BSc Natural Sciences with a Year in Industry

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Studying Natural sciences is an ideal way to combine interests from more than one area of science. The Natural Sciences degree programmes are at the heart of the science faculty. The science faculty has a powerful reputation for innovation, excellence and working across the boundaries of different academic disciplines.

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Key facts

There’s no such thing as a typical Natural Sciences degree. Our students can take modules from any of the Science Schools at UEA and build a unique course to suit their interests. We’ve got expertise in a huge range of fields, from Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Science to Maths, Physics and Computing.

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From cataracts to climate change; superbugs to the solar system - UEA research impacts the world. Discover more about research at UEA.

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Key facts

Find out more information about Norwich Research Park.

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Cross boundaries with this radically interdisciplinary degree that allows you to study Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics and Physics. We’re based at the heart of Norwich Research Park, where our cutting-edge work drives our teaching, placing you at the forefront of scientific advances. Graduates from our Natural Sciences degrees are highly employable

Scientific advances are forged through collaboration, and researchers are forming partnerships to tackle the world’s most pressing issues. This highly competitive degree provides you with knowledge of several scientific disciplines and the flexibility of the degree allows you to direct your learning to pursue your own interests or career goals. You’ll also experience a year on placement in a relevant industry, giving you the chance to learn from experience and stand out in the job market.

Overview

The Natural Sciences programme is ideal if you wish to combine study in more than one area of science whilst retaining a larger degree of flexibility than joint degrees allow. This particular degree programme also allows you to spend your third year on an industrial placement, giving you invaluable work experience and putting you one step ahead of other students.

During your studies you will engage with modules from a minimum of two key disciplines, with the opportunity to study specialist topics as your degree programme develops. Furthermore the theory and knowledge gained in the first two years of study can be applied practically in the workplace during your year in industry.

By studying Natural Sciences you will be able to appreciate complex concepts from across contemporary science. An example of this could be examining what causes a tsunami, including how scientists use mathematics to predict how the wave travels and to understand the economics of how it impacts on vulnerable people.

You will experience what is required of a competent scientist; from the deliberation needed to design an experiment, including consideration of the results, to the excitement of discovering something new.

Course Structure

This four year course gives you an opportunity to build on your existing scientific knowledge, and possibly discover new avenues of scientific study available at university level. Throughout your studies you will have the chance to choose from a diverse range of scientific modules from science schools across the faculty; from Artificial Intelligence to Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry.

The first two years of study follow the structure of the BSc Natural Sciences Programme. The third year is spent working in industry with one of our industrial partners. You return for your fourth year to UEA and complete the final year modules from the BSc Natural Sciences course, which includes undertaking an independent interdisciplinary research project.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used across the different modules available to Natural Sciences students, ranging from 100% coursework to 100% examination. Coursework assessment methods include course tests, problem sheets, laboratory reports, field exercises, field notebooks, literature reviews, essays and seminar presentations. Skills-based modules are assessed by 100% coursework. The final year project involves a substantial piece of written research work, which counts for 40% of your final year mark.

Year In Industry

Completion of a Year in Industry programme will ensure you graduate with relevant work experience, putting you one step ahead of other students. This exciting degree programme provides you with this opportunity.

There is no greater asset in today’s competitive job market than relevant work experience. A Year in Industry will give you first-hand knowledge of not only the mechanics of how your chosen field operates but it will also greatly improve your chances of progressing within that sector as you seal valuable contacts and insight. These courses will also enhance your studies as theory is transformed into reality in a context governed by very real, time and financial constraints.

Our Industrial Links

We have well-established commercial connections throughout the UK and beyond and can help you to identify and compete for appropriate industrial opportunities. Current links with industry include, amongst others; Local and National Government; Astra Zeneca; the Environment Agency, GlaxoSmithKline; ICI; AVIVA; Barclays Bank.

Financial Benefits

A big attraction to this type of course, apart from the enhanced career prospects, is that students spending a year in industry as part of their degree will only pay £900 tuition fees for that year (2012 figures). There is also a realistic chance of being paid by the placement provider during the year which is a great way to help fund your continued studies.

For the latest on financial arrangements for our Year in Industry students please visit the UEA Finance webpage.

How it Works

The Year in Industry degree programmes are four years duration with the work placement taking place during your third year. They are a minimum of nine months full-time employment and a maximum of 14 months.

Throughout the work placement, you will maintain close contact with an assigned mentor at UEA who will also visit you at least once during the year. You will also be supported by an industrial supervisor. You keep a regularly updated work diary, so that your mentor will be able to ensure you are fulfilling all of the necessary learning objectives. Assessment of the year will be via a written report marked by both supervisors and a presentation.

We expect students to seek their own work placements. Not only will this ensure that you work within your preferred field, it will also provide you with the essential job-hunting skills you will require after graduation. We will, of course, offer our guidance whilst students are identifying and negotiating placement opportunities.

Please note that we cannot guarantee any student a work placement as this decision rests with potential employers and students will be expected to source these placements themselves.

For further information, please contact: Dr Mark Fisher, Year in Industry Co-ordinator, e-mail: Mark.Fisher@uea.ac.uk

 

Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for credits:

Name Code Credits

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments.

BIO-4001A

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards, and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues.

ENV-4001A

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour - from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features - such as mountain belts and volcanoes - and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time - the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet - and how geological maps can used to understand Earth history. This course provides an introduction to geological materials - rocks, minerals and sediments - and to geological resources and natural hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology, and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Topics to be covered include the genetic basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, population dynamics, species interactions, and ecosystems.

BIO-4002B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

The habitability of planet Earth depends on the physical and chemical systems on the planet which control everything from the weather and clim ate to the growth of all living organisms. This module aims to introduce you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret these systems. The module will lead many of you on to second and third year courses (and beyond) studying these systems in more detail, but even for those of you who choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The course has two distinct components, one on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) and one on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). During the course of the module the teachers will also emphasise the inter-relationships between these two sections This course is taught in two variants: this module provides a Basic Chemistry introduction for those students who have little or no background in chemistry before coming to UEA (see pre-requisites). This course will run throughout semester 2 involving a mixture of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half day field trip.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

The habitability of planet Earth depends on the physical and chemical systems on the planet which control everything from the weather and climate to the growth of all living organisms. This module aims to introduce you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret these systems. The module will lead many of you on to second and third year courses (and beyond) studying these systems in more detail, but even for those of you who choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The course has two distinct components, one on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) and one on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). During the course of the module the teachers will also emphasise the inter-relationships between these two sections This module is for students with previous experience of chemistry. This course will run throughout semester 2 involving a mixture of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half day field trip.

ENV-4008B

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven challenging and contentious. The concept of `sustainability' was coined to denote processes aiming to achieve this balance. This module introduces sustainable development, and examines why sustainability is so difficult to achieve, bringing together social and ecological perspectives. It also explores sustainability from an ecological perspective, introducing a range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere and topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular ecology, and biodiversity conservation at different scales. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

Students will select 0 - 120 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

This module will strengthen your mathematical skills and will introduce you to differentiation and integration. You will apply quantitative skills to environmental and geographical problems. This module will widen the range of science modules you can take during your studies in geography and environmental sciences. It will cover statistical methods, including summarising data using numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. Students will be required to purchase access to MyMathLab software either stand-alone (GBP29.99), with an e-book (GBP39.99) or with a hard copy of the Foundation Maths textbook (6th Edition) by by A Croft and R Davison (GBP48.99) (prices for October 2016).

ENV-4014Y

20

ASTROPHYSICS,ACOUSTICS AND ADDITIONAL SKILLS

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music, introduces the fundamental principles of astrophysics and uses them to explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena and introduces the topics of uncertainties, accuracy and ethical behaviour in physics.

PHY-4002Y

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

After a shared introduction to chemical bonding atomic and molecular structure and chemical principles, this module will provide an introduction to the structures, properties and reactivities of molecules and ionic solids. The latter part of the course will concentrate more on fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between chemical bonding and the structures and properties of molecules. This module is the prerequisite for the 2nd year Inorganic Chemistry module. The first few lectures of this module are integrated with the module Chemistry of Carbon Based Compounds. . The course is supported and illustrated by the bonding, structrure and periodicity experiments of the first year practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory A or Research Skills in Biochemistry.

CHE-4301Y

20

CALCULUS AND MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

(a) Complex numbers. (b) Vectors. (c) Differentiation. Taylor and Maclaurin series. (d) Integration: Applications: curve sketching, areas, arc length. (e) First-order, second-order, constant coefficient ordinary differential equations. Reduction of order. Numerical solutions using MAPLE. Partial derivatives, chain rule. (f) Line integrals. Multiple integrals, including change of co-ordinates by Jacobians. Green's theorem in the plane. (g) Euler type and general linear ODEs. (h) Divergence, gradient and curl of a vector field. Scalar potential and path independence of line integral. Divergence and Stokes' theorems. (i) Introduction to Matlab.

MTHA4005Y

40

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This is a laboratory based module covering experimental aspects of the 'core' chemistry courses Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds), Bonding, Structure and Periodicity and Light, Atoms and Materials. A component on Analytical Chemistry is also included. The use of spreadsheets for analysing and presenting data is covered in this module.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

This module introduces the concepts of #and # bonding and hybridisation. Organic synthesis and spectroscopy are discussed, with a survey of methods to synthesise alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines and carboxylic acids, and the use of IR, UV and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to identify the products. After a shared introduction to atomic structure and periodicity this module introduces the concepts of ##and # bonding and hybridisation., conjugation and aromaticity, the mechanistic description of organic reactions, the organic functional groups, the shapes of molecules and the stereochemistry of reactions (enantiomers and diastereoisomers, SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation and 1,2-difunctionalisation of alkenes). These principles are then elucidated in a series of topics: Enolate, Claisen, Mannich reactions, and the Strecker amino acid synthesis; the electrophilic substitution reactions of aromatic compounds, and the addition reactions of alkenes, and the chemistry of polar multiple bonds.

CHE-4101Y

20

ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, RELATIVITY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

This module gives an introduction to important topics in physics, with particular, but not exclusive, relevance to chemical and molecular physics. Areas covered include optics, electrostatics and magnetism and special relativity. The module may be taken by any science students who wish to study physics beyond A Level.

PHY-4001Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

This module covers the history of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensic technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA profiling. Teaching and learning is through lectures, practicals and mentor groups using problem based learning. In the first semester the students will be split into investigative teams and asked to investigate a hypothetical criminal case with simulated evidence material which they will have to analyse, providing them with the taught basic science and developing problem-solving skills. They will further investigate the "case" through discussions in the mentor groups to decide whether or not the evidence supports the prosecution or defence scenarios and then present their report to an audience of fellow students. In the second semester students will be introduced to the basics of genetics and the chemistry behind the extraction, amplification and analysis of DNA.This will be placed in a forensic context through using the critical thinking approach developed in the first semester. Students will gain practical skills in the examination of crime scenes; the collection of evidence; and the extraction, analysis and handling of DNA samples.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the key aspects of physical and biological chemistry that underpin the physiology of living systems. It will provide a basic understanding of a number of physiological processes and functioning of major organ systems of the human body.

BIO-4009Y

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module provides an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. It begins with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This leads on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, nature, landscape and risk. In addition, the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers are introduced. Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles, and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means.

ENV-4010Y

20

LIGHT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

This module introduces students to the major areas of classical physical chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, electrolyte solutions and electrochemistry as well as spectroscopy. Chemical kinetics will consider the kinetic theory of gasses and then rate processes, and in particular with the rates of chemical reactions taking place either in the gas phase or in solution. The appropriate theoretical basis for understanding rate measurements will be developed during the course, which will include considerations of the order of reaction, the Arrhenius equation and determination of rate constants. Thermodynamics deals with energy relationships in large assemblies, that is those systems which contain sufficient numbers of molecules for 'bulk' properties to be exhibited and which, are in a state of equilibrium. Properties discussed will include the heat content or enthalpy (H), heat capacity (Cp, Cv), internal energy (U), heat and work. The First Law of Thermodynamics will be introduced and its significance explained in the context of chemical reactions. It is very important that chemists have an understanding of the behaviour of ions in solution, which includes conductivity and ionic mobility. The interaction of radiation with matter is termed spectroscopy. Three main topics will be discussed: (i) ultraviolet/visible (UV / Vis) spectroscopy, in which electrons are moved from one orbital to another orbital; (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy, a technique which provides chemists with important information on the variety of bond types that a molecule can possess; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which allow chemists to identify 'molecular skeletons'.

CHE-4202Y

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

In the first semester we develop the algebra of matrices: Matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects. This is followed in the second semester by vectors space theory: Subspqaces, basis and dimension, linear maps, rank-nullity theorem, change of basis and the characteristic polynomial.

MTHA4002Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

This module covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C.

ENV-4015Y

20

MOLECULES, GENES AND CELLS

The module explores the principles of how information is stored in DNA, how it is expressed, copied and repaired, and how DNA is transmitted between generations. The module will provide an introduction to fundamental aspects of biochemistry and cell biology. The essential roles played by proteins and enzymes in signalling, transport and metabolism will be considered in terms of their structures. You will discover how living cells are visualised and the nature of the cell's component membranes and organelles.

BIO-4013Y

40

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

The lecture programme will provide you with essential information about some of the physical principles that underpin our understanding of molecular and cellular systems. The complementary seminar series will help to consolidate your understanding through applying this knowledge to selected topics in the molecular biosciences and provide you with the opportunity to develop skills in problem solving, data analysis, scientific writing and presentation. The module is also enriched with six math workshops. In these workshops you are going to consolidate but also further develop basic and more advanced mathematical skills that directly relate with this module but that will also assist you for the duration of your degree. Background: It is assumed that you will have studied Chemistry to AS Level or equivalent and will have Maths to GCSE grade B or equivalent.

BIO-4007Y

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

This module explores how quantitative skills can be applied to solve a range of environmental problems. It is designed for students who have a GCSE in maths at grade B or C, but no AS/ A2 qualification (or equivalent). The module will include a review of some fundamental GCSE-level maths (such as manipulating expressions) but will focus on the practical use of maths through physical equations and mathematical models. Students will also learn about summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. Assessment is through coursework and a statistics course test.

ENV-4013Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences and Geography. It aims to provide a broad understanding of the research process through activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. A week-long residential field course, held at Easter and based at Slapton Ley, Devon, applies field, lab and other skills to a variety of environmental science and geography topics.

ENV-4004Y

20

RESEARCH SKILLS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

This module is aimed at Biochemistry students, and provides practical and research skills. The laboratory component exposes the students to experimental and computational aspects of different areas of chemistry: organic, inorganic, analytical and physical. The experiments and simulations exemplify the content of lectures in other modules and provide practical chemistry skills, complementing lectures in the first year modules Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds, Bonding, Structure and Periodicity), and Physical and Analytical Methods in the Biomolecular Sciences. The seminar and workshop component develops skills such as analysing data, using references critically, and presenting results in different formats.

CHE-4602Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; error propagation in physical chemistry and physical principles through applied mathematics. The module also contains a broadly based series of lectures on science, coupled with activities based upon them. The twin objectives for this part of the module are to provide a contextual backdrop for the more focused studies in other concurrent and subsequent degree courses, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information.

CHE-4050Y

20

Students will select 100 - 120 credits from the following modules:

In this option range 20 of the 100-120 credits may be selected from a School outside the Science Faculty, not listed in this profile, with the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA

We introduce groups and rings, which together with vector spaces are the most important algebraic structures. At the heart of group theory in Semester I is the study of symmetry and the axiomatic development of the theory, groups appear in many parts of mathematics. The basic concepts are subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, factor groups, group actions and the Isomorphism Theorem. In Semester II we introduce rings, using the Integers as a model and develop the theory with many examples related to familiar concepts such as substitution and factorisation. Important examples of commutative rings are fields, domains, polynomial rings and their quotients.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALOGUE AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

This module provides a practical introduction to electronics. Topics include a review of basic components and fundamental laws; introduction to semiconductors; operational amplifiers; combinational logic; sequential logic; and state machines. Much of the time is spent on practical work. Students learn how to build prototypes, make measurements and produce PCBs.

CMP-5027A

20

ANALYSIS

This module covers the standard basic theory of the complex plane. The areas covered in the first semester, (a), and the second semester, (b), are roughly the following: (a) Continuity, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables, differentiation, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, Moebius transformations. (b) Topology of the complex plane, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how wavefields and potential fields are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of metres to kilometres. The basic theory, data acquisition and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical, gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4015Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4015Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent). RESIDENTIAL FIELDCOURSE: This module includes a one-week fieldcourse and is presently held in the Lake District during the Easter break. There will be a charge for attending this field course. The cost is heavily subsidised by the School, but students enrolling must understand that they will commit to paying a sum to cover attendance. As the details of many modules and field courses have changed recently, the following figures should be viewed as ball-park estimates only. If you would like firmer data please consult the module organiser closer to the field course. The cost to the student will be on the order of GBP150.

ENV-5005K

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to teach the R statistical language and to cover 3 topics: Linear regression, and Survival Analysis.

CMP-5017B

20

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module provides training in how to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment and explores a number of important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate:- nutrient cyles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module would make a good combination with ENV-5001A Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analyzing water quality. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module fits well with other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and with modules in development studies or geography. It can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry, other geochemical modules and hydrology. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data. Lectures will show how the chemical and physical features of freshwaters influence their biological communities. Students may attend video screenings that complement lectures with examples of aquatic habitats in the tropics.

ENV-5001A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: Stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are among the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and processes in the atmosphere from the Earth's surface to the stratosphere, and considers current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem-solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module aims to develop understanding of contemporary biochemistry, especially in relation to mammalian physiology and metabolism. There will be a particular focus on proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, bioenergetics and signalling processes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

This module explores two major themes using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, specifically, 1) thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biological systems, and, 2) methodologies used to define these properties. Topics that will be discussed in the first theme include binding, activation, transfer and catalysis. Topics in the second theme will include optical spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and chromatography. Lecture and seminar materials are complemented by laboratory practicals.

CHE-5601Y

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. It also offers a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces the major community concepts and definitions, before looking in some detail at community patterns and processes including: species interactions; energy flows and productivity; and the hierarchy of drivers influencing community assembly, structure and diversity. Progression through these topics culminates in a macro-ecological perspective on community patterns and biodiversity. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of ecological theory and the fundamental science to the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, non-native species and pathogens, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples we draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

CONSERVATION, ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY IN THE TROPICS (FIELDCOURSE)

This module is for students on relevant courses in the Schools of BIO, ENV, DEV and NAT. NOTE: There will be a significant additional cost to this module to cover the costs of transportation and accommodation in the field. Costs will be detailed at an initial meeting for interested students and clearly advertised. Conservation ecology and biodiversity are central areas of research in the biological sciences and they share many theories, concepts and scientific methods. This module intends to take a practical approach to the commonalities in these areas using a combination of seminar work and fieldwork. The seminars will develop ideas in tropical biology and students will research issues affecting conservation of biodiversity in the tropics, considering the species ecology and the habitats, threats and challenges. There will be a significant component of small group work and directed, independent learning. The field component of this module will be a two week residential field trip to the tropics, one of two field sites (depending on numbers of students and availability).The field sites are run by expert field ecologists and during the two weeks we will explore the local environment, learn about the ecology of the landscape and about the species that inhabit the area. We will develop and run practical sessions on survey and census techniques, use of technology in modern field biology and the role of protected areas in species conservation. Students will conduct original research on the field trip, informed by prior research at UEA, to gain a deeper understanding of an aspect of tropical biology. There will be an assessed presentation on the field trip and many opportunities to develop the students own interests. All student participants will take an active role in the organisation and running of the module in order to gain project management and field logistics experience. Students will be responsible for the procurement, storage and transport of field equipment on the way to the field site and of samples on the return to the UK. Students will gain experience of travelling to a remote area and of working through licensing and customs processes. At the end of the module a report is written on the field project in the style of a journal article addressing specific questions in ecology conservation or biodiversity. Throughout the module students will be expected to maintain a modern-media record of their project from the initial desk based work at UEA, through the field component to outcomes and reporting.

BIO-5020K

20

CONSTRUCTING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module is a core element of the BA Geography degree, offering an overview of contemporary debates in human geography concerning sustainability and the environment in relation to society and the economy. The module is framed around key conceptual approaches in human geography and ongoing discussions about the discipline's engagement with policy-makers and other societal actors. Topics to be covered include: localisation, alternative economies, race, gender, conservation, cities, food security, big data and energy policy. The module is taught using lectures and participative workshops. Natural Sciences students taking this module must have taken either ENV-4010Y or ENV-4006B.

ENV-5038A

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms, and in the efficient implementation of a wide range of important data structures.

CMP-5014Y

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

EARTH SCIENCE LAB SKILLS

Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, and reading geological maps.

ENV-5029B

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

This module is designed to develop good observational and descriptive skills and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (in the field, in hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping. The module includes a week-long residential field work in the Easter vacation which has an added cost implication in the region of GBP250.

ENV-5030B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar presentations and a 4000 word case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This module investigates the principles of evolutionary biology, covering various sub-disciplines, i.e. adaptive evolution, population ecology, molecular and population genetics, speciation, biogeography, systematics, and finishing with an overview of Biodiversity. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the fundamentals of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works. Key topics and recent research will be used to highlight advances in the field and inspire thought. Weekly interactive workshops will explore a number of the conceptual issues indepth through discussions, modelling and problem solving.

BIO-5008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

(a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Following on from Forensic Chemistry- Collection and Comparison , where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and will cover: basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; dna analysis; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and spectroscopy and their application to fibres including the theory and practical application of infra-red and raman spectroscopy, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science including atomic absorption spectroscopy; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting.

CHE-5701Y

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have taken Mathematics for Computing A or equivalent. It provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.

CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

The aim is to provide an appreciation of genetics at a fundamental and molecular level and to demonstrate the importance and utility of genetic studies. Genetics and molecular biology lie at the heart of biological processes, ranging from cancer biology to evolution.

BIO-5009A

20

GEOMORPHOLOGY

Geomorphology is the scientific study of landforms and the processes that shape them. This module will provide an introduction to understanding a number of earth surface processes that create landforms. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding erosional and depositional concepts, weathering and sediment transport and the evolution of landscapes. The emphasis will be on local East Anglian field sites as case studies illustrating glacial geomorphology, ecogeomorphology and slope geomorphology with some arid geomorphology. Students will be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by geomorphologists (e.g., maps, imagery and field observations).

ENV-5034A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module builds upon the introduction to GIS provided in the first year Research and Field Skills module, focusing on how students can obtain their own data, integrate it together and then undertake analysis and presentation tasks. ESRI ArcGIS will be the main software used, but there will also be an introduction to scripting tools (Python) and open source software (QGIS). Teaching will consist of a one-hour lecture and a three-hour practical class each week. Students should expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of scheduled classes on their formative and summative coursework.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include 2D transformations, texture mapping, collision detection, graphics hardware, fonts, algorithms for line drawing, polygon filling, line and polygon clipping and colour in graphics.

CMP-5010B

20

HEAT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

Fundamental aspects of thermodynamics and condensed matter physics will be covered. Ideas about the electronic structure based on the free-electron Sommerfeld and band theories will be introduced along with the concept of phonons and their contribution to the heat capacity of a solid. Entropy will be considered in terms of a macroscopic Carnot cycle and the statistical approach. Two important distributions of particles will be treated; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac. Changes of state, 1st and 2nd order phase transitions and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation will be descibed.

PHY-5001Y

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an understanding of the themes and principles of physiology and a detailed knowledge of the major human organ systems. Topics include: Information transmission by the nervous system and the integrative processes of the spinal cord and brain; Reaction to the environment through perception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, including the eyes and ears; The muscular and skeletal systems, including muscle contraction and its control, bones and joints; Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function; Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral homeostasis; Nutrition and the digestive system; The endocrine system and its role in human disease. A central principle in physiology is the concept of homeostasis. An understanding of how disease affects the ability of organ systems to maintain the status quo is an important part of this course.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

Hydrology and hydrogeology are Earth Science subjects concerned with the assessment of the natural distribution of water in time and space and the evaluation of human impacts on the water. This module provides an introduction to geological controls on groundwater occurrence, aquifer characteristics, basic principles of groundwater flow, basic hydrochemistry, an introduction to catchment hydrology, hydrological data collection and analysis, runoff generation processes and the principles of rainfall-runoff modelling. Practical classes develop analytical skills in solving problems as well as field skills in pumping test analysis and stream gauging. A field excursion in Norfolk is also offered in this module.

ENV-5021A

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

The module explores the development of Information Retrieval technologies, which have been driven by large increases in online documents and the Internet search engines, surveys a range of IR topics and the use of natural language processing techniques and their role in IR.

CMP-5036A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The module describes the structure, bonding and reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds, and is a prerequisite for the 3rd level inorganic course Inorganic Compounds: Structure and Functions. It covers the electronic structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes (ligand field theory), the chemistry of main group clusters, polymers and oligomers, the structures and reactivities of main group and transition metal organometallics, and the application of spectroscopic methods (primarily NMR, MS and IR) to inorganic compounds. The module contains laboratory classes linked to the lecture topics and for this reason students must have completed either of the level 4 practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory (A) or Practical and Quantative Skills in Chemistry.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

CHE-5501Y

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module examines the physical/chemical principles of energy science and technologies - from clean energy generation and conversion, such as renewables, bioenergy, batteries, and hydrogen and fuel cells. It provides a systematic and integrated account of scientific/technical issues of the energy resources and conversion. The knowledge is used to make rational analyses of energy availability, applications and selections from physical, technical and environmental considerations. It also provides students with the opportunity to explore the future of energy provision in greater depth in practical sessions. These include invited talks, energy debates and group discussions on the applications of low carbon energy technologies.

ENV-5022B

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. A series of practical experiments in polymer and materials chemistry supports this module and are designed to improve and enhance laboratory skills through experiments, which cover important topics in modern chemistry.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

It introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing. Some Bayesian ideas will be also introduced.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the second in a series of three mathematical modules for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples.

MTHB5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

MTHB5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module introduces medicinal chemistry using chemical principles established during the first year. The series of lectures covers a wide range of topics central to medicinal chemistry. Topics discussed include an Introduction to Drug Development, Proteins as Drug Targets, Revision Organic Chemistry, Targeting DNA with Antitumour Drugs, Targeting DNA-Associated Processes, Fatty Acid and Polyketide Natural Products.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of radiation balance, fundamental thermodynamics, dynamics, boundary layers, weather systems and meteorological hazards. The assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential, including a basic understanding of differentiation and integration.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, weather hazards, micro-meteorology, further thermodynamics and weather forecasting. The module includes a major summative coursework assignment based on data collected on a UEA meteorology fieldcourse in a previous year.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, weather hazards, micro-meteorology, further thermodynamics and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, involving students in designing scientific experiments to quantify the effects of micro- and synoptic-scale weather and climate processes, focusing on lake, forest and mountain environments. There will be a charge to students in the order of GBP160 for attending this fieldcourse which is also heavily subsidized by the School.

ENV-5010K

20

MICROBIOLOGY

Pre-requisites: Students must have taken BIO-4003A and either BIO-4001A or BIO-4004B to take this module. A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 6 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The aims are to provide: (i) a background to the fundamental principles of molecular biology, in particular the nature of the relationship between genetic information and the synthesis, and three dimensional structures, of macromolecules; (ii) practical experience of some of the techniques used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material, and the necessary theoretical framework, and (iii) an introduction to bioinformatics, the computer-assisted analysis of DNA and protein sequence information.

BIO-5003B

20

NETWORKS

This module examines networks and how they are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. A layered approach is taken in the study of networks with emphasis given to the functionality of the OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. The module examines the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to overall reliable data transmission that the network provides. An emphasis is placed on practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information (e.g. VoIP) and network security. Labs and coursework are highly practical and underpin theory learnt in lectures.

CMP-5037B

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. Shelf Sea Dynamics is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here. We strongly recommend that you also gain oceanographic fieldwork experience by taking the 20-credit biennial Marine Sciences fieldcourse.

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This course builds on Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds (the first year organic chemistry course). Four main topics are covered. The first 'aromaticity' includes benzenoid and hetero-aromatic systems. The second major topic is the organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Spectroscopic characterisation of organic compounds is reviewed and the final major topic is 'stereochemistry and mechanisms'. This covers conformational aspects of acyclic and cyclic compounds. Stereoelectronic effects, Neighbouring Group Participation (NGP), Baldwin's rules, Cram's rule and cycloaddition reactions are then discussed.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, the thermodynamics of solutions and chemical kinetics of complex reactions. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one Level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology, with a molecular perspective and an emphasis on plant development and plant response to the environment.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) never before it was so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is, thus, fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferrable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

PROGRAMMING 2

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and is a continuation of CMP-4008Y. It contains greater breadth and depth and provides students with the range of skills needed for many of their subsequent modules. We recap Java and deepen your understanding of the language by teaching topics such as nested classes, enumeration, generics, reflection, collections and threaded programming. We then introduce C in order to improve your low level understanding of how programming works, before moving on to C++ in semester 2. We conclude by introducing C# to highlight the similarities and differences between languages.

CMP-5015Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

This course covers the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

RENEWABLE ENERGY

This module builds on understanding in wind, tidal and hydroelectric power and introduces theories and principles relating to a variety of renewable energy technologies including solar energy, heat pumps and geothermal sources, fuel cells and the hydrogen ecomony, biomass energy and anaerobic digestion. Students will consider how these various technologies can realistically contribute to the energy mix. Students will study the various targets and legislative instruments that are used to control and encourage developments. Another key aspect of the module is the study and application of project management and financial project appraisal techniques in a renewable energy context.

ENG-5002B

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history of environmental change, contain the fossil record and host many of the world's natural resources. This module includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks, their stratigraphy and the sedimentary structures they contain.

ENV-5035B

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

The shallow shelf seas that surround the continents are the oceans that we most interact with. They contribute a disproportionate amount to global marine primary production and CO2 drawdown into the ocean, and are important economically through commercial fisheries, offshore oil and gas exploration, and renewable energy developments (e.g. offshore wind farms). This module explores the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal waters, their effect on biological, chemical and sedimentary processes, and how they can be harnessed to generate renewable energy.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS WITH FIELDCOURSE

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. The module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. This will cover different perspectives on research, developing a research question, research design, research ethics, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and includes quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method approaches. The learning outcomes will be for students to be able to demonstrate: (i) Knowledge and critical understanding of relevant concepts and principles (ii) Ability to apply concepts and principles to the design of social science research (iii) Knowledge of some of the main methods of enquiry (iv) Ability to evaluate critically different approaches (v) Ability to present effectively a research proposal, both orally and in writing. The module will include a field course at Easter based in Keswick, an area which provides excellent opportunities for studying a range of geographical and environmental issues, including flooding, low-carbon energy developments, spatial contrasts in economic development and landscape management. The first part of the field course will consist of four days of faculty-organised activities where students will be able to practice questionnaire surveys, interviewing and other social research methods. During the final two days students will work in small groups to plan a research investigation from a list of pre-defined topics. Each group will present their research proposal on the final afternoon of the field course as a piece of formative assessment and the individual members will then write separate short reports on their proposal as their second item of summative assessment for the module. There will be an additional charge in the region of GBP250 for students to attend the field course.

ENV-5036K

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. Students will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. They will be taught state of the art in phased software development methodology, with a special focus on the activities required to go from initial class model design to actual running software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change; soil ecosystem services and soil quality.

ENV-5012A

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers, at a high level, various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to design and implementation. Its main focus, however, is on the early stages, in particular requirements investigation and specification including the use of UML. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including object orientated, soft systems, structured, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.

CMP-5003A

20

TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS

This module is an optional Year long module. It covers two topics, Lagrangian Systems and Special Relativity, one in each semester. Lagrangian Systems involves reformulation of problems in mechanics allowing solution of problems such as the osci llation of a double pendulum. Some discussion of Hamiltonian systems will also be included. Special Relativity is concerned with changes in time and space when an observer is moving at a speed close to the speed of light.

MTHF5200Y

20

TOPICS IN PURE MATHEMATICS

This module provides an introduction to two selected topics within pure mathematics. These are self-contained topics which have not been seen before. The topics on offer for 2017-18 are the following. Topology: This is an introduction to point-set topology, which studies spaces up to continuous deformations and thereby generalises analysis, using only basic set theory. We will begin by defining a topological space, and will then investigate notions like open and closed sets, limit points and closure, bases of a topology, continuous maps, homeomorphisms, and subspace and product topologies. Computability: This is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of computability theory. The main question we will focus on is "which functions can in principle (i.e., given unlimited resources of space and time) be computed?". The main object of study will be certain devices known as unlimited register machines (URM's). We will adopt the point of view that a function is computable if and only if i is computable by a URM. We will identify large families of computable functions and will prove that certain naturally occurring functions are not computable.

MTHF5100Y

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a level 4 module from the following list.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

This module will strengthen your mathematical skills and will introduce you to differentiation and integration. You will apply quantitative skills to environmental and geographical problems. This module will widen the range of science modules you can take during your studies in geography and environmental sciences. It will cover statistical methods, including summarising data using numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. Students will be required to purchase access to MyMathLab software either stand-alone (GBP29.99), with an e-book (GBP39.99) or with a hard copy of the Foundation Maths textbook (6th Edition) by by A Croft and R Davison (GBP48.99) (prices for October 2016).

ENV-4014Y

20

ASTROPHYSICS,ACOUSTICS AND ADDITIONAL SKILLS

This module explores the physics behind the generation and reception of music, introduces the fundamental principles of astrophysics and uses them to explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena and introduces the topics of uncertainties, accuracy and ethical behaviour in physics.

PHY-4002Y

20

BIODIVERSITY

An introduction to the evolution of the major groups of microorganisms, plants and animals. The module considers structural, physiological and life-cycle characteristics of these organisms. It charts the development of life on land and interprets evolutionary responses to changing environments.

BIO-4001A

20

BONDING, STRUCTURE and PERIODICITY

After a shared introduction to chemical bonding atomic and molecular structure and chemical principles, this module will provide an introduction to the structures, properties and reactivities of molecules and ionic solids. The latter part of the course will concentrate more on fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between chemical bonding and the structures and properties of molecules. This module is the prerequisite for the 2nd year Inorganic Chemistry module. The first few lectures of this module are integrated with the module Chemistry of Carbon Based Compounds. . The course is supported and illustrated by the bonding, structrure and periodicity experiments of the first year practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory A or Research Skills in Biochemistry.

CHE-4301Y

20

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (A)

This is a laboratory based module covering experimental aspects of the 'core' chemistry courses Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds), Bonding, Structure and Periodicity and Light, Atoms and Materials. A component on Analytical Chemistry is also included. The use of spreadsheets for analysing and presenting data is covered in this module.

CHE-4001Y

20

CHEMISTRY OF CARBON-BASED COMPOUNDS

This module introduces the concepts of #and # bonding and hybridisation. Organic synthesis and spectroscopy are discussed, with a survey of methods to synthesise alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, ethers, amines and carboxylic acids, and the use of IR, UV and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to identify the products. After a shared introduction to atomic structure and periodicity this module introduces the concepts of ##and # bonding and hybridisation., conjugation and aromaticity, the mechanistic description of organic reactions, the organic functional groups, the shapes of molecules and the stereochemistry of reactions (enantiomers and diastereoisomers, SN1/SN2 and E1/E2 reactions, and epoxidation and 1,2-difunctionalisation of alkenes). These principles are then elucidated in a series of topics: Enolate, Claisen, Mannich reactions, and the Strecker amino acid synthesis; the electrophilic substitution reactions of aromatic compounds, and the addition reactions of alkenes, and the chemistry of polar multiple bonds.

CHE-4101Y

20

ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, RELATIVITY AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

This module gives an introduction to important topics in physics, with particular, but not exclusive, relevance to chemical and molecular physics. Areas covered include optics, electrostatics and magnetism and special relativity. The module may be taken by any science students who wish to study physics beyond A Level.

PHY-4001Y

20

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICS

RESERVED FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS. This module utilises the mathematical concepts from the Mathematics for Scientists module in an engineering context, before complementing the material with practical mechanics to solve real-world problems. Over the first semester students are introduced to the vocational necessity of estimation in the absence of accurate data through a team-based competition, as well as the practical geometry and numerical methods which can be used when analytical techniques fail. This is supplemented by practical exercises in graphical presentation and data analysis which will contribute to the coursework element of the module. Teaching then concentrates on mechanics in the second semester, encompassing Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics and conservation laws before a final exam.

ENG-4004Y

20

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES AND LAWS

To successfully complete this module you will normally need the equivalent of Maths A level grade B. This module introduces three distinct topics which will be developed during the later stages of the course. During the first semester, students investigate how to harness the properties of modern materials within an engineering context, followed by fluid flow and hyrdaulics both assessed by formative course tests. Fluids continues in Semester 2 followed by the study of thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students complete a number of laboratory exercises which are assessed by two formal summative reports

ENG-4002Y

20

EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY

This module introduces the main ideas in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology, and ecology. It concentrates on outlining concepts as well as describing examples. Topics to be covered include the genetic basis of evolution by natural selection, systematics and phylogeny, the adaptive interpretation of animal sexual and social behaviour, population dynamics, species interactions, and ecosystems.

BIO-4002B

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - COLLECTION AND COMPARISON

This module covers the history of forensic science, forensic collection and recovery methods, anti-contamination precautions, microscopy, glass refractive index, introduction to pattern recognition including footwear; introduction to Drugs analysis; forensic statistics and QA chain of custody issues. The second half Introduces the student to the fundamentals of DNA and biotechnology essential for an understanding of forensic technologies. Topics covered include: nucleic acid/chromosome structure, replication, mutation and repair; concepts of genetic inheritance; DNA manipulation and visualisation; DNA sequencing; DNA profiling. Teaching and learning is through lectures, practicals and mentor groups using problem based learning. In the first semester the students will be split into investigative teams and asked to investigate a hypothetical criminal case with simulated evidence material which they will have to analyse, providing them with the taught basic science and developing problem-solving skills. They will further investigate the "case" through discussions in the mentor groups to decide whether or not the evidence supports the prosecution or defence scenarios and then present their report to an audience of fellow students. In the second semester students will be introduced to the basics of genetics and the chemistry behind the extraction, amplification and analysis of DNA.This will be placed in a forensic context through using the critical thinking approach developed in the first semester. Students will gain practical skills in the examination of crime scenes; the collection of evidence; and the extraction, analysis and handling of DNA samples.

CHE-4701Y

20

FOUNDATIONS FOR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY

The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the key aspects of physical and biological chemistry that underpin the physiology of living systems. It will provide a basic understanding of a number of physiological processes and functioning of major organ systems of the human body.

BIO-4009Y

20

GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

This module provides an introduction and orientation regarding geographical thought, methods and concepts. It begins with an overview of the history and development of the discipline. This leads on to discussion of core concepts such as space, place, scale, systems, nature, landscape and risk. In addition, the methods and different types of evidence used by geographers are introduced. Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the diversity of approaches to the generation of geographical knowledge and understanding and the capacity to communicate geographical ideas, principles, and theories effectively and fluently by written, oral and visual means.

ENV-4010Y

20

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

What are the most pressing environmental challenges facing the world today? How do we understand these problems through cutting-edge environmental science research? What are the possibilities for building sustainable solutions to address them in policy and society? In this module you will tackle these questions by taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider challenges relating to climate change, biodiversity, water resources, natural hazards, and technological risks. In doing so you will gain an insight into environmental science research 'in action' and develop essential academic study skills needed to explore these issues.

ENV-4001A

20

LIGHT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

This module introduces students to the major areas of classical physical chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, electrolyte solutions and electrochemistry as well as spectroscopy. Chemical kinetics will consider the kinetic theory of gasses and then rate processes, and in particular with the rates of chemical reactions taking place either in the gas phase or in solution. The appropriate theoretical basis for understanding rate measurements will be developed during the course, which will include considerations of the order of reaction, the Arrhenius equation and determination of rate constants. Thermodynamics deals with energy relationships in large assemblies, that is those systems which contain sufficient numbers of molecules for 'bulk' properties to be exhibited and which, are in a state of equilibrium. Properties discussed will include the heat content or enthalpy (H), heat capacity (Cp, Cv), internal energy (U), heat and work. The First Law of Thermodynamics will be introduced and its significance explained in the context of chemical reactions. It is very important that chemists have an understanding of the behaviour of ions in solution, which includes conductivity and ionic mobility. The interaction of radiation with matter is termed spectroscopy. Three main topics will be discussed: (i) ultraviolet/visible (UV / Vis) spectroscopy, in which electrons are moved from one orbital to another orbital; (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy, a technique which provides chemists with important information on the variety of bond types that a molecule can possess; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which allow chemists to identify 'molecular skeletons'.

CHE-4202Y

20

LINEAR ALGEBRA

In the first semester we develop the algebra of matrices: Matrix operations, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and geometric aspects. This is followed in the second semester by vectors space theory: Subspqaces, basis and dimension, linear maps, rank-nullity theorem, change of basis and the characteristic polynomial.

MTHA4002Y

20

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING, MECHANICS AND MODELLING

STUDENTS FROM YEARS 2 OUTSIDE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS CAN TAKE THIS MODULE IF THEY HAVE ALREADY TAKEN MTHA4005Y, MTHB4006Y OR ENV-4015Y AND HAVE NOT TAKEN MTHB4007B. The first part of the module is about how to approach mathematical problems (both pure and applied) and write mathematics. It aims to promote accurate writing, reading and thinking about mathematics, and to improve students' confidence and abilities to tackle unfamiliar problems. The second part of the module is about Mechanics. It includes discussion of Newton's laws of motion, particle dynamics, orbits, and conservation laws. This module is reserved for students registered in the School of Mathematics or registered on the Natural Sciences programme.

MTHA4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING A

The module is designed to provide students who have not studied A level Mathematics with sufficient understanding of basic algebra to give them confidence to embark on the study of computing fundamentals. Various topics in discrete and continuous mathematics which are fundamental to Computer Science will be introduced.

CMP-4004Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTING B

This module is designed for students with an A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics. For these students it provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. In addition 3D Vectors are introduced and complex numbers are studied.

CMP-4005Y

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS A

This module covers differentiation, integration, vectors, partial differentiation, ordinary differential equations, further integrals, power series expansions, complex numbers and statistical methods. In addition to the theoretical background there is an emphasis on applied examples. Previous knowledge of calculus is assumed. This module is the first in a series of three maths modules for students across the Faculty of Science that provide a solid undergraduate mathematical training. The follow-on modules are Mathematics for Scientists B and C.

ENV-4015Y

20

PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

The lecture programme will provide you with essential information about some of the physical principles that underpin our understanding of molecular and cellular systems. The complementary seminar series will help to consolidate your understanding through applying this knowledge to selected topics in the molecular biosciences and provide you with the opportunity to develop skills in problem solving, data analysis, scientific writing and presentation. The module is also enriched with six math workshops. In these workshops you are going to consolidate but also further develop basic and more advanced mathematical skills that directly relate with this module but that will also assist you for the duration of your degree. Background: It is assumed that you will have studied Chemistry to AS Level or equivalent and will have Maths to GCSE grade B or equivalent.

BIO-4007Y

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM I

The habitability of planet Earth depends on the physical and chemical systems on the planet which control everything from the weather and clim ate to the growth of all living organisms. This module aims to introduce you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret these systems. The module will lead many of you on to second and third year courses (and beyond) studying these systems in more detail, but even for those of you who choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The course has two distinct components, one on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) and one on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). During the course of the module the teachers will also emphasise the inter-relationships between these two sections This course is taught in two variants: this module provides a Basic Chemistry introduction for those students who have little or no background in chemistry before coming to UEA (see pre-requisites). This course will run throughout semester 2 involving a mixture of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half day field trip.

ENV-4007B

20

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARTH'S SYSTEM II

The habitability of planet Earth depends on the physical and chemical systems on the planet which control everything from the weather and climate to the growth of all living organisms. This module aims to introduce you to some of these key cycles and the ways in which physical and chemical scientists investigate and interpret these systems. The module will lead many of you on to second and third year courses (and beyond) studying these systems in more detail, but even for those of you who choose to study other aspects of environmental sciences a basic knowledge of these systems is central to understanding our planet and how it responds to human pressures. The course has two distinct components, one on the physical study of the environment (Physical Processes: e.g. weather, climate, ocean circulation, etc.) and one on the chemical study (Chemical Processes: weathering, atmospheric pollution, ocean productivity, etc.). During the course of the module the teachers will also emphasise the inter-relationships between these two sections This module is for students with previous experience of chemistry. This course will run throughout semester 2 involving a mixture of lectures, laboratory practical classes, workshops and a half day field trip.

ENV-4008B

20

PROBABILITY AND MECHANICS

(a) Probability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory. (b) Mechanics. Discussion of Newton's laws of motion. Particle dynamics. Orbits. Conservation laws.

MTHB4007B

20

PROGRAMMING 1

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of object-orientated programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming, although it is recognised that many will have done so in some measure.

CMP-4008Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR APPLICATIONS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features of programming using Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-4009B

20

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS

This module explores how quantitative skills can be applied to solve a range of environmental problems. It is designed for students who have a GCSE in maths at grade B or C, but no AS/ A2 qualification (or equivalent). The module will include a review of some fundamental GCSE-level maths (such as manipulating expressions) but will focus on the practical use of maths through physical equations and mathematical models. Students will also learn about summarising data using both numerical summaries and graphs, testing hypotheses and carrying out these analyses on computers. Assessment is through coursework and a statistics course test.

ENV-4013Y

20

REAL ANALYSIS

This module is concerned with the mathematical notion of a limit. We will see the precise definition of the limit of a sequence of real numbers and learn how to prove that a sequence converges to a limit. After studying limits of infinite sequences, we move on to series, which capture the notion of an infinite sum. We then learn about limits of functions and continuity. Finally, we will learn precise definitions of differentiation and integration and see the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MTHA4003Y

20

RESEARCH AND FIELD SKILLS

This module introduces a range of transferable skills, tools and data resources that are widely used in research across the Environmental Sciences and Geography. It aims to provide a broad understanding of the research process through activities that involve i) formulating research questions, ii) collecting data using appropriate sources and techniques, iii) collating and evaluating information and iv) presenting results. A week-long residential field course, held at Easter and based at Slapton Ley, Devon, applies field, lab and other skills to a variety of environmental science and geography topics.

ENV-4004Y

20

SETS, NUMBERS AND PROBABILITY

Basic set-theoretic notation, functions. Proof by induction, arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, the Euclidean algorithm. Styles of proof. Elementary set theory. Modular arithmetic, equivalence relations. Countability. Probability as a measurement of uncertainty, statistical experiments and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous distributions. Expectation. Applications of probability: Markov chains, reliability theory.

MTHA4001Y

20

SKILLS FOR CHEMISTS

Mathematical skills relevant to the understanding of chemical concepts; statistics as applied to experimental chemistry; error propagation in physical chemistry and physical principles through applied mathematics. The module also contains a broadly based series of lectures on science, coupled with activities based upon them. The twin objectives for this part of the module are to provide a contextual backdrop for the more focused studies in other concurrent and subsequent degree courses, and to engage students as participants in researching and presenting related information.

CHE-4050Y

20

SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND BIODIVERSITY

Striking a balance between societal development, economic growth and environmental protection has proven challenging and contentious. The concept of `sustainability' was coined to denote processes aiming to achieve this balance. This module introduces sustainable development, and examines why sustainability is so difficult to achieve, bringing together social and ecological perspectives. It also explores sustainability from an ecological perspective, introducing a range of concepts relevant to the structure and functioning of the biosphere and topics ranging from landscape and population ecology, to behavioural, physiological, molecular ecology, and biodiversity conservation at different scales. This module is assessed by coursework and an examination.

ENV-4006B

20

UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMIC PLANET

Understanding of natural systems is underpinned by physical laws and processes. This module explores energy, mechanics, physical properties of Earth materials and their relevance to environmental science using examples from across the Earth's differing systems. The formation, subsequent evolution and current state of our planet are considered through its structure and behaviour - from the planetary interior to the dynamic surface and into the atmosphere. Plate Tectonics is studied to explain Earth's physiographic features - such as mountain belts and volcanoes - and how the processes of erosion and deposition modify them. The distribution of land masses is tied to global patterns of rock, ice and soil distribution and to atmospheric and ocean circulation. We also explore geological time - the 4.6 billion year record of changing conditions on the planet - and how geological maps can used to understand Earth history. This course provides an introduction to geological materials - rocks, minerals and sediments - and to geological resources and natural hazards.

ENV-4005A

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

NATURAL SCIENCES YEAR IN INDUSTRY

Students on this module spend a year working at a placement provider. This module is reserved for students on U1GCF0402.

NAT-5005Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

NATURAL SCIENCES BSC PROJECT

This individual research module is compulsory for all Natural Sciences students and is only available to Natural Sciences students. It comprises supervised research in at least one area of science. It may involve research partners across the Norwich Research Park. The project can involve collection of data in the laboratory or in the field, and/or development of a piece of equipment, and/or development of software or a theoretical/numerical model, and/or analysis of pre-existing data from a variety of sources. It must include independent scientific analysis. It will be assessed by a written report, a presentation, and a web log maintained throughout the project.

NAT-6001Y

40

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

In this option range 20 of the 60-80 credits may be selected from a School outside the Science Faculty, not listed in this profile, with the approval of the Course Director.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUES

We provide techniques for a wide range of applications, while stressing the importance of rigor in developing such techniques. The calculus of Variations includes techniques for maximising integrals subject to constraints. A typical problem is the curve described by a heavy chain hanging under the effect of gravity. We develop techniques for algebraic and differential equations. This includes asymptotic analysis. This provides approximate solutions when exact solutions can not be found an6d when numerical solutions are difficult. Integral transforms are useful for solving problems including integro-differential equations. This unit will include illustration of concepts using numerical investigation with MAPLE.

MTHD6032B

20

ADVANCED STATISTICS

This module covers two topics in statistical theory: Linear and Generalised Linear models and also includes Stochastic processes. The first two topics consider both the theory and practice of statistical model fitting and students will be expected to analyse real data using R. Stochastic processes including the random walk, Markov chains, Poisson processes, and birth and death processes.

CMP-6004A

20

ALGORITHMS FOR BIOINFORMATICS

A brief introduction to the basics of molecular biology will be given, and so no background in biology is required. Topics will include sequence analysis, structural genomics and protein modelling, genome assembly and phylogenetics. Lecturers will highlight the relevance of the material to cutting-edge research and in applications such as understanding human diseases, developing new drugs, improving crop plants, and uncovering the origins of species.

CMP-6034B

20

AUDIOVISUAL PROCESSING

This module explores how computers process audio and video signals. In the audio component, the focus is on understanding how humans produce speech and how this can be processed by computer for speech recognition and enhancement. Similarly, the visual component considers the human eye and camera, and how video is processed by computer. The theoretical material covered in the lectures is reinforced with practical laboratory sessions. The module is coursework only and requires speech recognisers to be built that are capable of recognising the names of the students on the module and use both audio and visual speech information.

CMP-6026A

20

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND HUMAN SOCIETY

The global biodiversity crisis threatens mass species loss. What are the implications for society? How can communities solve this problem in a world that is facing other challenges of climate change, food security, environmental and social justice? This inter-disciplinary module focused on the interactions between biodiversity and human societies is designed for students of Geography, Environmental Science, Ecology and International Development who have an interest in biodiversity and its conservation.

ENV-6006A

20

BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE ECOLOGY

This module explores the evolution, biodiversity and ecology of bacteria, diatoms, coccolithophores and nitrogen fixers, and the physiology and distribution of zooplankton. Example ecosystems such as the Antarctic, mid ocean gyres and Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems will be studied in detail and predictions of the impact of environmental change (increasing temperature, decreasing pH, decreasing oxygen, and changes in nutrient supply) on marine ecosystem dynamics will be examined. Biological oceanographic methods will be critically evaluated. The module will include a reading week in week 7 and a voluntary employability visit to the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS). Students are expected to have some background in biology, e.g. have taken a biology, ecology or biogeochemistry based second year module.

ENV-6005A

20

CANCER BIOLOGY

This module deals with the concepts and principles of genetic analysis of cancer. The various roles of genes in development, apoptosis, the cell cycle, metastasis and angiogenesis are covered for example. A discussion on the potential of novel therapies concludes the module. This module takes advantage of several experts from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. Students will thus gain an in-depth appreciation of cancer as a disease process from both the scientific and clinical viewpoints.

BIO-6009A

20

CATCHMENT WATER RESOURCES

This module will adopt an integrated approach to studying surface water and groundwater resources in river basins to enable students to analyse aspects of land management that affect catchment water resources and ecosystems.

ENV-6018B

20

CELL BIOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE

To provide an understanding of key topics within cell biology and how these relate to human diseases. This module is concerned with the structure and function of cells in health and disease. It includes demonstrations of some of the imaging techniques used in the study of Cell Biology and workshops on how to design experiments and analyse a paper.

BIO-6006B

20

CELLULAR SIGNALLING

The module deals with signal transduction mechanisms, particularly in mammalian cells and with emphasis on human disease. Topics include the molecular basis of cell surface receptor activation, G-protein coupled receptors, kinases/phosphatases, 2nd messengers such as calcium and inositol lipids, and ion channels. The module then goes on to consider signalling mechanisms important for cell growth, differentiation and survival.

BIO-6003A

20

CHEMICAL PHYSICS - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

The module will consist of topics covering important areas of modern physical chemistry and chemical physics. The material will blend together experimental and theoretical aspects of photonics, condensed phase dynamics in molecular and macromolecular fluids and quantum and classical simulations.

CHE-6250Y

20

CLIMATE SYSTEMS

This module is about understanding the processes that determine why the Earth's climate (defined, for example, by temperature and moisture distribution) looks like it does, what are the major circulation patterns and climate zones and how do they arise, why the climate changes in time over different timescales, and how we use this knowledge to understand the climate systems of other planets. This course is aimed at those students who wish to further their knowledge of climate, or want a base for any future study of climate change, such as students doing the Meteorology/Oceanography or Climate Change degrees.

ENV-6025B

20

COMPUTER VISION

Computer Vision is about "teaching machines how to see". It includes methods for acquiring, analysing and understanding images. The unit comprises lectures and laboratories. Practical exercises and projects, undertaken in the laboratory support the underpinning theory and enable students to implement contemporary computer vision algorithms.

CMP-6035B

20

CRYPTOGRAPHY

Cryptography is the science of coding and decoding messages to keep them secure, and has been used throughout history. While previously only a few people in authority used cryptography, the internet and e-commerce mean that we now all have transactions that we want to keep secret. The speed of modern computers means messages encrypted using techniques from just a few decades ago can now be broken in seconds; thus the methods of encryption have also become more sophisticated. In this module, we will explore the mathematics behind some of these methods, notably RSA and Elliptic Curve Cryptogrphy.

MTHD6025A

20

DYNAMICAL METEOROLOGY

Dynamical meteorology is a core subject on which weather forecasting and the study of climate and climate change are based. This module applies fluid dynamics to the study of the circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. The fluid dynamical equations and some basic thermodynamics for the atmosphere are introduced. These are then applied to topics such as geostrophic flow, thermal wind and the jet streams, boundary layers, gravity waves, the Hadley circulation, vorticity and potential vorticity, Rossby waves, and equatorial waves. Emphasis will be placed on fluid dynamical concepts as well as on finding analytical solutions to the equations of motion.

MTHD6018B

20

ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

This module studies how electricity is generated and how it is distributed to users. The first part studies DC and AC electricity and looks at how RLC circuits behave through complex phasor analysis. The second part moves on to electricity generators, beginning with magnetism and Faraday's Law. Synchronous and asynchronous generators are studied along with application to conventional power stations and to renewable generation (e.g. wind). Transformers and transmission lines are studied with a view to distrubution of electricity. Voltage conversion methods such as the rectifier, buck and boost converters are examined and finally electricity generation through solar is covered.

ENG-6001B

20

EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Embedded processors are at the core of a huge range of products e.g. mobile telephones, cameras, passenger cars, washing machines, DVD players, medical equipment, etc. The embedded market is currently estimated to be worth around 100x the 'desktop' market and is projected to grow exponentially over the next decade. This module builds on the material delivered in CMP-5013A to consider the design and development of real-time embedded system applications for commercial off the shelf (COTS) processors running real-time operating systems (RTOS) such as eLinux.

CMP-6024B

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

This module will introduce students to a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. The module begins by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. The second part of the module then introduces some theories of social and technical change and uses these to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems - including behaviour change initiatives, domestic energy efficiency technologies, and community-scale renewables - that are currently being tried and tested around the world. TEACHING AND LEARNING The module is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars involving group projects, peer discussions, practical exercises and student-led learning. The lectures (2 per week) will introduce students to some core theoretical ideas about the relationships between energy and people, as well as examining a series of people-based solutions to energy problems that have been attempted around the world. The seminar sessions (1 per week) will give students the opportunity to engage with the lecture content in more depth through a range of exercises designed to promote discussion with both course lecturers and peers. Essential readings will be identified for each lecture. To do well in the module students will need to demonstrate that they have engaged extensively with the literature in this area, particularly regarding the 'real world' implications of theoretical ideas and debates. CAREER PROSPECTS Contemporary energy problems are a key concern of central and local government policy, business activities, charity and community work and wider public debates. A key reason why existing solutions to these problems either fail or are not as effective as at first assumed, is that they are often based on a poor understanding of how people use and engage with energy in the course of their everyday lives. Improving students' understanding of the relationships between energy and people and providing them with the intellectual tools necessarily to critically assess energy problems and potential solutions will therefore give them with a significant advantage in this growing job market. In addition to enhancing employability in the specific area of energy, this module will also provide students with a range of key transferable skills that will help them secure gainful employment on completion of their undergraduate degree. These include: developing analytical and critical thinking skills; understanding how to work effectively in teams; advocacy and negotiation skills; developing creative approaches to presentation; and presenting work to different audiences.

ENV-6026B

20

ENERGY MATERIALS

This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the developing landscape and challenges in the broad area of energy generation and transduction. It has a particular emphasis on the science that underpins emerging technologies related to the hydrogen economy, photovoltaics and biological or solar fuels. Necessarily it encompasses cross-discipline aspects of chemistry, physics materials and biological science with the students gaining knowledge of how these disciplines interplay in the design and construction of new devices for energy harvesting and utilisation.

CHE-6350Y

20

EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

The module provides up-to-date learning in evolutionary medicine and the evolution of disease. The module examines how evolutionary principles illuminate and provide fresh insight into a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic and nutritional diseases and disorders. Topics are introduced in a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the relationship between biology and society. The course covers 4 areas: (i) principles of evolutionary medicine - humans in their evolutionary context; (ii) evolution and non-infectious diseases (cancer, lifestyles, ageing); (iii) evolution and infection (vaccines, antibiotics, pathogens, emerging diseases); (iv) personalised medicine and social context of evolutionary medicine.

BIO-6017A

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION GENETICS

The aim of this module is to give students a deep understanding about conservation genetics / genomics based on an evolutionary / population-genetic framework, thereby covering contemporary issues in conservation biology, evolution, population biology, genetics, organismal phylogeny, Next Generation Sequencing, and molecular ecology. A background in evolution, genetics, and molecular biology is recommended. This is an advanced course in evolutionary biology / conservation genetics that will benefit students who plan to continue with a postgraduate degree in ecology, genetics, conservation, or evolution, plus students wishing to deepen their knowledge in 1st and 2nd year conservation / evolution / genetics modules.

BIO-6008B

20

FERMAT'S LAST THEOREM

This module looks at the Mathematics developed in attempts to prove Fermat's Last Theorem: that there are no natural number solutions to xn+yn=zn when n>2, This begins with Fermat's method of infinite descent, together with the property that any integer can be factorized uniquely into primes. However, to go beyond very small values of n, we must look at extensions of the integers, where unique factorization fails. Everntually, using tools from Abstract Algebra (rings and ideals) we will see Kummer's proof for so-calle regular primes n.

MTHD6024B

20

FLUID DYNAMICS

Fluid dynamics has wide ranging applications across nature, engineering, and biology. From understanding the behaviour of ocean waves and weather, designing efficient aircraft and ships, to capturing blood flow, the ability the understand and predict how fluids (liquids and gasses) behave is of fundamental importance. This Module considers mathematical models of fluids, particularly including viscosity (or stickiness) of a fluid. Illustrated by practical examples throughout, we develop the governing differential Navier-Stokes equations, and then consider their solution either finding exact solutions, or using analytical techniques to obtain solutions in certain limits (for example low viscosity or high viscosity).

MTHD6020A

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - INTERPRETATION AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS

In the first semester, the module contains introductory lectures on the diverse aspects of mass spectrometry in inorganic and organic chemistry from routine benchtop GC/LC-MS to Orbitrap-MS and MC-CC-ICPMS in a forensic chemistry context. It then applies this knowledge in two areas; an introduction to Forensic Toxicology, including drugs of abuse, and to Environmental issues, including provenancing of foodstuffs. The module also re-enforces issues of collection and preservation of evidence through two simulated case exercises dealing with scene examination and collection of evidence. In the second semester the module expands on themes introduced in the first semester and concentrates on developing both the written and oral presentation skills of students. It is based around a simulated case in which the students will need to examine some evidence, place in the context of the case and write an expert witness report. This will culminate in the presentation of live evidence to a simulated court. The module also includes teaching and discussion of more advanced forensic topics such as advanced DNA, firearms and gunshot residues. This module provides a foundation for the advanced forensic topics taught Through Forensic Chemistry - Advanced Topics Including Dna in the final year.

CHE-6701Y

20

FOSSIL FUELS

Geological, economic and political aspects of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) are introduced. These are used to discuss environmental concerns arising from the use of fossil fuels, and the potentially profound implications of future fuel scarcity on society. This module is suitable for students taking degrees in the School of Environmental Sciences. It can also be taken by students doing the Energy Engineering With Environmental Manageement course in the School of Mathematics. Some knowledge of Earth science and basic Chemistry will be expected.

ENV-6009A

20

GENOMES, GENES AND GENOMICS

This module provides a comprehensive coverage of contemporary biological studies of genomes. There will be a strong focus on the molecular basis of gene expression in a range of organisms, with a particular emphasis on the regulatory processes that affect expression at the genome level, including epigenetic ones. Topics covered will also include contemporary DNA sequencing technologies, comparative and functional genomics, the organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, global regulation of gene expression and the mechanisms that maintain genome integrity. Other lectures will highlight how modern genomics approaches are being exploited within BIO to address significant biological problems. The associated practical programme will also enhance students understanding of contemporary approaches used to characterise gene function, together with bioinformatics, as well as enhancing their practical skills in the analysis of genomes and gene products.

BIO-6013A

20

GEOPHYSICAL HAZARDS

Geophysical hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis and landslides have significant environmental and societal impacts. This module focuses on the physical basis and analysis of each hazard, their global range of occurrence, probability of occurrence and their local and global impact. The module addresses matters such as hazard monitoring, modelling and assessment. The module considers approaches towards risk mitigation and the reduction of vulnerability (individual and societal), with an emphasis on their practical implementation. Scenarios and probabilities of mega-disasters are also investigated. All the teaching faculty involved have practical experience of supplying professional advice on these hazards (and related risks) in addition to their own research involvement. A basic knowledge of physical science and of mathematics is assumed e.g. use of logs, exponentials, powers, cosines, rearrangement of equations.

ENV-6001B

20

GEOSCIENCES FIELDCOURSE: GREECE

This field course is designed to promote a deeper understanding and integration of geoscience subjects: the fieldwork will usually concentrate on applied skills in aspects of structural geology, regional tectonics, sedimentology, palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments, and volcanology. There are two field bases in the Aegean (Greece), the Gulf of Corinth active rift, and Santorini volcano.

ENV-6022K

20

GRAPHICS 2

This module introduces the fundamentals of 3D geometric transformations and viewing using OpenGL. It teaches the theory and implementation of fundamental visibility determination algorithms and techniques for lighting, shading and anti-aliasing. Issues involved with modern high performance graphics processor are also considered. It also studies 3D curves and fundamental geometric data structures.

CMP-6006A

20

HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

We trace the development of mathematics from prehistory to the high cultures of old Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Valley of Ind, through Islamic mathematics onto the mathematical modernity through a selection of results from the present time. We present the rise of calculus from the first worsk of the Indian and Greek mathematicians differentiation and integration through at the time of Newton and Leibniz. We discuss mathematical logic, the ideas of propositions, the axiomatisation of mathematics, and the idea of quantifiers. Our style is to explore mathematical practice and conceptual developments in different historical and geographic contexts.

MTHA6002B

20

HOST-PARASITE INTERACTIONS

This module examines the complex interactions between parasites/diseases and their hosts and explores how the selection pressures that each side of these interactions impose lead to coevolutionary processes. We will take an overview of the role that such parasitic interactions may have played in the development of key biological traits. The module will include traditional parasitology (to set the scene and understand the complexity of the interactions), introducing the major groups of parasites and their hosts. We examine the role of parasites and host-parasite interactions in evolution, drawing examples from conservation, behaviour, current medical research, theoretical predictions and models.

BIO-6016A

20

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY

This module provides a detailed coverage of the biology of selected infectious microorganisms, in the context of host and responses to pathogens. The properties of organs, cells and molecules of the immune system are described, along with the mechanism of antibody diversity generation, and the exploitation of the immune response for vaccine development. Examples of microbiological pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are used to illustrate major virulence strategies.

BIO-6010B

20

INORGANIC COMPOUNDS: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

This module concentrates on two important themes in contemporary inorganic chemistry: (i) the role of transition metals in homogeneous catalysis; (ii) the correlation between the structures of transition metal complexes and their electronic and magnetic properties. The structure and bonding in these compounds will be discussed as well as their applications in synthesis. There will be a series of problem-solving workshops interspersed with the lectures. There will also be two formative course tests of short questions in exam format.

CHE-6301Y

20

MACHINE LEARNING

This module covers the core topics that dominate machine learning research: classification, clustering and reinforcement learning. We describe a variety of classification algorithms (e.g. Neural Networks, Decision Trees and Learning Classifier Systems) and clustering algorithms (e.g. k-NN and PAM) and discuss the practical implications of their application to real world problems. We then introduce reinforcement learning and the Q-learning problem and describe its application to control problems such as maze solving.

CMP-6002B

20

MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY

Mathematics finds wide-ranging applications in biological systems: including population dynamics, epidemics and the spread of diseases, enzyme kinetics, some diffusion models in biology including Turing instabilities and pattern formation, and various aspects of physiological fluid dynamics.

MTHD6021A

20

MATHEMATICAL LOGIC

The subject analyses symbolically the way in which we reason formally, particularly about mathematical structures. The ideas have applications to other parts of Mathematics, as well as being important in theoretical computer science and philosophy. We give a thorough treatment of predicate and propositional logic and an introduction to model theory.

MTHD6015A

20

MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

This module provides a overview of the uses of microorganisms in biotechnological principles. It provides training in the basic principles that control microbiological culture growth, the microbial physiology and genetics that underpin the production of bioproducts such as biofuels, bioplastics, antibiotics and food products, as well as the use of micro-organisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation.

BIO-6004A

20

MICROBIAL CELL BIOLOGY

BIO-6005B provides a detailed understanding of cutting-edge developments in microbial cell biology. Essential techniques used to carry out modern day molecular microbiology will be covered. These techniques will be further explained in the context of work done on model microbial systems in research conducted on the Norwich Research Park (NRP). The module is taught by world-leading research scientists from the NRP and focus on the structure and analysis of bacterial genomes, the bacterial cytoskeleton, sub-cellular localisation, cell shape and cell division and intercellular communication between bacteria and higher organisms. There will also be research-led seminars delivered by NRP PhD students.

BIO-6005B

20

MODELLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES

The aim of the module is to show how environmental problems may be solved from the initial problem, to mathematical formulation and numerical solution. Problems will be described conceptually, then defined mathematically, then solved numerically via computer programming. The module consists of lectures on numerical methods and computing practicals (using Matlab); the practicals being designed to illustrate the solution of problems using the methods covered in lectures. The module will guide students through the solution of a model of an environmental process of their own choosing. The skills developed in this module are highly valued by prospective employers.

ENV-6004A

20

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENT

This module will discuss the mechanisms that drive embryonic development, including the signals and signalling pathways that lead to the establishment of the body plan, pattern formation, differentiation and organogenesis. Lectures will cover different model organisms used in the study of development with a focus on vertebrate systems. The relevance of embryonic development to our understanding of human development and disease is a recurring theme throughout the module, which also covers stem cells and their role in postnatal development and healthy tissue maintenance.

BIO-6012A

20

MOLECULAR ENZYMOLOGY IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

The module sets out to explain the molecular basis of the often complex catalytic mechanisms of enzymes concentrating particularly on their relevance to and applications in biotechnology and medicine. An extended practical based on the kinetics of a model enzyme, chymotrypsin, helps underpin concepts learnt in the module.

BIO-6001A

20

MOLECULAR PLANT-MICROBE INTERACTIONS

This module aims to provide an understanding of plant-microbe interactions, particularly at the molecular level. There is an emphasis on how microbes cause disease and how plants combat microbial pathogens. This module is taught by world leading scientists from the John Innes Centre, Sainsbury Laboratory, and UEA. This module includes a series of research seminars that will support the taught material. These will be given by younger scientists from the above centres of excellence.

BIO-6007B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

This module introduces some key principles of economics for students who have not studied the subject previously. It then explores how these principles can be applied to address a number of economy-environment problems including air pollution and over-fishing. The framework of cost-benefit analysis as a framework for decision-making is also introduced.

ENV-6012B

20

NUCLEAR AND SOLAR ENERGY

ENG-6002Y

20

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES

This module covers several key topics required to plan the synthesis of organic compounds, and to understand the properties displayed by organic compounds. The first topic is on synthesis planning, strategy and analysis, supported by a study of further important oxidation and reduction reactions. The second topic is on the various types of pericyclic reactions and understanding the stereochemistry displayed by an analysis of frontier orbitals. The third topic is on the use of organometallic compounds in synthesis with a particular emphasis on the use of transition metal based catalysts. The fourth topic is on physical organic chemistry and includes aspects of radical chemistry. The final topic is the synthesis of chiral non-racemic compounds, and describes the use of chiral pool compounds and methods for the amplification of chiral information, including asymmettric reductions and oxidations.

CHE-6101Y

20

PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY

This module examines the geological evidence for climatic change through the Quaternary Period (the last 2.6 million years) and the longer-term evolution of climate through the Cenozoic Era (the last 65 million years). The interpretation and causal mechanisms behind these major global environmental changes are explored using a diverse range of approaches - isotope geochemistry, sedimentology, palaeoecology and organic geochemistry. We focus on geochemical, biological and sedimentological information obtained from marine sediments, ice cores, and terrestrial environments and use these records to reconstruct the timing extent and magnitude of selected climatic events as expressed through changes in the geological record.

ENV-6017B

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

The module covers a selection of advanced topics in Physical Chemistry including statistical thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and theories of reaction rates, photochemistry, electrochemistry and diffraction techniques.

CHE-6201Y

20

PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRODUCTION

Plant biotechnology can play an important role in providing crop varieties with increased disease resistance, better P and N use efficiency, and higher nutritional value. Plant biotechnology includes not just genetic modification, but any technology to obtain desirable traits in plants, such as mutagenesis and marker-assisted selection. The identification of important traits from wild germplasm and existing cultivars, and their introduction into elite cultivars has been achieved primarily using conventional plant breeding methods. This module will identify the major challenges for sustainable crop production, highlight the role of plant biotechnology and current plant breeding strategies.

BIO-6025B

20

PROTEIN STRUCTURE, CHEMISTRY AND ENGINEERING

The structural basis of the function of many proteins has been elucidated and this, together with the ready availability of chemical and biochemical techniques for altering proteins in a controlled way, has led to the application of proteins in a wide variety of biologial and chemical systems and processes. These include their use as industrial catalysts and medicines, in organic syntheses and in the development of new materials. This module provides an introduction to the principles underlying this rapidly expanding and commercially-relevant area of the molecular biosciences and gives insights into their applications.

CHE-6601Y

20

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

This module brings an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module will be made aware of the theories surrounding learning and communication. They will investigate science as a culture and how this culture interfaces with the public. Students will examine case studies in a variety of different scientific areas. They will look at how information is released in scientific literature and how this is subsequently picked up by the public press. They will gain an appreciation of how science information can be used to change public perception and how it can sometimes be misinterpreted. Students will also learn practical skills by designing, running and evaluating a public outreach event at a school or in a public area. Students who wish to take this module will be required to write a statement of selection. These statements will be assessed and students will be allocated to the module accordingly.

BIO-6018Y

20

SOCIAL EVOLUTION

Life is organised hierarchically. Genes aggregate in cells, cells aggregate in organisms, and organisms aggregate in societies. Each step in the formation of this hierarchy is termed a major evolutionary transition. Because common principles of social evolution underlie each transition, the study of altruism and cooperation in nature has broadened out to embrace the fundamental hierarchical structure common to all life. This module investigates this new vision of social evolution. It explores how principles of social evolution underlying each transition illuminate our understanding of life's diversity and organisation, using examples ranging from selfish genetic elements to social insects and mammals.

BIO-6011B

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 2

Industrial software development is seldom started from scratch, companies generally have large systems of legacy software that need to be maintained, improved and extended. This module focuses on advanced software engineering topics, such as reverse engineering to understand legacy software, refactoring and design patterns to improve the design of software systems and developing new software products using third-party software components. Confidence in Java programming language skills as well as software engineering practice (phased development with agile methods, Unified Modeling Language, test-driven development) are pre-requisites. Software Engineering I (2M02) is required for this module.

CMP-6010A

20

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

This module draws together a wide range of material and considers it in the context of developing modern large-scale computer systems. Topics such as Outsourcing, Process Improvement, System Failure, Project Management, Configuration Management, Maintainability, Legacy Systems and Re-engineering, Acceptance and Performance Testing, Metrics and Human Factors are covered in this module. The module is supported by a series of industrial case studies and includes speakers from industry.

CMP-6003B

20

THE CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

What do you know about the drivers of climate change? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the greenhouse gas that has, by far, the greatest impact on climate change, but how carbon cycles through the Earth is complex and not fully understood. Predicting future climate or defining 'dangerous' climate change is therefore challenging. In this module you will learn about the atmosphere, ocean and land components of the carbon cycle. We cover urgent global issues such as ocean acidification and how to get off our fossil fuel 'addiction', as well as how to deal with climate denialists.

ENV-6008A

20

THEORY OF FINITE GROUPS

Group theory is the mathematical study of symmetry. The modern treatment of this is group actions and these are a central theme of this course. We will begin with permutation groups, group actions and the orbit-stabilizer theorem with many applications. This is followed by a discussion of the Sylow theorems, the class equations and an elementary theory of p-groups. Further topics include the theorem of Jordan and Hoelder, solvable groups and simple. Simplicity of finite and infinite alternating groups.

MTHD6014A

20

TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This module is to provide an awareness of organic natural product chemistry and the chemistry of bioactive compounds. The module illustrates natural product chemistry by a discussion of the biogenesis of terpenes and steroids and the chemistry of vision. In the synthetic chemistry section of the module, applications of multicomponent reactions, microwave and biphasic methods, procedures using organosulfur, organosilicon and organoselenium chemistry, and 'click' and multicomponent reactions are discussed in the context of the synthesis of natural products and bioactive compounds.

CHE-6151Y

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

A further 20 credits may be chosen from Options Range A above, or by taking a level 5 module from the following list.

Name Code Credits

ALGEBRA

We introduce groups and rings, which together with vector spaces are the most important algebraic structures. At the heart of group theory in Semester I is the study of symmetry and the axiomatic development of the theory, groups appear in many parts of mathematics. The basic concepts are subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, factor groups, group actions and the Isomorphism Theorem. In Semester II we introduce rings, using the Integers as a model and develop the theory with many examples related to familiar concepts such as substitution and factorisation. Important examples of commutative rings are fields, domains, polynomial rings and their quotients.

MTHA5003Y

20

ANALOGUE AND DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

This module provides a practical introduction to electronics. Topics include a review of basic components and fundamental laws; introduction to semiconductors; operational amplifiers; combinational logic; sequential logic; and state machines. Much of the time is spent on practical work. Students learn how to build prototypes, make measurements and produce PCBs.

CMP-5027A

20

ANALYSIS

This module covers the standard basic theory of the complex plane. The areas covered in the first semester, (a), and the second semester, (b), are roughly the following: (a) Continuity, power series and how they represent functions for both real and complex variables, differentiation, holomorphic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, Moebius transformations. (b) Topology of the complex plane, complex integration, Cauchy and Laurent theorems, residue calculus.

MTHA5001Y

20

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how wavefields and potential fields are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of metres to kilometres. The basic theory, data acquisition and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical, gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4015Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent).

ENV-5004B

20

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS WITH FIELDCOURSE

What lies beneath our feet? This module addresses this question by exploring how waves, rays and the various physical techniques are used in geophysics to image the subsurface on scales of meters to kilometres. The basic theory and interpretation methods of seismic, electrical and gravity and magnetic surveys are studied. A wide range of applications is covered including archaeological geophysics, energy resources and geohazards. The fieldcourse provides "hands-on" experience of the various techniques and applications, adding on valuable practical skills. This module is highly valued by employers in industry; guest industrial lecturers will cover the current 'state-of-the-art' applications in real world situations. Students doing this module are normally expected to have a good mathematical ability, notably in calculus and algebra before taking this module (ENV-4015Y Mathematics for Scientists A or equivalent). RESIDENTIAL FIELDCOURSE: This module includes a one-week fieldcourse and is presently held in the Lake District during the Easter break. There will be a charge for attending this field course. The cost is heavily subsidised by the School, but students enrolling must understand that they will commit to paying a sum to cover attendance. As the details of many modules and field courses have changed recently, the following figures should be viewed as ball-park estimates only. If you would like firmer data please consult the module organiser closer to the field course. The cost to the student will be on the order of GBP150.

ENV-5005K

20

APPLIED STATISTICS A

This is a module designed to give students the opportunity to apply statistical methods in realistic situations. While no advanced knowledge of probability and statistics is required, we expect students to have some background in probability and statistics before taking this module. The aim is to teach the R statistical language and to cover 3 topics: Linear regression, and Survival Analysis.

CMP-5017B

20

AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

The Earth's terrestrial and marine water bodies support life and play a major role in regulating the planet's climate. This module provides training in how to make accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the aquatic environment and explores a number of important chemical interactions between life, fresh and marine waters and climate:- nutrient cyles, dissolved oxygen, trace metals, carbonate chemistry and chemical exchange with the atmosphere. Students are expected to be familiar with basic chemical concepts and molar concentration units. This module would make a good combination with ENV-5001A Aquatic Ecology.

ENV-5039B

20

AQUATIC ECOLOGY

An analysis of how chemical, physical and biological influences shape the biological communities of rivers, lakes and estuaries in temperate and tropical regions. There is an important practical component to this module that includes three field visits and laboratory work, usually using microscopes and sometimes analyzing water quality. The first piece of course work involves statistical analysis of class data. The module fits well with other ecology modules, final-year Catchment Water Resources and with modules in development studies or geography. It can also be taken alongside Aquatic Biogeochemistry, other geochemical modules and hydrology. Students must have a background in basic statistical analysis of data. Lectures will show how the chemical and physical features of freshwaters influence their biological communities. Students may attend video screenings that complement lectures with examples of aquatic habitats in the tropics.

ENV-5001A

20

ARCHITECTURES AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This module studies the organization of both the system software and the underlying hardware architecture in modern computer systems. The role of concurrent operation of both hardware and software components is emphasized throughout, and the central concepts of the module are reinforced by practical work in the laboratory.

CMP-5013A

20

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE

Atmospheric chemistry and global change are in the news: Stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, greenhouse gases, and global scale air pollution are among the most significant environmental problems of our age. Chemical composition and transformations underlie these issues, and drive many important atmospheric processes. This module covers the fundamental chemical principles and processes in the atmosphere from the Earth's surface to the stratosphere, and considers current issues of atmospheric chemical change through a series of lectures, problem-solving classes, seminars, experimental and computing labs as well as a field trip to UEA's own atmospheric observatory in Weybourne/North Norfolk.

ENV-5015A

20

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY

In this module, the interrelationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution will be explored. Students will examine how behaviour has evolved to maximise survival and reproduction in the natural environment. Darwinian principles will provide the theoretical framework, within which the module will seek to explain the ultimate function of animal behaviours. Concepts and examples will be developed through the lecture series, exploring behaviours in the context of altruism, optimality, foraging, and particularly reproduction, the key currency of evolutionary success. In parallel with the lectures, students will design, conduct, analyse and present their own research project, collecting original data to answer a question about the adaptive significance of behaviour.

BIO-5010B

20

BIOCHEMISTRY

This module aims to develop understanding of contemporary biochemistry, especially in relation to mammalian physiology and metabolism. There will be a particular focus on proteins and their involvement in cellular reactions, bioenergetics and signalling processes.

BIO-5002A

20

BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO ANY STUDENT THAT SATISFIES THE PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS. Alternative pre-requisites are BIO-4001A and BIO-4002B, or BIO-4003A and BIO-4004B. This module will provide an opportunity to discuss various aspects of biology in society. Students will be able to critically analyse the way biological sciences issues are represented in popular literature and the media and an idea of the current 'hot topics' in biological ethics. Specific topics to be covered will involve aspects of contemporary biological science that have important ethical considerations for society, such as GM crops, DNA databases, designer babies, stem cell research etc. Being able to understand the difference between scientific fact and scientific fiction is not always straightforward. What was once viewed as science fiction has sometimes become a scientific fact or scientific reality as our scientific knowledge and technology has increased exponentially. Conversely, science fiction can sometimes be portrayed inaccurately as scientific fact. Students will research relevant scientific literature and discover the degree of scientific accuracy represented within the genre of science fiction.

BIO-5012Y

20

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

This module explores two major themes using predominantly examples from protein biochemistry, specifically, 1) thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biological systems, and, 2) methodologies used to define these properties. Topics that will be discussed in the first theme include binding, activation, transfer and catalysis. Topics in the second theme will include optical spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and chromatography. Lecture and seminar materials are complemented by laboratory practicals.

CHE-5601Y

20

CELL BIOLOGY

This module explores the molecular organisation of cells and the regulation of dynamic cellular changes, with some emphasis on medical cell biology. Dynamic properties of cell membranes, cell signalling, growth factor function and aspects of cancer biology and immunology. Regulation of the internal cell environment (nuclear organisation and information flow, cell growth, division and motility), the relationship of the cell to its extracellular matrix and the determination of cell phenotype. Aspects of cell death, the ageing process, developmental biology, mechanisms of tissue renewal and repair. It is strongly recommended that students taking this module should also take BIO-5003B or BIO-5009A.

BIO-5005B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

This module develops skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. The course gives grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. It also offers a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

COMMUNITY, ECOSYSTEM AND MACRO-ECOLOGY

This module introduces the major community concepts and definitions, before looking in some detail at community patterns and processes including: species interactions; energy flows and productivity; and the hierarchy of drivers influencing community assembly, structure and diversity. Progression through these topics culminates in a macro-ecological perspective on community patterns and biodiversity. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on the relevance of ecological theory and the fundamental science to the current environmental and biodiversity crisis. Anthropogenic impacts on natural communities through land-use, non-native species and pathogens, and climate change, are a recurrent theme underpinning the examples we draw upon.

BIO-5014B

20

CONSERVATION, ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY IN THE TROPICS (FIELDCOURSE)

This module is for students on relevant courses in the Schools of BIO, ENV, DEV and NAT. NOTE: There will be a significant additional cost to this module to cover the costs of transportation and accommodation in the field. Costs will be detailed at an initial meeting for interested students and clearly advertised. Conservation ecology and biodiversity are central areas of research in the biological sciences and they share many theories, concepts and scientific methods. This module intends to take a practical approach to the commonalities in these areas using a combination of seminar work and fieldwork. The seminars will develop ideas in tropical biology and students will research issues affecting conservation of biodiversity in the tropics, considering the species ecology and the habitats, threats and challenges. There will be a significant component of small group work and directed, independent learning. The field component of this module will be a two week residential field trip to the tropics, one of two field sites (depending on numbers of students and availability).The field sites are run by expert field ecologists and during the two weeks we will explore the local environment, learn about the ecology of the landscape and about the species that inhabit the area. We will develop and run practical sessions on survey and census techniques, use of technology in modern field biology and the role of protected areas in species conservation. Students will conduct original research on the field trip, informed by prior research at UEA, to gain a deeper understanding of an aspect of tropical biology. There will be an assessed presentation on the field trip and many opportunities to develop the students own interests. All student participants will take an active role in the organisation and running of the module in order to gain project management and field logistics experience. Students will be responsible for the procurement, storage and transport of field equipment on the way to the field site and of samples on the return to the UK. Students will gain experience of travelling to a remote area and of working through licensing and customs processes. At the end of the module a report is written on the field project in the style of a journal article addressing specific questions in ecology conservation or biodiversity. Throughout the module students will be expected to maintain a modern-media record of their project from the initial desk based work at UEA, through the field component to outcomes and reporting.

BIO-5020K

20

CONSTRUCTING HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module is a core element of the BA Geography degree, offering an overview of contemporary debates in human geography concerning sustainability and the environment in relation to society and the economy. The module is framed around key conceptual approaches in human geography and ongoing discussions about the discipline's engagement with policy-makers and other societal actors. Topics to be covered include: localisation, alternative economies, race, gender, conservation, cities, food security, big data and energy policy. The module is taught using lectures and participative workshops. Natural Sciences students taking this module must have taken either ENV-4010Y or ENV-4006B.

ENV-5038A

20

DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms, and in the efficient implementation of a wide range of important data structures.

CMP-5014Y

20

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLIED METHODS

(a) Ordinary Differential Equations: solution by reduction of order; variation of parameters for inhomogeneous problems; series solution and the method of Frobenius. Legendre's and Bessel's equations: Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions and their recurrence relations; Fourier series; Partial differential equations (PDEs): heat equation, wave equation, Laplace's equation; solution by separation of variables. (b) Method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; the characteristic equations; Fourier transform and its use in solving linear PDEs; (c) Dynamical Systems: equilibrium points and their stability; the phase plane; theory and applications.

MTHA5004Y

20

EARTH SCIENCE LAB SKILLS

Good observational and descriptive skills lie at the heart of many areas of Environmental Science. This module is designed to develop those and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects in this area. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, and reading geological maps.

ENV-5029B

20

EARTH SCIENCE SKILLS

This module is designed to develop good observational and descriptive skills and is particularly suitable for students with interests in Earth and Geophysical Sciences. It will cover generic Earth science skills of use for projects. The module will include: observing, describing and recording the characteristics of geological materials (in the field, in hand specimen and under microscope); measuring and representing 3d data, reading geological maps and basic geological mapping. The module includes a week-long residential field work in the Easter vacation which has an added cost implication in the region of GBP250.

ENV-5030B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar presentations and a 4000 word case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This module investigates the principles of evolutionary biology, covering various sub-disciplines, i.e. adaptive evolution, population ecology, molecular and population genetics, speciation, biogeography, systematics, and finishing with an overview of Biodiversity. This module will enable you to understand, analyse and evaluate the fundamentals of evolutionary biology and be able to synthesise the various components into an overall appreciation of how evolution works. Key topics and recent research will be used to highlight advances in the field and inspire thought. Weekly interactive workshops will explore a number of the conceptual issues indepth through discussions, modelling and problem solving.

BIO-5008B

20

FIELD ECOLOGY

Students explore the ecology of moorlands, bogs, sand dunes, rocky shores, estuaries and woodlands. Students should develop skills in identifying plants and animals using scientific keys, carrying out quantitative surveys and statistically analysing their data. Strong emphasis is placed on student-lead project work. The bulk of the teaching takes place on a two week field course in Western Ireland, that runs immediately before the start of the Autumn Semester.

BIO-5013A

20

FLUID DYNAMICS - THEORY AND COMPUTATION

(a) Hydrostatics, compressibility. Kinematics: velocity, particle path, streamlines. Continuity, incompressibility, streamtubes. Dynamics: Material derivative, Euler's equations, vorticity and irrotational flows. Velocity potential and streamfunction. Bernoulli's equation for unsteady flow. Circulation: Kelvin's Theorem, Helmholtz's theorems. Basic water waves. (b) Computational methods for fluid dynamics; Euler's method and Runge-Kutta methods and their use for computing particle paths and streamlines in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows; numerical computation and flow visualisation using Matlab; convergence, consistency and stability of numerical integration methods for ODEs. (c) Theory of Irrotational and Incompressible Flows: velocity potential, Laplace's Equation, sources and vortices, complex potential. Force on a body and the Blasius theorem. Method of images and conformal mappings.

MTHA5002Y

20

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY - ANALYSIS

Following on from Forensic Chemistry- Collection and Comparison , where the emphasis was on collection of evidence, this module introduces more in-depth forensic chemistry, looking at the way evidence gathered at a crime scene may be analysed in the laboratory. The module will deepen the knowledge of forensic statistics and will cover: basic detection and recovery techniques for body fluids; dna analysis; fingerprint development and recovery; advanced microscopy and spectroscopy and their application to fibres including the theory and practical application of infra-red and raman spectroscopy, paint and other particulates; the use of elemental analysis in forensic science including atomic absorption spectroscopy; and questioned document examination including counterfeiting.

CHE-5701Y

20

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

This module is for those students who have taken Mathematics for Computing A or equivalent. It provides an introduction to the mathematics of counting and arrangements, a further development of the theory and practice of calculus, an introduction to linear algebra and its computing applications and a further development of the principles and computing applications of probability theory. 3D Vectors and complex numbers are also studied.

CMP-5006A

20

GENETICS

The aim is to provide an appreciation of genetics at a fundamental and molecular level and to demonstrate the importance and utility of genetic studies. Genetics and molecular biology lie at the heart of biological processes, ranging from cancer biology to evolution.

BIO-5009A

20

GEOMORPHOLOGY

Geomorphology is the scientific study of landforms and the processes that shape them. This module will provide an introduction to understanding a number of earth surface processes that create landforms. The approach will be both descriptive and quantitative, based on understanding erosional and depositional concepts, weathering and sediment transport and the evolution of landscapes. The emphasis will be on local East Anglian field sites as case studies illustrating glacial geomorphology, ecogeomorphology and slope geomorphology with some arid geomorphology. Students will be introduced to the methods and different types of evidence used by geomorphologists (e.g., maps, imagery and field observations).

ENV-5034A

20

GIS SKILLS FOR PROJECT WORK

This module builds upon the introduction to GIS provided in the first year Research and Field Skills module, focusing on how students can obtain their own data, integrate it together and then undertake analysis and presentation tasks. ESRI ArcGIS will be the main software used, but there will also be an introduction to scripting tools (Python) and open source software (QGIS). Teaching will consist of a one-hour lecture and a three-hour practical class each week. Students should expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of scheduled classes on their formative and summative coursework.

ENV-5028B

20

GLOBAL TECTONICS

Processes in the Earth's interior have exerted a profound influence on all aspects of the Earth's system through geological time. This module is designed to explore all aspects of those processes from the creation and destruction of tectonic plates to the structure of the Earth's interior and the distribution and dissipation of energy within it. This will include: the theory and mechanisms of plate tectonics, the generation of magma and volcanism; the mechanisms behind earthquakes. The geological record of this activity, its evolution and impacts on the Earth will also be discussed.

ENV-5018A

20

GRAPHICS 1

Graphics 1 provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics for all computing students. It aims to provide a strong foundation for students wishing to study graphics, focusing on 2D graphics, algorithms and interaction. The module requires a good background in programming. OpenGL is utilised as the graphics API with examples provided in the lectures and supported in the laboratory classes. Other topics covered include 2D transformations, texture mapping, collision detection, graphics hardware, fonts, algorithms for line drawing, polygon filling, line and polygon clipping and colour in graphics.

CMP-5010B

20

HEAT, ATOMS AND MOLECULES

Fundamental aspects of thermodynamics and condensed matter physics will be covered. Ideas about the electronic structure based on the free-electron Sommerfeld and band theories will be introduced along with the concept of phonons and their contribution to the heat capacity of a solid. Entropy will be considered in terms of a macroscopic Carnot cycle and the statistical approach. Two important distributions of particles will be treated; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac. Changes of state, 1st and 2nd order phase transitions and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation will be descibed.

PHY-5001Y

20

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

This module aims to provide an understanding of the themes and principles of physiology and a detailed knowledge of the major human organ systems. Topics include: Information transmission by the nervous system and the integrative processes of the spinal cord and brain; Reaction to the environment through perception of external stimuli by sensory receptors, including the eyes and ears; The muscular and skeletal systems, including muscle contraction and its control, bones and joints; Respiration, gas transport, blood circulation and heart function; Kidney function in excretion and in water and mineral homeostasis; Nutrition and the digestive system; The endocrine system and its role in human disease. A central principle in physiology is the concept of homeostasis. An understanding of how disease affects the ability of organ systems to maintain the status quo is an important part of this course.

BIO-5004A

20

HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY

Hydrology and hydrogeology are Earth Science subjects concerned with the assessment of the natural distribution of water in time and space and the evaluation of human impacts on the water. This module provides an introduction to geological controls on groundwater occurrence, aquifer characteristics, basic principles of groundwater flow, basic hydrochemistry, an introduction to catchment hydrology, hydrological data collection and analysis, runoff generation processes and the principles of rainfall-runoff modelling. Practical classes develop analytical skills in solving problems as well as field skills in pumping test analysis and stream gauging. A field excursion in Norfolk is also offered in this module.

ENV-5021A

20

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

The module explores the development of Information Retrieval technologies, which have been driven by large increases in online documents and the Internet search engines, surveys a range of IR topics and the use of natural language processing techniques and their role in IR.

CMP-5036A

20

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The module describes the structure, bonding and reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds, and is a prerequisite for the 3rd level inorganic course Inorganic Compounds: Structure and Functions. It covers the electronic structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes (ligand field theory), the chemistry of main group clusters, polymers and oligomers, the structures and reactivities of main group and transition metal organometallics, and the application of spectroscopic methods (primarily NMR, MS and IR) to inorganic compounds. The module contains laboratory classes linked to the lecture topics and for this reason students must have completed either of the level 4 practical modules, Chemistry Laboratory (A) or Practical and Quantative Skills in Chemistry.

CHE-5301B

20

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

The module covers the theory and practical application of some key instrumental techniques for chemical analysis. Molecular spectroscopy, chromatography and electroanalytical techniques are the important instrumental methods included. Laboratory practicals using these techniques will reinforce material covered in the lecture programme.

CHE-5501Y

20

LOW CARBON ENERGY

This module examines the physical/chemical principles of energy science and technologies - from clean energy generation and conversion, such as renewables, bioenergy, batteries, and hydrogen and fuel cells. It provides a systematic and integrated account of scientific/technical issues of the energy resources and conversion. The knowledge is used to make rational analyses of energy availability, applications and selections from physical, technical and environmental considerations. It also provides students with the opportunity to explore the future of energy provision in greater depth in practical sessions. These include invited talks, energy debates and group discussions on the applications of low carbon energy technologies.

ENV-5022B

20

MATERIALS AND POLYMER CHEMISTRY

An introduction to the basic principles of polymer synthesis is presented, together with a discussion of their physical properties. Speciality polymers are discussed. Materials chemistry is developed further with the introduction of inorganic structures and the concept of ferroelectric properties together with powder x-ray diffraction as applied to cubic crystals. Ion conductivity and basic band theory are also discussed. Semiconductivity is introduced and related to the band description of these materials. A series of practical experiments in polymer and materials chemistry supports this module and are designed to improve and enhance laboratory skills through experiments, which cover important topics in modern chemistry.

CHE-5350Y

20

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

It introduces the essential concepts of mathematical statistics deriving the necessary distribution theory as required. In consequence in addition to ideas of sampling and central limit theorem, it will cover estimation methods and hypothesis-testing. Some Bayesian ideas will be also introduced.

CMP-5034A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS B

This module is the second in a series of three mathematical modules for students across the Faculty of Science. It covers vector calculus (used in the study of vector fields in subjects such as fluid dynamics and electromagnetism), time series and spectral analysis (a highly adaptable and useful mathematical technique in many science fields, including data analysis), and fluid dynamics (which has applications to the circulation of the atmosphere, ocean, interior of the Earth, chemical engineering, and biology). There is a continuing emphasis on applied examples.

MTHB5006A

20

MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENTISTS C

MTHB5007B

20

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This module introduces medicinal chemistry using chemical principles established during the first year. The series of lectures covers a wide range of topics central to medicinal chemistry. Topics discussed include an Introduction to Drug Development, Proteins as Drug Targets, Revision Organic Chemistry, Targeting DNA with Antitumour Drugs, Targeting DNA-Associated Processes, Fatty Acid and Polyketide Natural Products.

CHE-5150Y

20

METEOROLOGY I

This module is designed to give a general introduction to meteorology, concentrating on the physical processes in the atmosphere and how these influence our weather. The module contains both descriptive and mathematical treatments of radiation balance, fundamental thermodynamics, dynamics, boundary layers, weather systems and meteorological hazards. The assessment is designed to allow those with either mathematical or descriptive abilities to do well; however a reasonable mathematical competence is essential, including a basic understanding of differentiation and integration.

ENV-5008A

20

METEOROLOGY II

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, weather hazards, micro-meteorology, further thermodynamics and weather forecasting. The module includes a major summative coursework assignment based on data collected on a UEA meteorology fieldcourse in a previous year.

ENV-5009B

20

METEOROLOGY II WITH FIELDCOURSE

This module will build upon material covered in ENV-5008A by covering topics such as synoptic meteorology, weather hazards, micro-meteorology, further thermodynamics and weather forecasting. The module also includes a week long Easter vacation residential fieldcourse, based in the Lake District, involving students in designing scientific experiments to quantify the effects of micro- and synoptic-scale weather and climate processes, focusing on lake, forest and mountain environments. There will be a charge to students in the order of GBP160 for attending this fieldcourse which is also heavily subsidized by the School.

ENV-5010K

20

MICROBIOLOGY

Pre-requisites: Students must have taken BIO-4003A and either BIO-4001A or BIO-4004B to take this module. A broad module covering all aspects of the biology of microorganisms, providing key knowledge for specialist Level 6 modules. Detailed description is given about the cell biology of bacteria, fungi and protists together with microbial physiology, genetics and environmental and applied microbiology. The biology of disease-causing microorganisms (bacteria, viruses) and prions is also covered. Practical work provides hands-on experience of important microbiological techniques, and expands on concepts introduced in lectures. The module should appeal to biology students across a wide range of disciplines and interests.

BIO-5015B

20

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The aims are to provide: (i) a background to the fundamental principles of molecular biology, in particular the nature of the relationship between genetic information and the synthesis, and three dimensional structures, of macromolecules; (ii) practical experience of some of the techniques used for the experimental manipulation of genetic material, and the necessary theoretical framework, and (iii) an introduction to bioinformatics, the computer-assisted analysis of DNA and protein sequence information.

BIO-5003B

20

NETWORKS

This module examines networks and how they are designed and implemented to provide reliable data transmission. A layered approach is taken in the study of networks with emphasis given to the functionality of the OSI 7 layer reference model and the TCP/IP model. The module examines the functionality provided by each layer and how this contributes to overall reliable data transmission that the network provides. An emphasis is placed on practical issues associated with networking such as real-time delivery of multimedia information (e.g. VoIP) and network security. Labs and coursework are highly practical and underpin theory learnt in lectures.

CMP-5037B

20

OCEAN CIRCULATION

This module gives you an understanding of the physical processes occurring in the basin-scale ocean environment. We will introduce and discuss large scale global ocean circulation, including gyres, boundary currents and the overturning circulation. Major themes include the interaction between ocean and atmosphere, and the forces which drive ocean circulation. You should be familiar with partial differentiation, integration, handling equations and using calculators. Shelf Sea Dynamics is a natural follow-on module and builds on some of the concepts introduced here. We strongly recommend that you also gain oceanographic fieldwork experience by taking the 20-credit biennial Marine Sciences fieldcourse.

ENV-5016A

20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This course builds on Chemistry of Carbon-based Compounds (the first year organic chemistry course). Four main topics are covered. The first 'aromaticity' includes benzenoid and hetero-aromatic systems. The second major topic is the organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Spectroscopic characterisation of organic compounds is reviewed and the final major topic is 'stereochemistry and mechanisms'. This covers conformational aspects of acyclic and cyclic compounds. Stereoelectronic effects, Neighbouring Group Participation (NGP), Baldwin's rules, Cram's rule and cycloaddition reactions are then discussed.

CHE-5101A

20

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

The module covers a number of areas of modern physical chemistry which are essential to a proper understanding of the behaviour of chemical systems. These include the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, the thermodynamics of solutions and chemical kinetics of complex reactions. The module includes laboratory work. Due to the laboratory-based content on this module students must have completed at least one Level 4 module containing laboratory work.

CHE-5201Y

20

PLANT BIOLOGY

The module aims to provide an appreciation of modern plant biology, with a molecular perspective and an emphasis on plant development and plant response to the environment.

BIO-5006A

20

POPULATION ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

We live in a human dominated era recently designated "the Anthropocene". Humans harvest more than half of the primary productivity of the planet, many resources are over-exploited or depleted (e.g. fisheries) never before it was so important to correctly manage natural resources for an exponentially growing human population. It is, thus, fundamental to predict where other species occur and the sizes of their populations (abundance). Population Ecology is an area dedicated to the dynamics of population development. In this module we will look closely at how populations are regulated, from within through density dependent factors and from external density independent factors. We start the module with a global environmental change perspective to the management of populations and the factors that affect the population size. We then extend these ideas to help us understand population properties and processes both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Finally we examine several management applications where we show that a good understanding of the population modelling is essential to correctly manage natural resources on the planet. Practicals include learning to survey butterflies and birds using citizen science monitoring projects and will be focused on delivering statistical analyses of "Big data" using the programme R. The projects will provide a strong training in both subject specific and transferrable skills.

ENV-5014A

20

PROGRAMMING 2

This is a compulsory module for all computing students and is a continuation of CMP-4008Y. It contains greater breadth and depth and provides students with the range of skills needed for many of their subsequent modules. We recap Java and deepen your understanding of the language by teaching topics such as nested classes, enumeration, generics, reflection, collections and threaded programming. We then introduce C in order to improve your low level understanding of how programming works, before moving on to C++ in semester 2. We conclude by introducing C# to highlight the similarities and differences between languages.

CMP-5015Y

20

PROGRAMMING FOR NON-SPECIALISTS

The purpose of this module is to give the student a solid grounding in the essential features programming using the Java programming language. The module is designed to meet the needs of the student who has not previously studied programming.

CMP-5020B

20

QUANTUM THEORY AND SYMMETRY

This course covers the foundation and basics of quantum theory and symmetry, starting with features of the quantum world and including elements of quantum chemistry, group theory, computer-based methods for calculating molecular wavefunctions, quantum information, and the quantum nature of light. The subject matter paves the way for applications to a variety of chemical and physical systems - in particular, processes and properties involving the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHE-5250Y

20

RENEWABLE ENERGY

This module builds on understanding in wind, tidal and hydroelectric power and introduces theories and principles relating to a variety of renewable energy technologies including solar energy, heat pumps and geothermal sources, fuel cells and the hydrogen ecomony, biomass energy and anaerobic digestion. Students will consider how these various technologies can realistically contribute to the energy mix. Students will study the various targets and legislative instruments that are used to control and encourage developments. Another key aspect of the module is the study and application of project management and financial project appraisal techniques in a renewable energy context.

ENG-5002B

20

SEDIMENTOLOGY

Sedimentary rocks cover much of the Earth's surface, record the Earth's history of environmental change, contain the fossil record and host many of the world's natural resources. This module includes the study of modern sediments such as sand, mud and carbonates and the processes that result in their deposition. Understanding of modern processes is used to interpret ancient sedimentary rocks, their stratigraphy and the sedimentary structures they contain.

ENV-5035B

20

SHELF SEA DYNAMICS AND COASTAL PROCESSES

The shallow shelf seas that surround the continents are the oceans that we most interact with. They contribute a disproportionate amount to global marine primary production and CO2 drawdown into the ocean, and are important economically through commercial fisheries, offshore oil and gas exploration, and renewable energy developments (e.g. offshore wind farms). This module explores the physical processes that occur in shelf seas and coastal waters, their effect on biological, chemical and sedimentary processes, and how they can be harnessed to generate renewable energy.

ENV-5017B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. It covers research design, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results. It is recommended for any student intending to carry out a social science-based research project.

ENV-5031B

20

SOCIAL RESEARCH SKILLS FOR GEOGRAPHERS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS WITH FIELDCOURSE

The study of society and its relationship to the natural environment poses distinct research challenges and social science presents a range of approaches and methods with which to address these problems. The module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of social science research. This will cover different perspectives on research, developing a research question, research design, research ethics, sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and includes quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method approaches. The learning outcomes will be for students to be able to demonstrate: (i) Knowledge and critical understanding of relevant concepts and principles (ii) Ability to apply concepts and principles to the design of social science research (iii) Knowledge of some of the main methods of enquiry (iv) Ability to evaluate critically different approaches (v) Ability to present effectively a research proposal, both orally and in writing. The module will include a field course at Easter based in Keswick, an area which provides excellent opportunities for studying a range of geographical and environmental issues, including flooding, low-carbon energy developments, spatial contrasts in economic development and landscape management. The first part of the field course will consist of four days of faculty-organised activities where students will be able to practice questionnaire surveys, interviewing and other social research methods. During the final two days students will work in small groups to plan a research investigation from a list of pre-defined topics. Each group will present their research proposal on the final afternoon of the field course as a piece of formative assessment and the individual members will then write separate short reports on their proposal as their second item of summative assessment for the module. There will be an additional charge in the region of GBP250 for students to attend the field course.

ENV-5036K

20

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1

Software Engineering is one of the most essential skills for work in the software development industry. Students will gain an understanding of the issues involved in designing and creating software systems from an industry perspective. They will be taught state of the art in phased software development methodology, with a special focus on the activities required to go from initial class model design to actual running software systems. These activities are complemented with an introduction into software project management and development facilitation.

CMP-5012B

20

SOIL PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

This module will combine lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork to provide students with an appreciation of the soil environment and the processes that occurs within it. The module will progress through: basic soil components/properties; soil identification and classification; soil as a habitat; soil organisms; soil functions; the agricultural environment; soil-organism-agrochemical interaction; soil contamination; soil and climate change; soil ecosystem services and soil quality.

ENV-5012A

20

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

This module considers, at a high level, various activities associated with the development of all types of computer based information systems including project management, feasibility, investigation, analysis, logical and physical design, and the links to design and implementation. Its main focus, however, is on the early stages, in particular requirements investigation and specification including the use of UML. It makes use of a number of analysis and design tools and techniques in order to produce readable system specifications. Students are introduced to a number of development methods including object orientated, soft systems, structured, participative, iterative and rapid approaches.

CMP-5003A

20

TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS

This module is an optional Year long module. It covers two topics, Lagrangian Systems and Special Relativity, one in each semester. Lagrangian Systems involves reformulation of problems in mechanics allowing solution of problems such as the osci llation of a double pendulum. Some discussion of Hamiltonian systems will also be included. Special Relativity is concerned with changes in time and space when an observer is moving at a speed close to the speed of light.

MTHF5200Y

20

TOPICS IN PURE MATHEMATICS

This module provides an introduction to two selected topics within pure mathematics. These are self-contained topics which have not been seen before. The topics on offer for 2017-18 are the following. Topology: This is an introduction to point-set topology, which studies spaces up to continuous deformations and thereby generalises analysis, using only basic set theory. We will begin by defining a topological space, and will then investigate notions like open and closed sets, limit points and closure, bases of a topology, continuous maps, homeomorphisms, and subspace and product topologies. Computability: This is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of computability theory. The main question we will focus on is "which functions can in principle (i.e., given unlimited resources of space and time) be computed?". The main object of study will be certain devices known as unlimited register machines (URM's). We will adopt the point of view that a function is computable if and only if i is computable by a URM. We will identify large families of computable functions and will prove that certain naturally occurring functions are not computable.

MTHF5100Y

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level A*AA or A*ABB including two science subjects from list below. Science A Levels must include a Pass in the practical element.
  • International Baccalaureate 35 points including two HL Science subjects at 6 from list below
  • Scottish Advanced Highers AAA including two science subjects from list below
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAAAA or 6 subjects at H1 including two science subjects from list below
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3, including 12 Level 3 credits in two science subjects from list below
  • BTEC D*DD in a science related subject
  • European Baccalaureate Overall 90% including 85% in two science subjects from list below

Entry Requirement

Two A-Level (or equivalent) subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Further Mathematics, Environmental Science or Geography or Geology, and Information and Communication Technology.

General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

 

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)
  • We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in General Science FS1

International Foundation in Pharmacy, Biomedicine and Health FS2

International Foundation in Physical Sciences and Mathematics FS3

 

Interviews

Interviews are required as part of the selection process.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level A*AA including two science subjects from list below. Science A-levels must include a pass in the practical element.
  • International Baccalaureate 35 points including two HL 6 science subjects from list below. If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Highers Only accepted in combination with Scottish Advanced Highers.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including two science subjects from list below
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AAAAAA or 6 subjects at H1 including two science subjects from list below
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 45 credits at Level 3, including 12 Level 3 credits in two science subjects from list below. Science pathway required.
  • BTEC D*DD in a scienc related subject. Applied Science or Applied Science (Medical Science) preferred. Excluding Public Services. BTEC and A-level combinations are considered - please contact us
  • European Baccalaureate Overall 85% including 85% in two science subjects from list below

Entry Requirement

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

General Studies and Critical Thinking not accepted.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme and an interview. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

Interviews are required as part of the selection process.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

Two A-Level (or equivalent) subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Further Mathematics, Environmental Science or Geography or Geology, and Information and Communication Technology.

 

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact us for further information.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515