BA Philosophy (Part time)

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Philosophy graduates leave with skills in analysis and argument, presentation and teamwork that are highly sought after in a wide range of professions. Our lecturers are highly experienced and active in research. Their specialised findings are the central focus of many taught modules, giving our students direct insight into the latest philosophical understanding and cutting-edge debates.

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"The campus is unique, the philosophy faculty are excellent and the humanities staff are so helpful. I felt completely at home there.”

In their words

Emma Corsan, BA Philosophy

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(2017 Guardian University Guide)

"I was lucky enough to be taught by some excellent lecturers and tutors in my time at UEA. They were all experts in their field as well as passionate about their subject and getting the best from their students"

In their words

Jack Dedman, BA Philosophy

Join a tradition of thought and exploration that stretches back thousands of years and get to grips with the most fundamental questions of our existence. What is there, and why? How do we know? Why does it matter? When you study philosophy, you are responding to the deep desire to know and understand, to discover and change things, and to question received opinions.

On this course, your ideas matter, and you’ll learn how to express them, defend them and act on them with confidence and clarity. These powers of analysis and deep thought will prepare you to work in an amazing range of different fields from politics, journalism and education, to publishing and advertising.

At UEA Philosophy focuses on learning to think in new ways, and questioning existing ways of doing things, so you don’t need a background in philosophy to join this degree.

Overview

On this course you will gain a strong foundation in a broad range of philosophical topics. Then you will have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your interests by selecting your own optional modules. Throughout your time with us you will cultivate your imagination, your judgment and your ability to pay careful attention to standards of argument. From the very first day of your studies, you will be immersed in philosophical themes and theories.  

You will work with lecturers and tutors who are highly regarded in some of the most exciting areas of philosophy being studied today. This means you will have access to the very latest theories and approaches in the field. 

You will have a choice of major themes, including environmental philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of language, ethics, philosophy of religion, and literature. You will explore topics from philosophy of mind to philosophy of religion, from ethics to formal logic, and a myriad connections with other subjects (from maths to creative writing). You will engage in philosophical debates with great thinkers, from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary philosophers in this ever-unfolding field. You can also choose to complement your studies by taking classes in gender studies, classical ideas, creative writing, film studies, or languages and culture.

During your studies, you will discover that philosophy is still controversial, still disputed, and still open to correction, and you will be invited to make your own suggestions. You will build up the confidence to challenge received wisdom on the basis of genuine understanding and accurate critical focus, and to speak with your own unique voice. 

Throughout the course you will hone your study and research skills as well as your ability to engage with philosophical thought and debate. One of the most effective ways to achieve this is through producing your own written work. Your tutors will help you refine your writing skills with constructive feedback and individual guidance.

See our: Study Philosophy at UEA | University of East Anglia video

Course Structure

In your first year you study a range of core modules, designed to be interesting and challenging to both beginners and those who have taken philosophy at school. You will soon be confident discussing complex ideas, presenting convincing arguments and listening with purpose.

After your first and second year, you will tailor your degree to suit your own skills and interests. You can choose from a wide selection of philosophy modules, both historical and topical. You can also complement your studies by branching out into subjects outside of philosophy. 

Years 1 & 2

Your first and second year is about getting the right intellectual start to your degree. You will develop intellectual and practical skills essential for studying philosophy at degree level. You will quickly get to grips with logic, historical approaches, close reading of arguments, investigation of topics and problems, and exploring the connections with other disciplines. Whether you studied philosophy at school or are new to the subject, you will find these modules stimulating - this is not about covering old ground, but about thinking afresh. In the second semester there is the option to take one module in a subsidiary theme that interests you, in place of the Great Books module.

Years 3 & 4

During your third and fourth year you will choose six modules, of which at least four must be from philosophy – including one on history of philosophy (ancient or modern) and two from a range of core topics such as: Moral Philosophy; Ethics for Life; Art, Beauty and Interpretation; Epistemology and Metaphysics; Environmental Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Philosophy of History; Nietzsche and Nihilism; Phenomenology and Existentialism; The Philosophy of Wittgenstein; Ancient Philosophy; Film as Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Logic; Philosophy of Science.

If you wish, you can explore a chosen subsidiary theme, by taking one or two modules in gender studies, creative writing, languages, classical ideas or film studies. This is a good time to study a language, or you can spend a semester abroad at one of our partner universities.

Years 5 & 6

By now you will have carved out a degree that is tailored to your interests and career goals. Now you can specialise even further, by taking just four in-depth modules. There are no compulsory modules, but not more than one of your modules can be from outside philosophy (namely a module as specified for your ongoing subsidiary theme). 

You will also have the chance to write a dissertation. This is a great opportunity to hone your skills in research and independent study, as well as to immerse yourself in a topic of your choosing, all whilst benefiting from the one-to-one guidance of a specialist researcher in the School. You can also join, or even request, a ‘special subject’ module where you will conduct research alongside prominent academics.

Assessment

You will be assessed across a range of your work, including essays, substantial research projects or dissertation, and examinations. Each module will have its own combination of assessment methods. Your final result is calculated by combining the results of all of the modules which you have studied in the final two years.

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Course Modules

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

CLASSIC READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This introductory module for first year students is designed to invite you into philosophical enquiry by engaging in a conversation with some of the most famous philosophers of the past. We start with a classic work by Plato, from the birth of philosophy in Classical Greece, and we finish with a classic work from modern philosophy that has been of major significance. In between, we typically focus on one other text, usually a famous work by Aristotle, or some later Greek and Mediaeval thinker may be included. The texts are studied in English. You will learn to do philosophy in dialogue with thinkers whose ideas and arguments are not just brilliant "for their time", but brilliant for our time and for all time. You will come away thinking differently about many things that you had never properly asked about before. The module is suitable for those with no prior knowledge of philosophy, and students on other degrees who are taking no other philosophy modules. You should come with an open mind, or willing to open your mind.

PPLP4061A

20

MODERN READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY

This module introduces students to the history of modern philosophy by studying the work of a number of major philosophers from the period 1650 to 1950. Philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and de Beauvoir may be studied. We look at the different answers they give to a common set of problems, beginning with problems in epistemology, i.e. problems about the nature and limits of human knowledge, about what we can know and how we can know it. These problems connect with questions about what the world must be like in order for us to know it and what we (our minds) must be like in order to know the world, what sort of properties we possess and what this means for our freedom and actions. The module is taught through a detailed reading of original texts by these philosophers, and close reading of texts is developed in the formative exercises and the summative essay work; there is also an examination. The module is suitable for students with little or no prior experience of philosophy, and can be taken by students on other degrees, as your first or sole philosophy module.

PPLP4063B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will select up to 40 credits.

Name Code Credits

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premises and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

GREAT BOOKS

This module revolves around the close reading of four classic texts from the distant or the recent past, which offer profoundly original perspectives on problems that must constantly be faced and reflected upon by mankind. The specific problem we shall focus on in Spring 2017 is the opposition of liberty and oppression, seen in particular from the point of view of the relation between freedom and revolution. Our main task will be to explore a genealogy of the idea of revolution and then devote ourselves to philosophically central conceptions of revolution, beginning with Marx (and looking at his influence on thinkers and political figures such as Lenin or Rosa Luxemburg) and continuing with critics of Marx who made an effort to reconceive the very idea of revolution, notably the French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil and the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber. These figures and their ideas will naturally attract a number of other texts, some philosophical and some literary (authors may include Homer, LaBoetie, Landauer, Levi, Melville, Todorov), which will be discussed to broaden the context in which our four classics can be situated and explore their theoretical resonance with other classics.

PPLP4065B

20

PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER SUBJECTS

This module explores and samples the ways in which philosophy relates to a range of subjects, indeed almost the whole range of other academic disciplines: the ways in which it bleeds into other subjects, learns from them, uses their results, copies their methods, provokes them, comments on them, undermines them, or exposes their methods to critique. In a sequence of ten one week components, students will review (in lectures, workshops and seminars) one or two case studies or issues that bring philosophy into some kind of dialogue with each of ten key subject areas, followed by a week in which the lessons to be learned will be reviewed. This module is designed for single honours philosophy students, to provide a taster of interdisciplinary connections that they may wish to go on to explore later. It is also suitable for students from other subjects, giving them a grasp of the relevance of philosophy for all academic work, including their own major subject. It is assessed by continuous assessment, based on the student's assembled diary/log entries, to include reflections on each topic covered.

PPLP4066A

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS

The module offers a problem-focused introduction to philosophy. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students are invited to explore questions from several core areas of philosophy and to acquire and deploy some first techniques for approaching these questions and resolving the puzzles. The issues cover a spectrum of related topics, such as scepticism, the possibility of knowledge, causation, freedom and determinism, the nature of mind and its relation to body, language, morality and issues in political philosophy. By demonstrating the use of various tools and techniques used in philosophy in relation to these issues, the module prepares students for further work in each of these and other contemporary fields.

PPLP4062A

20

REASONING AND LOGIC

Consider this argument: 'If two equals one, then, since you and the Pope are two, you and the Pope are one'. This is admittedly odd, but at the same time it feels compelling. The impression is that the argument includes bizarre or false claims, but that these are used in a somewhat consistent manner. What does this mean, exactly? The key to an answer is to draw a distinction between arguments that have true premises and arguments that do not but are nonetheless correct. In this module we shall study this distinction and focus in particular on learning easy ways of finding out whether an argument is correct or not. Since there are simple rules to do so, this module will not only enable you to spot an incorrect argument whenever you see it, but also offer you an especially straightforward way into the study of logic. Moreover, this is one of the few modules in the humanities where you can get a full 100% mark on all of your coursework, if you just know the basic ideas and the way to apply them.

PPLP4064B

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP5093B

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP5087A

20

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP5074B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP5168B

20

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP5166A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP5077A

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

'I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP5081B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP5079B

20

Students will select 0 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will select up to 40 credits from the following modules (or another module approved by the Course Director).

Name Code Credits

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP5077A

20

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP5093B

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP5087A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP5074B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

'I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP5081B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP5076A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Since at least Xenophanes, philosophers have sought to raise religion from its lower, superstitious manifestations to a fully articulate, rational expression. This effort has been pursued along distinct lines, which have led to a variety of original outcomes, e.g. a synthesis between religion and morality, the humanistic mediation of religion and atheism or the elaboration of a metaphysical picture of transcendence and existence. In this module, we shall discuss these theoretical projects, as well as their differences and lines of continuity, as they have emerged between the XVIII-th and XX-th century.

PPLP5071A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP5168B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP5079B

20

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP5166A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP5093B

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP5087A

20

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP5074B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP5168B

20

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP5166A

20

Students will select 20 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Students will select their remaining Level 5 credits from the following modules (ensuring that a minimum of 80 credits at Level 5 are in PPLP modules).

Name Code Credits

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP5077A

20

EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP5093B

20

LANGUAGE AND REALITY

Twentieth century philosophy is characterised by a preoccupation with language. This attention involved a great deal of reflection on language itself and also on the possibility that traditional philosophical problems might be resolved or dissolved by thinking about the language in which the problems are posed. The period also witnessed great upheavals, with the rise and fall of logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy, the development of formal theories of meaning, and the eventual resurgence of pragmaticism and metaphysics. The module will explore these major themes through consideration of the work of major thinkers from the last fifty years, including Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Kripke.

PPLP5087A

20

LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

This module will offer a series of different approaches to the question of how Literature and Philosophy can speak to each other as academic disciplines, demonstrating the breadth and diversity of the two fields, as well as acquainting students with the research in literary criticism and philosophy currently being pursued at UEA. As well as examining the ways in which literature can illuminate and trouble philosophical argument, it will explore literature and 'the literary' as a topic for philosophical analysis, and the kinds of thinking such a topic would demand. Setting literature and philosophy into dialogue in this way will engender a more capacious understanding of the particular philosophical issues, and literary techniques, under discussion. The course will allow students to develop an awareness of the limits and advantages of various modes of literary and philosophical expression, and to foster more sophisticated skills in both literary and philosophical criticism. The module will be made up of a lecture circus, with two weeks given to each lecturer on a particular topic related to their current research (there will be five in all, David Nowell Smith (module convenor) plus two from PHI and two from LDC). The seminars will discuss issues arising from these lectures, working with texts set by the lecturer. The module is compulsory for VQ53 English Literature with Philosophy students, but is also open for other students in the English Literature and Philosophy degree courses.

LDCL5072A

20

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgments and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP5074B

20

NATURE, HUMANITY and ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES: THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

The aim of this module is to look at some of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying environmental concerns. In particular, we will ask in what sense it is possible to speak of a moral relationship of humans with their non-human environment. We will focus on understanding whether environmental value is intrinsic or relative to human interests, and look at how this distinction relates to arguments about the nature of our obligations towards other species and the natural environment. Finally we will examine some of the difficulties that debates about environmental policy face.

PPLP5167B

20

NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

'I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP5081B

20

PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP5076A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Since at least Xenophanes, philosophers have sought to raise religion from its lower, superstitious manifestations to a fully articulate, rational expression. This effort has been pursued along distinct lines, which have led to a variety of original outcomes, e.g. a synthesis between religion and morality, the humanistic mediation of religion and atheism or the elaboration of a metaphysical picture of transcendence and existence. In this module, we shall discuss these theoretical projects, as well as their differences and lines of continuity, as they have emerged between the XVIII-th and XX-th century.

PPLP5071A

20

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP5168B

20

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP5079B

20

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP5166A

20

WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This level 5 module examines in depth the works of selected thinkers who are seminal to the Western tradition of political thought, including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Machiavelli. Their work will also be compared thematically, with a focus on themes such as the natural law and social contract traditions, and other schools of thought which have been influenced by these traditions.The module will be based on the study and interpretation of key texts and will enable students to develop skills of textual analysis and critique. It will also provide some of the historical background necessary to study more contemporary political theory at level 6, as well as building substantially on some of the political theories encountered on Social and Political Theory at level 4.

PPLX5064A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP6123B

30

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The module focuses on the claims of theistic religion, and on the nature of religion, including non-theistic religion. It seeks to clarify the concept of God. It also seeks to examine some of the standard arguments for and against the existence of God. In doing this, we see how some central issues in the philosophy of religion are inter-related with questions of epistemology, logic and mind. We will furthermore investigate conceptions of God which bypass the standard arguments for and against God's existence, which takes us close to the claims of Buddhism and other more or less non-theistic religions/philosophies.

PPLP6007A

30

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP6126B

30

ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP6109B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgements and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP6035B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP6006B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP6106A

30

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP6107A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN (ADVANCED THEMES)

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both#including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP6125A

30

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED EPISTEMOLOGY and METAPHYSICS

Epistemology is about knowledge, and metaphysics is about what's real and what kind of reality it has. The two issues are somewhat related because knowledge has to do with knowing what is real and what the truth is about it. The first part of the module provides a problem-focused investigation of classical problems and current debates in epistemology and its relation to metaphysics. Classic problems which are still a matter of ongoing concern include: What is knowledge and why do we need it? Can we know the world through the veil of colours and sounds? Are colours as real as shapes, or do they exist only in the eye of the beholder? Some current debates revolve around the question of how empirical findings and methods can be brought to bear on these characteristically philosophical problems. Others address philosophical questions that are raised by recent scientific findings. E.g., recent findings from psychology have epistemologists ask: When can we trust our intuitions? Is there an 'intelligence of the unconscious'? What can we do to avoid cognitive illusions? In the second part of the module selected issues in metaphysics will be explored, asking questions like "is time real?", "Do fictional objects exist and are there truths about them?", "Are there abstract objects?" "What makes this the same object as it was yesterday?" and so on.

PPLP6123B

30

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

The module focuses on the claims of theistic religion, and on the nature of religion, including non-theistic religion. It seeks to clarify the concept of God. It also seeks to examine some of the standard arguments for and against the existence of God. In doing this, we see how some central issues in the philosophy of religion are inter-related with questions of epistemology, logic and mind. We will furthermore investigate conceptions of God which bypass the standard arguments for and against God's existence, which takes us close to the claims of Buddhism and other more or less non-theistic religions/philosophies.

PPLP6007A

30

ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Within contemporary culture, science is taken to be the benchmark both in terms of methods of inquiry and in terms of what kinds of things there are, ultimately, in the world. That is, science serves as our best model for how to investigate and thereby to reveal what there is and how it works. The success of scientific inquiry is not to be doubted, but many philosophical questions arise with such success. Does the success of science entail that it is getting the world right, or can the success be explained in other terms? How objective are scientific methods? Do different sciences work according to fundamentally different methods? Is the reach of scientific methods limited? How much progress have we really made in understanding consciousness, rationality, free will or the standing of moral values, as a result of applying scientific methods to those investigations? How can philosophical work draw on and/or complement scientific research? These questions and more will animate the module. No understanding of particular branches of science will be presupposed, and a variety of different disciplines from the natural and social sciences will be discussed, including physics, biology, psychology, and linguistics.

PPLP6126B

30

ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

The 18th century saw a radical change take place in European culture. A new value was placed upon knowledge, new views of the ways in which society should be run were formed, new attitudes towards religion occurred, new theories of art and culture arose. This module looks at these changes and the effects they had upon epistemology, political philosophy and aesthetics. Enlightenment figures studied may include Diderot, d'Alembert, Voltaire, David and Condorcet in France, Kant in Germany and Hume in Scotland. As a counterpoint to this we study some of the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, both an Enlightenment figure and yet perhaps its greatest critic.

PPLP6109B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN MORAL PHILOSOPHY

What is morality? What is it to be a moral agent and to engage in moral deliberation? What is it to justify moral judgements and is there such a thing as a justification of moral practices themselves? What does it mean to be or try to become a good person? In this module we take a look at various theories about the nature of morality as well as critically examining the idea that what one needs, to understand the phenomenon of morality, or to engage successfully in moral thinking, is a moral theory.

PPLP6035B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN NIETZSCHE AND NIHILISM

I am not a man, I am dynamite!' So proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). Since Nietzsche made that proclamation in 1888 his work has indeed had an explosive impact, radically challenging traditional ideas of what philosophy involves in a way that has had an enormous influence on many subsequent thinkers, artists, religious ideas, and culture at large. This module will explore some of Nietzsche's key writings, situating them in context and focussing on his diagnosis of nihilism in Western culture and his proposed responses to that nihilism . Some or all of the following themes will be explored: appearance and reality, genealogy, truth, naturalism, nihilism, aesthetics and the critique of morality and religion.

PPLP6006B

30

ADVANCED THEMES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

What is history? Is it just one damn thing after another? Is it, as Macbeth said of life, 'a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'? Is it reasonable to apply moral criteria to the historical process? In what sense, if any, can we understand history as progressive? On what basis can we divide history into epochs and how should we understand the change from one epoch to the next? Are there laws in history? From the 18th century enlightenment to Marxist historical materialism, strong claims have been made in response to these questions. They have come under severe attack from the later 19th century on to the present, from both existentialist philosophers and philosophers of historical method. The module will examine the arguments and concepts employed in these debates.

PPLP6106A

30

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This module provides an opportunity to explore a theme or selection of key texts from the swathe of great work produced between the 6th Century BC and the 6th century A.D. The choice of theme will be governed by the current research interests of the lecturer, but the module will provide a secure foundation for further detailed work on particular thinkers or periods in dissertations or special subject modules in the final year. Works are studied in modern English translations.

PPLP6107A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT I

This module is open only to students who have achieved an overall average of 60% or above in their second year assessment. When enrolling you MUST include a second choice on your enrolment form, so that if your marks are below 60% you can transfer smoothly to another module. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take up to two of these philosophy modules as group study programmes ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6102A

30

DISSERTATION OR SPECIAL SUBJECT II

This module is reserved for students who achieve an average of 60% or above in their second year. Applicants MUST include a second choice on the enrolment form, so that they can be automatically transferred to an alternative taught module if their summer grades are below what is required. Students are enrolled either on a one-to-one supervised dissertation (for which you must submit the relevant form to the module organiser for approval) or on one of the group study programmes ('Special Subjects') advertised at the module enrolment event and in the philosophy module booklet. Students who have not identified themselves with one of these groups or with a supervised dissertation will be removed from this module. NB Students may not take more than one supervised dissertation on any degree, but you may take two of these modules, so long as at least one is a group study programme ('Special Subjects'). Students from other Schools should contact the module organiser for details. The assessment project is a dissertation of up to 10,000 words prepared during the Spring semester. Teaching arrangements will be settled after enrolments are known.

PPLP6104B

30

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

This module examines different approaches to understanding the social world, tracing their philosophical presuppositions and their implications for the study of economics and politics. It focuses on two contrasts: between the positivist and the hermeneutic approaches, and between individualistic and holistic styles of explanation. This 30 credit version of the module is suitable for PHI students and for those from other HUM Schools. A 20 credit version is also available.

PPLP6128A

30

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WITTGENSTEIN (ADVANCED THEMES)

Ludwig Wittgenstein was arguably the most brilliant philosopher of the 20th century, yet at the same time he is one of the most underappreciated thinkers. Students at UEA are uniquely fortunate in having the chance to do serious work on this enigmatic man and his revolutionary methods and approaches, because UEA is one of the most important centres in the world for research on his legacy. His thought is conventionally divided into early and later periods, and this module will explore both#including both the famous Tractatus Logic-Philosophicus (a notoriously puzzling text) and the later works such as the Philosophical Investigations. Does the later work challenge the position he took in the early work, or develop it? How are they related? Does Wittgenstein solve philosophical problems or are there no problems left to solve once we have read his work?

PPLP6125A

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support: Home and EU Students

Tuition Fees

Please see our webpage for further information on the current amount of tuition fees payable for Home and EU students and for details of the support available.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

Home/EU - The University of East Anglia offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships.  To check if you are eligible please visit the website.

How to Apply

Applying for Part-Time Degrees

The University of East Anglia offers some of its undergraduate degrees on a part-time basis. Applications are made directly to the University: More information and an application form can be found at our Part-Time Study pages. For further information on the part-time application process, please contact our Admissions Service at admissions@uea.ac.uk.

Each year we hold a series of Open Days, where potential applicants to our Undergraduate courses can come and visit the university to learn more about the courses they are interested in, meet current students and staff and tour our campus. If you decide to apply for a course and are made an offer, you will be invited to a School specific Applicant Day. Applicants may be invited for interview or audition for some courses.

For enquiries about the content of the degree or your qualifications please contact the Admissions Service on 01603 591515 or email admissions@uea.ac.uk We can then direct your enquiry to the relevant department to assist you.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515