BA Media Studies


Attendance
Full Time
Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts



UCAS Course Code
P300
A-Level typical
ABB (2017/8 entry) See All Requirements
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At UEA we have a rich heritage as a pioneer of research and teaching in the field of Media Studies, giving you a solid grounding in theoretical and historical approaches to the subject but also going beyond the classroom through an exploration of the interplay between the critical and creative.

Watch It
"I was heavily involved in UEA: TV, which was a gateway to finding valuable work experience and really finding out what I actually wanted to do.”

In their words

Louise Chadwick, BA Media Studies

Read It
"My participation in the student TV society, UEA:TV, was almost certainly the thing that influenced my career the most. In immediately going for and securing a senior role, I was able to handle managing shoots, gear and people, and met my business partner"

In their words

Alex Morris, BA Film and Television Studies

Key facts

(Research Excellence Framework, 2014)

The BA Media Studies degree explores histories and theories of media, covering a diverse range of audio-visual, print and digital communications, and examining their social and aesthetic significance.

You'll benefit from our world-leading expertise and industry experience as you explore a global range of media industries and texts.

A first year covering all the essentials in the subject is followed by second and third years offering lots of student choice, enabling you to specialise in the areas that interest you the most.

Select from topics such as popular music or celebrity culture, and choose from a wide range of creative practice options in areas such as video, sound-based media, television studio work, magazine production, digital media, or an internship.

Students develop many transferable skills on this degree, including digital literacy and communication skills, team working, and self-management, all of which open up a wide variety of careers.

Overview

The BA Media Studies degree explores histories and theories of media, covering a diverse range of audio-visual, print and digital communications, and examining their social and aesthetic significance. You’ll benefit from our world-leading expertise and industry experience as you explore a global range of media industries and texts.

A first year covering all the essentials in the subject is followed by second and third years offering lots of student choice, enabling you to specialise in the areas that interest you the most. Select from topics such as popular music or celebrity culture, and choose from a wide range of creative practice options in areas such as video, sound-based media, television studio work, magazine production, digital media, or an internship.

Students develop many transferable skills on this degree, including digital literacy and communication skills, team working, and self-management, all of which open up a wide variety of careers.

Your Degree

Your degree programme may contain compulsory or optional modules. Compulsory modules are designed to give you a solid grounding, optional modules allow you to tailor your degree.

The course modules section below lists the current modules by year and you can click on each module for further details. Each module lists its value (in credits) and its module code, a year of study is 120 credits. 

Assessment

Our assessment methods are designed to test a variety of skills. We use a diverse range of assessments to ensure that you leave your degree with a broad set of skills. These include essays, video projects, live TV shows, in-class presentations, reports, and examinations. 

There is no final examination and your degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three

Want to know more?

Come along to an Open Day and experience our unique campus for yourself.

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

BROADCASTING

You will explore a range of audio-visual and audio formats, including television, radio and more recent audio formats, such as Internet streaming, and podcasts. Throughout the module you will be introduced to key theoretical approaches to the analysis of broadcasting content, programming, policy and regulation and reception. Areas of interest will include topics such as narrative and soundtrack, flow, seriality, liveness, innovation and funding, and domesticity.

AMAM4032B

20

Digital Media: Concepts, Technologies and Cultures

This module introduces students to the study of digital media, focusing on both the technologies and platforms that drive the 'digital age' and the cultures they have produced. We will examine how scholars have theorised digital media since the early 1990s, mapping how the production, circulation, and, consumption of new media has changed over the past twenty years. Weekly case studies will allow students to apply theories to contemporary cultural events and phenomena, which may include #blacklivesmatter, selfie culture, the Arab Spring, and SciHub.

AMAM4031B

20

MEDIA HISTORY

You'll explore media history from the perspective of departmental interests in critical media studies, cultural consumption and historiography. It will highlight the material, social and institutional contexts in which media forms have been produced, mediated and consumed and the ongoing power struggles therein. By working through different interpretations of how the media has intersected with long-term changes in society, the module will allow you to contrast 'top down' histories of industrial organisation, technological evolution and regulatory intervention with 'bottom up' histories of media as social activity.

AMAM4029A

20

MEDIA INDUSTRIES

As knowledgeable as you may be about certain media products - like your favourite TV programmes, films, songs, video games or websites - how much do you know about the functioning of the industrial contexts from which these typically emerge? It is easy to forget that standing between us and our favourite media products is a complex structure of interpenetrating cultural sectors and organisations. This module will introduce you to some of the core characteristics of the media industries, providing you with a better understanding of how and why they operate in the ways they do. Throughout the module you will come to appreciate the distinctiveness of the media industries and their products, the implications this has for producers and the broader effects implied for the overall structure of these industries. In addition, you'll learn about the economic and political organisation of the media industries, the policies and regulations to which they are subject, as well as the divisions of labour determined by their modes of organisation. You'll begin with a consideration of the particular characteristics of media goods and the challenges involved in commodifying and deriving revenues from them. Following this, you will explore issues of ownership, integration and concentration, before we consider such matters as policy and regulation, creative work, digitalisation, convergence and media systems. Having considered examples of specific media organisations, franchises, texts and sectors, you'll put your new knowledge into practice by developing your own case study project, aimed at explaining the functioning of one aspect of the media landscape. Across the module you will also gain experience in communicating your ideas in seminars as well as through workshop tasks and written work.

AMAM4028A

20

MEDIA REPRESENTATION

How do the media represent social groups and why does this matter? These two questions are central to Media Studies. On this module, we will give you an introduction to research across a range of topics, such as the representation of women, migrants and older people. You will learn how the media have represented these groups in the past and discuss whether and why representations have changed today. You will be introduced to theories that are central to Media Studies and which you will be able to explore in depth in more specialist modules in your second and third year, for example feminist theories, post-colonialism, critical race studies, queer theory, and disability studies. The assessment on this module is a small piece of independent research. You will write a literature review, a discussion of your research methodology and you will present and analyse the findings of a small piece of media analysis. This module will teach you the necessary skills of academic writing.

AMAM4034A

20

THEORISING MEDIA AND CULTURE

This module introduces you to a range of influential thinkers whose work has shaped Media Studies. It provides you with the foundational knowledge you need to progress with confidence onto more specialist modules in your second and third year. You will compare and contrast how different scholars have tried to explain the role of the media in creating communities, in reproducing social inequalities, but also in driving social change. You will discuss whether we need to study media audiences, media content or media industries in order to understand media power. The module will help you develop your own voice as a researcher and writer. You will learn how to effectively compare and contrast complex theoretical arguments and how to place your own argument within the context of academic debate. You will have opportunity to apply your knowledge of media theories to a small piece of media research and to express your research ideas not only through writing, but also through a creative media project.

AMAM4033B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

CONTEMPORARY MEDIASCAPES

You will be provided with an understanding of media access, production, participation and use/consumption. Module content is organised around notions of space and place, thereby enabling engagement with issues including: globalisation/the global; national media and media systems; regional and local media; community and 'grassroots' media, domestic and 'personal' media. Over the course of the module, you'll develop an understanding of the range and reach of media and the multiplicity of factors determining how, when and where populations are enabled to access and participate in media activities. Parallel to the above will be an exploration, through selected case study examples, of media and cultural policy issues, spaces/places of media production as well as a critical engagement with questions of power in relation to these. The module also adopts a contemporary focus by incorporating debates about the role and potential of digital media and communications technologies in enabling new forms of media production, distribution and participation.

AMAM5020A

20

RESEARCHING MEDIA

The module is designed to provide you with the key concepts and methods necessary to devise and execute an independent research project whether using traditional academic methods or practice based research. As a result, you'll cover the key processes involved in devising and focusing a research project, reflexively undertaking the research itself and writing up your results. In the process, you'll be shown how to position your work in relation to an intellectual context; devise the research questions that are practical and realistic; and develop research methods through which to address these questions. The module will be taught by lecture and seminar.

AMAM5025B

20

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

AMA UG INTERNSHIP

You will have the opportunity to work within a creative/cultural/media organisation for a semester. The module emphasises industry experience, sector awareness and personal development through a structured reflective learning experience. You will have the opportunity to work within your host organisations and undertake tasks that will help you to gain a better understanding of professional practices within your chosen sector. Your assessment tasks will provide you with an opportunity to critically reflect on the creative and cultural sector in which you have worked, as well as providing opportunities to undertake presentations, gather evidence, and articulate your newly acquired skills and experiences.

AMA-5029A

20

ANIMATION

Animation has long been one of the most popular and least scrutinised areas of popular media culture. You will be introduced to animation as a mode of production through examinations of different aesthetics and types of animation from stop motion through to cel and CGI-based examples. You will then go on to discuss some of the debates around animation in relation to case study texts, from animation's audiences to its economics. A range of approaches and methods will therefore be adopted within the module, including methods like political economics, cultural industries, star studies and animation studies itself. You will be taught by seminar and screening rather than by practice.

AMAM5024A

20

DIGITAL MEDIA: THEORY AND PRACTICE

This module introduces you to the practical and theoretical study of digital media. By exploring the historical and contemporary aspects of various media, including text, audio-visual, creative software and games, you will consider how the digital turn has affected media production and consumption. You will also gain awareness of the technologies which underpin digital media, the interfaces for delivering media online, and the cultural and social aspects of digitisation. By the end of the module, you will be able to evaluate digital media in their contemporary and historical contexts, and understand the principles which influence the digital remediation of media forms. You will gain hands-on experience of turning analogue materials into digital media, drawing on sessions based in UEA's archives, and use these creations to explore cutting edge digital approaches to media texts. These practical sessions will introduce students to: digitisation of text and images; digital asset management and metadata creation; image processing; digitisation of audiovisual media; and creating basic games. Each of these sessions will serve to illuminate particular theoretical issues, including media archiving, reproduction and restoration, and the problems associated with ephemerality and preservation in the digital age.

AMAP5124B

20

DOCUMENTARY

This module will introduce you to key issues in documentary history, theory and practice. You will engage with definitional and generic debates; historical forms and founders; different modes of documentary; ethical issues; and social and political uses. We will draw upon a range of national and media contexts and give you the opportunity to engage with a range of theories, archival materials, documentary styles and ethical debates within your written and practical work. At the end of the module you will produce a documentary shaped by the traditions and theories you have studied, employing a range of archive film and television footage sourced from the East Anglian Film Archive.

AMAM5045A

20

FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION

Film is frequently described as a 'director's medium', while simultaneously defined as a 'collaborative effort'. How is that possible? How do the director, cinematographer, designer and editor work together to create the suspense, romance, or comedy that we expect from our favourite films? What does the film director actually do? What are the choices that see one director lauded as an 'auteur' and another derided as a 'hack'? Why does a cinematographer choose the specific lighting, framing and camera style for a scene? How does the director work with a script and coax performances out of the actors? What prompts the editor to use one angle, rather than another? This module attempts to answer these questions, as it introduces you to the practical application of film and television grammar and explores the fundamental questions of cinematic and televisual storytelling. A series of filmmaking exercises give you the chance to experiment with elements of camera and blocking, the use of sound, and multiple editing options. Other exercises look at script as a dramatic text and introduce basic techniques of working with actors. The final project asks you to work with professional script material to produce a video scene study. The module encourages students to understand the choices and decision-making processes involved in filmmaking, and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

AMAP5123A

20

FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION

Film is frequently described as a 'director's medium', while simultaneously defined as a 'collaborative effort'. How is that possible? How do the director, cinematographer, designer and editor work together to create the suspense, romance, or comedy that we expect from our favourite films? What does the film director actually do? What are the choices that see one director lauded as an 'auteur' and another derided as a 'hack'? Why does a cinematographer choose the specific lighting, framing and camera style for a scene? How does the director work with a script and coax performances out of the actors? What prompts the editor to use one angle, rather than another? This module attempts to answer these questions, as it introduces you to the practical application of film and television grammar and explores the fundamental questions of cinematic and televisual storytelling. A series of filmmaking exercises give you the chance to experiment with elements of camera and blocking, the use of sound, and multiple editing options. Other exercises look at script as a dramatic text and introduce basic techniques of working with actors. The final project asks you to work with professional script material to produce a video scene study. The module encourages students to understand the choices and decision-making processes involved in filmmaking, and the pros and cons involved in any creative decision.

AMAP5125B

20

GENDER AND THE MEDIA

You'll examine the role of media in constructing - and challenging - contemporary gender relations and understandings of a range of femininities and masculinities, providing a conceptual overview of feminist research methods You'll explore both theoretical and methodological issues and cover theoretical approaches from feminist media studies, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory. You'll explore a range of media and visual cultures including television, magazines, sports media, music, digital media culture, etc.

AMAM5031A

20

POPULAR MUSIC

For many people, popular music provides the soundtrack to their lives. It is intimately bound up with their sense of themselves, their attitudes and values, their friendships and social lives, their dreams and fantasies. But what can we learn about the power and place of popular music by studying it from an academic perspective? Throughout this module you will discover the range of approaches brought to popular music's sounds, images, meanings, audiences and production through the perspectives of media studies, cultural studies and sociology. In examining songs and videos, fans, industry and performance, you'll be encouraged to communicate your ideas in seminars and written work, engaging with key concepts and theories which will give you the tools to carry out your own research on popular music. We'll begin with a consideration of the 'popular' of pop, before critically engaging with historical perspectives on popular music, tracing this through to the development of a fully-fledged 'popular music studies'. Along the way, you'll uncover approaches to analysing popular music's texts, their production and the ways in which audiences and fans relate to them in the formation and expression of identities. You'll also be encouraged to reflect on popular music's relationship with other media (such as television, music writing and the internet), its role in everyday life, questions of representation, politics and power, and the contemporary relevance of terms such as 'scene', 'subculture' and 'genre'. Having considered the study of popular music in this way, you will put your knowledge into practice by developing and conducting your own research project into an aspect of popular music audiences and/or culture of your choice.

AMAM5046A

20

PROMOTIONAL CULTURE

The advertising and PR industries are central to public life: in business, politics and culture. Branding strategies reach into our intimate lives, whether this is through the ways that we promote ourselves in social media or how corporations collect, analyse and sell our data for marketing purposes. The purpose of this module is to introduce you to these developments, their histories, and the key ethical and political debates that surround them. Previous discussions have included how PR has informed politics and ideology since the 1920s, through the rise of the advertising in 1960s Manhattan, to today's flow of brands across digital platforms. Also, the promotional cultures surrounding the film and television industries, including product placement, corporate sponsorship and celebrity. It could examine the ways in which we are encouraged to become micro-celebrities, using promotional techniques online and offline in order to market ourselves in an increasingly visual and commercialized culture. It may ask to what extent brands are integral to our social lives and subjectivities, how far they forge intimate relationships with and between users. It will use case studies that may touch on vlogging, selfies, viral marketing, and issues or controversies affecting the promotional cultures such as sexualisation, corporate social responsibility, greenwashing, sustainability, and surveillance.

AMAM5049B

20

RECEPTION STUDIES

In this module you will be introduced to the key theoretical frameworks and approaches within the tradition of reception studies. It will offer you a critical exploration of the main debates and studies that have shaped the field, exploring both historical and contemporary contexts of media reception. In particular, you will consider the transcultural circulation of media, and the issues that arise when film, television and other media transfer between cultures with significantly different values and modes of reception. You will also be encouraged to critically evaluate existing reception studies, being equipped with the tools necessary to undertake your own small-scale reception study.

AMAM5035A

20

TELEVISION STUDIO PRODUCTION

This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. You will learn basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), using practice-based training. You will produce a short television programme, researching the appropriate genre characteristics, style and narrative to create the final work. The live broadcast will be accompanied by written reports analysing and evaluating the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run; if that enrolment is not met, the module may be withdrawn.

AMAP5119B

20

TELEVISION STUDIO PRODUCTION

This module introduces students to television studio production, using the resources of the campus television studio. You will learn basic skills of both live and recorded studio production (including directing, vision and sound mixing, camera-work, lighting, floor management and editing), using practice-based training. You will produce a short television programme, researching the appropriate genre characteristics, style and narrative to create the final work. The live broadcast will be accompanied by written reports that critically analyse and evaluate the production process and the finished product. PLEASE NOTE - This module needs a minimum of 12 students enrolled to run; if that enrolment is not met, the module may be withdrawn.

AMAP5122A

20

THEORISING TELEVISION

This module explores some of the key ways in which television has been theorised, conceptualised and debated. You are offered insight into how the discipline of Television Studies has developed, as well as how television itself has developed - in terms of social roles, political functions and aesthetic form. The medium will be explored as a textual entity, a social activity (i.e. the focus on audiences and viewing), and a political agent (ideology and power). Part of our intention is to focus on how the specificities of television have been understood.

AMAM5047A

20

WRITING THE AMERICAN SCRIPT

Writing the American Screenplay: Hollywood and Beyond For much of the twentieth century, the screenplay was synonymous with Hollywood, the Studio System, and "The Movies": films as brash and bold as booming American power, written by screenwriting giants, such as Preston Sturges, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Billy Wilder, Anita Loos and Paddy Chayfsky. But much of what we love about more recent American film-making has been the work of writers outside the mainstream: John Cassavetes, Joan Micklin Silver, Charlie Kaufman, Spike Lee, Nora Ephron, Quentin Tarantino, and the like. Throughout, American screenwriting has produced work as dynamic and expansive as the nation itself. In this module you will move through the high points of American scriptwriting, using scripts, texts, and creative pastiche to develop an understanding of the form. Your work may be assessed through a mix of creative and critical work, writing exercises and a complete short script. In broadly the first half of the semester you will use pastiche and other techniques to develop basic screenwriting skills. The remainder of the term will be devoted to developing and workshopping an original script. You will be introduced to the basic dramaturgy of cinematic storytelling, screenwriting form and format, and skills in pitching and story development. This module will therefore help you develop your creative capacity, your communication skills, and will help broaden your commercial awareness.

AMAM5052B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Education and Critical Thinking, Globalisation and The Environment. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Time and Sleep, World Population and Urbanisation and Tourism. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5044B

20

AMERICAN ART AND AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY 1900-1950

You will explore the relations between art and photography in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. The central debate in American modernism has concerned the role of the medium, and considering photography in relation to the other visual arts permits a reassessment of this debate. Artists and photographers examined include Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Marcel Duchamp, Diego Rivera and Walker Evans.

AMAA5002B

20

AMERICAN MUSIC

The first book published in the New World was a hymn book. Music, sacred and profane, has been at the centre of American lives ever since. Distinctive American musical styles still dominate the globe, as they have done for decades. But how did American music develop into the genres that we recognise today? How did uniquely American sounds catch the ear of listeners all over the world? You will gain a thorough understanding of the development of American music. You will focus on a number of distinctive musical traditions - from minstrelsy to blues, jazz, and country; from rock and roll to hip hop - and consider the way that they have shaped popular music today. Throughout the course, you will encounter a rich variety of music and an extraordinary range of characters, from the most famous entertainers in modern culture, to the obscure, the forgotten and the neglected. Whilst exploring the development of American music, you will also examine the ways in which its growth tells a larger story about the history of America and its people. In particular, it will give you a different perspective on the issue of race in American life. Through seminar discussion, written coursework, and group presentations, you will develop your analytical and critical abilities - whether that means your ability to think about the significance of a song and its meaning for a particular historical moment, or the way that the shifting meaning of a genre of music can tell us many things about its wider social and cultural context.

AMAS5023A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II (AUTUMN)

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module.

PPLB4046A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I (SPRING START)

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4051B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II (AUTUMN)

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4052A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French which exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II (AUTUMN) - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills (70%) and the second will cover your speaking skills (30%). On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4053A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1.1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II (AUTUMN) - A1.2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4048A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. On this module you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following topics: Meeting people Food and drink: Eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

You have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business. Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II (AUTUMN)

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4054A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II (AUTUMN) - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. As usual, you will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure.

PPLB4055A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken a basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this widely spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners' Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? You will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will get personal feedback on every single one of your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module, you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you. Please contact the module organiser if you wish to discuss your eligibility.

PPLB4023B

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to International Development students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying International Development.

DEV-5015A

20

ENGLISH ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS

Do you need help in organising your writing and expressing your thoughts clearly? Would you like to gain the tools and confidence to write more clearly and fluently, leading to better grades and greater satisfaction with your work? In this module you will learn how to structure academic essays and how best to write logically organised paragraphs. You will have practice in summarising and paraphrasing material from sources that you have read to ensure you can capture the essential points of a writer's argument and avoid any form of plagiarism. This will include help with ways to manage the referencing of sources. There will be a focus on vocabulary throughout the course and you will be set tasks to direct you to appropriate academic language; and you will have help in using a range of cohesive devices to link ideas within and between paragraphs. It is also likely that the class will need some remedial work on a specific area of grammar occasionally, and the tutor will allow time in class to deal with such issues. Naturally, you will be required to complete weekly homework assignments in addition to any reading and writing you do in the classroom, and you will receive regular feedback. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Also students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5045B

20

FAKE NEWS! AMERICAN JOURNALISM, HISTORY AND PRACTICE.

How do we know what is real and what is fake? Previous generations, we are told, could reliably turn to "the news"#but is that really true? From the very beginning, American news was always synonymous with low scandal, scurrilous rumour, and fakery. And yet, there is no doubt that there have been crucial moments when journalists and journalism have gone beyond merely reporting events, to shape the public imagination. "The news" has always manipulated as much as informed its audiences, and in this module you will learn about how this in turn has shaped American life. In learning about the history of journalism and its cultural impact in America in the wider global context, you will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the art of journalism, both critically and in practice. You will engage with questions surrounding print, broadcast and digital media#looking back to the past, reflecting on the present, and looking forward into the future of journalism. You will consider the ways in which marginalised peoples have sought to assert their voices through news media, by seizing the means by which our public understanding of reality is produced. The work will involve critical readings, engagement with primary source materials, seminar discussions, presentations, and critical writing with creative practice. You will have the opportunity to refine your communication skills, and especially the art of writing in different modes for different audiences.

AMAS5049B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic is for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. In this module you will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic I, this module offers you lively dialogues, varied texts and exercises, plus fascinating cultural insights. You will cover a wide variety of topics such as leisure, news and media, arts and cinema, as well as an end-of-unit focus on the geography, culture and dialects of major Arab countries. The course has three contact hours per week. Alternative slots may be available depending on enrolment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2.1 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Beginners II) this module is for you. This module will enable you to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. You will consolidate at a higher level, specific aspects of the language. The emphasis will lie on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst you will develop knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. You will enhance your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: discuss/read and write on the following Topics: Leisure / culture/sports Travel / Car Hire Meeting people (2) (formal-informal)/Receive a guest/visito Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Intermediate I ) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You will also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Staying with a Greek host Solving Problems Making Complaints Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you'll have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You;ll learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study, and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable for you if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Do you want to continue to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and expand your cultural knowledge of contemporary Italy? Do you want to focus on language usage rather than abstract concepts and meet Italy head on? You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and small groups; exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the Italian language. One of your main goals will be to use your language skills actively and creatively in meaningful communication. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through engaging with current topics and you will focus on different learning strategies such as using your background knowledge or doing research online. Interesting texts will help facilitate your understanding of authentic reading material and you will become familiar with different writing styles and genres as well as natural language written by and for native speakers. By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself in Italian in a more subtle way and you will understand language spoken by native speakers in a variety of different contexts, formal and informal. The simulated real-life situations will have prepared you for working, studying, or travelling in Italy or communicating with Italians whilst in this country in a social or business setting. Before starting this module you should have completed the Intermediate Italian One module or studied up to a similar level in another institution or at UEA. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or would you like to enhance your career opportunities? An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. You will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or do you want to enhance your career opportunities? You will continue to build upon what you have learnt in Intermediate Japanese I. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. You will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II (AUTUMN)

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4056A

20

MEDIA, GLOBALISATION AND CULTURE

What role do media and communication play in processes of globalisation? How is an ever more global media creating cultural change? In this module you will explore the cultural implications of global media and culture by investigating audience practices and media representations. You will begin by being introduced to the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation, before examining how these work in practice. Indicative topics include the power of global branding, global celebrity culture, global publics and local audiences, transnational cultures, and representations of migration.

PPLM5003B

20

OF MICE AND KRAZY KATS: HISTORY AND ART OF AMERICAN COMICS

Are comics art? The answer is yes, and this module will show you why through an in-depth examination of American comics from early newspaper strips to contemporary graphic novels. You'll read a wide range of different comics, including the birth of superheroes, World War II propaganda comics, controversial horror comics, underground comix from the San Francisco counterculture, recent alternative comics, and the current boom in reality-based graphic novels. You'll learn about the complex history of American comics, including the specific contexts for the form's development as a mass medium and its frequent marginalisation in the cultural sphere, such as the great comic-book scare of the 1950s. In the process, you'll learn to pay special attention to form as well as content when reading comics, and will develop a critical vocabulary for evaluating the aesthetics of the form. In addition to a broad selection from the history of American comics, you'll also examine comics through different thematic perspectives, such as race, gender, and sexuality, and you'll read critical material that'll further inform your understanding of the form. You'll learn through seminars as well as through independent library study of the periods and themes that resonate the most with you, and you'll be assessed through coursework. At the end of the module, you'll have gained a deep understanding of the many historical and cultural issues that inform any appreciation of comics, and you'll have learned to consider the form as a unique and mature form of American art.

AMAS5050B

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I - B1.1 CEFR

Would you like to become a more fluent German speaker who is able to deal with most situations whilst travelling? Do you need the confidence to survive a work placement abroad or a term at a German university? Or maybe you are keen to learn how to write an essay or deliver a short presentation German style. This advanced course in German is perfect if you have completed both intermediate modules or have A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this . You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you start to study grammar at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and describe and evaluate basic statistical information with confidence. During this module you will improve your understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at and evaluating conventions in the world of work and at universities in German-speaking countries. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and discuss topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. A first advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II - B1.2 CEFR

Do you aim to become a more fluent and spontaneous German speaker? Are you interested in current social and political affairs in German-speaking countries and would like to find out more? Or maybe you would prefer to further develop your essay-writing and presentation skills to be able to bring your viewpoint across effectively? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Post A-level I/I module or have sound A-level experience in German. This module is also open to near-native speakers of German, who seek to develop their written skills and improve their grammar. You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you study selected grammar and some specialist vocabulary at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and put it forward convincingly. During this module you will improve and refine your understanding of contemporary Germany through looking at and evaluating current political and social affairs. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and debate topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. An advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4021B

20

Students must study the following modules for 30 credits:

Name Code Credits

FILM, TELEVISION AND MEDIA STUDIES DISSERTATION (SPRING)

This module provides the opportunity to work on an independently-researched dissertation on an aspect of Film, Television and/or Media Studies; you will choose and negotiate the topic of your choice to gain approval. You are able to choose whether you do the dissertation module in the Autumn or the Spring Semester of your final year, whichever fits in better with your schedule of modules. You need not relate directly to material taught in previous modules, although it is expected that dissertations will draw on and reflect upon perspectives and methodologies introduced earlier in the degree course.

AMAM6080B

30

FILM, TELEVISION AND MEDIA STUDIES: DISSERTATION (AUTUMN)

This module provides the opportunity to work on an independently-researched dissertation on an aspect of Film, Television and/or Media Studies; you will choose and negotiate the topic of your choice to gain approval. You are able to choose whether you do the dissertation module in the Autumn or the Spring Semester of your final year, whichever fits in better with your schedule of modules. You need not relate directly to material taught in previous modules, although it is expected that dissertations will draw on and reflect upon perspectives and methodologies introduced earlier in the degree course.

AMAM6079A

30

Students will select 60 - 90 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADAPTATION AND SCRIPTWRITING

Today more films are made from adaptations than wholly original screenplays. All scriptwriters preparing for work in the business today should therefore be aware of the process and nature of script adaptation. You will explore the practice of scriptwriting, dramaturgy and story structure; including the creation of a piece of scriptwriting, adapted from source material of your choice. You will also explore key theories of adaptation, from the ideas of 'fidelity' to the source, to the movement of narratives across media. You can examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across literary and media contexts.

AMAM6115A

30

ADAPTATION AND SCRIPTWRITING

Today more films are made from adaptations than wholly original screenplays. All scriptwriters preparing for work in the business today should therefore be aware of the process and nature of script adaptation. You will explore the practice of scriptwriting, dramaturgy and story structure; including the creation of a piece of scriptwriting, adapted from source material of your choice. You will also explore key theories of adaptation, from the ideas of 'fidelity' to the source, to the movement of narratives across media. You can examine a series of different examples of narrative adaptation across literary and media contexts.

AMAM6116B

30

ANIMALS ON SCREEN

What happens to the study of television, film, and other forms of media if we take into account the representation of animals? Throughout this module you will discover, critique, engage with, and apply multiple frameworks useful for thinking about the functions animals fulfil within media. In doing so, you will critique the hitherto human-centric nature of the majority of academic thinking, and explore why thinking about animals matters. You'll cover a wide range of theoretical and practical approaches for discussing animals and human-animal relationships. For example, human-animal studies and critical animal studies are relevant interdisciplinary approaches, and you'll also explore topics such as posthumanism. Key to the module are debates about representation, and you will examine a variety of television programmes, films and other media, to unearth how animals are used in different kinds of culture. This will also map onto debates about genre with, for example, discussion of how human-animal hybrids are represented in science fiction, or the multitude of animals that appear in children's culture. The module will enable you to examine representations more thoroughly and with more nuance. It will also encourage you to think about the implications of animal representations in media, in terms of debates such as animal welfare and environmentalism.

AMAM6119B

30

CELEBRITY

You will explore the phenomenon of celebrity and fame from its origins to the present day, moving across a range of different media, including film, television, print media and the internet. In the process, you will examine key approaches to the study of celebrity, paying particular attention to the cultural formation of celebrity and how it is bound up with structures of power (e.g. gender, class, ethnicity). You will encounter a range of case studies that will include Classical Hollywood cinema, the coming of television, the supposed 'tabloidization' of print media, the birth of Reality TV, the growth of the celebrity scandal and the relationship between celebrity and the internet.

AMAM6090B

30

CREATIVE WORK IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES

What is it like working in the media industries? What are the key opportunities and challenges which face aspiring and established media professionals? In engaging with such questions, this module offers you the opportunity to gain an understanding of the industries in which you may well wish to work. You'll engage with academic research and other writing, both historical and contemporary in nature, to provide you with an understanding of the potential to find pleasure, fulfilment (and a steady income), as well as pressure, frustration and precariousness in media work. As well as developing skills in communicating ideas, principles and theories, you will conduct your own research into the nature and conditions of media work. To help you understand media work, we reflect on changes in the nature of work itself in modern societies, considering historical and recent developments in working cultures and questions of work-life balance. Following this, you will gain insights into work in the media and creative industries through an engagement with academic research, policy developments and the accounts of media workers themselves (across sectors such as film, television, music, magazines, advertising and digital media). We also look at questions about the extent to which it is feasible to do 'good work' and produce challenging, innovative, ground breaking, thoughtful or just genuinely entertaining media products in a seemingly ever competitive and commercial media landscape. Having developed a grasp of some of the key dynamics at play in creative labouring, you'll put this knowledge into practice by carrying out and reflecting upon your own research into the challenges and opportunities bound up with media work. The module will not only provide you with a range of valuable insights into the realities of media work but will also help you develop skills in conducting research, organising and communicating your ideas and weighing your own arguments against those of others.

AMAM6086B

30

GENERATION AND THE MEDIA

Generation is a key part of media discourse. Young people are represented as having fewer opportunities than the generations before them. They are portrayed as narcissists, obsessed with brands and social media. Older generations, such as the 'Babyboomers', are represented as selfish and as having stolen young people's future. This module complicates these stereotypes. You'll explore theories of generation and their relation to media texts and media use. It asks, how are generations represented in the media, and what are the effects of this on people's experience and identity? You'll look at how media is used and consumed in different ways according to age, lifecycle and family structure. You'll explore the ways that generation intersects with other identities such as race, class, gender, ability, sexuality, place. You'll combine textual analysis and theory with an emphasis on personal experience and autoethnography. That is, you are expected to engage with the academic debates around generation but also to critically reflect on their own understandings of generation in relation to their peers, family, the past and the future.

AMAM6113A

30

INVESTIGATING AUDIENCES

In this module you will investigate a range of changing audience practices and cultures in the twenty-first century. You will be introduced to some of the key research on, and theoretical debates around, audience practices in relation to changes in distribution, technology and evolving forms of engagement. You will also study social practices and fan cultures surrounding new technologies, transmedia storytelling, branding, steamed media, event cinema, theme park attractions and other participatory cultures. Investigating Audiences will enable you to expand your critical and analytical skills, and also to develop your abilities as an audience researcher. You will evaluate and assess published academic writing on audience research methodologies, which will then enable you to exercise critical judgement in the design of your own empirical research project..

AMAM6108B

30

MAGAZINES

You will explore magazines both as cultural objects and consumer products from the emergence of the medium in the 17th century to the present day. You will critically engage with the rapidly transforming structure, nature and operations of the industry in an increasingly digital age, understanding contemporary magazines as transmedia, multi-platform brands. You will explore magazines as key sites for the negotiation of contemporary power relations. You will be examined through a series of case studies relating to the political economy of the magazine industry; promotional cultures; digital media; and gender, sexuality and the body. Your module also contains a vocational strand that seeks to equip you with knowledge of contemporary magazine production processes.

AMAM6032A

30

MEDIA AND THE BODY

Over the past 30 years a variety of academic disciplines have understood the body to be central to our experiences of media cultures. You will examine the ways that different bodies are not only represented by and produced in relation to the media but also the place of the body in the consumption of media texts. Using different theoretical frameworks your module approaches the body as a key site in popular culture where power relations are negotiated. It does this through a range of case studies and therefore a range of different media forms. These case studies include the racialised body, the muscular body, the pornographic body, the politics of beauty, the HIV/AIDS crisis, trans-bodies, fitbits, and disco and grime subcultures. By the end of your module you should be able to analyse and assess a contemporary mediated body culture of your choice using one (or more) of the body theories that have been taught.

AMAM6111B

30

Students will select 0 - 30 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

MEDIA PRACTICE PROJECT (AUTUMN)

You'll be able to make use of your practical skills to produce a significant practice-based project investigating some aspect of Media, Film and/or Television studies. You'll produce a significant practical work that refers to, and makes use of, relevant theoretical debates and issues, and will also write a critical evaluation of your work. Projects are individually negotiated with supervisors, and will build upon an area of practice that you have previously covered (film-making, screenwriting, digital media, magazine or sound media).

AMAP6097A

30

MEDIA PRACTICE PROJECT (SPRING)

You'll be able to make use of your practical skills to produce a significant practice-based project investigating some aspect of Media, Film and/or Television studies. You'll produce a significant practical work that refers to, and makes use of, relevant theoretical debates and issues, and will also write a critical evaluation of your work. Projects are individually negotiated with supervisors, and will build upon an area of practice that you have previously covered (film-making, screenwriting, digital media, magazine or sound media).

AMAP6098B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • BBCV

    Desiree Peeters studied Film and Television Studies at UEA and has gone on to be a Production Management Assistant at the BBC. Her first taste of paid media work was through MAKE@UEA, where she worked on various projects as a freelance filmmaker.

    Read it BBCV
  • The Community Cinema

    Cinema-going has retained its popularity in the 21st Century as a space in which to socialise watching films. But where do rural cinemas fit into the cinematic experience?

    Read it The Community Cinema
  • In This Corner of the World

    In This Corner of the World: a Japanese film caught between past and present- Reyna Denison It's widely known as a crowdfunding record-breaker, but the painstaking work to recreate Hiroshima in a new anime film is a nod to its traditional roots.

    Read it In This Corner of the World
  • #ASKUEA

    Your University questions, answered

    Read it #ASKUEA
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB including at least one art or humanities subject
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points including at least one arts or humanities subject
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB including at least one arts or humanities subject
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB to include at least one ARTS/Humanities subject or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2 to include at least one ARTS/Humanities subject
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM in an Arts/Humanities subject
  • European Baccalaureate 75% including at least one arts or humanities subject

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

At least one GCE A-Level or equivalent in an arts or humanities subject is required.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (with no less than 6.0 in any component).

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 overall. If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Highers Only accepted in combination with Scottish Advanced Highers.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC. A combination of Advanced Highers and Highers may be acceptable.  
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3
  • Access Course Distinction in 30 credits at level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at level 3. Humanities or Social Sciences pathway preferred. Other pathways are acceptable, please contact the University directly for further information.
  • BTEC DDM. BTEC Public Services is not accepted

Entry Requirement

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.
 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component).

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a foundation programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take either of the following routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business and Economics
International Foundation in Humanities and Law

Alternatively, if you meet the academic requirements but do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA also offer intensive English language programmes, designed to get you ready for undergraduate study at UEA in September:

Pre-sessional English at INTO UEA

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Students will have the opportunity to meet with an academic individually on an Applicant Day in order to gain a deeper insight into the course(s) you have applied for.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.

Deferred Entry - We welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We welcome a wide range of qualifications - for further information please email admissions@uea.ac.uk

 

GCSE Offer

GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4, or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Film and Television)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details online via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515