • intensive work in focusing partnerships, and the bringing of this back to the whole group
  • use of audio and video demonstrations by experienced practitioners
  • use of audio and video recordings of practice sessions

Assessment

Assessment will be based on three written assignments, two of which will involve audio or video recordings of focusing sessions with colleagues or clients, while the third will be a theoretical essay.   The first two assignments will involve transcripts of sessions, and detailed analysis of process together with its relationship to relevant theory.

Focusing Institute Certification

The Focusing Institute in New York certifies the Course as leading to their Certificate as a Focusing Trainer.  This certificate will be awarded subject to satisfactory completion of the unit, and payment of the appropriate fee.

Award of  Postgraduate Certificate

The Postgraduate Certificate will be awarded subject to satisfactory completion of  the course. The Board of Examiners will consider assignments and attendance in reaching their decision.

Students who do not achieve a pass standard at the Board of Examiners may be given an opportunity to be reassessed on one occasion only.

External Examiner

An External Examiner to the Course will be appointed who holds a senior position in the field of counselling and psychotherapy education.

Preparatory Work for the Course

Participants will be expected to be familiar with the person-centred background to focusing-oriented therapy as found in texts such as:

Rogers, C. (1967) On Becoming a Person. London: Constable.

Mearns, D. and Thorne, B. (2013)  Person-Centred Counselling in Action. 4th edition.  London: Sage.

Mearns, D. and Thorne, B.  ( 2000)  Person-Centred Therapy Today.  London:  Sage.

Sanders, P. (ed.) (revised edition 2012)  The Tribes of the Person-Centred Nation. Ross-on-Wye:  PCCS Books.

In preparation for the Course, participants are also asked to read:

Gendlin, E. (2003)  Focusing. Revised edition.  London: Rider

Some main texts for the course will be:

Gendlin, E.  (1996) Focusing-oriented Psychotherapy.  New York:  Guilford Press

Purton, C. (2004)  Person-Centred Therapy: The Focusing-Oriented Approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Purton, C. (2008)  The Focusing-Oriented Counselling Primer. Ross-on-Wye: PCCS Books

Course dates:

The next intake for this course will be in September 2016. The dates for the teaching programme are as follow:

  • 1-2 October 2016
  • 5-6 November 2016
  • 10-11 December 2016
  • 28-29 January 2017
  • 25-26 February 2017
  • 29-30 April 2017

Please note these dates are subject to change. 

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

FOCUSING-ORIENTED PSYCHOTHERAPY

This is a one-year certificate course in focusing-oriented psychotherapy, taught over six weekends. The course is designed for counsellors who wish to further their professional development. The central emphasis is on the experiencing process of the client and on ways in which the therapist can help the client to relate to their experiencing of their situation. Focusing is a naturally occurring process which can be cultivated by training and then incorporated into work with clients. Applicants will be expected to have a Diploma in Counselling or equivalent. It is open to applicants from any therapeutic orientation, although some familiarity with the person-centred approach will be assumed.

EDUC7003Y

60

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

Entry Requirement

Applications will be welcomed from practitioners who already possess a diploma or equivalent qualification in counselling or psychotherapy.  Applicants will normally be expected to be graduates but those with other professional qualifications or who can demonstrate appropriate academic skills will be considered.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 7.0 (minimum 6.5 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 68 (minimum 62 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Assessment

In the selection process the staff will be particularly concerned with the following questions:

  • Does the applicant have some knowledge of, and sympathy for, the person-centred or client-centred approach to therapy? Their initial training need not have been specifically in the person-centred approach, but focusing-oriented therapy draws deeply on the spirit of the person-centred tradition.
  • Does the applicant have experience of  therapeutic work, so that their work on the course can be related to that experience?
  • Will the applicant be able to meet the academic challenges of the course?  The course operates at post-graduate level and the written assignments are substantial.

Selection will take place on the basis of a completed application form, two references, and preferably an interview, either in person or by telephone. It is a strong preference that applicants from overseas be interviewed face to face. Failing this, the applicant will be offered a telephone interview at his or her expense.

Fees and Funding

Fees for the academic year 2015/16 will be: 

  • UK/EU Students: £2,330
  • International Students: £4,733

International applicants from outside the EU may need to pay a deposit.


Scholarships and Funding

A variety of Scholarships may be offered to UK students. Please click here for more detailed information about funding for UK students.

The University offers around £1 million of Scholarships each year to support International students in their studies. Scholarships are normally awarded to students on the basis of academic merit and are usually for the duration of the period of study. Please click here for further information about fees and funding for International students.

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

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    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515