BA Philosophy (with a Foundation Year)


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
V50F
A-Level typical
CCC (2018/9 entry) See All Requirements
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Philosophy graduates leave with skills in analysis and argument, presentation and teamwork that are highly sought after in a wide range of professions. Our lecturers are highly experienced and active in research. Their specialised findings are the central focus of many taught modules, giving our students direct insight into the latest philosophical understanding and cutting-edge debates.

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"The campus is unique, the philosophy faculty are excellent and the humanities staff are so helpful. I felt completely at home there.”

In their words

Emma Corsan, BA Philosophy

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Article

(2017 Guardian University Guide)

"I was lucky enough to be taught by some excellent lecturers and tutors in my time at UEA. They were all experts in their field as well as passionate about their subject and getting the best from their students"

In their words

Jack Dedman, BA Philosophy

The Humanities Foundation Year is an innovative programme aimed at students who need to develop their skills and knowledge in order to study on one of the prestigious degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

Taught by dedicated lecturers from the Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities, the Foundation Year offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of academic subjects including Literature, History, Philosophy, Film, Television, and Media, American Studies, Politics and the History of Art. As well as providing students with a sound theoretical basis for their continuing studies, this approach allows students to discover previously unknown areas of study, and encourages them to develop their own scholarly interests and ideas.

The Foundation Year also places a strong emphasis on the development of essential study skills and we work closely with each individual to identify and work towards their own individual learning goals.

Overview

Our innovative BA Philosophy (with Foundation year) gives students the opportunity to progress on to the three year Philosophy programme following successful completion of a Foundation Year.

What is the Foundation Year?

Our Foundation Year is a one-year introduction designed to equip you for undergraduate study.

It is an intensive period of study which offers an average of 18 hours per week of guided learning to help you develop a variety of key study skills which will enable you to excel as an Undergraduate.

Over the course of the year you will be introduced to a wide range of academic subjects, including literature, history, philosophy, film, television and media, American studies, politics and the history of art. You will gain essential knowledge of many of the concepts, methods and techniques you will need in order to carry out successful study in the rest of the degree programme. You will also benefit from smaller class sizes and individual tutorials which will help you to get the most out of the programme.

Is it the right course for me?

Have you thought about going to university before, but something got in the way? This is our way of helping you to get on the right track to start your career in higher education.

We recognise that our BA programmes demand high entry standards, but we also appreciate that not everyone is going to be able to achieve these at A-level, so the Foundation Year offers an opportunity to work with us for a year, majoring in the subject you would like to do at degree level, with the chance to work on your study skills to get you to the level required. It is an intensive teaching and learning experience staffed by dedicated lecturers and taught in the Interdisciplinary Institute for the Humanities’ building, and we aim to make sure that all our students reach the position where they will be able to get onto their chosen degree programme at UEA.

Assessment

During the Foundation Year will be assessed in a variety of ways which will allow you to exercise different learning styles and familiarise you with the format and expectations of assessment in Higher Education. There will be a strong emphasis on formative assessment with feedback on drafts of written work and group tutorials which will help you to clearly see how you can improve and develop, enabling you to learn from your peers as well as teaching staff. This in turn will help you to build confidence in your abilities and become a more independent learner.

Your progress will be monitored through individual tutorials to ensure that you are happy on the course and achieving your full potential.

After the Foundation Year

Successful completion of the Foundation Year will lead you through onto the first year of the BA Philosophy degree.

During your Foundation Year there is the option to switch between degree programmes with the approval of the Course Director.

Explore you options, look at our courses, and decide where you want your degree to take you.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

See our: Study Philosophy at UEA | University of East Anglia video

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITIES: TECHNIQUES AND METHODS

This module provides students with an intensive induction to higher education equipping them with the basic skills they will need to reach their full potential on their degree programme. Weekly seminars and study groups will help students to develop skills in areas such as research, essay writing, giving presentations, teamwork, time-management, revision and exam techniques. This module also helps students to create an individual learning plan which assesses their strengths and weaknesses and enables them to track their development over the course of the module and beyond.

HUM-3006A

20

HUMANITIES: THE KEY CONCEPTS

This interdisciplinary module will give students a broad but detailed overview of some of the key themes and ideas within the Humanities and introduce them to a variety of critical perspectives. Weekly seminars cover topics such as ideology and myth, representation and reality, psychoanalysis, feminism, otherness, power and society, trauma and testimony. By studying key texts and theories students will explore how and why certain themes have become so prominent within the Humanities and they will begin to develop the requisite understanding and analytical skills to identify them at work in their future studies.

HUM-3005Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be enrolled onto HUM-3007A: Creative Industries as a default. If you wish to replace this module with a language, please choose one from the list below.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled (A1 CEFR or equivalent) may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The term 'Creative Industries' encompasses a range of disciplines taught in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, including film and television, media and creative writing. This module offers students the opportunity to gain an understanding of these industries that many may wish to work in. With a particular focus on employability, the module has been designed to allow for a critical exploration of a range of creative subjects (television, film, media, music, publishing - fiction and non-fiction, newspapers, magazines - among others). The module aims to empower students to engage effectively with a competitive Creative Industry environment and economy and acquire knowledge and a range of analytical skills across this range of disciplines.

HUM-3007A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language (or A2 CEFR or international equivalent). This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students can only take part II of a language module if they have taken the first part of the module in the Autumn semester.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. (If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

HISTORY AND SOCIETY

The module takes as its theme the development of nineteenth century Britain. We will look at the development of many key areas such as education, poverty and health and the realities of rural society. In particular, the role that faith has played in their development, either as experienced by individuals or the church as a concept. We will also consider how the media, through documentaries, costume drama and celebrity shows, present this period. The aim is to give you an insight into the importance and nature of Christian belief in rural England, and to aid an understanding of the place it played in pre-modern societies, using England as our focus.

HUM-3001B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level / Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding and awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURES

This module offers a foundation-level introduction to the field of Visual Cultures, and the diverse ways in which images have communicated meaning across different societies, time periods and cultures. It provides students with a grounding in how to study and analyse a wide range of art, media and design, including painting, artefacts and antiquities, photography, film, television, advertising and online digital media. The module's teaching and learning will be carried out through two different teaching formats: weekly 1 hour lecture which provides a detailed examination of an aspect of that week's topic. Weekly 3 hour seminar which provides an opportunity for students to discuss theoretical concepts and visual examples in depth.

HUM-3003B

20

LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES

This interdisciplinary module introduces a wide range of narratives in a variety of formats, asking you to consider questions such as: What is literature? How is literature influenced by its historical and cultural contexts? How can the humanities help us to make sense of literary texts? Over the course of the module, you will be introduced to key themes in literary studies, as well as examining the value of reading texts in their interdisciplinary contexts. You will develop your ability to analyse texts, engage with historical and cultural contexts, and develop your own critical arguments.

HUM-3004B

20

MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES

No previous experience of media production or any technical experience is required to take this module. The module will provide an introduction to the various media - related technologies. There will be both practical and taught sessions and opportunities for extracurricular activities. No previous film making, musical or programming experience will be necessary to complete the module, which will cover: The use of technology in media production and distribution#Social media, the Internet and its relationship to media#Critical listening and viewing and an introduction to the analysis of film music from a technological perspective#Debate and the media#Podcasting and citizen journalism#An introduction to the use of computers as creative tools#Digital media and the impact of digital technologies on research, media production, archiving and restoration#An introduction to interactive storytelling#Practical sessions.

HUM-3008B

20

WHAT IS POLITICS?

This module will introduce students to some of the key ideologies and 'isms' within contemporary political theory which form the focus of contemporary debates. It will encourage students to consider the role that politics plays in their lives through examination of political theory. Radical doctrines such as anarchism and fundamentalism will be discussed and evaluated alongside more traditional ideologies such as socialism, liberalism and conservatism. It will have relevance to students across a range of Foundation Year programmes through its critical approach to ideology.

HUM-3002B

20

Students must study the following modules for 100 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module for first year students is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle, or some later Greek and Mediaeval thinker may be included. The texts are studied in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant "for their time", but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy, and students on other degrees who are taking no other philosophy modules. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores and samples the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of other academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from them, uses their results, copies their methods, provokes them, comments on them, undermines them, or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one week components, students will review (in lectures, workshops and seminars) one or two case studies or issues that bring philosophy into some kind of dialogue with each of ten key subject areas, followed by a week in which the lessons to be learned will be reviewed. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students, to provide a taster of interdisciplinary connections that they may wish to go on to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other subjects, giving them a grasp of the relevance of philosophy for all academic work, including their own major subject. It is assessed by continuous assessment, based on the student's assembled diary/log entries, to include reflections on each topic covered.

PPLP4066A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premises and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Students will be automatically enrolled on PPLP4065B unless they request an alternative module from this list. PPLP4065B is recommended for all routes and is mandatory for those pursuing Further Philosophy, or Creative Writing as their subsidiary subject. PPLP4065B is treated as the reserve choice in case a chosen module is oversubscribed. All students are guaranteed a place on PPLP4065B. Alternative modules may be requested as follows for four of the subsidiary routes: (a) for Classical Ideas: AMAA4025B; (b) for Film Studies: AMAM4030B or AMAM4021B; (c) for Language and Culture: AMAM4030B, PPLC4012B, PPLP4067B or any language module for which the student is eligible; (d) for Gender Studies: AMAA4025B, PPLL4067B or HIS-4004B. Note that choosing one of these options will restrict your choice of route in Year 2.

Name Code Credits

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

DISCOURSE AND POWER

This module focuses on the role of discourse in the structuring of social relations. Its aim is to show that the linguistic features that make up our texts and verbal exchanges reflect the purpose language is put to in a specific context. Particular consideration is given to the discourse of the media, advertising and politics and how it affects and is affected by ideology and socio-cultural assumptions and by the relationship between individuals and social groups. Students are introduced to the main concepts and essential analytical tools and are encouraged to select their own material for analysis (class practice and formative exercises) on the basis of relevance to their studies and interests. This module equips students with the necessary skills to undertake their own critical analysis of any texts encountered in the course of their studies and beyond and is, therefore, suited to students majoring in political and social sciences, media and cultural studies, literature, philosophy and languages. Students attend a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar.

PPLL4011B

20

FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS OF THE GREAT CIVILISATIONS

In this module we explore the ways in which human beings have, from time immemorial, used narratives and poetry to create their models of the universe, and to think about issues relating to mankind's place within it. It focuses on ancient texts from a variety of major civilisations over the last four millenia, many of them still treated as living sources of wisdom and insight, spiritual guidance and moral vision. It has become customary in modern philosophy to privilege rational discourse in prose as the acceptable way of doing philosophy, and to imagine that to be human is to be rational. But is it irrational to explore our world and discover the deeper truths through narrative? Is that even non-rational enquiry? Might it actually be one of the key ways in which philosophy can reach and engage every human being? And might that be why all civilisations have stories and poetry as their foundational texts, not philosophical arguments? Students will acquire a basic knowledge of some key texts (including Homer, key parts of the King James Bible and the Quran) that any citizen of the world should know.

PPLP4067B

20

GREAT BOOKS

This module revolves around the close reading of four classic texts from the distant or the recent past, which offer profoundly original perspectives on problems that must constantly be faced and reflected upon by mankind. The specific problem we shall focus on in Spring 2017 is the opposition of liberty and oppression, seen in particular from the point of view of the relation between freedom and revolution. Our main task will be to explore a genealogy of the idea of revolution and then devote ourselves to philosophically central conceptions of revolution, beginning with Marx (and looking at his influence on thinkers and political figures such as Lenin or Rosa Luxemburg) and continuing with critics of Marx who made an effort to reconceive the very idea of revolution, notably the French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil and the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. These figures and their ideas will naturally attract a number of other texts, some philosophical and some literary (authors may include Homer, LaBoetie, Landauer, Levi, Melville, Todorov), which will be discussed to broaden the context in which our four classics can be situated and explore their theoretical resonance with other classics.

PPLP4065B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

The module aims to equip students with ways of thinking about issues such as language, (non) verbal communication, identity, intercultural interpersonal relationships and intercultural transitions. Interpersonal communication always involves a high degree of 'cultural business'. This becomes especially apparent when communicating with others who have different sets of cultural assumptions that may lead to misunderstanding, even if the same language is used. Interpersonal communication also involves a high level of self-awareness and critical understanding of issues surrounding the concept of identity. Before we communicate with people who are perceived to be different to ourselves, we need to understand how we present ourselves to others. By the end of this module students will be expected to have developed greater self-awareness and sensitivity to intercultural understanding. Lectures and seminars will enhance students' critical cultural awareness to enable them to become more effective interpersonal communicators and intercultural mediators in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work, global organisations, multinational companies, foreign volunteering placements, etc. Open to both home and international students. NB. Students do not need to speak a foreign language to take this module.

PPLC4012B

20

PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY

Introducing students to portraiture as it has been practiced by visual artists working in the European tradition between the Middle Ages and the present day, this module considers issues such as 'likeness'; the face; the self-portrait; portraiture as the embodiment of political, social and aesthetic power; the ways in which portraiture has variously reinforced and challenged concepts of class, race and gender; the photographic portrait, and the role of portraiture in contemporary art and culture. We will analyse the works of art alongside histories and concepts of the individual self, perhaps the supreme artefact of all.

AMAA4025B

20

STUDIES IN FILM HISTORY

This module provides an introduction to the history of film from the mid to late 20th Century, familiarizing students with key points of reference in the field. However, the module is also designed to familiarize students with a range of objects and methods within the practice of film history and to use these to encourage students to start asking questions about the construction of the established and accepted narrative of film history.

AMAM4021B

20

WITCHCRAFT, MAGIC AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This module examines the history of early modern Europe through the history of witchcraft, witch-beliefs, and especially witchcraft prosecutions after 1500. Through learned demonology and folk traditions, we explore the development of the idea of the witch, and see how during the turbulent era of the Reformation this thinking translated into legal trials and, occasionally some savage witch-panics. We look in detail at subjects such as gender, fear and anxiety, state building, and scepticism, ranging across early modern Britain, continental Europe and colonial America.

HIS-4004B

20

Students will select 0 - 100 credits from the following modules:

You must take at least 40 credits from this Option Range unless you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from Option Range C. If you are taking either PPLP5072A or PPLP5073B you will take modules from this and other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad.

Name Code Credits

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

You must take at least 20 credits from this Option Range unless you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from Option Range C. If you are taking either PPLP5072A or PPLP5073B you will take modules from this and other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad.

Name Code Credits

AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole. This module is taught biennially.

PPLP5091B

20

ETHICS FOR LIFE

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5083B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP5088A

20

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP5170B

20

Students will select 0 - 100 credits from the following modules:

You will take up to 60 credits in this Options Range, unless you are taking a Semester Abroad. If you are taking PPLP5072A: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Autumn or PPLP5073B: Philosophy Semester Abroad - Spring from this Option Range, you will take additional modules from this and/or other ranges in consultation with the Course Director, to take account of the philosophy content in your studies abroad, subject to a maximum of 100 credits from this Option Range.

Name Code Credits

AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole. This module is taught biennially.

PPLP5091B

20

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

ETHICS FOR LIFE

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5083B

20

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film and different themes in film will be studied.

PPLP5089B

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5082A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - AUTUMN

The Philosophy Sector, PPL School, and HUM Faculty have various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. Arrangements for a semester abroad must have been made in advance with the PPL ERASMUS Director for Politics and Philosophy, Dr Liki Koutrakou.

PPLP5072A

60

PHILOSOPHY SEMESTER ABROAD - SPRING

The Philosophy Sector, PPL School, and HUM Faculty have various ERASMUS arrangements with European Universities where it is possible to spend a semester abroad. Arrangements for a semester abroad must have been made in advance with the PPL ERASMUS Director for Politics and Philosophy, Dr Liki Koutrakou.

PPLP5073B

60

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP5088A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP5170B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

If you embarked on the relevant subsidiary theme in Year 1 you may choose to take modules from this Option Range. Students will select 0-40 credits from this Option Range, subject to permission from the Course Director as follows: (a) for Classical Ideas: AMAA5098B; AMAA5105B; LDCL5071B; PPLX5051B; PPLX5064A; HIS 5002A; (b) for Creative Writing: LDCC5004B; LDCC5005A; LDCL5072A; (c) for Language and Culture: LDCL5031A; PPLL5170A; LDCL5061A or any language module for which the student is eligible; (d) for Gender Studies: PPLM5002A; LDCD5025B; LDCL5030A; LDCL5050B; HIS-5063B. You can only take 20 credits of Level 4 modules in Year 2.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

ARCHAEOLOGIES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

Using case studies from around the Mediterranean world, this module provides a grounding in the archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Case studies range from Palaeolithic Europe, to the Neolithic of the Aegean, Cyprus, The Near East, or North Africa, depending on the expertise of the module convener. Themes include early artistic endeavour (Palaeolithic Europe), the transition from hunting to farming (Crete, the Aegean, Cyprus the Near East), the emergence of urban societies (Egypt, the Near East), climate and society (the Mediterranean).

AMAA5098B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II/IMPROVERS

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. (If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled (A1 CEFR or equivalent) may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

COMEDY AND THE ABSURD IN DRAMA

How and why does comedy work as idea and theatrical practice? This module explores comedy across time and place, using a range of themes, texts, thinkers and practitioners to explore the theory, practice, politics and place of comedy in drama, encompassing comedy as social critique or challenge, resistance or reinforcement, comedy of ideas, language, confrontation, carnival and the grotesque, comic types and bodies, gender and identity politics, clowning, metatheatre and theatricality, as well as forms such as commedia dell'arte, and farce. We will also examine the idea and evolution of 'theatre of the absurd'. Texts will vary each year and you are encouraged to seek out performed comedy in a variety of contexts to text out theories and practice, as well as the particular relationship of comic performance to its audiences. The main mode is seminar discussion complemented by opportunities to participate in and/or observe some practical workshops. You may choose to include a performance element as part of the assessment but this module is open to all.

LDCL5071B

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (AUT)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 5 Creative Writing modules. The aim of the module is to get students writing prose fiction and/or poetry, using structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of work. At the outset students will be encouraged to write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. Throughout attention will be given to the work of established authors, using exemplary texts both as a basis for discussion and as a stimulus to students' own writing. Along the way students will begin to develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. They will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc.

LDCC5005A

20

CREATIVE WRITING: INTRODUCTION (SPR)

An introductory module open only to second year students. It is not available to students on the Creative Writing Minor and is offered as an alternative to other Level 5 Creative Writing modules. The aim of the module is to get students writing prose fiction and/or poetry, using structured exercises based on objects, handouts, discussion and visualisation to stimulate the production of work. At the outset students will be encouraged to write about 'what they know', drawing on notebooks, memories and family stories. Throughout attention will be given to the work of established authors, using exemplary texts both as a basis for discussion and as a stimulus to students' own writing. Along the way students will begin to develop an understanding of the craft of writing - the technical nuts and bolts. They will also acquire some of the disciplines necessary to being a writer - observation, writing in drafts, reading as a writer, submitting to deadlines, etc.

LDCC5004B

20

CRITICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Through a combination of lectures and seminars, this module will explore the theory and practice of literary criticism from the origins of the study of English literature as an academic discipline to the present. In order to do this, we examine not only the work of literary critics and theorists, but also engage with developments in linguistics, economics, psychoanalysis and philosophy, tracing the ways in which these overlap with, and inform, literary study. Covering the work of writers as various as Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Derrida, Eve Sedgwick and Gayatri Spivak, and exploring structuralist, feminist, queer and post-colonial theories amongst others, this module engages with ideas and ways of thinking which you will find helpful throughout your degree.

LDCL5031A

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of the intermediate course in Arabic (PPLB5035A). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level / Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

An intermediate course in Greek for those students who have taken Beginners' Greek I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

A continuation of Intermediate Greek I. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

An intermediate course in Russian for those students who have taken Beginners' Russian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

A continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language (or A2 CEFR or international equivalent). This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding and awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LEVEL 5)

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some approaches to research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, multilingualism and politeness. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest for a class presentation and the project. The module does not assume knowledge of a second language and is relevant to students majoring in political, socio-cultural and media studies as well as to language students.

PPLL5170A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

POLITICAL THEATRE

This module examines the use of theatre and performance - by the State, by oppositional groups, by political activists and by theatre and performance practitioners - to solidify or challenge structures of power. The course looks at specific examples of how theatre and public spectacles have been used in the twentieth century to control or contest the political stage. Examining American, South America, African, Russian, and Eastern European performance in the twentieth century, this class will document and explore through specific performances, videos, dramatic texts and theoretical essays, how performance in theory and practice can be used to explore issues to race, ethnicity, gender, political upheaval and social change within a society.

LDCD5025B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I

A basic module in post A-Level German (also open for students with AS-Level grade A, or equivalent to B1 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) consisting of revision and extension of selected areas of advanced grammar and reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Its aim is to develop competence in all areas of spoken and written German. (The module may contain a component of 'Business German': "International trade fairs in Germany", depending on student interest and enrolment.) This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II

This module is designed to continue Post A-level German 1. It consists of revision and extension of selected advanced grammar integrated into the study of authentic texts and audio-visual materials. The aim is to further enhance students' communicative competency in German, in both writing and oral (presentation and interaction), encouraging their engagement with current affairs in German-speaking countries but also to get insights into the contemporary literary and cultural scene. Film, short prose and poetry will be analysed and discussed and students will be required to respond to different sorts of media. The module also promotes cultural awareness as it exposes students to the richness and diversity of the German-speaking social and political world.

PPLB4021B

20

READING AND WRITING TRANSLATIONS

This course focuses on reading translated texts from around the world, and analysing them in the context of translation theory. Texts explored will range from the Bible and Latin poetry (Virgil, Catullus) through the Arabian Nights to non-fiction works (Nietzsche, Freud) and Harry Potter; translation theories studied will include historical examples (Jerome, John Dryden, Friedrich Schleiermacher) and more recent theoretical work in translation studies, with a particular emphasis on the way translation theory intersects with cultural movements such as feminism and postcolonialism. There is one piece of summative coursework assessment, which involves either an original translation with commentary or a comparative analysis of existing translations or an essay on a theoretical issue in translation studies. Other pieces of formative assessment to be completed over the course of the module include analyses of translated texts, sample translations, and self-commentaries on translations. A thorough reading knowledge of another language besides English is advisable, but not essential.

LDCL5061A

20

THE ORIGINS OF THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE 4000BC TO 1066AD

This module will examine the development of the English landscape from early prehistoric times to the late Saxon period. We will examine the field archaeology of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, discuss the landscapes of Roman Britain, and assess the nature of the Roman/Saxon transition. We will then investigate the development of territorial organisation, field systems and settlement patterns during the Saxon and early medieval periods. The module provides an introduction to the theory and methods of landscape archaeology, as well as giving a broad overview of the development of society, economy and landscape in the period up to c.1100.

HIS-5002A

20

THREE WOMEN WRITERS

The writings of Edith Wharton, Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf intersect with discourses of 'new women' and gender as well as feminism, and social and cultural history. This second level seminar develops historicist and generic understanding as well as exploring women's identity through these authors' writings, which move between realism and modernism. Special attention to just one writer is possible in the final essay. Particular attention will be given to some of Virginia Woolf's lesser known writing.

LDCL5050B

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

WOMEN, POWER AND POLITICS II, THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE TO NANCY ASTOR

This module explores female involvement in politics, from the Duchess of Devonshire's infamous activities in the 1784 Westminster election until 1919, when Nancy Astor became the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. It will examine topics including the early feminists, aristocratic female politicians, radical politics and the suffragettes. It will investigate the changes and continuities with female engagement with the political process from the eighteenth century through to the twentieth century.

HIS-5063B

20

Students will select 80 - 120 credits from the following modules:

Students will select at least 80 credits (normally 90 to 120 credits) from the following modules. The two 20 credit modules (PPLP6103A; PPLP6134B) may only be taken by students following guided option range 'Language and Culture'.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole.

PPLP6121B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face. This module runs alongside a Level 5 module in the same area, PPLP5100B, but students at Level 6 have a separate seminar/tutorials and they prepare a distinctive independent project for assessment. This is a 20 credit module and is designed for PPE students, students in SSF and Science degrees, and students on degrees in the LCS sector of PPL.

PPLP6134B

20

ADVANCED THEMES IN PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida.

PPLP6112A

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP6118A

30

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939 (EXTENDED VERSION)

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP6137A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY (EXTENDED VERSION)

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP6135B

30

ETHICS FOR LIFE (WITH EXTENDED ESSAY)

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP6113B

30

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY WITH ADVANCED ESSAY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film will be studied.

PPLP6119B

30

LOGIC AND LANGUAGE

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling. This third year module runs alongside a second year module (entitled Logic). It covers the same topics as that module in the taught elements, but third year students have a dedicated seminar and are required to submit work from additional research-based tasks in the final assessment. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6127A

30

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND: ADVANCED THEMES

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g. what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6030B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This module is designed for PPE students and is also open to SSF and Science students, and students on degrees in the LCS sector of PPL. STUDENTS IN THE PHI and PSI SECTORS OF PPL SHOULD TAKE PPLP6128A, WHICH IS A 30 CREDIT VERSION THAT RUNS ALONGSIDE.

PPLP6103A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES (EXTENDED VERSION)

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP6136B

30

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

If you embarked on the relevant subsidiary theme in year 2 you may choose to take modules from this Option Range. Students will select a maximum of 30 credits, except for those following the Language and Culture guided option range, who may select up to 40 credits (if 40 credits are selected, a 20 credit philosophy module must be selected too). The modules, subject to permission from the Course Director, are as follows: (a) for Classical Ideas: LDCL6124B; LDCL6054B; LDCL6056B; LDCL6085B; LDCL6087A; (b) for Language and Culture: PPLL6137A; PPLB5039A; PPLB5040B; (c) for Gender Studies: PPLL6137A; AMMA6128B; LDCL6120A; LDCL6123B; LDCL6033B.

Name Code Credits

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

An intermediate course in Italian for those students who have taken Beginners' Italian I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

An intermediate course in Italian for those with no more than GCSE, O-Level or Beginners' Italian. A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. Can be taken in any year. NB: orals are arranged separately. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5040B

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER (LEVEL 6)

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism). This is a 30-credit variant of PPLL6035A and it may not be taken by language and communication students.

PPLL6137A

30

LYRIC

The module will incorporate a historical survey of Western lyric, looking at its inception in the poetry of Pindar and Sappho, and the Aristotelian division of poetic arts in lyric, dramatic and epic. It will cover lyrics from Provencal troubadour poets through the Italian and English renaissance to Romantic lyric. Finally, it will cover the fate of lyric in the present day, from 'conceptual writing' and 'post-humanism' which offer a thoroughgoing rejection of lyric, to the embrace of lyric in contemporary young poets. The module will start by considering the question: 'What is lyric'? The purpose is not to establish a transhistorical concept of lyric as genre or mode, but rather to see how different thinkers at different times have approached it. This is a particularly timely question for literary criticism and poetics. We will isolate certain tropes, ethics, and focal points that are taken to be characteristic of lyric, whilst at the same time probing the historicity of lyric as a concept, especially regarding the ideology of the lyric 'I' that is associated with romanticism. This module fulfils the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6087A

30

QUEER LITERATURE AND THEORY

This module offers students the chance to learn about LGBTQ literature and its development in English-speaking countries, as well as approaches to queer theory. This means analysing sexuality and gender and the representation of such identities in literature and also connections between literature and the broader culture. Authors studied may include James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, David Levithan, Maggie Nelson, and Sarah Waters. Authors of theoretical texts looked at may include Beatriz Preciado, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, and Teresa de Lauretis. Understanding how LGBTQ characters are featured in literature also helps us to see how queer people are understood in a given society in general. This course also aims to look at a variety of genres in order to see how these different text types work and how they approach similar material in different ways, as well as analysing current events. This module also includes presentations and a writing workshop.

LDCL6033B

30

SATIRE

'Satire is problematic, open ended, essayistic, ambiguous in relation to history, uncertain in its political effects, resistant to final closure, more inclined to ask questions than provide answers, ambivalent about the pleasures it offers' (Dustin Griffin). The aim of this module is to investigate the problematic territory of satire. Using examples from modern and contemporary fiction, journalism, and television alongside early modern and classical satire, we will formulate a critical and conceptual map, which will in turn allow us to discuss some of the problems of satire (those of genre, of gender, of politics, of morality, of history), and to explore some of the paradoxes of its strategies and functions (freedom versus limits; subversion versus conformity; transformation versus stasis).Writers under discussion will include Juvenal, Horace, Persius, Swift and Pope; John Dryden, Evelyn Waugh, and Malcolm Bradbury. Television examples will include Brass Eye and The Thick of It. This module offers the opportunity for one or more of the assessments to be a creative writing piece. This module counts towards the pre-1789 requirement.

LDCL6085B

30

SHAKESPEARE: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE

Platonist epistemology permeated Elizabethan culture: the aim of this module is to explore the relationship of Shakespeare's topic of the world as a stage to Neoplatonic conceptions of perception, politics, poetry and love.

LDCL6056B

30

T. S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY POETRY

THIS IS A 20 CREDIT VERSION OF LDCL6122B T. S. ELIOT AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY POETRY AND IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING/EXCHANGE STUDENTS ONLY.

LDCL6123B

20

THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE: TRANSLATING LOVE, DEATH AND ADVENTURE

For something to be reborn it must first die. The Italian Renaissance ('rebirth') sought to disinter the past in order to reanimate the present, but in order to do so the present had to come to terms with its loss - as Petrarch asked, 'who can doubt that Rome would rise again instantly if she began to know herself?'. How can we best understand this process of loss and reanimation? How did Renaissance writers understand it, and how did they bridge the gulf between death and rebirth? And can we do the same? In order to answer these questions this module examines the twin practices of imitation and translation in English responses to some of the most exciting and influential texts of the Italian Renaissance. It does so in two ways: through a sustained analysis of those practices in their diverse forms and genres (sonnets, epic, dialogue, drama), and by imitating the process of creative imitation ourselves. In other words, we step into the shoes of the Renaissance imitator. The module allows us to understand how Italian poets such as Dante, Petrarch and Ariosto responded to the classical past (and each other), and how English poets and playwrights such as Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare and Jonson responded to Italian models. By imitating the imitators - for example by writing sonnets - we gain a deeper understanding of how imitation is both a creative practice and a critical process, both a reading and a rewriting. Students are not expected or required to know any Italian in advance. THIS MODULE FULFILS THE PRE-1789 REQUIREMENT.

LDCL6124B

30

VIRGIL'S CLASSIC EPIC

After the Bible, the Aeneid is probably the single most important and influential work in the Western cultural tradition. For T. S. Eliot, it is the "classic of all Europe." It is also one of the most extraordinary - moving, complex, formally and philosophically subtle and ambitious - poems we have. This module is devoted to exploration of the Aeneid and to its medieval reception. The first half of the module looks at Virgil's poem in relation to its literary models, particularly in Homer's great epics, The Iliad and The Odyssey, within its own Roman (Augustan) context, and in its formal complexity. The second attends to the medieval reception of the Aeneid: the accommodation of its challenging pagan difference and the co-option of its remarkable cultural authority within new religious, political, and literary contexts. We explore Dante's response to Virgil's poem in the Divine Comedy alongside those of Augustine and Chaucer; we read medieval Romance reworkings of Virgil's classical epic; and we consider the variety of ways in which medieval writers looked to continue the Aeneid in their own distinctive ways.

LDCL6054B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

Fees and Funding

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Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

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Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

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We offer a range of Scholarships for International Students – please see our website for further information.

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