BA International Relations and Modern Languages

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Our International Relations courses examine a broad range of important transnational issues including the causes of war, global economics, the environment, human rights, religion and migration.

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"Once I visited UEA I knew I wanted to study there, it was a match made in heaven!”

In their words

Robert Slater, BA International Relations and Politics

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Our Politics courses offer students a broad range of options and opportunities – from politics to international relations, media and popular culture to public policy and management, and beyond. Our students benefit from an excellent research programme, regular guest speaker seminars and a range of exciting internship opportunities to build experience and employability.

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"Choosing UEA came out of a number of factors: I knew I wanted to go to a university with a strong campus community, and focus on modern British politics and media studies within a friendly and modern environment"

In their words

Dan Youmans, BA Politics

In this globalised world, knowledge of a modern language is an increasingly important skill which greatly enhances your career prospects. Nowhere are modern languages more important than in a subject like International Relations. This course will allow you to reach graduate level standard in your chosen language (one of French, Spanish and Japanese) whilst having options to study some of the International Relations modules available in the School.

Overview

The BA in International Relations and Modern Languages offers in-depth analysis of global politics, whilst also giving you the opportunity to study a modern language to graduate level. Not only is a modern language very useful in terms of a future career, it also gives you a particular insight into the culture of another country and helps you understand that country’s foreign policy.

This course is unique in our International Relations programme at UEA in offering you a year (rather than just a semester) abroad to perfect your language skills. Students can choose whether to spend the year abroad at a university or in a work placement, or both.

In your final year, there are opportunities to further your employability skills through internships, work placements and work shadowing. Graduates can hope to get jobs in international organisations, business, marketing, media, translation, interpreting and teaching amongst many others. For further details, see our Careers and Employability pages.

Course structure

Your degree programme may contain compulsory or optional modules. Compulsory modules are designed to give you a solid grounding, optional modules allow you to tailor your degree.

The course modules section below lists the current modules by year and you can click on each module for further details. Each module lists its value (in credits) and its module code, a year of study is 120 credits. 

Assessment

The majority of teaching is carried out through a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. Many of the modules you study will include continuous formative and summative assessments, which may take the form of essays, oral presentations, book reviews, reports, projects, tests and examinations.

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Study Abroad

Please see our Study Abroad website for further information and criteria.

Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

GLOBAL POLITICS 1

This module introduces students to the core theoretical approaches to understanding the dynamics of global politics, such as Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism and Critical Perspectives. It also introduces a number of core concepts for making sense of global politics, including sovereignty, the balance of power, international law, security and globalization.

PPLI4056A

20

GLOBAL POLITICS 2

This module focuses on particular issues and debates in contemporary global politics. It can be taken as a stand-alone module, but it also builds on the ideas and concepts introduced in PPLI4056A: Global Politics I. It takes in debates related to power in the international system, such as US hegemony, the rise of China and the future of the EU. It engages with security issues, such as nuclear proliferation and global terrorism. It considers ethical issues such as human rights and humanitarian intervention, as well as considering transnational problems such as global finance, the global environment and global governance.

PPLI4055B

20

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

This module introduces students to some of the key contemporary debates and issues in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations. The central theme of the module is liberal democracy, its nature, scope and potential strengths and weaknesses. We consider forces which have had an impact upon western liberal democracy - such as globalisation and the media - and examine case studies which illustrate the success and failure of liberal democracy in practice. The case studies change from year to year, but currently include Weimar Germany, Northern Ireland, Britain and the Middle East, and the US.

PPLX4052A

20

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules. Among those, students should take 40/60 credits at the relevant language level:

Name Code Credits

AN INTRODUCTION TO POPULAR CULTURE IN LATIN AMERICA

From Salsa to Samba, football to fiesta, Candomble to Capoeira, telenovelas to Tex Mex: Latin American popular cultures combine indigenous, African and European elements in unique ways found nowhere else on earth. In this module, we will examine the origins of a number of Latin American popular cultural forms, the contexts in which they are enjoyed, and the significance they have for Latin Americans. The module is divided into two parts: the first focuses on the historical and social processes which have shaped modern Latin America, while the second examines specific forms of popular culture including popular music genres, popular art, film, media, television and football. The module aims to elucidate the historical, religious, social and political factors that have shaped modern Latin America, and to examine the meanings that Latin Americans themselves attach to popular cultural forms in the region. Note: you do NOT need to speak Spanish or Portuguese to take this module.

PPLH4004B

20

FRENCH AB-INITIO HONOURS I

This is a module for students taking their French Honours language degree from an ab initio starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where the French language is spoken. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar.

PPLF4004Y

60

FRENCH LANGUAGE IN ACTION (LEVEL 4)

This module is for students who have A-Level French or equivalent. It is designed to increase your confidence in speaking French in public via the transferable skill of oral performance while enabling you to further your knowledge of French culture and society. Through practice, feedback and both practical and theoretical guidance, it will allow you to gain a better understanding and command of speech production, including pronunciation, tone and body language. The module also explores a range of genres and registers, from film to comedy and drama.You will study and practise delivery of an oral text in a number of forms such as news reports, documentary voice-overs, speeches, interviews, songs, stage and film performance texts. The summative assessment will involve the preparation and delivery of an agreed oral text as well as a portfolio of written tasks.

PPLF4002B

20

FRENCH POST GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their French Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in French from post-GCSE level.

PPLF4003Y

40

INTRODUCTION TO JAPAN

This module is designed to offer a critical overview of changes occurring in contemporary Japanese culture and society. This module, taught in English, is designed to introduce students to major aspects of the history, society, cultures of Japan. The module will provide a good all-round basic knowledge of Japan that will be of value both to students intending to major in Japanese and those interested in Japan. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. Topics such as overview of Japanese history from ancient to modern times, geography, contemporary politics and economics, society, education, and traditional and contemporary culture will be considered.

PPLJ4029B

20

JAPANESE AB-INITIO HONOURS I

This is a module for students taking their Japanese Honours language degree from an ab initio starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module caters for beginners' level entrants and is only available to language and communication students or students of International Relations and Modern Language in PPL.

PPLJ4008Y

60

JAPANESE POST-GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their Japanese Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in Japanese from post-GCSE level.

PPLJ4009Y

40

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

The module aims to equip students with ways of thinking about issues such as language, (non) verbal communication, identity, intercultural interpersonal relationships and intercultural transitions. Interpersonal communication always involves a high degree of 'cultural business'. This becomes especially apparent when communicating with others who have different sets of cultural assumptions that may lead to misunderstanding, even if the same language is used. Interpersonal communication also involves a high level of self-awareness and critical understanding of issues surrounding the concept of identity. Before we communicate with people who are perceived to be different to ourselves, we need to understand how we present ourselves to others. By the end of this module students will be expected to have developed greater self-awareness and sensitivity to intercultural understanding. Lectures and seminars will enhance students' critical cultural awareness to enable them to become more effective interpersonal communicators and intercultural mediators in international or multicultural settings, such as the year abroad, overseas work, global organisations, multinational companies, foreign volunteering placements, etc. Open to both home and international students. NB. Students do not need to speak a foreign language to take this module.

PPLC4012B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/I

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. If you have studied French abroad and are unsure what your level is, please get in touch with the module organiser as early as possible. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) to start with. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the teacher's discretion.

PPLF4016A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH 1/II

A course for students with a French A-Level, Intermediate French, or any other equivalent qualification. This module continues the work done in PPLF4016A, in developing students' reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on productive skills (writing/speaking). It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar which will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on productive skills and textual grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. This module is not available to French native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLF4017B

20

POST A-LEVEL JAPANESE LANGUAGE 1

A course in Japanese for students with Japanese A-level, having passed Japanese Language Proficiency Test N4, or holding any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and language learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop understanding of the diversity in Japanese society. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar and vocabulary in meaningful contexts, whilst also developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLJ4057Y

40

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/I

A course in Spanish for students with Spanish A-Level, Intermediate Spanish, or any other equivalent qualification. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4025A

20

POST A-LEVEL SPANISH 1/II

A course in Spanish for students who have completed Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A) or equivalent. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and understanding, in addition to study and research skills. Key components include exploring issues for the development of intercultural competence and learning to articulate the employability skills developed as part of the module. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Grammar notions and topics for discussion are different from those in Post A-Level Spanish 1/I (PPLH4025A). (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers). Orals are arranged separately. This module is not available to native speakers or those with equivalent competence.

PPLH4026B

20

SPANISH AB-INITIO HONOURS I

This is a module for students taking their Spanish Honours language degree from an ab initio starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where the Spanish language is spoken. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Lectures/seminars will be taught in the slot E3,B3*D5*D6 in the Autumn semester and in the slot E3,B3*C3*D4 in the Spring semester.

PPLH4005Y

60

SPANISH POST- GCSE I

This is a module for students taking their Spanish Honours language degree from a post-GCSE starting point. The need for significant progress in reading, writing, listening and speaking is met with the intensive teaching that this module provides. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real-life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is also placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. It is only available to students taking a degree in Spanish from post-GCSE level.

PPLH4006Y

40

Students must study the following modules for 20 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

This module will give students an essential grounding in International Relations theory, encompassing both the foundational theories of realism and liberalism, and contemporary debates about hegemony, neo-imperialism and post-positivism. The module is structured around the positivist/post-positivist divide and starts with classical realism and neo-realism, and liberalism and neo-liberalism. It then explores the English School and constructivism before turning to more critical theories like post-colonialism, feminism and gender studies, and postmodernism.

PPLI5059A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students will take 40 credits from their Honours level language.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH POST-GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of French post-GCSE I. It is co-taught with the Post A-Level French Language 1/1 and 1/2 modules. This module is designed to develop students' existing reading/listening/writing and speaking skills, with a particular focus on receptive skills (listening/reading) during the first semester, and on productive skills (writing and speaking) during the second semester. It promotes autonomous learning and independent/group research. The aim is to equip students with a solid grammatical, lexical and cultural basis which will then be enhanced and built upon in subsequent years. Alongside academic skills, the module's objectives include developing intercultural competence and employability skills to allow for a range of applications of students' learning. The module consists of four contact hours per week: an hour grammar seminar will provide students with opportunities to review and practise essential grammar points, an oral hour focusing on speaking practice, and a two hour seminar whose focus will be to work on receptive skills as well as textual grammar during the autumn semester, and on productive skills and textual grammar in the spring.

PPLF5006Y

40

JAPANESE AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year long module is for Year 2 students and is the continuation of Japanese Ab-Initio Honours I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLJ5013Y

40

JAPANESE POST GCSE II

This year long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE entry students and is the continuation of Japanese Post-GCSE I. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad.

PPLJ5014Y

40

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/I

This semester-long Japanese language module is compulsory for all second-year students of Japanese (single- or double-honours) who have previously taken Post A-Level Japanese 1/I and 1/II. In this module, students use the content- based textbook to learn about Japanese language and culture from various perspectives.

PPLJ5155A

20

MODERN JAPANESE LANGUAGE HONOURS 2/II

This module is a continuation of Modern Japanese Language Honours 2/I. In this module, students will further develop an intermediate to advanced level of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills on various topics including social and cultural aspects of Japan.

PPLJ5156B

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/I

This semester-long Spanish language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours Spanish students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post-A-Level Spanish Language I. Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLH5053A

20

POST A LEVEL SPANISH LANGUAGE 2/II

This semester-long module is compulsory for all second-year Spanish Honours students as well as being an option for any student who has done Post A-Level Spanish language 2/I (or equivalent). Its aim is to build up language proficiency and cultural awareness of Spain and Latin America. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLH5154B

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/I

This French Honours language module is compulsory for all second-year Single Honours French students. It is designed to focus on reading, writing, semi-formal oral presentations and awareness of current affairs in French speaking countries. Activities focus on promoting self-direction in language learning, and draw on a variety of resources, including electronic resources, for in-class, self-access and group project work (oral, aural, written). Seminars are taught in French. (Alternative groups will be available for seminars.)

PPLF5148A

20

POST A-LEVEL FRENCH LANGUAGE 2/II

This module is the continuation of the Post A-Level French Language 2/I module and is compulsory for all second year French Honours students. There is a core element to this module which takes up the objectives of Post A-Level French Language 2/I in a translation hour and grammar hour (D2 or E3) and a year abroad preparation oral class. There are two additional strands. Each student will take one of these strands: i) Introduction to Interpreting (obligatory for Translation and Interpreting Double Honours students) (A3*B4), or ii) Professional (compulsory for Language with Management Studies students) (A7*A8). Students on other degree programmes will be asked to state a preference in the Autumn semester.

PPLF5149B

20

SPANISH AB INITIO HONOURS II

This year-long module is for Year 2 Ab Initio students and is the continuation of Ab Initio Honours I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop intercultural competence. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish 2 for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5009Y

40

SPANISH POST GCSE II

This year-long module is for Year 2 post-GCSE students and is the continuation of Spanish post-GCSE I. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. It is designed to build up linguistic proficiency, cultural knowledge and learning skills in preparation for the year abroad. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop intercultural competence. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students join Post A-Level Spanish 2 for some lectures and seminars.

PPLH5010Y

40

Students will select 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ASPECTS OF JAPANESE COMMUNICATION (LEVEL 5)

In this module, students will be introduced to aspects of Japanese language and communication, through the study of authentic materials such as TV programmes, magazine excerpts, and newspaper extracts. The module will explore how the language is used in real life and how it functions differently according to various contexts in Japanese society. Aspects will include the study of dialects, importance of politeness, differences between formal/informal expression, variations in gender and age, written/spoken Japanese, usage of aspect/modality as well as non-verbal communication. This module will be particularly useful for year abroad preparation. Although the module is taught in English, some basic knowledge of the Japanese language is desirable. Taught together with Level 6. Assessment commensurate with level.

PPLJ5157A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

'International Organisations' (Ios) is a term which refers to organisations whose members comprise the representatives of nation states. Few areas of international relations and politics remain unregulated by such international organisations and/or by international norms. We examine several 'grand' dilemmas facing humanity (security, welfare, environmental) and the forms of international governance set up to address those dilemmas. We ask why sovereign nation-states form, join and usually comply with the rules and the factors which determine the design and evolution of Ios. We also consider how Ios and member states interact with international non-governmental organisations (iNGOs), and the impact of the latter on domestic public policy. In particular, we examine the UN, NATO, European Union, and international financial institutions, the emergence of potential alternatives to these mainly western-centric organisations and we bring together a critical evaluation of the main theories which seek to explain international cooperation with an examination of contemporary issues in these public policy fields. Finally, we consider whether international organisation (the latter singular) amounts to an effective form of global governance to the extent that it at least mitigates anarchy in the international system.

PPLI5057A

20

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SINCE 1945

This module provides a brief historical and theoretical review of the cold war. It then goes on to look at some of the key issues of the post-cold war world. How far have international relations changed since the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989? What are the prospects for peace, stability and prosperity now that the ideological and military struggle between the USSR and the USA is over? Has international terrorism replaced communism as the main threat to the West?

PPLI5045A

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE EUROPEAN UNION

This module examines the development, structure, nature and functions of the European Union and looks at the history and theories of European integration from the 1940s to the present day. The module concentrates on the institutions and processes which run the EU, demystifies its main policies, examines critically the role of the Euro, and assesses the positions of the member-states on the EU's constantly developing agenda. The significance of the European Union in relationship to the rest of the world, its democratic credentials and its importance for understanding politics and governance are also considered. This module is recommended for those students who intend to progress to the European Studies with Brussels Internship' module in Year 3

PPLI5044A

20

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY

Different social groups and different speech situations give rise to a remarkable range of linguistic variety. In this module we will explore the kind of factors that govern such variety, the social meanings and ideologies with which it is associated, and some approaches to research. Issues covered include: language and social class, language and gender, language and education, code-switching, multilingualism and politeness. Examples given are drawn from socio-linguistic practices in Britain and a variety of other cultural contexts. You are introduced to the main concepts and studies and given opportunities for class discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution by researching a particular area of interest for a class presentation and the project. The module does not assume knowledge of a second language and is relevant to students majoring in political, socio-cultural and media studies as well as to language students.

PPLL5170A

20

LANGUAGE IN ACTION

This module deals with the ways in which people use language to communicate in real life and it addresses some of the questions you may have wondered about if you are curious about the way language works in practice. It is concerned, for example, with the way in which simply speaking certain words ('I do') actually changes the state of social play. Questions addressed include: what are people doing when they engage in 'conversation'? Why is communication still problematic even when I am fluent in a foreign language? How does a word like 'this' refer to different things? How do we create implied meanings without actually saying what we mean? The main theoretical concepts are introduced and illustrated and ample opportunity is then given to the students to contribute and discuss their own examples to show how the concepts apply in different situations and in different cultural/linguistic environments. This module is relevant not only to language students but also to those students who are generally interested in communication.

PPLL5019A

20

LATIN AMERICA AND THE WORLD (LEVEL 5)

This module will examine the trajectories of selected Latin American countries from a post-colonial perspective. Post-colonialism is concerned with revealing and challenging a politics of representation which continues to use colonising strategies in describing the 'Third World' and its 'problems of development'. It is a discipline that seeks to engage with and destabilise the legacy of colonial rule, its political aftermath, and its cultural and economic consequences. The module will focus on specific issues such as nation-building, revolutionary movements, guerrilla movements, racism, indigenous politics, environmentalism, social movements, feminism, religion, gay rights, migration, displacement, urbanisation, the impact of oil extraction, the Chicano movement, dependency theory, narco-corridos and other cultural movements and expressions, etc., as examples of local responses to the colonial legacy, to diverse historical instances of foreign involvement, and to dominant Western constructions of Latin America.

PPLH5156B

20

THE FRENCH LANGUAGE TODAY

This module provides an introduction to selected aspects of contemporary French. You will describe and comment on spontaneous and prepared spoken extracts and on written extracts. Material studied includes newspaper articles, television and radio programmes, film dialogues, interviews, among many types. The aim is to build on existing knowledge of French to discover the range of uses and varieties across the French-speaking world. We will for example study differences between French spoken in Africa and in France, compare spoken French in different social contexts, or study French journalistic writing. Aspects that we will get acquainted to as tools to describe and discuss features of French include phonetics/phonology, morphology and etymology, gender, collocations, syntax, tense and aspect, modality, spoken and written French, non-standard French and other registers. A-Level French or equivalent is essential. Teaching and assessment are in English.

PPLF5005A

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

BRITAIN AND EUROPE

'Brexit means Brexit'. But what does Brexit mean and what are the public policy choices at stake? The UK's relationship with its continental European neighbours has historically been fraught with tension and difficulty. This module investigates and attempts to explain Britain's longstanding ambivalent attitude towards European integration and considers competing visions of Britain's post-war destiny. It tracks through an examination of internal debates in the political parties the UK's changing European policy from aloofness in the 1950s through the two half-hearted applications for membership in the 1960s to accession in 1973 and the development of its reputation as an 'awkward partner'. It also examines the impact of EU membership on British politics and the British political system, and what may or may not happen over the next few years as a result of the 2016 referendum. This module is recommended for students who wish to apply in due course to take part in PPLI6087B: European Studies with Brussels Internship in Year 3.

PPLI5058B

20

EU'S FUTURE AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR

The module focuses on European political and economic co-operation and projections for the future. Issues include: the EU's attempts at foreign policy in international conflicts such as Iraq, former Yugoslavia, Georgia, co-operation with other International organisations, as an economic superpower vis-a-vis the United States, China and Japan, as aid-donor to the Developing World and a pioneering force behind environmental policy and energy policy - as a hesitant superpower in security and defence (Islamic State, Africa, Asia, etc.). It is advisable - but not compulsory - to know a few basics as to the make-up and workings of the EU before embarking on this module.

PPLI5046B

20

IN AND OUT: THE POLITICS OF MIGRATION

This module will address the politics of migration and citizenship. It will provide students with a background to political thought on citizenship, membership and belonging. It will then examine migration at the international, state and individual levels. The international level will focus on historical movements of people (such as from Europe and Asia towards the Americas) and contemporary flows of refugees and guest workers. The state level will look comparatively at immigration and emigration policies and critically assess the logic behind them. Attention will be given to different countries in various regions for comprehensive comparative evaluation. Different types of migration will be considered, including economic (such as non-immigrant and immigrant work visas), family (such as spousal and family reunification visas) and humanitarian (refugees, asylum seekers, and special humanitarian protections). The politics of these migration categories will be foregrounded, including governmental tactics of management, how they comply or fail to comply with international human rights norms, and the foreign policy implications of humanitarian visas. Finally the individual level will consider narrative accounts of migration in order to understand policy and practice from a bottom-up and experiential perspective. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate and analyse the politics of migration as manifest in the various policies and practices.

PPLI5060B

20

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

This module explores issues within, and perspectives on, international security. In the first part of the module, we explore the continuing salience of violent conflict and the use of force in world politics. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system. The module examines the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force are managed in world politics. It surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict including terrorism will be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War". Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples of war and violent conflict, it assesses the contributions of different actors and processes to the achievement of regional and world peace and security. The module's second part turns to contemporary 'critical' debates around international security. These will include constructivist, feminist, and sociological perspectives on what security is, how it is achieved, and whether it is desirable. We will also investigate the host of seemingly new security challenges that have increasingly captured the attention of policymakers and academics. How useful is it to think of issues such as pandemics, environmental degradation, poverty, and undocumented migration as security issues? What is gained and what is lost by so doing?

PPLI5056B

20

LANGUAGE AND POLITICS

The module looks at the linkage between language and politics, at propaganda and the (mis)representation of the world. It places particular emphasis on the acquisition of linguistic tools that will enhance your ability to analyse varieties of political discourse in action, including the numerous forms of media involvement in political processes. Presentations of the main concepts and examples are linked with practice sessions in which students have the opportunity to design and produce political texts. In addition we use analytical exercises to test and challenge the theories of language use and the practices of politics focusing on both historical and contemporary situations and data. The module encourages students to develop, practice and test a range of skills, including: being able to consider, analyse and challenge critically the ideas and practices of themselves and others; taking part in teamwork; presenting ideas and analytical outcomes. By the end of the module, you should be able to understand and engage with politics (and language itself) in a significantly different way to before.

PPLL5015B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

RUSSIA AND THE WORLD

The aim of this module is to consider the relationship between domestic and foreign policy in post-Soviet Russia. The module will start by studying Russian domestic politics and assess the extent to which President Putin has taken Russia back to Soviet-style dictatorship. We will then look at foreign policy, and concentrate on a number of case studies, including the wars in Georgia, Ukraine and Syria, and discuss whether Russia has become an expansionist and militaristic power which is a threat to stability in the world.

PPLX5043B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

YEAR ABROAD

A compulsory year abroad for students taking one or more honours language(s). Satisfactory completion of the year abroad, as defined by the School Board, is necessary for registration in the following year.

PPLA5027Y

120

Students will select 30 credits from the following modules:

Students who are taking an Honours language in Japanese MUST enrol on PPLI6069A and students taking an Honours language in either French or Spanish MUST enrol on PPLI6087B.

Name Code Credits

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

Module teaching will focus on preparing students for a training placement in Brussels by developing a practical understanding of how the EU works and it will provide knowledge of 'domestic' EU public affairs including regional policy, public health, sport, business promotion, trading standards, energy and environmental policy, funding and regulation. This module does NOT offer experience of foreign affairs, diplomacy or security. Selection to take part in the module will be by competitive interview from applicants in PPL who have taken a level 5 EU module and who are also a national of a European Economic Area (EEA) member state (UK, other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Lichtenstein). Selection will be based on the judgement of the interviewing panel of which applicants will (a) gain the most from the training placement and, (b) the extent to which candidates demonstrate real drive and commitment. There will be seminars, workshops and briefings during the Spring Semester and the four week training placement in Brussels will be taken between Easter and late Autumn at dates set by the School and the host organisation in Brussels in consultation with each student. The placement is optional and not tied to successful completion of the module. A substantial contribution will be made towards the costs of accommodation and travel for each placement.

PPLI6087B

30

POWER OVER THE PACIFIC: THE AMERICAN RELATIONSHIP WITH ASIA

This module will introduce important themes in the American relationship with East Asia, at a time when the Pacific region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the American relationship with China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While this will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, the latter part of the module will consider contemporary political issues. This will require an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.

PPLI6069A

30

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 40 credits from their Honours language.

Name Code Credits

FRENCH ORAL AND WRITTEN COMPOSITION

This is an academic module designed to systematise and expand linguistic capacities through critical use of existing competence. Main activities: textual analysis, written composition, formal oral presentations. The module is compulsory for all final-year French Honours students and for second-year language and communication students identified as students with (near) native competence in French and is also open to visiting/exchange students. Taught in French.

PPLF6004A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/1

This module is compulsory for all final-year Japanese Honours students. In this module, students develop skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening at an advanced level. Various genres of reading materials will be used throughout the semester and students will also develop their presentation skills with project work.

PPLJ6010A

20

JAPANESE HONOURS LANGUAGE 3/II

This module, which is compulsory for all final year Japanese Honours students, aims to enhance the existing language competence to a higher standard. Main activities include formal oral presentations and research on a chosen topic which is submitted as an essay as one of the final pieces of work.

PPLJ6011B

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: ADVANCED HISPANIC STUDIES

This module develops the students' Spanish language skills at an advanced level. It fosters an understanding of various Spanish language features and develops critical cultural awareness. Specific components of grammar at a higher level are revisited, problematic areas identified for improvement and academic writing skills are further developed. The module offers the opportunity of exploring the components that control the use of language when communicating in Spanish. The oral component of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening and widening vocabulary at a higher level. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6007A

20

SPANISH HONOURS 3: WORLD SPANISHES

This module offers the opportunity to develop your Spanish speaking, listening, reading and writing skills at an advanced level. The main objective is to further develop higher level language skills and raise awareness of linguistic issues to aid inclusion and immersion in Spanish-speaking countries. It covers the exploration of the varieties of the Spanish language from a linguistic point of view and the variations of the Spanish language through the analysis and identification of extracts of spoken texts. The oral element of the module focuses on improving speaking and listening skills, whilst widening vocabulary. This module is conducted entirely in Spanish. Assessment commensurate with credit value. (NB: Alternative groups available depending on student numbers). It is also open to second year language and communication students with near native competence in Spanish and some visiting/exchange students. However, it is not suitable for native Spanish speaking visiting/exchange students.

PPLH6006B

20

TRANSLATION (ENGLISH TO FRENCH)

This module, which is compulsory for all final year French Honours students, aims to enhance translation skills and involves English into French translation. Students will refine their control of grammar, vocabulary and style and will enhance their awareness of differences between French and English expression, on a range of topics. It is also open to second-year language and communication students with (near) native competence in French and/or visiting/exchange students.

PPLF6005B

20

Students will select 50 credits from the following modules:

Students must take 20 credits of Language modules and 30 credits of Politics modules.

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION MODULE

The dissertation module gives students the opportunity to undertake research on a project of their own choosing under the supervision of a member of staff. The goal is to produce an extended essay of 8,000-9,000 words, which relates in-depth research on a specialist topic to wider issues in politics, media and culture, sociology and international studies. A limited number of parliamentary internships are also available as part of this module. There is a series of lectures that all students will be expected to attend in the autumn semester as well as meeting their supervisor on a regular basis.

PPLX6042Y

30

ETHICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

The aim of this module is to help students develop an understanding of how debates, traditions and theories of ethics have applied in international relations. The module will be broken into three main substantive areas. The first will focus on war and ethics, examining Just War theory and its development in modern warfare and humanitarian intervention. We will look at war and non-state actors, the use of drones and remote technology and the ethics of peacekeeping and peacebuilding. The second substantive area explores economics, human rights, and ethics. This will include giving attention to the role of accountability in international development and the global neoliberal political economy. This area will also consider the relationship between economics and human rights, critically examining the difference between economic rights and political rights. The final substantive area is centred around the ethics of belonging, examining authority in international relations, state sovereignty, international legal jurisdictions, human mobility, and the ethics of border controls. Students will gain comprehensive overview of ethical theories and concepts as they have been used and developed in international relations scholarship and practice.

PPLI6041A

30

EUROPEAN STUDIES (WITH BRUSSELS INTERNSHIP)

Module teaching will focus on preparing students for a training placement in Brussels by developing a practical understanding of how the EU works and it will provide knowledge of 'domestic' EU public affairs including regional policy, public health, sport, business promotion, trading standards, energy and environmental policy, funding and regulation. This module does NOT offer experience of foreign affairs, diplomacy or security. Selection to take part in the module will be by competitive interview from applicants in PPL who have taken a level 5 EU module and who are also a national of a European Economic Area (EEA) member state (UK, other EU countries, Iceland, Norway and Lichtenstein). Selection will be based on the judgement of the interviewing panel of which applicants will (a) gain the most from the training placement and, (b) the extent to which candidates demonstrate real drive and commitment. There will be seminars, workshops and briefings during the Spring Semester and the four week training placement in Brussels will be taken between Easter and late Autumn at dates set by the School and the host organisation in Brussels in consultation with each student. The placement is optional and not tied to successful completion of the module. A substantial contribution will be made towards the costs of accommodation and travel for each placement.

PPLI6087B

30

INTERCULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (LEVEL 6)

This module prepares students to become effective communicators in intercultural settings, especially focusing on multilingual business management, multinational companies and work within multicultural teams. The aim is that the student will develop intercultural competence, a crucial skill in our globalised world. In order to acquire this, different strategies should be fostered, such as seeking commonalities with others, overcoming stereotyping and prejudice, and developing flexibility and openness. Practical activities in small groups will be held in classroom sessions, with a special focus on intercultural communication problems in business. Theoretical approaches to intercultural communication will be provided in order to understand how to be successful in communication across cultures and to solve intercultural conflicts in Business contexts. Some of the benefits of being aware of intercultural communication are the ability to build intercultural understanding, the promotion of international business exchanges, and the facilitation of cross-cultural adaptation.

PPLC6138A

20

LANGUAGE AND GENDER

This module explores a variety of matters relating to language and its relationship to questions of gender and sexuality. Do men and women use language differently? Are the genders represented differentially in language and what might this show about socio-cultural ideologies and power structures? Is linguistic behaviour used to create and construct gender and sexual identities? Consideration will include such issues as stereotypical ideas of gendered language, sexist language, how same-sex conversations differ from mixed-sex conversations, how children are linguistically socialised into their gender categories, whether men are from Mars and women from Venus, and so on. Discussion and reading will be informed by a wide variety of ideas from fields such as anthropology, psychology, biology, sociology, and politics (especially feminism).

PPLL6035A

20

LATIN AMERICA AND THE WORLD (LEVEL 6)

This module will examine the trajectories of selected Latin American countries from a post-colonial perspective. Post-colonialism is concerned with revealing and challenging a politics of representation which continues to use colonising strategies in describing the 'Third World' and its 'problems of development'. It is a discipline that seeks to engage with and destabilise the legacy of colonial rule, its political aftermath, and its cultural and economic consequences. The module will focus on specific issues such as nation-building, revolutionary movements, guerrilla movements, racism, indigenous politics, environmentalism, social movements, feminism, religion, gay rights, migration, displacement, urbanisation, the impact of oil extraction, the Chicano movement, dependency theory, narco-corridos and other cultural movements and expressions, etc., as examples of local responses to the colonial legacy, to diverse historical instances of foreign involvement, and to dominant Western constructions of Latin America.

PPLH6009B

20

POWER OVER THE PACIFIC: THE AMERICAN RELATIONSHIP WITH ASIA

This module will introduce important themes in the American relationship with East Asia, at a time when the Pacific region has assumed great importance. There will be a particular focus on the important historical periods in the American relationship with China and Japan. An understanding of elements of the trajectory of these relationships will be provided by taking a selection of historical subjects for analysis. While this will address the knowledge of history, and of long-term themes, the latter part of the module will consider contemporary political issues. This will require an understanding of the interaction of the United States with Asia, and China and Japan in particular.

PPLI6069A

30

REINTERPRETING 21ST CENTURY SPAIN (LEVEL 6)

This module analyses contemporary Spain focusing on different aspects of Spanish contemporary history, politics, culture, education, social life and traditions. It offers the students the change to answer the question 'what is Spain?' by understanding key factors of Spanish development that have created the identity of Spain nowadays. This identity is the result of both ancient traditions and cultures that have influenced the Iberian peninsula for centuries, and frenetic changes in the past fifty years that have created new roles and thoughts in the society. Different sources will be used to approach the topics, which include art, music, national identity, history, media, gender, religion, sexuality, Europeanization, tourism, stereotypes and folklore, among others. Students will be able to understand current social and political issues in Spain and the changes Spanish society has experienced since the end of Franco#s dictatorship in 1975 to the present moment. Theoretical approaches and academic research will be provided as well as practical activities where the students will work in small groups and develop critical thinking skills. Students will learn how to research about contemporary issues of a different culture.

PPLH6141B

20

SHIFTING POWERS AFRICA IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Surveying the relationship between the world's major powers and Africa, this module examines Africa's relation with and position within contemporary global politics. In contrast to the conventional approach of studying how external actors impacted on Africa's international relations, this module seeks to open up a new approach, focusing on the impact of African political actors within the continent and in international politics. It does this by analysing African agency - the degree to which African political actors have room to manoeuvre within the international system and exert influence internationally, and the uses they make of that room for manoeuvre. The module is organised along themes (as opposed to the logic of covering countries) which expose a range of political, social and economic spheres of power at play in international relations. These include Rising Africa, Africa's cities, African women in power, African perspectives on security, Africa and the environment, innovative and communicative Africa and Africa in the new millennium.

PPLI6039A

30

SPORT, COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY

Sport is now a global phenomenon. It generates billions of dollars for economies across the world, often dominates media schedules, creates global celebrities with increasing political power and patterns the lives of millions of #ordinary# participants and fans. In short, sport is a key feature of contemporary culture that can be used to study the ways in which social organisations and relations interact and are shifting in contemporary society. The ways in which sport communicates itself to society, and the ways in which athletes, and the organisations they represent, communicate, provide fertile ground for investigation. This module typically involves academics from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. The teaching team varies from year to year but usually includes colleagues from American studies, economics, sociology, film and media studies, history, and translation studies. You will consequently be able to address a wide range topics while reflecting on the ways different disciplines approach the study of sport. Topics covered usually include: globalisation of labour markets in professional team sports; intercultural communication and sport; media, globalisation and sport; sport and gender; sport and race; and sport and conflict. These topics will vary slightly from year to year. Assessment and volume of work will be commensurate with credit value.

PPLC6029B

20

TERRORISM AND COUNTER-TERRORISM

Although the term terrorism goes back to the French revolution, it was rarely employed until the 1970's. Contrast this with today when terrorism, it seems, is everywhere we look: in foreign policy decisions, military interventions, homeland security measures, legal frameworks, newspaper headlines, speeches and sermons, films and video games, and, of course, university modules such as this. In this module, we engage in a critical exploration of terrorism, counter-terrorism, and the academic field of terrorism research. We will begin by exploring the history of terrorism, and engage in debates around the definition and character of terrorist violence. Is it possible, necessary, or even desirable to separate terrorism from other forms of violence, for instance? The module will then introduce different perspectives on the causes, types and threat of non-state terrorism. This leads into an examination of a range of strategies for countering terrorism, and their political and normative implications. The module finishes by exploring the emergence and contribution of critical terrorism studies, examining issues including state terrorism, gender and terrorism, cultural representations of terrorism, and the production and influence of terrorism 'experts.'

PPLI6040B

30

THE CLASH OF FUNDAMENTALISMS

The twenty first century has been marked by terrorism and religious tensions. Underlying these tensions are competing ideologies, different world views and widespread misunderstanding. In Europe we live in an increasingly secular society where religious literacy is at an all-time low. In this module we seek to address these issues of our time. This module examines the theo-political background of Islamism, Christian and Jewish fundamentalism and its impact on global politics, religious and secular societies. The module will appeal to those seeking to understand more about religion, terrorism, security, gender, Israel-Palestine, media, Islamist thought, and the Christian right.

PPLX6025B

30

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE. A GCSE Grade C or grade 4 or above in either French, Spanish or Japanese is required.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

Applications from students whose first language is not English are welcome. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading) :

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 overall. If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Highers Only accepted in combination with Scottish Advanced Highers.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB. A combination of Advanced Highers and Highers may be acceptable.
  • Access Course Distinction in 30 credits at level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at level 3. Humanities or Social Sciences pathway preferred. Other pathways are acceptable, please contact the University directly for further information.
  • BTEC DDM. BTEC Public Services is not accepted

Entry Requirement

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.
 


 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Please click here for further information.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.

We also welcome applications for deferred entry, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

GCSE grade B (or grade 5) in any modern language, or other evidence of language learning ability, is required for this course.

Native or near-native speakers can also apply for the French and/or Spanish degree programmes, but please note that the programme followed will be different from the one advertised. It is not possible to undertake a Japanese degree if you are a native or near-native speaker of Japanese. 

 

Intakes

This course's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We welcome a wide range of qualifications - for further information please email admissions@uea.ac.uk

 

GCSE Offer

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Service prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Service
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515