PG Certificate Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Skills (Part time)


Attendance
Part Time
Award
Postgraduate Certificate



This course attracts people with a wide range of interests including many from the helping professions including counsellors, substance misuse, advice, and learning support workers.

The Postgraduate Certificate provides students with an opportunity to acquire both the practical experience and the theoretical understanding required to use Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) skills with confidence and competence.

CBT provides the foundation work in many self–help approaches and its influence can also be seen beyond the field of counselling and therapy. Central to the model is a focus on helping people to examine and reflect on their thoughts, feelings and behaviours and have more control and greater choice in their lives. The cognitive behavioural approach is also the basis of many programmes used to help people change their behaviour and life styles and is used within fields such as management, criminal justice and the health and caring professions.

Overview

This one year part-time Certificate courses provides students with an opportunity to acquire both the practical experience and the theoretical understanding required to use CBT skills with confidence and competence.

Please be aware that completion of this course does not confer professional status, although it does provide a good preparation for Diploma level training.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has risen to prominence as the therapy of choice for many common psychological problems. It provides the foundation work in many self–help approaches and its influence can also be seen beyond the field of counselling and therapy.

Central to the model is a focus on helping people to examine and reflect on their thoughts, feelings and behaviours and have more control and greater choice in their lives. The cognitive behavioural approach is also the basis of many programmes used to help people change their behaviour and life styles and is used within fields such as management, criminal justice and the health and caring professions.

This course will cover some of the recent developments within the CBT field including the use of Mindfulness-based approaches an area with an increasing body of research within CBT. Motivational Interviewing is also explored with its focus on the process of change which makes it a valuable addition to the skills associated with work based on the cognitive behavioural approach and Professional Development.

This course attracts people with a wide range of interests including many from the helping professions including counsellors, substance misuse, advice and learning support workers. The course will help you to develop your skills and understanding of the ways in which the cognitive behavioural approach can be used to enhance your work. The aim of the course is to enable participants to understand individuals’ responses to their life circumstances in terms of the CBT model. The focus is on the skills needed to work with people to help them recognise the thinking distortions that are causing and maintaining distress and the behavioural patterns which reinforce it. You will learn how to formulate problems and practice a wide range of CBT techniques and evaluate the effectiveness of your practice.

"The course programme is pioneering a long overdue rapprochement between the cognitive-behavioural and person-centred approaches. This raises the exciting prospect of students learning the best of both traditions and bringing them together in a new form of interpersonally informed and empirically founded psychological therapy.."

Frank Wills Best selling co-author of our recommended key texts: 'Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: An Introduction' and 'Cognitive Therapy: Transforming the Image'

Dates for the 2016/7 Academic Year:

Friday Session: 18 November 2016 – 21 July 2017.

These dates are subject to change.  

Course Modules

The course aims to provide participants with:

  • A clear understanding of the theoretical model which underpins the Cognitive Behavioural Approach and the rationale for its use
  • An understanding of the conditions necessary for a supportive and collaborative helping relationship in which CBT can be used effectively
  • An understanding of the formulation of cognitive processes and maintenance cycles and behaviours
  • Familiarity with a range of techniques used in CBT and their appropriate use
  • Opportunities to practice and develop the use of CBT skills and techniques
  • An understanding of the use of behavioural experiments and their purpose in CBT An understanding of the use of the Cognitive Behavioural approach in a variety of settings
  • A good foundation for professional therapist training at Post-graduate Diploma level

There are three main areas of emphasis, which are inter-related throughout the course so that sessions will contain elements of each:

Theory and Professional Issues

  • An overview of the theoretical roots of Cognitive Behavioural theory
  • Identifying and differentiating between thoughts, feelings and behavioural and exploring their relationship to the maintenance of problems
  • The relationship between behavioural and cognitions
  • Three levels of cognition: negative automatic thoughts, assumptions and rules and schemas
  • The role of formulation and conceptualisation
  • Collaborative empiricism
  • An understanding of the application of the CBT model in student’s own work setting

CBT-based Helping Skills

  • Beginning and ending CBT sessions
  • Integrating CBT skills into the students’ model of working
  • Structuring CBT sessions
  • Setting agendas
  • Developing and maintaining the collaborative relationships
  • Developing cognitive empathy
  • Explaining the CBT approach to clients
  • Problem listing and prioritising
  • Goal setting
  • Cost benefit analysis
  • Setting homework
  • Use of thought records
  • Socratic questioning and guided discovery
  • Identifying and challenging cognitive distortions
  • Identifying core beliefs and dysfunctional assumptions
  • Developing and using longitudinal formulations
  • Using CBT in working with people with depression, anxiety and low self esteem
  • Action planning
  • Activity scheduling
  • CBT Model for panic attacks
  • Collaborative planning of behavioural experiments
  • Reviewing and evaluating behavioural experiments
  • Relapse prevention

Personal Development and Reflection on Practice

  • Developing the skills of a reflective practitioner
  • Identifying and enhancing interpersonal styles of communicating and relating
  • Experiential group work
  • Giving and receiving feedback constructively
  • Keeping a reflective learning journal
  • Applying skills and theory to self
  • Using personal concerns as material for skills practice
  • Identifying strengths and areas for Development

Coursework and Assessment

Participants will be required to keep a learning journal, complete formative written and practical assignments, participate in group discussion, presentations and complete homework tasks.

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject All degree subjects considered
  • Special Entry Requirements Applicants are preferred to hold a degree

Entry Requirement

Applicants should demonstrate the following in their application and personal statements:

  • Evidence of previous study of Counselling Skills.  This will ordinarily be demonstrated by satisfactorily completing an introductory course in Counselling Skills.*
  • Evidence of a good understanding of the theory of CBT.  This will ordinarily be demonstrated by satisfactorily completing an introductory course in CBT.*
  • Some experience of a helping role in which counselling skills are used.
  • That you have opportunities to use your developing counselling skills during the course (e.g. in a voluntary placement or a professional role).

*Please contact the admissions office at admissions@uea.ac.uk or on 01603 591515 for details of suitable introductory courses in Norwich.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Special Entry Requirements

Applicants should ensure they have sufficient time for private study.  Students should expect to spend at least 8 hours a week for the January-July Certificate and 6 hours a week for the November-July Certificate courses.  This study time will include guided reading, keeping a reflective learning journal, using counselling skills in work or voluntary work and completing coursework assignments.

Unfortunately, successful completion of this course does not guarantee progression to the PG Diploma in CBT.  Applicants joining the PGT Diploma in CBT are expected to be qualified Mental Health professionals and further information can be found here.

Fees and Funding

Fees for the academic year 2016/17 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £2,380
  • International Students: TBC

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can usually apply online.

Please note that this course will not run in November 2015 and applicants should apply for entry in November 2016.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office

Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

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    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515