MA Modern British History


Attendance
Part Time
Award
Degree of Master of Arts



The MA in Modern British History is a rigorous, exciting and broad-ranging programme, which allows students to explore their own research interests. Students will be taught and supervised by one of the largest concentrations of Modern British historians in the country, who have expertise in political, diplomatic, economic, social, gender and cultural history. The breadth and depth of their research is reflected in the programme, which encourages scholarly debate and independent research.

Overview

Why Study Modern British History at UEA?

The MA in Modern British History is a rigorous, exciting and broad-ranging programme, which allows students to explore their own research interests. Students will be taught and supervised by one of the largest concentrations of Modern British historians in the country, who have expertise in political, diplomatic, economic, social, gender and cultural history. The breadth and depth of their research is reflected in the programme, which encourages scholarly debate and independent research. 

Content and Structure of the Course

The MA, which can be taken either as a one-year full-time programme or a two-year part-time degree, aims to equip students with the advanced skills and intensive subject knowledge they need to proceed to further independent research. This preparation is provided by three main elements. The first is the dissertation, the completion of which will provide all MA students with the experience and expertise to go on to doctoral study should they so wish. The second is a core module in British history, which runs over both semesters, and the third is an optional module examining aspects of British and/or European history, reflecting the challenges of coming to terms with the modern age.

Core Modules

The Making of Modern Britain, 1851-1951 runs weekly over the course of two semesters. It will enable you to examine a tumultuous period in which Britain was transformed, both at home and in its worldwide role. In the mid-nineteenth century it had become the global hegemon, buoyed by industrial revolution and drawing on British power overseas. By the late nineteenth century, it was already being challenged; two cataclysmic world wars left its power draining away. Or did it? Alternating between Britain within its borders and its role beyond them, this module will allow you to explore a range of topics, questions and approaches to illuminate the period. The module is team-taught by our eight modern British historians, who will draw upon primary material from their own research as the basis for seminar discussion, while the topics of your written work will be defined by you.

Optional Modules

Students also take a supplementary module, which runs either weekly for a semester or fortnightly over the whole year.

From The Zenith Of Imperial Prestige To The Nadir Of British Power: The British Empire 1919-1956 explores developments between the high noon of Empire following the settlement of the First World War to the Suez Crisis of 1956. It will examine the various challenges posed to the British imperial system from the growth of resistance and nationalism in India and the Middle East during the inter-war period to the important role played by imperial questions in relations between Britain and the United States (the ‘Special Relationship').

Modernity in Russia focuses in particular on the revolutionary period in Russia and the manifold problems that Russian society and culture confronted in the transition to modernity. Students will engage with a broad variety of topics, including violence against civilians in times of war, racially motivated genocide, wars of national liberation and decolonisation, as well as questions of memory and representation. The module, which is team-taught, will run every second week over the autumn and spring semesters.

The culmination of the programme is a dissertation on an approved topic of your own devising. It is undertaken mainly in the second half of the degree and supervised by one or more members of the School.

Course Tutors and Research Interests

Geoff Hicks: British political history and foreign policy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

Anthony Howe: free trade; William Cobden; William Huskisson and the British State; international and national political economy, 18th to 20th centuries

Thomas Otte: diplomatic and international history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

Camilla Schofield - the politics of memory, histories of immigration, the impact of decolonisation and international development, transnational race politics and ideas of citizenship and the nation in postwar Britain

Ben Jones - memory studies, urban history, the history of sexuality, class studies and political activism

Jayne Gifford - Britain’s imperial relations during the inter war period, particularly the Middle East and the development of nationalism, Anglo-Australian relations and colonial violence

Emma Griffin - gender history, the industrial revolution, and working-class life

Jennie Davey - politics, diplomacy and political culture in Modern Britain

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

HISTORICAL RESEARCH SKILLS

Historical Research Skills focuses on the professional craft of the historian. Seminars will be facilitated by members of the School of History who are specialists in particular historical approaches and methodologies. Each seminar will investigate the methods used by scholars to interrogate a range of sources. The module seeks to be inclusive and address archives covering a broad chronology, geography and form. This module offers students transferable skills in identifying, using and interpreting different forms of data. It is team-taught and the precise content of seminar topics may vary in any given academic year according to the availabilty of specific teaching staff. Topics covered may include: using legal and government documents; micro/macro histories; material and visual cultures; digital humanities; life narratives and collective memory; history and literature; comparative and transnational histories.

HIS-7024Y

20

NATIONALISM AND VIOLENCE IN 20TH CENTURY EUROPE

This innovative and theory-based module approaches the turbulent history of the 'Dark Continent' from a transnational and comparative perspective. Students will engage with a broad variety of topics, including violence against civilians in times of war, racially motivated genocide, wars of national liberation and decolonisation, as well as questions of memory and representation. The course is team-taught and brings together various historians of modern Europe and Britain with an interest in, amongst others, French national identity, the Irish Question, Fascist regimes in Italy and Germany, and multi-nationalism and ethnic cleansing in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

HIS-7016Y

60

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

HISTORY - SPECIALIST TUTORIALS

Specialist Tutorials give students the opportunity to choose one topic from a wide array of options, so that they can specialise in the area of history that interests them most. Students will work closely in tutorial sessions with an expert in their chosen field. They will work with secondary and/or primary source material to gain a strong grounding in the major historiographical questions of the research area. This will give them the historiographical knowledge to contribute new, original work to the historical literature in the MA History Dissertation. The range of tutorial options will vary each year, reflecting the availability and expertise of academic staff. Meeting times and locations will be established at the beginning of the year between staff and student.

HIS-7025Y

20

MA HISTORY DISSERTATION

Dissertation for students taking the MA in Landscape, Medieval, Early Modern, Modern British and Modern European History. 14,000 - 16,000 Words

HIS-7019X

80

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject History or a related subject
  • Degree Classification UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent
  • Special Entry Requirements Applicants must submit a sample of written work (in English). This should be a typed essay on a historical subject, 2-3,000 words long, preferably a photocopy of an assessment marked by a tutor, complete with critical comments and a percentage or grade. The essay should address a specific question, and must demonstrate an ability to construct a historical argument, familiarity with the conventions of academic writing, and competence in English. This should be uploaded to your online application.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

If you have alternative qualifications that have not been mentioned above then please contact university directly for further information.

Fees and Funding

Tuition fees

Tuition fees for the academic year 2016/17 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £7,150
  • International Students: £14,500

If you choose to study part-time, the fee per annum will be half the annual fee for that year, or a pro-rata fee for the module credit you are taking (only available for UK/EU students).

We estimate living expenses at £820 per month.

Scholarships and Awards:

There are a variety of scholarships and studentships available to postgraduate applicants in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. For further information relevant to the School of History, please click here.

 

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

    Need to know more? Take a look at these pages to discover more about Postgraduate opportunities at UEA…

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515