MA Film, Television and Creative Practice

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Our students are provided with the option to study a range of topics, from science fiction cinema to television comedy, animation to popular music. Our courses are taught by scholars with a reputation for world-leading research – as well as by creative practitioners who have made award-winning BBC documentaries and written scripts for Hollywood movies.

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"Studying at UEA was one of the most enjoyable and significant formative experiences of my life. Doing both an undergraduate and postgraduate course there provided me with an academic background in literature and film which was a vital stepping stone for my career in the British film industry"

In their words

Adrian Wooton, Chief Executive Film London, previously Director of the London Film Festival

Key facts

(Research Excellence Framework 2014)

Article

Tim Snelson and his colleagues launch their website for their AHRC-funded project which looks at the undercroft on the London South Bank as an example of young people's attachment to subcultural spaces. You can also find the film 'You Can't Move History', which the project team made in collaboration with skaters and campaigners for the undercroft.

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Our MA Film, Television and Creative Practice degree enables students to combine development of their creative skills in film and television production with a grounding in historical and theoretical approaches to the two media, all taught by staff with academic expertise and extensive industry experience.

Core modules on studying media, creativity and developing ideas, and video production are accompanied by a range of options covering areas such as television and reality, blockbuster cinema, and Asian film culture. All students work towards a dissertation-by-practice, an audio-visual project combining your intellectual and theoretical knowledge with your practical skills, supervised by a faculty member.

Our thriving postgraduate community benefits from regular conferences and events on campus, as well as workshops from visiting media professionals. Graduates from our MA programmes have gone on to rewarding careers in various fields, including in the film and television industries.

Overview

Our MA Film, Television and Creative Practice degree enables students to combine development of their creative skills in film and television production with a grounding in historical and theoretical approaches to the two media, all taught by staff with academic expertise and extensive industry experience.

Core modules on studying media, creativity and developing ideas, and video production are accompanied by a range of options covering areas such as television and reality, blockbuster cinema, and Asian film culture. All students work towards a dissertation-by-practice, an audio-visual project combining your intellectual and theoretical knowledge with your practical skills, supervised by a faculty member.

Our thriving postgraduate community benefits from regular conferences and events on campus, as well as workshops from visiting media professionals. Graduates from our MA programmes have gone on to rewarding careers in various fields, including in the film and television industries.

Course Content and Structure

The MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice is taught as either a one-year full-time course or a two-year part-time course.

The MA in Film, Television and Creative Practices offers students the opportunity to refine their existing critical academic and practical production skills through a series of compulsory modules in Semester 1, followed by optional modules in Semester 2.

In Semester 1, students learn about the methods and theories commonly used to study media topics, and additionally they learn about the scholarly approaches to studying television’s connections to documentary and realism. In addition, students learn about the processes involved in pitching ideas to industry.

In the second semester, students also take a compulsory module on video production. They then choose two further theory-based modules from a selection that includes topics like blockbuster films and Asian cinema.

Individual Supervision / Final Dissertation 

All students also undertake a Dissertation-by-practice, in which students formulate an academic question which they seek to answer using their production and research skills (e.g. making documentaries on an academic topic). Each student will be assigned a member of staff as a supervisor to advise them on the research, production and writing up of this dissertation.

Course Assessment 

Assessment is on the basis of coursework and projects: such as essays and seminar papers, presentation reports, reflective learning journals, video production, and the final dissertation.

This course is also available on a part time basis.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 140 credits:

Name Code Credits

CREATIVITY AND DEVELOPMENT IN FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION

The module is designed to introduce students to key skills in film and television development practice. It will provide an understanding of the processes of creative script and project development, including film and TV business, the activities of the market and dealing with bodies responsible for commissioning films and television programmes. Priority for places on this module will be given to students taking the MA in Film Studies.

AMAM7007A

20

FILM STUDIES DISSERTATION

This module involves the production of a 15,000 word piece of work, or a practical project, which focuses upon a suitable topic of your own choosing. You will be assigned a supervisor to advise you on your research and writing of the dissertation.

AMAM7014X

60

STUDYING MEDIA

This module is intended to provide an introduction to the key study skills in media studies. It will be particularly useful for students unfamiliar with the British university system and its expectations of students. Students will apply theoretical and methodological approaches to contemporary media texts and discuss key scholarship on the international media landscape. In addition to introducing key study skills and debates in the discipline, the workshop sessions will provide a supportive environment for critical reflection and intercultural communication. Thus the module aims: to introduce students to the key study skills in media studies and its related disciplines (film studies, screen studies, cultural studies); to provide methods training in key academic and research skills, both generic and discipline specific; and, to enable students to grasp the expectations and acclimatise to the culture of the British university system.

AMAM7003A

20

TELEVISION AND REALITY

This module will examine the particular ways in which television - as a technology, as an institution, and as a social phenomenon - records, responds to, and contributes towards constructing our sense of reality. Taking recent developments within television and society - such as the growth of surveillance, genre hybrids, and the availability of media technology - as its starting point, it will explore ranges of genres - such as documentary, reality television, and comedy - from a predominantly British and public service broadcasting perspective.

AMAM7005A

20

VIDEO PRODUCTION

THIS MODULE IS RESERVED FOR STUDENTS ON THE MA FILM TELEVISION AND CREATIVE PRACTICE and MA FILM STUDIES This module introduces students to key skills in video production and provides them with the opportunity to take an idea from conception through to the final product while also learning about the processes and procedures behind the camera. Students will engage with questions about narrative, sound and cinematography and explore them in relation to their practical work. Students wishing to take this module must have previous experience of video production.

AMAM7010B

20

Students will select 20 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Between option range A and option range B you will need to select a total of 40 Credits

Name Code Credits

ASIAN CINEMA

'Asian Cinema' is a category of films increasingly in evidence in diverse places ranging from cinemas to high street shops. Recent years have seen a variety of Asian cinema incursions into global film culture, from Bollywood in UK multiplexes to Hong Kong action styles used in the Hollywood blockbuster. Inherent within the label are debates of resistance, industry, art, technology and aesthetics that have held sway since the dawn of cinema worldwide. In this module we break down these discourses and address the significant cultural, economic and political influences that Asian cinemas have had, and indeed still have, within world culture.

AMAM7000B

20

FEMINISMS AND TELEVISION FROM WONDER WOMAN TO HANNAH HORVATH

This module is about the relationship between feminisms and the cultural history of (primarily) US and UK television from second wave feminism to the present. It thus charts the dialogue between feminism and television in Anglophone contexts from the 1970s through to the 2010s, focussing on flashpoint moments for feminism (e.g. the women's liberation movement; millennial postfeminism; the global financial crisis) and touchstone texts (e.g. The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Prime Suspect, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Sex and the City, Girls, Scandal) that have resonated particularly strongly with female audiences (e.g. soap operas; lifestyle TV; women centred dramas), struck a chord with feminist concerns (e.g. work/life balance, sexual freedoms, empowerment, the politics of relationships/singlehood/friendship), and generated foundational criticism by feminist television scholars. It will be structured chronologically, and topics may include feminism and female audiences; action heroines on television; the figure of the female detective; women's work; intersectional identities (queerness, post-racial discourse, masculinities) and recessionary culture.

AMAM7009B

20

THE BIG PICTURE: CONTEMPORARY HOLLYWOOD CINEMA

Hollywood has remained a dominant force in film production, distribution and exhibition in recent decades, despite competition from other local and transnational cinemas. This module aims to explore the success of the Hollywood system through a focus on the industry itself, and the films it produces, particularly those that have been most successful at the domestic and international box office. The module will, therefore, cover a range of relevant topics that may include: what kind of films does Hollywood invest in? Is financial gain the best lens to judge issues of 'popularity'? Who are the target audiences for those films? What is the role of the audience in receiving and popularising these hit movies? What is the relationship between domestic theatrical release, circulation in foreign markets and distribution in other media such as television, film, and DVD?

AMAM7011B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Between option range A and range B you will need to select 40 credits

Name Code Credits

BEYOND NATIONAL CINEMA

Beyond National Cinema links to work undertaken in Semester 1 of the MA Film Studies degree, to expand our definitions of cinema beyond the confines and borders of the nation. We examine a series of case studies that think through different methods and means by which films can be categorised, and what is at stake when those categories are enacted. Topics may include things like: flows and trafficking in national cinemas, transnational cinemas, world cinema, postcolonial cinemas, regional and local cinemas and global cinema. Within these topics we will study a wide range of cinemas from around the globe including things such as: Middle-Eastern cinema, British cinema abroad, Bollywood, Women's cinema, Asian "extreme" cinema and transnational Hollywood cinema. In examining these topics we will introduce students to a wide range theories and methods useful in the study of films beyond national borders including thing such as historical methods, gender studies, audience studies, political economics, industrial studies and more. The aim of the modules is to encourage students to think beyond the normative definitions of films within national categories, to shift their view to the global, regional and political aspects of filmmaking and consumption.

AMAM7013B

20

FANTASY GENRES

This module will develop students' engagement with genre studies through the analysis of a range of fantasy genres, focusing particularly on science fiction film and television, and its overlaps with horror, anime, blockbuster Hollywood franchises, etc. In the process it will require students to think about how these genres work in terms of their historical contexts of production and consumption, and analyse a range of texts in relation to a variety of social/cultural and political issues. In the process, the students will engage with a range of theories and methods, which will also be grounded through the examination of specific texts and historical case studies.

AMAM7001B

20

MEDIA AUDIENCES

The module is designed to explore the debates over media effects. It will challenge the effects tradition, which motivates many of the concerns with media censorship and regulation, and suggest alternative ways of understanding the ways in which audiences consume contemporary media. In the process, it will examine a range of approaches to the understanding of media consumption.

AMAM7006B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • Degree Subject Humanities or Social Sciences
  • Degree Classification UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows:

  • IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components)

Test dates should be within two years of the course start date.

Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. The full list of accepted tests can be found here: Accepted English Language Tests

INTO UEA also run pre-sessional courses which can be taken prior to the start of your course. For further information and to see if you qualify please contact intopre-sessional@uea.ac.uk

Special Entry Requirements

Applicants are expected to have experience of using editing software and professional level cameras.

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Assessment

All applications for postgraduate study are processed through the Faculty Admissions Office and then forwarded to the relevant School of Study for consideration. If you are currently completing your first degree or have not yet taken a required English language test, any offer of a place will be conditional upon you achieving this before you arrive.

Fees and Funding

Tuition fees for the academic year 2017/18 are:

  • UK/EU Students: £7,300 (full time)
  • International Students: £14,800 (full time)

If you choose to study part-time, the fee per annum will be half the annual fee for that year, or a pro-rata fee for the module credit you are taking (only available for Home/EU students).

We estimate living expenses at £1,015 per month.

Scholarships and Awards:

For details of all of the scholarships available to postgraduate applicants to Film, Television and Media Studies, please click here

How to Apply

Applications for Postgraduate Taught programmes at the University of East Anglia should be made directly to the University.

You can apply online, or by downloading the application form.

Further Information

To request further information & to be kept up to date with news & events please use our online enquiry form.

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances prior to applying please do contact us:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

International candidates are also encouraged to access the International Students section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515