BA International Development with Politics with a Year Abroad

"Politics comes in to everything you do, say and think about in development. The approach taken in this degree programme is vital to understanding all things development-related."

In their words

Dave Shraga, BA International Development, 2011-2014

Video

Find out more about how Politics for International Development Matters

Watch It

Video

Find out more about International Development with Politics – hear from our students

Watch It
"This course offers broad-based coverage of the politics underpinning why the practice of development is the way it is today, and how power operates across the globe - two spheres of debate that provide a critical base for students wishing to understand frames of injustice, and locate points of resistance."

In their words

Rosie Rawle, BA International Development, 2010-2013

Video

Our Development Work Experience module is a distinctive feature of our programme.

Watch It
This degree is particularly suitable for students who are interested in understanding the uneven patterns and trajectories of development between and within countries, and how different structural conditions as well as the behaviour of key development actors shape the development process.

Central themes of the degree include dynamics of state-civil society relations, democracy and democratisation, and the risk of intrastate violence in developing countries, all of which will be analysed within an explicit political science framework.

Overview

This exciting new degree programme combines the study of politics with interdisciplinary approaches to international development. Core modules encompass a range of topics such as the politics of poverty and inequality; democracy and democratization; the causes and consequences of conflict; relationships between state and society; and the practices of a range of actors from governments to international development agencies, and from NGOs to social movements.

The BA International Development with Politics is particularly suitable for students who are interested in understanding why patterns of development vary between and within countries, and how development actors shape the development process. In addition to the degree’s core modules, you will be able to choose from the wide range of modules that are available in the School.

The degree combines the School’s emphasis on critical analysis with rigorous theoretical and methodological training. As part of your degree you can:

  • take the very popular 'Development Work Experience’ module that allows you to gain practical experience in development projects
  • attend a range of specialised practical skills sessions, which enhance your employability prospects. 

Course Structure

The first year provides an introduction to key themes in politics and international development. In the second year, you will learn about research methods used in the politics of development, and begin to critically analyse development practice.  In addition to the core modules, you will be able to choose from a range of optional courses that focus on various aspects of international development and politics.

You will have the opportunity to take up a work placement for a period of two to five months at the end of your second year.

In the third year, you will learn more about the links between politics and policy-making in international development and be able to select further optional modules.

Year 1

In the first year you will be expected to take three core modules that introduce you to major theories in the politics of development, key themes in development studies, and the use of evidence in development:

  • Introduction to the Politics of Development
  • Introduction to Development Studies
  • Evidence in Development and Geography

In addition to these core modules, you will select two further modules from a range of optional courses offered by the School. These include:

  • Social Anthropology and International Development 1
  • Media and Development 1: Humanitarian Communication
  • Introduction to Economics of Development
  • Introduction to Natural Resources and Development
  • Introduction to Human Geography

Year 2

You will be expected to take two core modules in your second year:

  • Research Methods and Tools in the Politics of Development
  • The Political Sociology and Political Economy of Development Practice

In addition to these core modules, you will be asked to select four further modules from a range of optional courses offered by the School of International Development and the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies. These optional courses include:

  • Gender and Development
  • Education and International Development
  • Social Anthropology and International Development 2
  • Media and Development 2: Communication for Development
  • Latin American Development
  • Sub-Saharan African Development
  • South Asian Development
  • Geography of Development
  • People and Place
  • Economics of Development
  • Natural Resources and Development
  • Power and Society
  • Global Political Economy
  • Democracy
  • Gender and Power

Year 3

In the third and final year you will study the core module “Politics and Policy-Making in International Development” and write your BA dissertation. The dissertation is a substantial research project based on a topic of your choice relating to the politics of international development, supervised by an academic with expertise in the area of your research. In addition you will be able to select three further modules from a range of optional modules offered by the School of International Development and the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies. These include;

  • Wars and Humanitarian Crises
  • Capitalism and its Critics
  • Distributive Justice
  • Development Work Experience
  • Development in Practice

Assessment

The BA International Development with Politics uses a variety of assessment methods throughout your three years of study including formative and summative assessments of presentations, essays, and exams, as well as a dissertation. To facilitate your learning progress, you will be able to access learning materials through UEA’s library and Blackboard (UEA’s online teaching platform), and will receive guidance from an academic adviser.

What Next?

You will graduate with the specialist and practical skills needed for a successful career in the UK or overseas. Many of our graduates work in development, including roles in:

  • United Nations World Food Programme
  • British Red Cross
  • Government (both UK and foreign)

Others use the academic and transferable skills gained for careers in business, the voluntary and public sector, community development, environment, and media. 

Study Abroad

For Home/EU students opting for a Year Abroad the tuition fee is currently £1,350. The Year Abroad tuition fee will be subject to an annual increase. International Students are required to pay 25% of their annual tuition fee to UEA during their Year Abroad and this will be calculated based on the current tuition fee for that year.
Visit our Study Abroad website

 

Course Modules 2017/8

Students must study the following modules for 80 credits:

Name Code Credits

EVIDENCE IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND GEOGRAPHY

The Evidence in International Development (EID) module is closely integrated with the DEV-4001A Introduction to Development Studies (IDS) module taken by all students. This module focuses on the role of evidence in understanding the themes introduced in IDS. We aim to provide a basic introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods; introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development and human geography; provide training in use of important technology such as Geographical Information Systems, Statistical Software and online collaboration tools; and to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective oral communication and teamwork skills. Learning by doing is the central teaching approach and throughout the term students will apply ideas from classes to their work on two projects. One of these is on a topic from the IDS module. There is only one lecture; most sessions are interactive workshops, complemented by IT lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This module provides an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

INTRODUCTION TO THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an introduction to political concepts and frameworks that are central to the study of international development. Through studying theoretical approaches students will gain the foundations required to critically evaluate contemporary development debates and development policy and practice.

DEV-4009B

20

Students will select 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITARIAN COMMUNICATION

This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and international development actors, such as NGOs. This will include a critical review of media representations of development in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises and poverty. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication, such as 'pornography of poverty', as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of 'post-humanitarian' communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading NGOs and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such blogging, writing a press release, and the basics of photography.

DEV-4008B

20

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces students to the main macro- and micro-economic issues of development. It lays the foundations for the modules Microeconomics of Development and Macroeconomics of Development. The main theories of development will be reviewed. Central issues related to poverty, human capital development, the environment, globalisation, balance of payments and financial systems will also be covered.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. These issues will be explored through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. The module will also cover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The course has an integrated biophysical core and also deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two-year integrated course that covers basic principles from the social sciences, and uses them to think critically about processes of social change in developing countries. SAID1 provides an introduction to social analysis and is framed by the study of social anthropology. Concepts and methods are explained through the use of indepth case studies which from a range of developing country contexts. Issues covered in the course include: kinship, religion, violence, labour, politics and resistance. As well as introducing students to classical anthropological texts the course engages with the work of anthropologists looking at issues of contemporary development and change.

DEV-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2: RESEARCH METHODS AND TOOLS

This module introduces students to concepts and methodologies in political research that help to understand key social, political and economic challenges in the Global South. Beginning with an exploration of the philosophical foundations of political research methods, the module will introduce students to a range of methodological approaches, including the comparative method and the case study approach. Particular emphasis will be given to the distinction between qualitative and quantitative methods and issues associated with their use, such as how to measure complex concepts (including, for example, democracy and dictatorship), or how to deal with questions of endogeneity and multicausality. These more methodology-focused topics are complemented by sessions on crucial schools of thought in political science research, including agency-based approaches, new institutionalism, and the local turn. To illustrate the relevance of these methodological considerations, the module applies them to central topics in contemporary comparative politics and international development, such as democratisation theories; governance, authoritarian rule and democracy; contentious politics, political violence and civil wars; the resource curse; and peace building. This module is open to all students. It is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5018A

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. This module is open to all students. It is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 2: Microeconomics

Economics for Development II (Microeconomics) introduces students to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5016A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 3: Macroeconomics

The course introduces students to the main macroeconomic issues of development. The first part of the unit covers long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, while the second part focuses on short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The unit will be a combination of theory and evidence/discussion, relating theoretical arguments with recent macroeconomic phenomena, such as the recent global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change. More specific topics include the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, long-term economic growth, gender, institutions, and physical, human and natural capital.

DEV-5017B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology module where disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

What is uneven development and why should we care about it? How did uneven development emerge, and what can we do about it? This module focuses on how geographers have engaged with these questions, drawing on three perspectives within geographical thinking. We start by exploring the unevenness of economic activity. We examine the evidence for 'natural advantage' and explore how the broadly-neoclassical 'New Economic Geography' School has sought to understand the spatiality of economic activity. But some geographers have argued that capitalism itself is the cause of uneven development, so we investigate their arguments in the context of work on the restructuring of cities and the neoliberalization of nature. You will be introduced to Marxist theory and invited to critique it. Following this, we turn our attention to society, and particularly how civil society and ordinary people have tried to address, contest and resist uneven development. We conclude by considering what the future might hold for both spatial difference and the geographies of development.

DEV-5010B

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This module involves a residential field course. Students have a choice between a trip within the UK or overseas. Current overseas locations include Chile and India. Extra charges apply for the overseas trips and the locations are subject to change. Students undertake immersive field-based learning, tailored to each of the field trip locations. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE BA GEOGRAPHY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEGREE, BUT IF THERE IS SPACE STUDENTS ON OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMMES ARE WELCOME.

DEV-5016B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

This module continues to explore and develop the themes covered in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development and Natural Resources And Development 2 and exposes students to a number of new quantitative data collection and analysis tools to analyse and interpret data sets. The module also introduces some conceptual and management approaches to natural resources. The module focuses on the understanding of climate and water as resources and agricultural research and agricultural systems. The module is taught around themes of: quantifying natural resources - the water balance; managing water resources - supply and demand; dealing with environmental variability; agricultural research and innovation; and participation processes and users of outputs.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, and a framework for analysing the social determinants of health, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, and broad patterns of health inequality. The social determinants of health and risk environments are then examined in detail, , focusing on how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The module provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The module also develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other units, ii) to become critical readers of Published quantitative data analysis and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with sampling approaches, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and linear regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In RMSA we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings. Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investigates the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

This course is a pre-requisite to the study of Arabic language. Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. The student will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I (PPLB4029A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. Alternative slots may be available, depending on student numbers. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I (SPRING START)

This module aims to introduce Standard Chinese (Mandarin) to learners with no (or very little) experience with the language and to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module. Teaching will include pronunciation, vocabulary and basic grammar of Mandarin. Word processing and cultural topics will also be covered in class. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4051B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Chinese. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of French (if you have a recent French GCSE grade C or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in French (Beginners' French I). This module can be taken in any year, but not by final-year language and communication students. (If you have a recent French GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module may not be appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure). The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The aim is to equip them with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of German. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where German is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in German (PPLB4018A). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. This module cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Greek. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of Beginners' Greek I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Italian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Italian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in Italian. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Japanese. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

A continuation of the beginners' course in Japanese (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Russian. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Russian is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled (A1 CEFR or equivalent) may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of Beginners' Russian I. Students with a GCSE or A Level in Russian (or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

This module is for students at beginners' level who have little or no prior experience of Spanish. The module will develop students' reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip students with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. This is a repeat of module PPLB4022A for those who wish to start their course in the Spring. This module is not available to language and communication students. This module is NOT open to students who have GCSE Spanish (or GCSE equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

A continuation of the beginners' course in Spanish (Autumn or Spring). Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience) may join this module. It cannot be taken by final-year language and communication students. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4023B

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar presentations and a 4000 word case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level / Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language (or A2 CEFR or international equivalent). This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

A beginners' course in British Sign Language assuming no prior or minimal knowledge of the language. It is designed to provide students with basic training in communication with deaf people and an awareness of life and culture in the deaf world. Teaching and learning strategies include the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and in-class assessments. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. More classes will be put on if demand for PPLB4032B is low. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation of Introduction to British Sign Language I and Introduction to British Sign Language I (Spring Start). Teaching and learning strategies continue with the use of signed conversation, role play, games and exercises to embed vocabulary and principles unique to a visual language. It is designed to provide students with a follow-on in their understanding and awareness of life, culture and use of equipment in the Deaf World. Assessment is based on a Sign Language conversation and one written assessment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

Students must study the following modules for 120 credits:

Name Code Credits

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT YEAR ABROAD

A year spent at an university abroad taking an approved course of study based on international development. Restricted to students on 4 year International Development programmes.

DEV-5014Y

120

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation provides an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with a supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing students to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to them in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. A dissertation is RESTRICTED TO DEV AND EGID STUDENTS ONLY.

DEV-6007Y

40

Students will select 40 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

CAPITALISM AND ITS CRITICS

The aim of this module is to enable students to develop an understanding of capitalism and its political and social impact. Students graduating from the module will be able to demonstrate: -critical understanding of the main theories, models and concepts applied in the analysis of capitalism -critical understanding of normative debates about capitalism -knowledge of the arguments made by advocates and critics of capitalism, with an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses. This module is a 20 credit version of PPLX6081B Capitalism and its Critics. THIS 20 CREDIT VERSION IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO VISITING, EXCHANGE AND NON-HUM STUDENTS.

PPLX6083B

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module aims to provide practical training and learning opportunities to support students to develop capabilities and skills to be effective development practitioners in the field and workplace, whether in the UK or abroad. Students will draw on and apply conceptual and subject-related knowledge gained through their degree to specific development challenges, thereby enhancing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in international development and in particular in project planning and evaluation. The course will be delivered through lectures, discussions and skills based workshops. Students will be required to work individually and in teams towards course objectives and assessments.

DEV-6009B

20

DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE

The module examines one of the fundamental and enduring questions of normative political theory and applied ethics: who should get what and why? The module focuses on some of the leading contemporary theorists of distributive justice, including Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Elster, and Sen. As well as exploring macro questions of justice (e.g. What principles of justice for the basic institutions of society? Equality or sufficiency? Need or desert?) the module also spends time on a range of micro questions about just allocation (e.g. How should household chores be divided between men and women? On the basis of what criteria should scarce donor organs be distributed in hospitals?) In addition to this, the module also addresses, through the work of Beitz, Pogge, and Miller, questions of global distributive justice (Is global economic inequality unjust? If so, why? Do people have a right to an equal share in the value of the Earth's natural resources?). The format of the module will be a two-hour workshop each week, comprising research-led teaching, seminar discussions, practical exercises, textual reading, balloon debate, and essay writing and research-skills mini-sessions. The assessment will be comprised exclusively of a series of short workshop briefing papers, with a heavy emphasis on formative feedback on drafts to be discussed during optional weekly one-to-one tutorials. This module is a 20 credit version of PPLX6097B: Distributive Justice. THIS 20 CREDIT VERSION IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO VISITING, EXCHANGE AND NON-HUM STUDENTS.

PPLX6098B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of WHC is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool, including territorial solutions to violent conflicts and the establishment of power-sharing arrangements.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their final year.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English.

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Advanced English I and Advanced English II are free-standing modules. Students can choose to take the Autumn course (Sept-Dec) or the Spring course (Jan-Apr) only, or both courses. Both courses are designed for people who already have an advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5 or above/CEFR strong B2) and who want to develop their current skills to reach a more competent level. There will be a range of contemporary topics discussed and skills practised during the course. The programme may be modified from time to time in response to the needs and interests of the group and where necessary to deal with common grammatical, lexical and phonological issues in spoken and written English. Students may not enrol on this module if they already have a knowledge of English equivalent to 7.5/8.00 IELTS/C1/C2 CEFR or above, i.e. if they are a native speaker or near-native speaker of English

PPLB5044B

20

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? This module will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, community media, press freedom, media literacy, entertainment education and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to DEV students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying international development.

DEV-5015A

20

DEMOCRACY

This module considers how the concept of democracy has changed since it originated in ancient Greece and looks at the critiques of democracy advanced by its opponents. The ideas and values underpinning democracy will be examined. The first part of the module focuses on texts by the major democratic thinkers including Locke, Rousseau and Mill. The second part concentrates on contemporary theories of democracy and examines the problems which democracy currently faces and evaluates the solutions proposed, including "electronic democracy" and "cosmopolitan democracy".

PPLX5051B

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module provides students with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. Students are expected to fund their own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The school has a database of projects to assist students with their project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). As a 20 credit module students are expected to work for a minimum of 2 months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing (750 words) about the placement;, and an essay of 2500 words related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 2: Microeconomics

Economics for Development II (Microeconomics) introduces students to basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5016A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 3: Macroeconomics

The course introduces students to the main macroeconomic issues of development. The first part of the unit covers long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, while the second part focuses on short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The unit will be a combination of theory and evidence/discussion, relating theoretical arguments with recent macroeconomic phenomena, such as the recent global economic crisis and the current debates on climate change. More specific topics include the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, long-term economic growth, gender, institutions, and physical, human and natural capital.

DEV-5017B

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides students with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will have an introductory session followed by four blocks. The first block introduces students to three key theories and how they are played out in the context of education - human capital, rights and capabilities/social justice. This is followed by three lectures examining how these are articulated in and through different forms of education - formal/schooling, non-formal/adult education and informal/learning in family or community environments and through labour. The third block will explore issues of difference and inclusion in relation to current and interrelated educational priorities such as economic poverty and child labour; gender inequalities and gender violence; and minoritised groups (on the basis of ethnicity, class, language etc.). The fourth block investigates theories of learning and their provenance and both classroom practices and pedagogies and learning in 'informal' out of school contexts.

DEV-5003A

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling students to select (and develop their own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment is via seminar presentations and a 4000 word case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues in the DEV 1 Introduction to Development Studies, and sits alongside the SAID 2 anthropology module where disciplinary approaches to gender are covered. This however is an interdisciplinary module which is open to students following any principles combination. The course will begin by exploring the various approaches to theorising gender and development, then introduces and explains a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The second part of the course applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: land and property rights, work and employment policies, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence, religion and the gendered nature of social and cultural institutions.

DEV-5001A

20

GENDER AND POWER

Providing a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches, this module examines contemporary gender and power relations. It examines both the formal and informal power structures that shape the experience of gender. Bringing together the fields of media, sociology, politics and cultural studies, the module explores the extent to which feminist theory informs gender-based activism.

PPLM5002A

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

What is uneven development and why should we care about it? How did uneven development emerge, and what can we do about it? This module focuses on how geographers have engaged with these questions, drawing on three perspectives within geographical thinking. We start by exploring the unevenness of economic activity. We examine the evidence for 'natural advantage' and explore how the broadly-neoclassical 'New Economic Geography' School has sought to understand the spatiality of economic activity. But some geographers have argued that capitalism itself is the cause of uneven development, so we investigate their arguments in the context of work on the restructuring of cities and the neoliberalization of nature. You will be introduced to Marxist theory and invited to critique it. Following this, we turn our attention to society, and particularly how civil society and ordinary people have tried to address, contest and resist uneven development. We conclude by considering what the future might hold for both spatial difference and the geographies of development.

DEV-5010B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who have enough pre-A-Level experience of French and wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. The module is NOT available to students with AS or A-Level French /Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

This is a continuation of PPLB5150A (Intermediate French I). This is an intermediate course in French and is intended for students who wish to develop their knowledge to a standard comparable to A-Level / Baccalaureate / B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The module is made up of four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year. (Alternative slots may be available depending on student numbers.) Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. The module is NOT AVAILABLE to students with AS or A-Level / Baccalaureate / Level B1 in the CEFR. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2 CEFR

An intermediate course in German for those students who have taken Beginners' German I and II or who have a GCSE or an AS level grade D (or below, or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) in the language. This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

A continuation of Intermediate German I. Open for students with AS-Level (below grade C or equivalent to A2 CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

An intermediate course in Spanish for those students who have taken Beginners' Spanish I and II or who have a GCSE in the language (or A2 CEFR or international equivalent). This module aims to enable students to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Students will attend a seminar and a one hour oral. This module is NOT open to students who have AS-level or A level Spanish (or AS-level or A level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Alternative slots available depending on student numbers. This module is NOT open to students who have A-level Spanish (or A-level equivalent). Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5034B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

A regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MEDIA PRODUCTION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this practical module is to provide an introduction to practical production techniques for storytelling relevant to the field of international development. The module will teach students the basic skills required to make a short film/documentary. Skills taught will include pre-planning a production, working in a team, selecting appropriate equipment, interview techniques, camera work, lighting, sound recording and editing. The module is delivered over an intensive two-week period after the end of the 2nd Year exam period, but counts as 20 credits towards the 3rd Year. The course is taught in collaboration with Duckrabbit who specialise in media training for the third sector. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR MEDIA AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDENTS AND SPACE ON THE MODULE IS VERY LIMITED. IF THERE IS SPACE, STUDENTS ON OTHER COURSES ARE ALSO ABLE TO REGISTER

DEV-6013A

20

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for both the Dissertation and Field course modules as well as equipping students with research design and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will begin with introductory lectures on research design, considering the different ways in which 'knowledge' is constructed in human geography and the implications for choice of research methods. It will then proceed to desk-based research skills including specialist literature reviews and use of secondary data. Following these sessions on research design, the module will introduce three types of methodology through three projects that involve fieldwork in Norfolk. The projects will enable students to learn and practice qualitative, quantitative and GIS methods with each project split into a design phase, data collection phase and data analysis phase.

DEV-5014A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

This module continues to explore and develop the themes covered in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development and Natural Resources And Development 2 and exposes students to a number of new quantitative data collection and analysis tools to analyse and interpret data sets. The module also introduces some conceptual and management approaches to natural resources. The module focuses on the understanding of climate and water as resources and agricultural research and agricultural systems. The module is taught around themes of: quantifying natural resources - the water balance; managing water resources - supply and demand; dealing with environmental variability; agricultural research and innovation; and participation processes and users of outputs.

DEV-5013B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY FIELD COURSE

This field based module is designed to enable students to develop and carry out a small independent research project on a natural resource or environment-related topic. The research takes place in Europe, the specific location decided each year by the module convenors. Students are introduced to a range of research techniques, drawing from Rapid Rural Appraisal and Participatory Rural Appraisal field methods, as well as standard methods for environmental assessment and for social research. They are encouraged to apply different research methods to their own topic, with support from faculty. The module takes place during a two week period at the beginning of the summer vacation. THIS IS PRIMARILY FOR DEV BSC STUDENTS, THOUGH ENV (EGID) and DEV BA (WHO TAKE NR) ARE WELCOME, PROVIDED THERE IS SPACE.

DEV-6001A

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module analyses two key questions about people, place and space: how and why people's health varies in different development settings; and the links between development processes and people's migration. The ways that migration affects health are also examined. The module begins by analysing global patterns of health and development, and a framework for analysing the social determinants of health, including risk levels of non-communicable diseases across many parts of the world, and broad patterns of health inequality. The social determinants of health and risk environments are then examined in detail, , focusing on how social relations (related to class, occupation, gender, ethnicity, colonial history), operating across different spaces, generate susceptibility to health risks in particular places. The examples of HIV and TB are used to illustrate the ways social processes cerate risk environments. The module also looks at places where good health has been achieved and why. The module provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. The module also develops understanding of the factors driving migration, such as labour relations, conflict or climate change and how these population movements influence men and women, risk environments and their health and well-being?

DEV-5011A

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This module offers an introduction to Global Political Economy (GPE), understood to be both a field of study and an approach to understanding the world of 'International Relations'. As a field of study, GPE encompasses the processes of trade, production, finance, the division of labour, "development", the environment, gender, and ideas as they operate at and across all levels, from global to local. As an approach, GPE is rooted in classical political economy, in that it recognizes the mutually constitutive nature of politics and economics. This is seen not only in the ways that the political and economic influence each other, but also in accepting that the full reality of political processes, possibilities, and outcomes cannot be adequately comprehended without reflection on associated economic dynamics, and vice versa. The course provides an overview of various classical and modern theoretical perspectives within GPE. Weekly discussion groups facilitate discussion on the lecture themes, offer a space to ask questions, and allow students to engage with some important arguments in the field.

PPLI5161B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2

This module teaches concepts, theories and methods that are fundamental to social anthropology and its relationship with development and change. The teaching methods include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. The topics include: fieldwork and ethnography, kinship and marriage, personhood, identity and gender, cultural rights, economic anthropology ecological anthropology, and the anthropology of development. In order to take DEV-5004A students must have taken either DEV-4005B or AMAA4014A.

DEV-5004A

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

This module provides a historically-grounded analysis of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on a range of scholarship from political science, sociology and economics the course examines key development trends. Though the course looks at formal development assistance and its role in sub-Saharan Africa, the focus is on development in its broader sense. It covers areas including colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the reason for Africa's poor economic performance, famine and aid effectiveness, conflict and the growing importance of religion in public life in Africa. It also explores the practice of policy through issues such as decentralisation, basic services and education, examines the implications of policy on equity and equality, and investigates the way forward for economic policy. The course takes into account both common experiences across the region and more particular national and local experiences.

DEV-5006B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Message from the Course Director

    Welcome to the Politics and International Development Programme at UEA. We offer a unique degree programme that addresses key issues in the politics of development. For us politics is not about political actors and institutions in themselves, but the ways in which they shape developing societies and the lives of ordinary people.

    Read it Message from the Course Director
  • Environmental Justice

    A group of International Development Researchers at UEA are working on global environmental justice, linking in with questions of biodiversity conservation, climate change, ecosystem management, forestry, disaster risks and water.

    Read it Environmental Justice
  • Annual Newsletter 2017-2018

    Students in the field, volunteers on the ground and keeping older people healthy. A year in Development.

    Read it Annual Newsletter 2017-2018
  • How DEV Students Are Making An Impact To The World

    Hear how two of our Alumni are building global careers and making a positive impact on people's lives.

    Read it How DEV Students Are Making An Impact To The World
  • Politics Matters

    Combining political science and interdisciplinary approaches to international development - find out more about why Politics Matters.

    Read it Politics Matters

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.
  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM BTEC Public Services is not accepted.
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here. 

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not yet meet the English language requirements for this course, INTO UEA offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Development)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515