BA Politics and Media Studies

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Our Politics courses offer students a broad range of options and opportunities – from politics to international relations, media and popular culture to public policy and management, and beyond. Our students benefit from an excellent research programme, regular guest speaker seminars and a range of exciting internship opportunities to build experience and employability.

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Lee Jarvis has published a new book on Terror and Neoliberalism. The book is co-edited with Charlotte Heath-Kelly and Christopher Baker-Beall, and attempts to situate contemporary counter-terrorism discourse and practice within historical contexts which include the evolution of capitalism and the state.

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"Choosing UEA came out of a number of factors: I knew I wanted to go to a university with a strong campus community, and focus on modern British politics and media studies within a friendly and modern environment"

In their words

Dan Youmans, BA Politics

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Lee Marsden has written a new blog 'After Paris: time to rethink the usual responses' on Eastminster Professor Lee Marsden discusses how in light of the Paris attacks, we should rethink the usual responses and think again.

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To understand modern politics, we must understand the role played by media. It would be hard to make sense of the election of President Donald Trump, for example, without reference to the platform that The Apprentice gave him, or the use of social media – by him and his team – to secure popular support. On this course you will have the opportunity to explore and reflect upon how media and politics are linked. You will also develop the skills required for a world where media and public communication are crucial to many fields of employment.

The BA Politics and Media Studies from UEA will provide you with the tools to understand and research the relationship between the political world and the many forms of contemporary media. You’ll study in detail how multi-dimensional, modern media are changing politics, but also how political, social and economic interests can shape the media industries and the practices of journalists and other commentators.

Overview

Our Politics and Media Studies degree will equip you with the tools to enable you to understand and research the relationship between the political world and the many forms of contemporary media. You’ll also have the chance to learn the skills needed for a career in journalism, or for running political or social campaigns.

You will develop your knowledge of politics, from the core ideas and theories that inform political thought, through to the institutional arrangements that organise political life. You’ll engage with and debate ideas of justice, equality and freedom. You’ll encounter different approaches to the study of power, and question how and where it operates.

You’ll gain real insight into the fast changing world of political communication. You’ll follow the increasing use of digital media, by both traditional political parties and social movements and activists. You’ll have the chance to study the effect of globalisation on media and the place of media in shaping and expressing political and social identities.

And you’ll constantly be asking yourself the big question: how much power does the media exercise and on whose behalf?

Our course will give you the opportunity to arm yourself with the skills necessary for a career in journalism or to running a political or social campaign. You’ll also be offered the chance to learn a foreign language, or to study abroad for a semester.

Course Structure

Our Politics and Media Studies degree includes both compulsory and optional elements. The compulsory modules are designed to provide you with key knowledge about your areas of study, together with the academic and practical skills essential to success in your degree. While the optional modules allow you to tailor your degree to your interests.

Year 1

The course begins with modules that will give you an appreciation of the core ideas in the study of media and politics. You’ll trace the history of social and political thought and examine the practices of government and politics more generally. And you’ll engage with debates about media power and about the multiple forms of political communication.

Year 2

In your second year, you’ll look closely at the relationship between media and politics and at methods of researching society. You’ll also be able to choose options that allow you to study different aspects of politics and media, including journalism.

Year 3

In your final year, you’ll specialise even further, focusing in on the areas that fascinate you, and putting into practice the research skills that you will have acquired.

Teaching and Learning

Our degree combines a range of teaching methods. Including lectures, which will provide you with an overview of the topic. Plus small group seminars, where you’ll debate the work you’ve been reading that week. And one-to-one tutorials, which are great opportunities to get feedback to help your studies develop and improve.

Our teaching is focused, interactive and up-to-date – and we make a point of incorporating current world events into our teaching.

While you discover more about the fascinating, intersecting worlds of politics and media, you’ll also develop crucial skills. Such as how to summarise and analyse information, how to develop and critique arguments, and how to communicate that information and those arguments in the public realm.

Independent study

Our Politics and Media Studies degree will provide you with opportunities to learn and study independently. From your first year onwards, you will spend time reading, analysing and critiquing the arguments of others.

As you progress through the course, you’ll have the chance to develop, research and present your own ideas – including writing a dissertation on a topic of your choosing, under the supervision of an academic expert.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment techniques, including essays, exams, presentations, group work and portfolios.

Some of our assessments are linked to work with professional organisations outside the University, which will help prepare you for your future career.

Whatever the form the assessment takes, we’ll help you by providing formative feedback and guidance.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

During the course you will have the opportunity to take part in study trips, internships and placements in Britain and Europe (see our Careers and Employability pages).

You’ll also have the opportunity to broaden your horizons and experience the political climate and media presence of another country first-hand, by spending a semester studying abroad.

For further details, visit our Study Abroad section of our website.

After the course

A Politics and Media Studies BA from UEA will equip you with the knowledge and skills for a large choice of careers directly related to politics, the media and well beyond.

You could find yourself working for an international organisation, parliament or political party, or the civil service. Or you could take your skills and apply them to journalism, marketing, advertising, the private sector, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), think-tanks, a university or a research institutions.

You could even choose to return to academia to study for a Masters or post doctorate degree.

Career destinations

Examples of careers you could enter include:

  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Management, among other careers.

Course related costs

Please see Additional Course Fees for details of other course-related costs.

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

This module introduces you to some of the key contemporary debates and issues in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations. The central theme of the module is liberal democracy, its nature, scope and potential strengths and weaknesses. You will consider forces which have had an impact upon western liberal democracy - such as globalisation and immigration - and examine case studies which illustrate the success and failure of liberal democracy in practice. The case studies change from year to year, but currently include Weimar Germany, Northern Ireland, Britain, the Israel-Palestine conflict, Iraq, France and the US. You will be assessed on this module via coursework, usually a combination of an essay and/or a reading and seminar logbook. You will learn via attendance at weekly lectures and seminars, and your own private study. In addition to enhancing your subject knowledge, you will also acquire and develop skills which will be helpful in the rest of your degree, such as critical analysis and the construction of political arguments, in both written and spoken forms, as well as improving your confidence to participate in seminar discussions.

PPLX4052A

20

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

Trump's Tweets, Corbyn's "fans", and personalised campaign messages sent by algorithms#political communication has changed drastically in the last five years. Pundits and some scholars warn of serious dangers to democracy. What are the tricks of the trade in modern political communication and how different are they from those of the past? How does one now succeed to get across a message and gain support? Should we be worried about the implications for political discourse and decision-making? This module will enable you to critically assess the role of communication in national and international politics and help you understand the dynamics among political actors, media and citizens in opinion formation and decision-making. This is a professional practice module in which you will gain skills relevant to the conduct of political communications and to many other work environments, as well as experience working in a team on a task that requires critical thinking and collaborative strategizing. This module is ideal for anyone interested in working in politics, diplomacy, journalism, marketing, or for advocacy or activist civil society groups. Ideas about the power of communications and the ways that various political actors use that power are at the heart of this module. You'll examine how these actors use the media in political communications. Lectures and readings will cover media effects, how political communication has changed with changes in media technology, branding and celebrity in politics, and soft power with political communication at the international level, as well as the tools used by various political actors, such as political parties or civic movements. Lectures are interactive, using an audience response system and open discussion. Seminar activities include practical tasks as well as ones to enhance understanding of the readings. The first assessed work is a group project in which you will play the role of junior analysts in a communications consultancy and you will work together to assess the political communications of a real political actor, your "client", producing a report and presentation that includes recommendations for improvement. The second is an essay that gives you the chance to develop your ability to analyse and synthesise. By the end of this module you will be able to identify and describe the actors and their interests in a given political communications contexts, as well as formulate and articulate clear arguments about the relationships between political actors and the media in relation to power and agency. You will have gained experience in a simulated work scenario that will give you skills transferable across a number of professions as you will have delivered analysis and recommendations in a professional-style presentation and report. You will also be able evaluate political communications' role in an international context, something increasingly necessary in the ever more globalized world both for political and corporate actors.

PPLM4001B

20

MEDIA POWER

How was a reality TV star elected President? Should sexist media content be banned? Do popular media forms rot our minds? These sorts of questions are complex and different perspectives offer different sorts of response. This module helps you answer challenging and important questions like these by introducing key media theories and using them to think about power in our society. You will practice key skills of academic reading and writing in a structured and supportive environment. You will reflect on the importance of reading for academic research and learn how to assess and discuss the relevance and impact of milestones in media and mass communications theory from the nineteenth century to the present. You will explore theoretical approaches to media content, production, regulation and reception, including key themes such as freedom of speech, public sphere and political economy.

PPLM4054A

20

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY

This module introduces you to a few important and interesting writers and thinkers whose ideas have been so influential that they have become part of, and have even transformed, our society, culture and politics. As you read their work, learning how to make sense of it and arguing about it with others, you will come to think more deeply about the workings and politics of contemporary society and culture: the forces that shape it and the contradictions that define it. You will pay special attention to the three fundamental values that have shaped modern society and politics since the French Revolution: liberty, equality and fraternity. This will underpin your studies on other modules (in Political Science, International Relations, Media, History and Literature) and provide you with a strong basis upon which to develop your knowledge in Levels 2 and 3.

PPLX4051A

20

Students will select 20 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DISCOURSE AND POWER

Why may politicians say that andquot;'immigration is a problemandquot; rather than andquot;immigrants are a problemandquot; and why am I addressing you as andquot;youandquot; rather than andquot;the studentsandquot; throughout this module outline? Can there be unbiased news reporting? In this module you will explore some of these questions and how the language and images that make up our texts and interactions reflect their purpose in specific contexts. We will explore the powerful expressive means by which agency, responsibility and blame are attributed to or removed from key players in the language of media, advertising and politics. We will see how the representation of events affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the power relationship between individuals and social groups. Essentially, this module is for those who are curious about the practical impact of expressive choices in everyday written and oral communication and wish to find out more about the creative but also manipulative power of language in context (discourse). By the end of this module, you will have learnt how particular linguistic and visual patterns may be used to report, persuade or instruct. You will have acquired the skill to critically assess and challenge others' perspectives, attitudes and values but also consider more critically how you may produce or change your language to achieve your desired aims, from increasing the cohesion of your writing to producing a more engaging website. These are highly valuable skills in any work environment. In the seminars, you will be encouraged to apply the new analytical tools presented in the lecture and you will be able to select your own material for analysis for formative exercises and the final assignment so that it relates to your studies and interests.

PPLL4011B

20

GLOBAL POLITICS 2

Global Politics 2 explores the most important controversies and debates in contemporary international politics. Because international politics is constantly changing, we review this module every year, altering the precise mix of topics to reflect the world that you see around you. All of our topics involve questions of power, ethics, transnational cooperation and security. Recently we have explored terrorism, nuclear weapons, our moral obligations to foreigners, as well as migration, the fate of the environment, and emerging powers in the international system.

PPLI4055B

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module offers a brief introduction to the history of western philosophy from 1600 to 1950 via the work of key figures. We explore different philosophical traditions and several philosophical revolutions, from the rise of modern philosophy and science, to the emergence of analytic philosophy. The module will examine how key questions from different areas of philosophy arose and evolved. These questions typically include: How do mind and body interact? What is real? What do we perceive? What can we know? How should we act? How does language influence thought? Why are philosophical problems so persistent?

PPLP4063B

20

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY

In this module, we study some of the most original thinkers of the twentieth century, in order to reflect in unconventional ways on the ideas of human association and community as well as evaluate the loss of autonomy produced by cultural invasion and the institutionalisation of values. The basic goal of Radical Philosophy is to present you with a constellation of styles of thinking and forms of criticism that will stimulate you to examine in a rigorous way several thought-provoking perspectives on the idea of social transformation.

PPLP4065B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I (SPRING START)

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4051B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1.1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

How do scientists in the fields of political science, media, and international relations actually perform their research? How do they know what they claim to know? How can we use scientific methods to study the political and social world? You'll learn how to evaluate research, and more importantly, how to perform your own research using scientific methods. You'll acquire knowledge of the theory and practice of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. You'll acquire a variety of skills - computerised data analysis, interviewing, observation, focus groups, taking fieldwork notes, and report writing. You'll begin by examining ways of thinking about the world, developing ideas and hypotheses, and ways of testing them. You'll explore a variety of ways to examine these hypotheses using a variety of basic quantitative/statistical methods. You'll then explore a variety of qualitative, in-depth methods of collecting and analysing data such as interviewing and focus groups. You do not need to have any mathematical background to follow this module.

PPLX5047A

20

POLITICS AND MEDIA

Media are an inescapable part of contemporary political life. This much is obvious. What is more difficult to know is how media affect the conduct of politics - and how politics affects the conduct of media. In this module, you'll examine the many dimensions of media's political involvement. You'll start with arguments about how 'powerful' media are, and then go on to look at questions of media 'bias', before turning to the ways in which political communication has changed (and is changing). We'll look at the role of the state in using and controlling media and the new techniques of media management - and at how, in particular, digital media are changing the relationship between politics and media. This will lead to a discussion of media effects and how to measure them. You'll end the module by asking what is meant by a democratic media and what the future might bring for the relationship of media and politics.

PPLM5001B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

DIGITAL MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the andquot;network societyandquot;; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

PPLM5053A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, you will examine contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS

Is political language use always biased, untrue and misleading? How can we distinguish between 'genuine' political communication and propaganda? You'll study examples of topical and historical language use in politics and learn to use key analytical tools from rhetoric, linguistic pragmatics, semantics and discourse analysis that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes, and to compare historical and contemporary discourse data.

PPLL5015B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. You will begin by being introduced to the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

PPLM5003B

20

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, you will use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both your own identity and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you will critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

PPLM5042B

20

Students will select 20 - 60 credits from the following modules:

If taking PPLX5049B: Study Abroad, you are not permitted to take any language modules in Option Range C. You must also submit reserve choices for spring semester. Please note that you are only permitted to take one level 4 module during your second year of studies.

Name Code Credits

STATES, INSTITUTIONS AND CITIZENS

Political systems around the world are facing profound challenges and transformations. Established democracies in Europe and North America have seen the rise of populism, as marked by election of Donald Trump in the USA, the Brexit referendum in the UK or support for Marine Le Pen in France. Democracy has also been in retreat in many states which democratised or partly democratised after the cold war such as Russia and Poland. At the same time, autocratic regimes in the Middle East and North Africa have come under pressure, with movements such as the Arab Spring signalling aspirations amongst many people for a more democratic system of governance. This module provides you with a critical understanding of how political systems vary around the world and the pressures facing them. It begins by focusing on the drivers of democratisation. It then proceeds to consider how political institutions such as the executive, legislature and the degree of decentralisation vary - and the effects that this has. Finally, we consider new trends in citizen's voting behaviour at the ballot box and pressure groups campaigning for change. You'll gain a critical awareness of current debates in comparative politics and develop key skills including critical evaluation, analytical investigation, written presentation, and oral communication.

PPLX5162B

20

DIGITAL MEDIA AND SOCIETY

For better or worse, new digital technologies are hyped at having revolutionised society. This module will provide students with an introduction to the ways in which the internet and other digital technologies are (and are not) affecting society from theoretical and empirical perspectives, and how society shapes technology. Topics covered include: the evolution of the internet; the andquot;network societyandquot;; regulating new media; the radical internet and terrorism; social networking, blogs and interactivity; culture and identity in the digital age; and how the internet affects politics and the media.

PPLM5053A

20

FAKE NEWS! AMERICAN JOURNALISM, HISTORY AND PRACTICE.

How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to "the news"#but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. "The news" has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media#looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5049B

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, you will examine contemporary gender and power relations. You will examine both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Why are wars fought? What is peace? What is security? International Security introduces you to these key issues in global politics. In the first part of the module, you will explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have argued that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make violent conflict less relevant in today's world, war and the use of force remain an integral part of the international system. In exploring these issues, you will study a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace to examine the roots of violent conflict and security problems in the present day. In the second half of the module, we will turn to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These include constructivist and feminist perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as environmental degradation, gendered violences, and poverty as security issues? What do we gain and lose in broadening security studies beyond a narrow focus on warfare and military power?

PPLI5056B

20

JOURNALISM: CONTEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

An introductory practical journalism module for students of politics or related topics who intend a career in journalism. You will cover the basic skills and knowledge of the reporter, news production skills, news values and news sources, professional and ethical standards, online presentation and writing, radio, video and TV reporting. The course will include interview techniques, and package creation for radio and TV news. You will participate in workshops on scripting for radio and TV, including writing to picture. There will be practical instruction in camera work and editing (including mobile journalism) and timeline video and audio editing. The teaching approach will be one three-hour workshop each week - allowing sufficient class time for workshop and production activities. A feature of the course will be regular and detailed review of mainstream media, including online news sites, local and national radio and TV broadcasts.

PPLM5051Y

40

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS

Is political language use always biased, untrue and misleading? How can we distinguish between 'genuine' political communication and propaganda? You'll study examples of topical and historical language use in politics and learn to use key analytical tools from rhetoric, linguistic pragmatics, semantics and discourse analysis that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes, and to compare historical and contemporary discourse data.

PPLL5015B

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. You will begin by being introduced to the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

PPLM5003B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AND POLITICS FOR SECOND YEARS

NEW - available in 2019/0 History and politics are inseparable because human societies and communities develop and transform historically. Philosophical thinking about society and community requires us to question deep assumptions about the human good and how we form ideas about that good over time. Does history show that we have made political progress? What does 'progress' even mean? How should we think about our social understanding of the past? Does your historical situation limit your political horizons or your political culture limit your historical understanding? Is it in the person or the community that should not be divided, i.e. that is 'in-dividual'? What kind of understanding, what kind of methods are involved in the disciplines of history and politics? Can philosophy ground a political system, and, if so, which political system(s) does philosophy ground? These are some of the questions you will address in this module in dialogue with key thinkers of history and politics, such as Hegel; Marx; Collingwood; Simone Weil; Arendt and Rawls.

PPLP5167A

20

POLITICAL VIOLENCE and CONFLICT: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES

Political violence, individual or collective, is easily condemned as an irrational and barbaric phenomenon, with little relevance for understanding political developments and social change. A lot is down to LeBon's famous nineteenth century accounts of the crowd as 'a primitive being' so destructive 'that the interests of the individual, even the interest of self preservation, will not dominate them' (LeBon, 1995). The taboo of violence persists despite attempts of social and political theorists to engage with the issue and understand different forms and contexts, from riots, to religious violence and terrorism. The aim of the module is to break this generalized taboo by tracing the role (explicit or implicit) of political violence in political theory and its function in processes of socio-political transformations and change. Critical engagement with contemporary theoretical and empirical debates around the issue and the examination of mass and new media representations of political violence will enable students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the origins, logics, perceptions and outcomes of political violence and conflict.

PPLM5002B

20

POLITICS IN THE USA

The election of Donald Trump as President in 2016 has radically changed US politics. Yet to fully understand the current times, contemporary American politics needs to be put into context. This module covers the historical themes that exist in US politics from the eighteenth century to the present day. The emphasis will be on modern political history and contemporary politics, but this will be underpinned by a knowledge of the political philosophy at the time of the formation of the United States, the governmental structures, and political developments over historical time.

PPLX5164A

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

PSI SEMESTER ABROAD MODULE

Students often say that spending a semester abroad expands their horizons and improves their career prospects. You will be able to judge this claim for yourself by completing this module. You'll experience a different educational culture and develop new perspectives on learning. Assessed formatively and summatively by the host university and on successful completion of the semester abroad, you'll have developed the knowledge and skills to study in a foreign academic environment with more confidence. Assessment will be in the foreign institution and you might be assessed via different methods depending on the institution you attend.

PPLX5166B

60

THE MEDIA AND IDENTITY

How do the media shape how we see ourselves? Or indeed how others see us? In a world of social media, self-branding and the increasing importance of mediated forms of identity, you will explore critical ways of thinking about the relationship between culture, media and the self. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches in the field of media and cultural studies, you will use research methods from autoethnography to content analysis to explore both your own identity and the way in which identities more broadly are formulated through contemporary media culture. Through discussing the representation of identity in media content, as well as issues of media production, regulation and consumption, you will critically reflect upon the relationship between media culture and social power and consider how social and technological changes impact on the ways in which identity is experienced in everyday life. On successful completion of this module, you will critically reflect upon the ways in which media texts construct social identity and be able to discuss the relationship between media and identity with awareness for social, institutional and technological factors that shape both media production and consumption. Assessment is by group presentation and independent research project.

PPLM5042B

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

In this second year module you will examine in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, and have shaped the ways in which we think about politics even today, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. You will also compare their work thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions. The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key primary texts and will enable you to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at 3rd year undergraduate level, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at first year level. The module is taught by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, supported by private study of your own, and you will be assessed by coursework, usually a combination of an essay and a portfolio which reflects on your reading and seminar performance throughout the semester.

PPLX5064A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Please be advised that if you have previously studied a language module during your degree, it is recommended that you only take a continuation of this language, as opposed to starting a further language. If you wish to take a 2nd language module you can only do so in consultation with the Course Director. If taking PPLX5049B: Study Abroad in Option Range B, you are not permitted to take any language modules from this option range.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French which exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken a basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this widely spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners' Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? You will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will get personal feedback on every single one of your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module, you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you. Please contact the module organiser if you wish to discuss your eligibility.

PPLB4023B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. You will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/I

'Decouvrir et discuter.' Here are two key elements of this module which will further your French language and communication skills by working on them through the lens of French culture. If you have a French A level, any other international equivalent qualification, or if you have completed French Intermediate II, then this module is for you! You'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). You will focus on receptive skills (listening and reading) in particular and will be taught in an interactive and friendly environment (pairs and small groups). Your seminars will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will develop your confidence in speaking. In the lecture you will review and practise essential grammar points. You will have a great exposure to authentic French in all three components of the module, as it is entirely taught in French. The material that you will study in and out of class (videos, articles, short stories, films) will help you to further your knowledge of French culture, as well as to build up your French vocabulary on a variety of topics. You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills, and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand the main points of clear standard input on the topics covered in class, and to produce simple connected texts on these topics. You'll be able give reasons and explanations for your opinions, based on your personal experience and on the material studied in this module. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. You should not already have a level of French that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I - B1.1 CEFR

Would you like to become a more fluent German speaker who is able to deal with most situations whilst travelling? Do you need the confidence to survive a work placement abroad or a term at a German university? Or maybe you are keen to learn how to write an essay or deliver a short presentation German style. This advanced course in German is perfect if you have completed both intermediate modules or have A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this . You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you start to study grammar at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and describe and evaluate basic statistical information with confidence. During this module you will improve your understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at and evaluating conventions in the world of work and at universities in German-speaking countries. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and discuss topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. A first advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL JAPANESE LANGUAGE 1

A course in Japanese for students with Japanese A-level, or holding any other equivalent qualification. Our aim is to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. We have designed the course to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and language learning skills, through the study of wide range of topics such as geography, food and pop culture. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar and vocabulary in meaningful contexts, whilst also developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. You are required to take a placement test during the transition week (week 1) and by that, may be placed in a different module with more suitable level. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLJ4057Y

40

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

Would you like to apply your Spanish language skills for intercultural dialogue? Then look no further as this is the right module for you. The core of the teaching will involve participating in a project and you will engage in a number of activities that focus on improving your Spanish whilst learning about an issue of global concern. During this module you will: - build on, and further enhance, your reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. - build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. - explore an issue of contemporary relevance and work together to find practical solutions to a real world problem. - learn through lectures, seminars, tutorials and independent study and develop knowledge of contemporary life, society and current affairs. - revisit and consolidate specific Spanish grammatical structures at a higher level to build up language proficiency. The oral classes will be arranged separately in smaller groups to maximize your opportunities for speaking in the target language. This module is suitable for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification.

PPLH4025A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

If you select PPLX6042Y, PPLM6076B, or PPLX6046A from this Option Range you cannot take them from Option Range B.

Name Code Credits

ACTIVIST CAMPAIGNING

How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of this module will be the experience of a "live" campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a "reverse internship." As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.

PPLM6076B

30

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

This module offers students a valuable experience of both individual and collective research - as well as the opportunity to study in depth an important contemporary aspect of politics, media and international relations. You will work in small groups pursuing research into a specific topic using a wide variety of source materials under the guidance of a leading expert in the field. There will also be accompanying classes developing skills vital for undertaking research and presenting that research to policy makers and practitioners. The available topics will vary on a yearly basis, but may include subjects such as: The Trump Presidency, Electoral Fraud in Britain, Assessing British Prime Ministers, The Rise of Populism, Nuclear Brinkmanship on the Korean Peninsula, Inside the EU, The Corbyn Leadership of the Labour Party, The Macron Presidency, Devolution and the Four Nations of the UK, and Negotiating Brexit.

PPLX6046A

30

ANALYSING MEDIA DISCOURSES

How can we distinguish "fake news" from reliable journalism? Which language features help us to assess the veracity and significance of political reporting, commenting and advertising? By using methods from Systemic-Functional Linguistics, Cognitive Semantics and Multimodal Analysis we analyse a range of media discourses, i.e. press, TV and computer-mediated communication and investigate how topics such as International Relations, Immigration and Climate Change are construed and interpreted by the media, and how this andquot;social construction of realityandquot; impacts on agenda-formation in public opinion and political decision taking.

PPLM6074B

30

DIGITAL POLITICS

Today's political world is more than ever influenced by digital technologies, from innovative social movements to 'fake news' and digital election campaigns. We will explore how the technologies influence political processes and how political processes in turn influence technology. We will examine the impact of digital media on electoral politics, examining key election campaigns (including recent UK and US elections) and the impact of social media, big data, and targeted advertising on their results. We will investigate how social movements (from Black Lives Matter to the Alt-Right) have been transformed through their use of digital networks. We will navigate the world of online politics, with a particular focus on the new culture wars being fought out in online environments. Finally we will explore the politics of the everyday, and the political effects of the technology platforms on which we live our online lives.

PPLM6077A

30

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a project of your own choosing under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The goal is to produce a dissertation of 8,000-9,000 words, which involves in-depth research on a specialist topic. An undergraduate dissertation represents a piece of independent research produced over an extended period and which demonstrates elements of originality in the selection of the topic, the use of sources and the analysis or argument contained within it. It is an opportunity to demonstrate the depth of your understanding of what you have learned across your degree course by applying concepts and theories from one or several modules to new contexts. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. You will be expected to attend a series of lectures in the autumn semester which provide general advice on the process of conducting a dissertation, as well as meeting your supervisor on a regular basis over the course of the year.

PPLX6042Y

30

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

Do you think gender affects the way that people speak? How do you think our language reflects gender differences in society? Do you think we can use language to create societal change? In this module, you will bring your own personal experiences to a lively critical discussion on the relationship between language and gender, putting together your own portfolio of evidence from your everyday life. You will bring your own modern-day reflections to historic studies on language and gender, starting with early 20th-century studies on how men and women use language differently, moving to 1960s sociolinguistic studies on how 'standard' language differs between women and men, and then, following the growth of the Women's Movement in the 1970s, studies on male dominance in mixed-gender talk. Finally, you will look at the recent move to reconceptualise 'gender' not as a 'fixed' phenomenon, but one that may be performed or 'interactionally achieved' in different ways in different contexts. You will bring your thoughts together in a final report, in which you will have the opportunity to reflect on the issues through your own case studies that you will collect over the course of the module. This is a 30-credit variant and it may not be taken by language and communication students.

PPLL6137A

30

POLITICS AND POPULAR CULTURE

Popular culture links to politics in a variety of ways, some obvious, some less obvious. There are the politicians who seek the endorsement of film stars; there are the politicians who were film stars; and there are the rock performers who pretend that they are politicians. And then there are the states that censor popular culture, or those that sponsor it and use it as propaganda. We will explore the many ways in which popular culture and politics are linked. You will: - be introduced to competing theories of the politics of popular culture - those that see popular culture as political manipulation and those that see it as political resistance. - analyse examples of popular culture for the political ideas and values they represent. - look at how popular culture is used in political communication. - track developments in the political economy of popular culture, especially in relation to globalisation, digital media and power within the cultural industries. - debate the censorship of popular culture and use of state subsidies to promote it. - reflect on the effects of popular culture, and about its role in personal and collective identity.

PPLM6037A

30

TOPICS IN PUBLIC OPINION

The role of public opinion is paramount in any democracy, as the public is often asked at election times and in-between elections to confer legitimacy to politicians and to their decisions. Yet what determines the public's opinion? How much does the public know about politics? How does political communication influence the public's positions? And last, but not least, how do we measure public opinion? You'll discuss old and new directions in answering these questions, drawing on political psychology and communication theories. The module is well anchored in current politics, and will provide you with the tools to understand current public opinion trends in the UK and other democracies.

PPLM6045B

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

If you select PPLX6042Y, PPLM6076B, or PPLX6046A from this Option Range you cannot take them from Option Range A.

Name Code Credits

ACTIVIST CAMPAIGNING

How do grassroots and third sector organisations campaign for social and political change? Rather than pose this as an abstract question, you will partner with existing organisations to conduct campaigns on specific issues such as climate change, tax avoidance or gender inequality. You will receive a brief from a partner organisation and be supported in planning, devising, and carrying out activities that will achieve the aims of the brief. Taught content will include strategies for both online and offline activism, analysing power relations at different scales, and ways of assessing the effectiveness of your campaigns, but the bulk of this module will be the experience of a "live" campaign. You will combine applied research skills with professional practice in the form of a "reverse internship." As the partner organisations are embedded in the module, you will build valuable skills for employability as well as an opportunity for being supported in the exercise of engaged citizenship. You will be assessed by presentation and critical reflection. In the year 2017-2018 the partner organisation was Greenpeace, but partners may change each year.

PPLM6076B

30

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

This module offers students a valuable experience of both individual and collective research - as well as the opportunity to study in depth an important contemporary aspect of politics, media and international relations. You will work in small groups pursuing research into a specific topic using a wide variety of source materials under the guidance of a leading expert in the field. There will also be accompanying classes developing skills vital for undertaking research and presenting that research to policy makers and practitioners. The available topics will vary on a yearly basis, but may include subjects such as: The Trump Presidency, Electoral Fraud in Britain, Assessing British Prime Ministers, The Rise of Populism, Nuclear Brinkmanship on the Korean Peninsula, Inside the EU, The Corbyn Leadership of the Labour Party, The Macron Presidency, Devolution and the Four Nations of the UK, and Negotiating Brexit.

PPLX6046A

30

BETTER WORLDS? UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

Would an ideal society have no more crime? Who would be wealthy? Would politics be outlawed? Do utopians wish to impose their views on the rest of us? This module explores questions such as these, which are central to political and social theory, through the prism of selected utopian and dystopian novels and other utopian texts ranging from Thomas More's Utopia (1516) to the present. It focuses on themes such as property, social control, gender, work, the environment and politics. A major question which the module addresses is the political significance and effects of utopian ideas - often derided as frivolous or impractical in their own time - and the historical role of utopian ideas in political theory and social reform.

PPLX6041A

30

BRITAIN AND EUROPE

Understanding Britain's relationship with the European Union and how the EU works is important in many jobs at local, national and international levels in the public, private and third (community and voluntary) sectors. The EU has been an integral part of the structures of governance of the UK and arguably will continue to impact the UK's political, social and cultural life after Brexit. This module will enable you to understand the complex relationship between Britain and the rest of the EU as we attempt to explain the ambivalence of the British towards European integration. We also track Britain's changing policy from aloofness to eventual accession in 1973 and the development of a reputation as and 'awkward partner'. The module culminates in the decision in 2016 to pursue 'Brexit' by examining its impact, management and the wider consequences.

PPLI6090B

30

CAPITALISM AND ITS CRITICS

The nature of Capitalism and its possible futures is one of the preeminent issues of our time. You'll consider the past, present and possible future development of capitalism as a socio-economic system. Drawing upon a wide range of classical and contemporary theorists of capitalism, you'll deliberate capitalism in relation to a range of issues, such as: freedom, urbanisation, imperialism, technology, climate change, art and culture and go on to consider capitalism's tendency towards recurrent crises, and what the alternatives to a capitalist system might be. The module will enable you to develop a critical understanding of capitalism as a political, economic and cultural system.

PPLX6081B

30

CONSUMER CULTURE AND SOCIETY

In this module you will critically examine consumer cultures within Euro-American societies, understanding consumer culture as a specific form of material culture that is not restricted to commerce, but is both an economic and cultural phenomenon. The themes explored as a part of the module will intersect with larger questions of identity, modernity and globalisation. The main aims of the module are to challenge previous claims that production determines consumption and engage with broader ideas about the negotiation of power, and how individuals use goods to construct their own cultural identities.

PPLM6061B

30

DEMOCRACY: IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

When the Berlin Wall collapsed in 1989 democracy seemed triumphant as the best of all of political systems. Fast forward 30 years and the democracy is under threat. Distrust of government has risen, economic inequality persists, populist support is growing for illiberal leaders, and elections are being criticised for being 'rigged'. This module looks back to consider how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece, the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents and the practical problems involved in designing democratic institutions. The first part of the module focuses on great texts by the major democratic thinkers such as Locke, Rousseau and Mill before exploring contemporary theories of democracy, examining the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluating the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy". The second part looks at the applied challenges of designing and implementing democratic institutions including the challenges of organising elections, designing electoral systems, regulating media systems and designing legislatures.

PPLX6044B

30

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a project of your own choosing under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The goal is to produce a dissertation of 8,000-9,000 words, which involves in-depth research on a specialist topic. An undergraduate dissertation represents a piece of independent research produced over an extended period and which demonstrates elements of originality in the selection of the topic, the use of sources and the analysis or argument contained within it. It is an opportunity to demonstrate the depth of your understanding of what you have learned across your degree course by applying concepts and theories from one or several modules to new contexts. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. You will be expected to attend a series of lectures in the autumn semester which provide general advice on the process of conducting a dissertation, as well as meeting your supervisor on a regular basis over the course of the year.

PPLX6042Y

30

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

You'll examine one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what? You'll focuse on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) you'll also spend time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, you'll also address, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth's natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials.

PPLX6097B

30

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

Our aim is to meet the needs and interests of students outside of the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies (PPL) who have been competitively selected by interview to undertake a short optional volunteering internship at the East of England European Partnership in Brussels. This is also subject to a continuing relationship post Brexit with the host organisation in Brussels. ................... If you're serious about wanting to work at the international level you must be totally committed and well informed in order to increase your understanding of all things international and extend your knowledge of the many opportunities, not only with the EU but also with other International Organisations, Non Governmental Organisations, in public affairs, and with the private sector. Brexit is of course the dominant issue for the Brussels Office and a major political issue for the EU itself. The Brussels Office provides services and advice to its members which includes 52 local councils, three universities, local enterprise partnerships, and other organisations in the East of England. Foreign affairs, security and defence are NOT covered by the module or the volunteering internship. To take this module students will be shortlisted for competitive interview. Applicants must be a PPL student, citizen of the EEA member state and have successfully completed either PPLI5044A or PPLI5058B Level 5 PPL EU Module/s.

PPLI6087B

30

IN AND OUT: THE POLITICS OF MIGRATION

You'll address the politics of migration and citizenship. It will provide you with a background to political thought on citizenship, membership and belonging. You'll then examine migration at the international, state and individual levels. The international level will focus on historical movements of people (such as from Europe and Asia towards the Americas) and contemporary flows of refugees and guest workers. The state level will look comparatively at immigration and emigration policies and critically assess the logic behind them. Attention will be given to different countries in various regions for comprehensive comparative evaluation. Different types of migration will be considered, including economic (such as non-immigrant and immigrant work visas), family (such as spousal and family reunification visas) and humanitarian (refugees, asylum seekers, and special humanitarian protections). The politics of these migration categories will be foregrounded, including governmental tactics of management, how they comply or fail to comply with international human rights norms, and the foreign policy implications of humanitarian visas. Finally the individual level will consider narrative accounts of migration in order to understand policy and practice from a bottom-up and experiential perspective. You'll be encouraged to critically evaluate and analyse the politics of migration as manifest in the various policies and practices.

PPLI6089B

30

MULTICULTURALISM

This module looks at the political implications of the rise of multicultural societies in Europe and North America since the end of World War II. (Canada is given consideration because of its importance to these debates both as a practical model as well as a source of influential theorists.) The aim is to introduce students to a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism and facilitate critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches in the face of competing political discourses such as nationalism and alternative forms of liberalism. Theorists under examination may include; Parekh, Kymlicka, Levy, Taylor and Modood as well as major liberal alternative views; Barry, Rawls and Raz. Among the module themes the following will be addressed; group differentiated rights; institutional racism, Islamophobia, recognition vs toleration and cultural offence. The module will also look at divergent policies adopted within European states (eg: France and Germany) and give attention to the attempts to operationalize multiculturalism in the UK in particular via the Parekh Report.

PPLX6072B

30

POLITICS AND FOREIGN POLICY OF THE ASIA-PACIFIC

This module will introduce you to important themes in international relations within the Asia Pacific, at a time when the region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the relations between the USA, China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While you will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, in the latter part of the module you will consider contemporary political issues. This will require you to develop an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.

PPLI6069A

30

SHIFTING POWERS AFRICA IN THE 21ST CENTURY

What do you know about Africa? Is it still the Dark Continent, lost outside of time, or do you see it as the next exciting 'happening' place to follow fashion, use FinTech, and do business? Did you know that Timbuktu was one of the world's greatest centres of learning? That West Africa's gold underpinned the global economy? How about if I told you that an explosion of megacities is taking place in the Global South, principally in Africa as the continent's population doubles to 2bn? You will look at Africa's place and importance within the international system and more, including exploring China's One Belt Initiative in East Africa, the African Union and security, and the African Development Bank's 'High five' development plan.

PPLI6039A

30

TERRORISM AND COUNTER-TERRORISM

Although the term terrorism goes back to the French revolution, it was rarely employed until the 1970's. Contrast this with today when terrorism, it seems, is everywhere we look: in foreign policy decisions, military interventions, homeland security measures, legal frameworks, newspaper headlines, speeches and sermons, films and video games, and, of course, in university modules such as this. In this module, we engage in a critical exploration of terrorism, counter-terrorism, and the academic field of terrorism research. You will explore the history of terrorism, and engage in debates around the definition and character of terrorist violence. Is it possible, necessary, or even desirable to separate terrorism from other forms of violence, for instance? The module will introduce different perspectives on the causes, types, and threat of non-state terrorism. You will examine a range of strategies for countering terrorism, and their political and normative implications. The module also explores the emergence and contribution of critical terrorism studies, examining issues including state terrorism, gender and terrorism, cultural representations of terrorism, and the production and influence of terrorism 'experts.'

PPLI6040B

30

TOPICS IN BRITISH POLITICS

Rarely before has British politics been in such turbulent times. The prospect of Brexit has left Britain's position in the world uncertain; consecutive general elections have produced results that have defied the pundits; constitutional relationship between the UK nations unstable are unstable; a decade after the 2007/8 crash, austerity politics create further instability. We examine contemporary events and themes by examining four topics which vary on an annual basis according to developments in a fast changing world. These might include: Who run's Britain? Prime Ministerial Power, Parliament, Electoral Integrity in Britain, UK General Elections, Austerity and Economic Policy in Britain, and the Welfare State.

PPLX6043A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Public Enemy

    UEA Reader in International Security, Dr Lee Jarvis, has investigated how and why governments outlaw terrorist organisations and how counter-terrorism powers impact on citizenship and security.

    Read it Public Enemy
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • Eastminster: a global politics and policy blog from UEA

    Expert analysis from the University of East Anglia

    Read it Eastminster: a global politics and policy blog from UEA
  • Counter-Terrorism

    Responding to the threat of terrorism has become a key global policy priority in recent years. Counter-terrorism policies and the language that surrounds them have gone on to have a big impact on British society.

    Read it Counter-Terrorism
  • The Art of Persuasian

    Why are political speeches so often boring, predictable and unconvincing?

    Read it The Art of Persuasian
  • The new editor of British Vogue must make diversity fashionable

    Vogue remains a powerhouse in print journalism and has at least an opportunity, if not a responsibility, to represent all communities in society.

    Read it The new editor of British Vogue must make diversity fashionable
  • Just how far has Jeremy Corbyn come – and how far could he still go?

    From outcast campaigner through looming electoral disaster to near-triumph, Corbyn's remarkable political journey is far from over. Just how far has Jeremy Corbyn come – and how far could he still go?

    Read it Just how far has Jeremy Corbyn come – and how far could he still go?
  • #ASKUEA

    Your University questions, answered

    Read it #ASKUEA
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award
  • Return to Learn

    Thinking of returning to education after some time away? Come along to our open evening on 23 May to find out about studying for a degree in the Arts and Humanities.

    Read it Return to Learn

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.
  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 overall. If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Highers Only accepted in combination with Scottish Advanced Highers.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB. A combination of Advanced Highers and Highers may be acceptable.
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3
  • Access Course Distinction in 30 credits at level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at level 3. Humanities or Social Sciences pathway preferred. Other pathways are acceptable, please contact the University directly for further information.
  • BTEC DDM. BTEC Public Services is not accepted

Entry Requirement

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.
 

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

 

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Alternative Qualifications

We welcome a wide range of qualifications - for further information please email admissions@uea.ac.uk

 

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515