MA Public Policy and Public Management

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The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies offers a wide range of MA degrees.

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"I wanted to specialise in International relations, and in particular US foreign policy and international security. International politics has always fascinated me and postgraduate study enables you to understand current affairs and to broaden your knowledge on key debates."

In their words

Oliver Steward, MA International Relations.

Key facts

The Research Excellence Framework 2014.

In a world which - it is often argued - is becoming more globalised, we need more than ever a critical understanding of how and why public institutions’ decisions are made, and what happens as a result. This MA develops an advanced understanding of public policy and public management and their many facets, at national and international levels.

Overview

You can choose to focus on one of three pathways: Public Policy and the Environment; International Public Policy; and Regulation and Competition.

Focus on Public Policy and the Environment and you will look at how the main theories, models, and concepts in public policy are applied, comparing environment policy with social policy and policy in other areas. This is complemented with modules examining decision making about the environment more widely, including individual and cultural framings and values, and societal changes.

Focus on International Public Policy and you will consider the impact of international organisations, including the EU, on national governments, and develop an advanced understanding of the main theories applied in the study of public policy and public management.

Focus on Regulation and Competition and you will build upon a political science understanding of public policy and public management and examine regulation, competition, international institutions and the legal aspects of the subject.

Why Study Public Policy at UEA?

This flexible and cross-disciplinary MA will appeal to a wide range of students: those with social science undergraduate degrees (in politics or a related subject, economics, law, business studies, or international relations for example) looking to specialise; environmental studies or geography graduates interested in wider applications of their subject knowledge; practitioners of all types interested in a deeper understanding of the processes they deal with every day; and those interested in enhancing their influence over decision-making processes.

Our School has world-leading expertise in research and teaching of public policy, international politics, media and society, and social and political theory. You will also have the chance to be taught by academics from the Schools of Law, Environmental Sciences and International Development.

We pride ourselves on our high quality research-led teaching, which means that your lecturers will lead you to the most up-to-date, cutting edge information on your subject of study.  A rich programme of research seminars, visiting speakers, panel debates and high profile public events also contribute to making UEA a stimulating environment to study in. Our postgraduate community includes students from across the globe which adds many different perspectives on the subjects studied.

Course Structure

The MA lasts twelve months for full-time students and two years for those studying part-time. You will have classes during the first two semesters and then over the summer you will work on your dissertation which is handed in at the start of September.  Many MA modules use small group seminar teaching, which encourages individual students to communicate and inspire others with their own unique insights.

Assessment

You'll be assessed in part on the basis of work you do on your modules across the year, and in part on the basis of a dissertation that you hand in at the end of the year. We use a range of assessment methods across our modules, but you can expect to be assessed on the basis of essays, literature reviews, and project reports that you write. Your dissertation will be a longer piece of work on a topic of your choice.

Transferable Skills

The MA will help you develop many transferable skills important for your career. The ability to think critically, and to constructively and sensitively question ‘received wisdom’, is an enormously important skill for any profession.  To help develop this, many skills will be honed, including debating, giving oral presentations, team work, project work, critical analysis and synthesis of arguments, independent research, writing, time management, working under time constraints, ability to communicate clearly to a variety of audiences, and ability to apply theory to real world cases.

Career opportunities

This course provides a wide range of career opportunities with enough choice to allow either specialism in one element, or a wider focus.  Recent graduates from our MA programmes have taken up jobs in a wide variety of roles, including: business executive, policy analyst, consultant, subject specialist, lobbyist, advisor, NGO staff, civil servant, and university or research institute researcher, via pursuing a PhD.  

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

PSI DISSERTATION

For all MA students registered in PSI except those undertaking a Dissertation by Practice . Students are required to write a dissertation of 10,000 words on a topic approved by the Course Director or other authorised person. The dissertation is to be submitted the first working day of September 2016.

PPLX7010X

60

PUBLIC MANAGEMENT: THEORIES AND CHANGE

Is there a crisis in public services? Is the efficient and accountable organisation of the machinery of governments under threat? We hear much about entering a 'postbureaucratic age' for the governance of countries. What might this mean? Is it possible? In this module, students will examine the organisation and operation of public sectors in the shadow of democracy, putting current debates in the UK in a historical and international comparative context. On completing the module, students will have analysed and evaluated the most influential models and theories of public management and organisational behaviour, be able to describe and critically reflect on the framework for public management in practice, focussed especially on recent developments in the UK, understand the reasons for public management reform, and be able to engage in debates about the future direction of the public sector.

PPLX7011A

20

PUBLIC POLICY: THEORY AND ANALYSIS

This module enables students to develop advanced understanding of the main theories, models and concepts used in the study of public policy, the main debates in the field, and substantive knowledge of public policy in a variety of settings. Students successfully completing the module will be able to demonstrate: - critical understanding of the main theoretical approaches used in the study of public policy - familiarity with the main debates in the scholarly literature on public policy - advanced knowledge of public policy and policy processes in a variety of national settings - familiarity with the main theories and debates relating to the operation and impact of international organisations, including the European Union, on domestic policy and policy-making processes.

PPLX7002A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CLIMATE CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT I: SCIENCE, IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION

This module introduces students to the phenomenon of climate change, interconnections between climate change and development and theory and practice for adapting to climate change, in the context of developing countries. The first part of the module covers key aspects of climate change science necessary for a basic understanding of the causes of climate change, future projections of climate change and key impacts as well as methods for assessing these. The second part of the module focuses on adaptation to climate change by introducing the concepts of adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. National and sectoral policy making for adapting to climate change is then explored with reference to case studies. Finally the interconnections between disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation are explored. Seminars explore climate science and adaptation topics.

DEV-7042A

20

RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS

This module provides the knowledge required to understand issues in the business environment. Understanding the concept and framework of regulatory policy, both within each region and country, and as applied to individual sectors and industries, is crucial to gain maximum benefit for companies and other organisations (including those in the public and voluntary sector) and their stakeholders, and to avoid inadvertently violating legal requirements (which might involve criminal sanctions, including imprisonment). Exploring corporate governance developments in different countries will enable students to understand the importance of different institutional settings, the influence of legal, regulatory and political environments, and why differences in ownership structure have arisen and how this impacts on companies and organisations. Corporate governance in a variety of different countries is then examined in detail together with topical issues including directors' remuneration, board diversity, and succession planning. This module is taken in conjunction with NBS-7050A.

NBS-7051A

20

THEORY OF COMPETITIVE MARKETS

Theory of Competitive Markets covers the theory and reality of how markets function depending on their characteristics, with a focus on markets where the number of firms is relatively small. Students will develop an appreciation of the effects the action of one firm can have on consumers and other firms, and how and why competition law and its enforcement places limits on firms freedom to act. This module is invaluable for those intending to work in competition law whether in legal practice or beyond. By offering insights into the workings of the market and how it is regulated, the module is also relevant for students interested in commercial law and more generally.

LAW-7021A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY

This module will use case studies of Southeast Asia, Central America and the Middle East to explore the reasons for American interventions and to assess their success or failure. It will offer an historical understanding of the assumptions and practices which lie behind contemporary US foreign policy-making. The module will introduce students to the institutions and processes involved in the making of American foreign policy.

PPLI7008B

20

BRICS - EMERGING POWERS IN GLOBAL POLITICS

The BRICS - Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa - grouping is a symbol of our changing world. This module examines how dynamic emerging powers - and not only the BRICS - are spurring global change. When it comes time to write the story of the 21st century, the global narrative will not only be about the challenges of the USA and EU to adjust to a world of diffuse power, or the rise of China and the decline of Europe. It will also be about the way that substantial portions of the world's societies emerged from poverty and how ICT is reshaping vast regions of Africa, and also about how India's middle classes started to redefine that. As a consequence, the fundamental logic of the need to reform global governance structures emerges. We are seeing new international governance through stronger regional blocs, new South-South alliances, and the progress of international institutions such as the BRICS Development Bank. For policy makers in the West, engaging emerging powers is the only way of assuring that international institutions remain functional once the traditional powers are no longer in control of social, political and economic change underway in world order.

PPLI7011B

20

CONFLICT AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

The module introduces students to the study of intercultural conflict and conflict resolution, through case studies of miscommunication at the levels of everyday language use, business communication, international political disputes and the public representation of cross-cultural conflicts. The module enables students to apply discourse- and face/politeness-analytical methods to conflicts in intercultural communication on the basis of applied linguistics (contrastive semantics, pragmatics and sociolinguistics) and cultural studies. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the linguistic dimensions of conflicts (and their mediation) in intercultural communication. Formative work includes oral and written presentations.

PPLC7008B

20

DEMOCRACY

This module draws on normative political theory and contemporary political science to consider how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by critics and opponents especially in the 20th century. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be interrogated and some recent solutions for today's 'democratic deficit' including electronic democracy and cosmopolitan democracy will be evaluated.

PPLX7001B

20

EUROPE AND THE WORLD

This module examines the position of Europe in International Relations. Weekly lectures and seminars centre upon contemporary debates on Globalisation and Regionalism, Europe's trade relations with the US, China, Russia and the European neighbourhood, security strategies and responses to topical international conflicts like Palestine, Syria, and African civil wars, inter-regional co-operation among trading blocs in politics and commerce, relations with emerging powers and the Developing World, and environmental/energy issues.

PPLI7010B

20

FREE SPEECH

The module examines one of the pressing issues of political theory, constitutional law, democracy, and media regulation: why is free speech important and what if any should be its limits? Students are introduced to some of the classic defences of free speech found in the writings of J.S. Mill and the judicial decisions of Oliver Wendall Holmes. Following on from this they will examine the question of free speech as it relates to freedom of the press and new media. Students will also explore the question of the limits of free speech, particularly in relation to hate speech. At this point students will have a chance to examine human rights instruments and laws pertaining to the issues, including the ECHR, the Human Rights Act 2008, and the Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2008, as well as a range of legal cases from courts across the world. During the module the students will be exposed to a range of deeper ideological debates among liberals, libertarians, multiculturalists, and critical theorists. The approach will be multidisciplinary drawing on politics, philosophy, and law. Finally, the format of the module will be a two-hour class each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The module will rely heavily on formative feedback on presentation and essay writing skills, building to one assessed long essay and a seminar performance mark.

PPLX7007B

20

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN PRACTICE

This module explores the issues fundamental to intercultural communication (IC) in practical contexts. The theoretical component of the module examines the different ways of thinking about effective communication in a variety of work-based environments. We will also relate theory to the practice of intercultural communication in the LCS public lectures. During these lectures, invited practitioners will introduce students to how IC operates in specific organisations, e.g. in government agencies, in multilingual business management, education etc. The module is relevant to those wishing to pursue careers in international management and relations, multilingual business and international development; it is also of interest to those who wish to become more effective communicators in other professions such as translation, interpreting, education and cultural mediation.

PPLC7007B

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module examines the study of security in the international system, through its roots in Cold War strategic studies to the development of the more broadly focused field of security studies today. The module critically analyses contemporary security issues and provides a sound theoretical base for considering practical issues of security, including new wars, intervention and terrorism. Themes are explored from theoretical perspectives and include security and the nation state, war and peace, new wars, alliances, democratic peace, securitisation, human security, the arms industry, religion and security and terrorism.

PPLI7006B

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE EU INTERNAL MARKET

This module provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of European economic integration from a legal perspective. It focuses on essential aspects of the internal market (the free movement of goods, workers, services and freedom of establishment), as well as the structure of the EU (institutions and relations with Member States' legal systems). In addition, the module teaches students how to retrieve and work with the various sources of EU law. This module is not suitable for students who have already studied European Union law.

LAW-7034B

20

MULTICULTURALISM

This module looks at the responses in political theory to the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and to facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of competing approaches. Theorists under examination will include: Parekh, Kymlicka, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. The module will combine theoretical study with analysis of practical issues/case studies surrounding multiculturalism. Among the issues to be considered are the following: models of integration, group rights, institutional racism, Islamophobia, and the Rushdie affair. The module will also consider divergent policies adopted within European states (eg, France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalise multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

PPLX7003B

20

PUBLIC RELATIONS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND THE MEDIA

This module enables students to develop an advanced understanding of the theory and practice of public affairs, interest intermediation, and the strategies used by interest, advocacy groups and others to influence the political process. As well as covering the main debates in the academic literature, it draws directly on the experience of practitioners and offers unique insights into this under-studied area of politics.

PPLX7005B

20

THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF CHINA AND JAPAN IN THE MODERN WORLD

The module looks at the history of China and Japan from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. The attempts at modernisation, conflict between the two nations, their relationships with the Asian region and the United States are covered. Their contrasting attempts to develop in the postwar period are investigated. We also assess their current policies and the issues of importance to China and Japan in the twenty first century, and assess whether they can move beyond the legacy of this difficult history.

PPLI7007B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject Humanities or Social Sciences
  • Degree Classification UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

If you have alternative qualifications that have not been mentioned above then please contact university directly for further information.

Assessment

All applications for postgraduate study are processed through the Faculty Admissions Office and forwarded to the relevant School of Study for consideration. If you are currently completing your first degree or have not yet taken a required English language test, any offer of a place will be conditional upon you achieving this before you arrive.

Fees and Funding

Tuition fees

Tuition fees for the academic year 2017/18 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £7,300
  • International Students: £14,800

If you choose to study part-time, the fee per annum will be half the annual fee for that year, or a pro-rata fee for the module credit you are taking (only available for UK/EU students).

We estimate living expenses at £820 per month.

Scholarships

Scholarships and Awards

The Faculty of Arts and Humanities has a number of Scholarships and Awards on offer. For further information relevant to Political, Social and International Studies, visit the Scholarships and Funding page for postgraduate students.

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515