BA Philosophy (Part time)

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Philosophy graduates leave with skills in analysis and argument, presentation and teamwork that are highly sought after in a wide range of professions. Our lecturers are highly experienced and active in research. Their specialised findings are the central focus of many taught modules, giving our students direct insight into the latest philosophical understanding and cutting-edge debates.

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"The campus is unique, the philosophy faculty are excellent and the humanities staff are so helpful. I felt completely at home there.”

In their words

Emma Corsan, BA Philosophy

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(2017 Guardian University Guide)

"I was lucky enough to be taught by some excellent lecturers and tutors in my time at UEA. They were all experts in their field as well as passionate about their subject and getting the best from their students"

In their words

Jack Dedman, BA Philosophy

Join a tradition of thought and exploration that stretches back thousands of years and get to grips with the most fundamental questions of our existence. What is there, and why? How do we know? Why does it matter? When you study philosophy, you are responding to the deep desire to know and understand, to discover and change things, and to question received opinions.

On this course, your ideas matter, and you’ll learn how to express them, defend them and act on them with confidence and clarity. These powers of analysis and deep thought will prepare you to work in an amazing range of different fields from politics, journalism and education, to publishing and advertising.

At UEA Philosophy focuses on learning to think in new ways, and questioning existing ways of doing things, so you don’t need a background in philosophy to join this degree.

Overview

On this course you will gain a strong foundation in a broad range of philosophical topics. Then you will have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your interests by selecting your own optional modules. Throughout your time with us you will cultivate your imagination, your judgment and your ability to pay careful attention to standards of argument. From the very first day of your studies, you will be immersed in philosophical themes and theories.  

You will work with lecturers and tutors who are highly regarded in some of the most exciting areas of philosophy being studied today. This means you will have access to the very latest theories and approaches in the field. 

You will have a choice of major themes, including environmental philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of language, ethics, philosophy of religion, and literature. You will explore topics from philosophy of mind to philosophy of religion, from ethics to formal logic, and a myriad connections with other subjects (from maths to creative writing). You will engage in philosophical debates with great thinkers, from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary philosophers in this ever-unfolding field. You can also choose to complement your studies by taking classes in gender studies, classical ideas, creative writing, film studies, or languages and culture.

During your studies, you will discover that philosophy is still controversial, still disputed, and still open to correction, and you will be invited to make your own suggestions. You will build up the confidence to challenge received wisdom on the basis of genuine understanding and accurate critical focus, and to speak with your own unique voice. 

Throughout the course you will hone your study and research skills as well as your ability to engage with philosophical thought and debate. One of the most effective ways to achieve this is through producing your own written work. Your tutors will help you refine your writing skills with constructive feedback and individual guidance.

See our: Study Philosophy at UEA | University of East Anglia video

Course Structure

Your degree programme may contain compulsory or optional modules. Compulsory modules are designed to give you a solid grounding, optional modules allow you to tailor your degree.

The course modules section below lists the current modules by year and you can click on each module for further details. Each module lists its value (in credits) and its module code, a year of study is 120 credits. 

Assessment

You will be assessed across a range of your work, including essays, substantial research projects or dissertation, and examinations. Each module will have its own combination of assessment methods. Your final result is calculated by combining the results of all of the modules which you have studied in the final two years.

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Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module for first year students is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle, or some later Greek and Mediaeval thinker may be included. The texts are studied in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant "for their time", but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy, and students on other degrees who are taking no other philosophy modules. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will select up to 40 credits.

Name Code Credits

FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS OF THE GREAT CIVILISATIONS

In this module we explore the ways in which human beings have, from time immemorial, used narratives and poetry to create their models of the universe, and to think about issues relating to mankind's place within it. It focuses on ancient texts from a variety of major civilisations over the last four millenia, many of them still treated as living sources of wisdom and insight, spiritual guidance and moral vision. It has become customary in modern philosophy to privilege rational discourse in prose as the acceptable way of doing philosophy, and to imagine that to be human is to be rational. But is it irrational to explore our world and discover the deeper truths through narrative? Is that even non-rational enquiry? Might it actually be one of the key ways in which philosophy can reach and engage every human being? And might that be why all civilisations have stories and poetry as their foundational texts, not philosophical arguments? Students will acquire a basic knowledge of some key texts (including Homer, key parts of the King James Bible and the Quran) that any citizen of the world should know.

PPLP4067B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premises and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

GREAT BOOKS

This module revolves around the close reading of four classic texts from the distant or the recent past, which offer profoundly original perspectives on problems that must constantly be faced and reflected upon by mankind. The specific problem we shall focus on in Spring 2017 is the opposition of liberty and oppression, seen in particular from the point of view of the relation between freedom and revolution. Our main task will be to explore a genealogy of the idea of revolution and then devote ourselves to philosophically central conceptions of revolution, beginning with Marx (and looking at his influence on thinkers and political figures such as Lenin or Rosa Luxemburg) and continuing with critics of Marx who made an effort to reconceive the very idea of revolution, notably the French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil and the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. These figures and their ideas will naturally attract a number of other texts, some philosophical and some literary (authors may include Homer, LaBoetie, Landauer, Levi, Melville, Todorov), which will be discussed to broaden the context in which our four classics can be situated and explore their theoretical resonance with other classics.

PPLP4065B

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores and samples the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of other academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from them, uses their results, copies their methods, provokes them, comments on them, undermines them, or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one week components, students will review (in lectures, workshops and seminars) one or two case studies or issues that bring philosophy into some kind of dialogue with each of ten key subject areas, followed by a week in which the lessons to be learned will be reviewed. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students, to provide a taster of interdisciplinary connections that they may wish to go on to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other subjects, giving them a grasp of the relevance of philosophy for all academic work, including their own major subject. It is assessed by continuous assessment, based on the student's assembled diary/log entries, to include reflections on each topic covered.

PPLP4066A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

FOUNDATIONAL TEXTS OF THE GREAT CIVILISATIONS

In this module we explore the ways in which human beings have, from time immemorial, used narratives and poetry to create their models of the universe, and to think about issues relating to mankind's place within it. It focuses on ancient texts from a variety of major civilisations over the last four millenia, many of them still treated as living sources of wisdom and insight, spiritual guidance and moral vision. It has become customary in modern philosophy to privilege rational discourse in prose as the acceptable way of doing philosophy, and to imagine that to be human is to be rational. But is it irrational to explore our world and discover the deeper truths through narrative? Is that even non-rational enquiry? Might it actually be one of the key ways in which philosophy can reach and engage every human being? And might that be why all civilisations have stories and poetry as their foundational texts, not philosophical arguments? Students will acquire a basic knowledge of some key texts (including Homer, key parts of the King James Bible and the Quran) that any citizen of the world should know.

PPLP4067B

20

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premises and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole. This module is taught biennially.

PPLP5091B

20

ETHICS FOR LIFE

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5083B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP5088A

20

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP5170B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will select up to 40 credits from the following modules (or another module approved by the Course Director).

Name Code Credits

AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole. This module is taught biennially.

PPLP5091B

20

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

ETHICS FOR LIFE

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5083B

20

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film and different themes in film will be studied.

PPLP5089B

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5082A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP5088A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP5170B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

Students will select 20 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Students will select their remaining Level 5 credits from the following modules (ensuring that a minimum of 80 credits at Level 5 are in PPLP modules).

Name Code Credits

AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole. This module is taught biennially.

PPLP5091B

20

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP5171A

20

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP5169B

20

ETHICS FOR LIFE

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5083B

20

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film and different themes in film will be studied.

PPLP5089B

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

LOGIC

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling.

PPLP5080A

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP5082A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g., what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise.

PPLP5098B

20

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP5088A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP5170B

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole.

PPLP6121B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face. This module runs alongside a Level 5 module in the same area, PPLP5100B, but students at Level 6 have a separate seminar/tutorials and they prepare a distinctive independent project for assessment. This is a 20 credit module and is designed for PPE students, students in SSF and Science degrees, and students on degrees in the LCS sector of PPL.

PPLP6134B

20

ADVANCED THEMES IN PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida.

PPLP6112A

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP6118A

30

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939 (EXTENDED VERSION)

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP6137A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY (EXTENDED VERSION)

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP6135B

30

ETHICS FOR LIFE (WITH EXTENDED ESSAY)

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP6113B

30

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY WITH ADVANCED ESSAY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film will be studied.

PPLP6119B

30

LOGIC AND LANGUAGE

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling. This third year module runs alongside a second year module (entitled Logic). It covers the same topics as that module in the taught elements, but third year students have a dedicated seminar and are required to submit work from additional research-based tasks in the final assessment. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6127A

30

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND: ADVANCED THEMES

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g. what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6030B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES (EXTENDED VERSION)

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP6136B

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF ART

This module will explore some of the major themes and problems in aesthetics and the philosophy of art, asking questions about the value of art, aesthetic experience and judgement, artistic creativity, interpretation and representation. The module begins by looking at Plato's reflections on the place of the arts in society and includes an exploration of classics of the 18th and 19th Century aesthetic tradition such as Hume's Of the Standard of Taste, Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment, and Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy, as well as more contemporary works from various traditions. We end with a reading of one of the most influential essays on art in the last century, Heidegger's Origin of the Work of Art, drawing together and attempting to reappraise many of the issues tackled in the module as a whole.

PPLP6121B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face. This module runs alongside a Level 5 module in the same area, PPLP5100B, but students at Level 6 have a separate seminar/tutorials and they prepare a distinctive independent project for assessment. This is a 20 credit module and is designed for PPE students, students in SSF and Science degrees, and students on degrees in the LCS sector of PPL.

PPLP6134B

20

ADVANCED THEMES IN PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

In this module we explore the genesis and development of the phenomenological tradition, one of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Edmund Husserl's attempt to investigate the intentionality of pure consciousness in all its forms, we will investigate the critique of these ideas put forward by Husserl's most famous student, Martin Heidegger. Rooting phenomenological analysis in the lived world of anxiety, mortality, freedom, and temporality, Heidegger's work gave rise to important debates in existential philosophy, especially in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Phenomenological analysis and existential philosophy share a commitment to understanding human life as an integrated whole that does away with traditional philosophical divisions between metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and political thought. Time permitting, we will also look at some later immanent criticisms of phenomenology and existentialism developed by such thinkers as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida.

PPLP6112A

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant political philosophy of our time is liberalism (and 'neo-liberalism'). This module will examine topics in contemporary political philosophy including the liberalism of John Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice' (1972) together with the critical responses to it of Marxists, ecologists, free-market libertarians, and communitarians. It thus puts students in a position to understand and criticise the mainstream 'received wisdom' in this area, and potentially to formulate alternatives to it. Is liberalism a suitable political philosophy for our time? If not, what is?

PPLP6118A

30

ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY TO 1939 (EXTENDED VERSION)

Analytic Philosophy has been the dominant model of philosophy in the English-speaking world for about a century, and most philosophy degrees still privilege this way of doing philosophy. But what is it and what is its history? According to its original promises this approach should make possible progress in philosophy that is comparable to scientific progress. But has this really happened? Could a revision of some of the original methodological ideas make this possible? In this module we examine the heritage of famous pioneers in this kind of philosophy, particularly Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, the early work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the work of Rudolf Carnap.

PPLP6137A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM: EXPERIENCE, EXPERIMENTS, AND PHILOSOPHY (EXTENDED VERSION)

The birth of modern science went hand in hand with the rise of Empiricist styles of philosophy that have exerted a huge philosophical and cultural influence, ever since. This module will critically assess this key tradition, explore how it has evolved over time, and examine how it influences exciting philosophical debates today. We will cover classical (early modern) empiricism, logical (20th century) empiricism, and current naturalism with a focus on methodological naturalism and the potentially transformative movement of experimental philosophy.

PPLP6135B

30

ETHICS FOR LIFE (WITH EXTENDED ESSAY)

Moral problems impinge directly on our lives. These may be either issues pertaining to oneself and to people close to one, or they may be connected with public policies, the law and issues of global justice. Though we shall discuss classic topics of practical ethics such as justice, equality, death and civil disobedience, our main interest will be in discerning the underlying patterns in our thinking about such problems. Another focus will be issues relating to philosophy's practical role. How exactly might philosophy help us in thinking about real moral problems and how best to live our lives? Are there ways in which literature might help us in thinking about morality and life? Using examples from literature and life we seek to expose over-simplifications in moral theory, develop sensitivities to the complexity of situations, and explore how tragedy, may, in the end, be a fundamental and unavoidable aspect of the human condition. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. This module is offered biennially.

PPLP6113B

30

FILM AS PHILOSOPHY WITH ADVANCED ESSAY

The module will present and evaluate the thesis that film not only exemplifies particular philosophical problems, but also provides its own distinctive style of answer to those problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in distinguishing between genres. They will, for example, examine the differences and overlap between film, literature, and drama, and explore the implications of these differences. A range of different kinds of film will be studied.

PPLP6119B

30

LOGIC AND LANGUAGE

This module will look at the conceptual foundations of logic with an especial emphasis on the relationship between logic and natural language. After a brief introduction to (recap on) first-order logic with identity (semantics and proof), the unit will proceed to look at a number of interconnected themes, including the semantic paradoxes, Russell's theory of descriptions, the nature of truth, logical syntax, and natural language quantification. Although PPLP4064B Reasoning and Logic is not a pre-requisite, those students who did not get at least 60% on that module, or did not take the module at all, should see the Module Organiser before enrolling. This third year module runs alongside a second year module (entitled Logic). It covers the same topics as that module in the taught elements, but third year students have a dedicated seminar and are required to submit work from additional research-based tasks in the final assessment. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6127A

30

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND: ADVANCED THEMES

What is it to have a mind? Are we humans the only things to have a mind? Is a mind even a unitary thing? This module will investigate these fundamental questions by way of considering two so-called marks of the mental. Firstly, to have a mind is to be able to represent or think about things (intentionality). Secondly, having a mind involves qualitative states: e.g. what it's like to feel pain or see red. The status of both of these marks is highly controversial. The module will seek to explain why they are controversial and assess possible solutions to the problems to which they give rise. This third year module runs alongside a second year module on the same topic, but has more advanced seminars, reading lists and assessment tasks. It is taught biennially.

PPLP6030B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

WORLD PHILOSOPHIES (EXTENDED VERSION)

'World philosophies' is a chance to study 'non-Western' philosophy at Honours level. In this module, UEA philosophers present and examine a package of philosophical ideas, approaches and arguments from the non-Christian world. These include traditions such as Mediaeval Jewish and Islamic philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, Zen, Daoism, and the applied philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi. Throughout the unit, connections will be made, where appropriate, to 'Western philosophy', especially to ancient Greek thought; but the main point of this module is to provide a serious opportunity for the student to immerse themselves in approaches which have been relatively removed from the dominant influences upon philosophy in the English-speaking and European world.

PPLP6136B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

Entry Requirement

We always welcome applications from mature students and 'non-standard' applicants - (those not coming directly from school or college) - but we usually ask that they have some relevant and recent academic study to prepare them for the demands and challenges of undergraduate work.  By this we mean study at A-Level equivalent standard within the last 3 or 4 years. We would consider an A-Level in an Arts or Humanities subject (a high grade would be required), an Access to Higher Education course (Humanities route) (many local colleges offer these and we would be looking for Distinction and Merit grades (exact requirements are dependent on exactly which programme you apply to as they all have slightly different entry requirements) or some Open University study in a relevant subject area.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

·         IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

Interviews

Applicants with alternative qualifications are usually invited to attend for interview. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact us for further information.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE.

Course Open To

UK and EU applicants only.

Entry Requirement

We always welcome applications from mature students and 'non-standard' applicants - (those not coming directly from school or college) - but we usually ask that they have some relevant and recent academic study to prepare them for the demands and challenges of undergraduate work.  By this we mean study at A-Level equivalent standard within the last 3 or 4 years. We would consider an A-Level in an Arts or Humanities subject (a high grade would be required), an Access to Higher Education course (Humanities route) (many local colleges offer these and we would be looking for Distinction and Merit grades (exact requirements are dependent on exactly which programme you apply to as they all have slightly different entry requirements) or some Open University study in a relevant subject area.

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here.

Interviews

Applicants with alternative qualifications are usually invited to attend for interview. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Alternative Qualifications

We welcome a wide range of qualifications - for further information please email admissions@uea.ac.uk

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applying for Part-Time Degrees

The University of East Anglia offers some of its undergraduate degrees on a part-time basis. Applications are made directly to the University: More information and an application form can be found at our Part-Time Study pages. For further information on the part-time application process, please contact our Admissions Service at admissions@uea.ac.uk.

Each year we hold a series of Open Days, where potential applicants to our Undergraduate courses can come and visit the university to learn more about the courses they are interested in, meet current students and staff and tour our campus. If you decide to apply for a course and are made an offer, you will be invited to a School specific Applicant Day. Applicants may be invited for interview or audition for some courses.

For enquiries about the content of the degree or your qualifications please contact the Admissions Service on 01603 591515 or email admissions@uea.ac.uk We can then direct your enquiry to the relevant department to assist you.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515