MSc Information Systems (Part Time)

Article

Computer Scientists have developed a new programme that will unearth the missing links in our planet’s past.

Read It

Key facts

(2014 Research Excellence Framework)

Modern organisations need to manage huge amounts of digitised information to operate successfully, so graduates trained in systems design are highly sought after. This course teaches you both the technical aspects of systems development and the skills in business analysis that you’ll need to work in the field.

You’ll develop an understanding of contemporary approaches to analysis and design, set in the wider context of project management and modern business practices. A number of taught modules give you the chance to customise your degree to suit your particular educational background, and you’ll complete a Masters-level dissertation in a topic that really interests you.

Overview

This degree follows the same programme as its full-time equivalent but is spread over two or four years.

Module enrolment for each year is discussed with the Course Director at the start of the course.

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES (RESEARCH METHODS)

This module aims to prepare postgraduate students with necessary intellectual and practical skills for successfully carrying out research work for their MSc Dissertation in Computing Sciences and Computational Biology. Specifically, it teaches research methodologies, techniques and tools used in computing sciences, and more importantly, provides systematic trainings to enhance students' transferable skills and their understanding in ethics, social and legal issues involved in computing professions.

CMP-7030Y

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

CMP-7003A MUST be taken if students have not previously studied the material covered by the module.

Name Code Credits

HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

Human Computer Interaction (or UX) covers a very wide range of devices, including conventional computers, mobile devices and "hidden" computing devices. In this module you will learn about interactions from a variety of perspectives, such as cognitive psychology, ethnographic methods, security issues, UI failures, the principles of good user experience, heuristic and experimental evaluation approaches and the needs of a range of different audiences.

CMP-7018A

20

INTERNET LAW AND GOVERNANCE

Legal issues relating to Internet use are increasingly important. You are introduced to the key principles of Internet law, including competing views on its status and its relationship with other legal principles. You will also consider the question of the relationship between law and technology. You will explore case studies of alternative forms of governance, including international co-operation and stakeholder-driven processes, in the context of issues such as domain names, social networking and the regulation of Internet service providers. Current issues in Internet law are included on the syllabus each year.

LAW-7012A

20

INTERNET and MULTIMEDIA TECHNIQUES

In this module you will learn about the development and core technologies of the web, website design, deployment on desktop and mobile devices, current issues (e.g. security), and its impact on society. In the practical part of the module you will work on the design and integration of web sites, emphasising maintainability, accessibility and usability.

CMP-7003A

20

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING ISSUES

This module draws together a wide range of material and considers it in the context of developing modern large-scale computer systems. Topics such as Systems Thinking, Casual Loop Diagrams, Systems Failure, Outsourcing, Quality, Risk Management, Measurement, Project Management, Software Process Improvement, Configuration Management, Maintainability, Testing and Peopleware are covered in this module. The module is supported by well documented case studies and includes guest speakers from the industry.

CMP-7004B

20

THE PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT OF PRIVACY AND REPUTATION

In the intrusive, multi-faceted world that exists today, with 24/7 media and an ever-expanding internet, the potential for damage to reputation and interference with privacy has never been greater. This module focuses on the various ways in which the law protects rights to reputation and privacy and examines ways in which the law can be used to manage reputations in this complex world. You will focus on the law of defamation, the laws relating to the protection of privacy interests, and the developing interplay between law and technology. While the approach taken by English law will form a significant part of the module's content, comparative study will also be made of the laws of America and other common law jurisdictions as well as the laws of the European Union and some specific European countries.

LAW-7004B

20

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

In this module, each Masters student is required to carry out project work with substantial research and practical elements on a specified topic for their MSc dissertation from January to late August. The topic can be chosen and allocated from the lists of proposals from faculty members, or proposed by students themselves with an agreement from their supervisor and also an approval from the module organiser. The work may be undertaken as part of a large collaborative or group project. A dissertation must be written as the outcome of the module.

CMP-7027X

60

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DATA MINING

You will explore the methodologies of Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD). You will cover each stage of the KDD process, including preliminary data exploration, data cleansing, pre-processing and the various data analysis tasks that fall under the heading of data mining, focusing on clustering, classification and association rule induction. Through this module, you should gain knowledge of algorithms and methods for data analysis, as well as practical experience using leading KDD software packages.

CMP-7023B

20

DATABASE MANIPULATION

This module introduces most aspects of databases, database manipulation and database management systems. Practical experience of database manipulation is provided through the use of SQL and the Java JDBC interface on a relational database management system. Database design is introduced using Entity-Relationship modelling and normalisation.

CMP-7025A

20

HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

Human Computer Interaction (or UX) covers a very wide range of devices, including conventional computers, mobile devices and "hidden" computing devices. In this module you will learn about interactions from a variety of perspectives, such as cognitive psychology, ethnographic methods, security issues, UI failures, the principles of good user experience, heuristic and experimental evaluation approaches and the needs of a range of different audiences.

CMP-7018A

20

INFORMATION VISUALISATION

This module is an introduction to information visualisation. You will learn techniques for summarising and presenting a wide range of data. There is a strong emphasis on understanding the appropriate context and use of visualisation techniques. You will also learn about problems and techniques for dealing with large data flows and issues of integrating multiple data sources.

CMP-7022B

20

INTERNET and MULTIMEDIA TECHNIQUES

In this module you will learn about the development and core technologies of the web, website design, deployment on desktop and mobile devices, current issues (e.g. security), and its impact on society. In the practical part of the module you will work on the design and integration of web sites, emphasising maintainability, accessibility and usability.

CMP-7003A

20

MACHINE LEARNING

This module covers the core topics that dominate machine learning research: classification, clustering and reinforcement learning. We describe a variety of classification algorithms (e.g. Neural Networks, Decision Trees and Learning Classifier Systems) and clustering algorithms (e.g. k-NN and PAM) and discuss the practical implications of their application to real world problems. We then introduce reinforcement learning and the Q-learning problem and describe its application to control problems such as maze solving.

CMP-7031B

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

In taking this module you will learn about the issues and techniques involved in and maintaining industrial software development and evolution. You will learn about a range of advanced software engineering topics, such as: reverse engineering to understand legacy software, refactoring, design patterns to improve the design of software systems, using third party software components, designing secure systems, and design for maintainability. In the practical work for the module you will use a range of tools and techniques appropriate for developing contemporary industrial software. You will be developing your existing good programming and software engineering skills to prepare you for working with industrial software. Students on CMP-7000A who are likely to achieve a mark below 65% are strongly advised that this module is not suitable for them. YOU CANNOT TAKE THIS MODULE IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY TAKEN CMP-6010B.

CMP-7032B

20

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING ISSUES

This module draws together a wide range of material and considers it in the context of developing modern large-scale computer systems. Topics such as Systems Thinking, Casual Loop Diagrams, Systems Failure, Outsourcing, Quality, Risk Management, Measurement, Project Management, Software Process Improvement, Configuration Management, Maintainability, Testing and Peopleware are covered in this module. The module is supported by well documented case studies and includes guest speakers from the industry.

CMP-7004B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject Computer Science, Information Systems or a related subject.
  • Degree Classification Good first degree (minimum 2.1 or equivalent).

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees for 2018/19

Tuition fees for the academic year 2018/19 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £7,550
  • International Students: £15,800

If you choose to study part-time, the fee per annum will be half the annual fee for that year, or a pro-rata fee for the module credit you are taking (only available for UK/EU students).

International applicants from outside the EU may need to pay a deposit.

We estimate living expenses at £1,015 per month.

 

Scholarships

A variety of Scholarships may be offered to UK/EU and International students. Scholarships are normally awarded to students on the basis of academic merit and are usually for the duration of the period of study. Please click here for more detailed information about funding for prospective students.

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515