BA International Development

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Life post-graduation : UEA DEV

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Unethical fashion practices can leave whole communities without clean water.

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“Being able to develop my own field of expertise at UEA really enabled me to take a holistic approach on development, which changed my perception on the topic and enriched my knowledge and future career plans.”

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Holger Vogt, Business Development Officer, Bahrain Economic Development Board

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Prepare for a career in sustainable international development with a degree that explores the social, political, and economic dimensions of the field.

You’ll tackle diverse issues such as poverty, globalisation, gender inequality, conflict and humanitarian interventions. You’ll also have the option of taking modules on environmental change, education and development, geographies of development, and media and development, as well as modules focusing on particular regions of the developing world.

Overview

On this course you’ll develop a thorough understanding of contemporary issues in international development. At the same time you’ll have the chance to explore key related academic disciplines such as anthropology, politics, economics and geography. Your dissertation allows you to study a topic of your own choice in depth, under the supervision of a faculty member.

You’ll also have the chance to develop a range of skills that are valued by employers, including research skills, the ability to analyse data, prepare reports, give presentations, and work as part of a team.

You’ll be taught by academic staff whose research is internationally renowned. We’re actively involved in research across the globe, working with many national and international development agencies.

Our flexible approach to learning enables you to explore your interests and strengths, graduating with a world-class degree in international development.

Course Structure

Year 1

In your first year you’ll be introduced to contemporary debates and issues in international development through the two compulsory modules, Introduction to Development Studies and Evidence in Development.

Alongside these modules, you’ll choose three optional modules from a diverse range provided by the School. These include Introduction to Economics of Development, Introduction to Human Geography, Introduction to Social Anthropology, Introduction to Politics, and Humanitarian Communication.

Year 2

In your second year you’ll study two main subject areas, choosing from anthropology, politics, economics, natural resources and geography, and politics. You’ll also be able to choose from a range of optional modules, including Gender and Development, Education and Development, Communication for Development and regional modules on Latin American Development, South Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

You’ll also study research methods and have the opportunity to choose a module from a different School. This could include a foreign language.

Year 3

In your third year you’ll write a dissertation on a development topic of your own choice. You’ll be supported and supervised by an academic with expertise in your chosen area of research.

In addition to this you’ll continue to define your own learning, selecting a number of optional modules from a diverse range. Options currently include Wars and Humanitarian Crises, and Education and Development. You can also choose from a selection of modules from another School at UEA.

In your spring semester you will have the opportunity to choose modules from an alternative range, including Globalisation and Economic Development, Urban Geographies, Resource Development and Conservation, Engaging Anthropology in Development, and Media Production for Development. You can also opt to do a work placement in the UK, or take a vocational skills module, Development in Practice.

Teaching and Learning

You’ll learn through a combination of lectures and seminars. You’ll engage with a range of interactive tasks and activities and find the use of technology is also widespread.

In seminar group work and presentations you’ll be able to develop transferable skills, such as articulating an argument both orally and in writing, and presenting academic information in a lucid and cogent manner.

As your degree progresses there will be more emphasis on independent study. That means you can pursue areas of learning that suit your needs and interests. You’ll also develop your independent study skills in your dissertation.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed across a combination of coursework and unseen written exams. Your coursework will typically consist of two of the following:

  • An essay
  • A quantitative assignment
  • Practical or experimental assignments
  • A report

Your dissertation contributes a significant amount to your final grade. It’s an important opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate your skills in interdisciplinary analysis in a self-motivated study.

Optional Study abroad or Placement Year

After the course

You’ll graduate with the specialist and practical skills you need for a successful career in the UK or overseas.

Many of our graduates work in development, including in roles in the United Nations World Food Programme, UK governments, foreign governments, non-government organisations, and charities such as Oxfam and British Red Cross.

Others use the academic and transferable skills gained for careers in business, the voluntary and public sector, activism and campaigning, community development, environment, and media.

Alternatively you could go on to further study with an MA or PhD.

Career destinations

  • United Nations World Food Programme
  • International NGOs
  • Government (both UK and foreign)
  • British Red Cross
  • Oxfam

Course Modules 2018/9

Students must study the following modules for 60 credits:

Name Code Credits

EVIDENCE IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND GEOGRAPHY

The Evidence in International Development and Geography (EIDG) module is closely linked to the DEV-4001A Introduction to Development Studies (IDS) module taken by all Development students in Year 1. This module focuses on the role of evidence in understanding the themes introduced in IDS, with the following aims: - to provide a basic introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods; - to introduce key concepts in maths and statistics relevant to the study of international development and human geography; - to provide training in use of important software used in the analysis of evidence; and - to provide a foundation in the key academic skills expected at university including writing, reading and thinking critically, using UEA Library services and computing systems and developing effective teamwork skills. Learning by doing is the central teaching approach and throughout the semester you will apply ideas from classes to address a research question of your choice. There are few conventional lectures; most sessions are interactive workshops, complemented by IT lab sessions.

DEV-4002A

20

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

This is an introduction to International Development Studies. Themes of poverty, inequality, economic growth and sustainability are explored from the perspectives of development economics, social development, human geography and environment and natural resource management. A number of contemporary development issues are examined including globalisation, environmental degradation, gender, the state, aid, property rights, knowledge and progress.

DEV-4001A

40

Students will select 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

HUMANITARIAN COMMUNICATION

This module will critically explore changing trends in humanitarian communication by both the international news media and development actors. This will include a critical review of media coverage of development and poverty in the Global South and the role and responsibility of journalists reporting about humanitarian crises. We will also explore conventional strategies of humanitarian communication used by development charities, such as 'pornography of poverty', as well as more contemporary issues such as the role of celebrities, social media and the rise of 'post-humanitarian' communication. With case studies ranging from Live Aid to Kony 2012, you will be introduced to key concepts and theoretical approaches cutting across a range of disciplines. This module also contains an integral practical skills component. Speakers from leading Non-Governmental Organisations and experienced practitioners will share their insights about the everyday complexities of humanitarian communication and a number of workshops will focus on a relevant hands-on skills such as blogging and the basics of development photography.

DEV-4008B

20

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT

The module introduces you to key development economics theories and empirical evidence. Topics include the economics of poverty and inequality, economic growth, the balance between states and markets, agriculture and internal migration, population growth, health, human capital, the environment, international trade, and development aid. All of these are discussed within the context of development.

DEV-4003B

20

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module introduces geographical approaches to the key processes of change that shape our world and its societies. You will examine how people and places are connected and transformed as a result of processes such as colonialism, globalisation, industrialisation, migration, urbanisation and development, and explore how differences and inequalities emerge. A central theme will be why space matters, as people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them - both near and far - and as they in turn change those places. You will explore these issues through a range of contemporary geographical topics, from sweatshops to climate change, through which you will be introduced to core geographical concepts, ideas and approaches, emphasising on critical thinking and practice. You will discover key methods for geographical research, including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and will include field-based practical work in the local area.

DEV-4007B

20

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS

This module explores the biological and physical basis for primary production within the main natural resource systems providing food, fuel and fibre to human populations. The module has an integrated biophysical core and deals with resource demand, supply and exploitation issues. There will be a particular emphasis on the important processes in production and a number of key issues in natural resource systems will be introduced here e.g. global resource cycles, diversity, productivity and stability of natural resource systems. There is an important field-based, practical element throughout this course.

DEV-4004B

20

INTRODUCTION TO THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT

This module provides an introduction to political concepts and frameworks that are central to the study of international development. Through studying theoretical approaches you will gain the foundations required to critically evaluate contemporary development debates and development policy and practice.

DEV-4009B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1

This is the first part of a two year course that covers basic principles in social anthropology, and uses them to understand society and processes of social change in developing countries. The SAID1 module provides an introduction to anthropological theory to advance student's knowledge of socio-cultural issues and disciplinary themes such as adaptation and the environment, human evolution, colonialism, witchcraft and magic, religion, kinship and marriage, class and hierarchy, exchange, rituals, myths and ceremonies. The module's main aim is to promote an understanding of key figures and debates in social theory and show how these can be applied to development issues and policies. The lectures and seminars are accompanied by a weekly film series in which ethnographic films addressing key anthropological debates are shown and discussed.

DEV-4005B

20

Students must study the following modules for credits:

Name Code Credits

Students will select 40 - 100 credits from the following modules:

During their 2nd year, students must select at least 20 credits from at least two of the five disciplinary streams in DEV: Economics, Natural Resources, Anthropology, Politics and Geography (at least 40 credits in total).

Name Code Credits

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 2: Microeconomics

You'll be introduced to the basic concepts of microeconomics and its application to development problems. Microeconomic theories of consumption, production, externalities, public goods, common property resources, market structures, land and labour markets and households are covered with an emphasis on issues relevant to developing countries. In addition to conventional microeconomic principles, insights from behavioural and institutional economics on development problems are also covered.

DEV-5016A

20

ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT 3: Macroeconomics

The module will introduce you to the main macroeconomic issues of development. You will cover long-run macroeconomics, with a particular focus on economic growth, and short-run macroeconomics, including fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy. The module combines theory and evidence, relating theoretical arguments to recent macroeconomic phenomena. You will look at specific topics including the government budget and fiscal policy, inflation and monetary policy, trade and the balance of payments, exchange rates and capital flows, and the relationships between gender, institutions, and capital (physical, human and natural) and economic growth.

DEV-5017B

20

GEOGRAPHIES OF DEVELOPMENT

What is uneven development and why should we care about it? How did uneven development emerge, and what can we do about it? This module focuses on how geographers have engaged with these questions from different perspectives, including economic, environmental and social. You will explore how economic geographers (and geographical economists) have sought to explain the spatiality and unevenness of economic activity, including examining the evidence for 'natural advantage'. You will engage with geographical work on urban restructuring and environmental governance which have seen uneven development as a product of capitalism, and consider the influence of Marxist theory on geographical thought. You will also consider how both ordinary people and civil society have tried to address, contest and resist spatial difference and uneven development. Questions of scale emerge in various forms through the module, which demonstrates how understanding 'uneven development' is a fundamentally geographical endeavour by exploring some of the key geographies of development.

DEV-5010B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 2

This module builds on the key issues and themes introduced in Introduction To Natural Resources And Development, i.e. diversity, productivity, sustainability, variability and stability, change and degradation etc. It broadly addresses the major challenges encountered when trying to achieve sustainable management of natural resources. It aims to give students a working understanding of scientific principles behind natural processes, as well as how these relate to broader contexts in development. The module also develops students' understanding of and experience in using a range of quantitative tools and approaches for measuring and describing natural resources.

DEV-5012A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 3

In this module, you will focus on the governance of natural resources in the global South. In particular you will investigate some important and contested environment and development issues involving biodiversity conservation, agricultural technology and energy. These contests will include problems of human-wildlife conflict arising from protected areas, conflicts over genetically modified crops and debates about how to achieve food security. By focusing on these contested areas of policy and practice, you will gain insight into the challenges facing governance in the real world. Understanding of these challenges is supported by using different frameworks for analysing the underlying contexts, including an ecosystem services approach, political ecology and environmental justice.

DEV-5013B

20

PEOPLE AND PLACE

This module will develop your theoretical and empirical understanding of how social environments in different places affect people's health or ill-health. It is about the geographies of health. You will develop knowledge about how ill-health and health inequalities are linked to socio-economic inequalities, poverty and marginalisation. You will be able to apply this knowledge to questions of health policy and interventions designed to improve health. A key conceptual framework for this module is the social determinants of health (SDH). This includes analysis of the risk environment for ill-health, influenced by social structures (such as gender or class) in a particular setting, how people make a living (their livelihoods), environmental change and the nature of health policy and the health services available to people. We are therefore also interested in the interventions which can help deal with risk environments, to make people less susceptible to disease and less vulnerable when they become ill. You will learn how some places have achieved good health. The module is inter-disciplinary, drawing on theories and evidence from disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, public health and development studies, and to a lesser extent economics, demography and epidemiology. It also provides an understanding of the ways different cultures and societies define and understand health and ill-health and why some diseases are highly stigmatised. Case studies from different places and of different diseases are used to illustrate the social determinants of health, including infectious diseases (such as HIV, malaria, Ebola) and non-communicable diseases.

DEV-5011A

20

POLITICS, DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIETY

This module critically analyses the role of key development actors, and the contexts that they work within. It emphasises how actual interventions play out in society - where they become concrete and have real effects. What changes because of these interventions, and what stays the same, and why? What are the actors' intentions, who shaped them, and why are outcomes often unintended and contradictory? The module considers a range of actors from social movements to international organisations. It exposes students to the complexities of policy implementation and social change, and provides a strong grounding in understanding the politics of development policy. Although open to all students it is useful if you have taken Introduction to the Politics of Development (DEV-4009B). If you have not you may have to do some additional work in the opening weeks of the semester in order to familiarise yourselves with key concepts. Lecturers will assist you in doing so.

DEV-5019B

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll learn the concepts and debates that are fundamental to social anthropology, and their relationships with development and change. The teaching methods on this module include formal lectures, guided discussions of key readings, small-group seminars, and ethnographic films. Topics you'll cover include economic anthropology, ecological anthropology, personhood, embodiment, the anthropology of talk, identity and gender, cultural rights, technical change and the anthropology of development.

DEV-5004A

20

Students will select 20 - 40 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

METHODS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of research methods in human geography. It will provide a preparation for undertaking research within and beyond the university context i.e. both for the Dissertation and Field course modules and equipping students with key employability attributes for professional careers. In doing so, the module will introduce you to a range of qualitative, quantitative and spatial methods that human geographers use in research including research design, data collection and data analysis skills that are transferable to the workplace. The module will be taught using lecture-based classes and computer labs. The majority of the module is organised into three projects that use different approaches to data collection, analysis and presentation. There is a qualitative research project based on primary data collection using interviews and forms of narrative analysis. There is a quantitative research project that uses secondary survey data for statistical analysis. And finally there is a Geographic Information System project that uses primary georeferenced data collected during class.

DEV-5014A

20

POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2: RESEARCH METHODS AND TOOLS

Learn the fundamentals of research design in the social sciences, emphasising the ways in which assumptions, paradigms, and objectives affect methodological choices, and reflecting on the differences and commonalities between qualitative and quantitative approaches. Over the course of the semester these methodological considerations are applied to central themes in contemporary politics and development. You will have the opportunity to design your own political research project based upon your individual interests, and to apply the methodological issues addressed. The module thus enhances your understanding of contemporary political challenges, as well as introducing you to the basic principles of social science research.

DEV-5018A

20

QUANTITATIVE EVIDENCE IN DEVELOPMENT

Throughout the study of international development, it is important to weigh our theoretical ideas and policy recommendations against the available evidence. This module deals with the use of quantitative evidence. The aim is to enable students: i) to understand quantitative analysis encountered in other modules; ii) to become critical readers of published quantitative data analysis; and iii) to gather, analyse and Interpret quantitative evidence themselves in support of their own study of development questions. The module deals with research design, a review of descriptive statistics and a number of inferential methods. Techniques taught include simple tests for group differences such as the t-test, analysis of variance and multiple regression.

DEV-5002A

20

RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In this module we examine how social anthropological methods have developed and how they have changed in response to global factors. We specifically focus on contemporary anthropological methods and how they might be applied to better understand critical development issues such as poverty, inequality and social disintegration. A key aim is to question our most basic assumptions about what anthropologists do and how they do it. By the end of the module, you will have a basic awareness of key anthropological methods and practical experience in how to apply them. Topics we address include: Anthropologies and Anthropological Methods, Methodologies and Methods, Sampling and Selection, Fieldwork and Ethics, Collecting Data, Visual Anthropology, Genealogies and life histories, Ethnographic Film-making, Interpreting Speech/Findings, Situating your analysis within the literature and Ethnographic Writing. The module is taught primarily through practical and workshop exercises in small groups to develop practical skills in gathering and analysing data. Assessment is in the form of a portfolio based on practical fieldwork situated within the ethnographic literature.

DEV-5009B

20

Students will select 0 - 60 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to International Development students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying International Development.

DEV-5015A

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides you with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will begin by introducing you to some key policy themes in education and international development, and some established theories such as human capital, human development and capabilities, and theory on education as social reproduction. The module then goes into more depth with thematic content on themes such as early childhood development, conflict, gender and difference.

DEV-5003A

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues and disciplinary approaches to gender. You will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development. You will then be introduced and explore a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

DEV-5001A

20

GEOGRAPHY FIELD COURSE

This module involves a residential field course, either within the UK or overseas. You will undertake immersive field-based learning, tailored to the field trip location/s. Depending on the number of enrolments, multiple trips might run each year. Extra charges apply for the overseas trips and the locations are subject to change.

DEV-5016B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll analyse key historical, political, social and economic issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. You'll develop a historically-grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa's poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development, you'll explore and examine the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5006B

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Education and Critical Thinking, Globalisation and The Environment. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Time and Sleep, World Population and Urbanisation and Tourism. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5044B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4029A

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC I (SPRING START)

Its aim is the mastery of the alphabet: the script, the sounds of the letters, and their combination into words. Also, it introduces basic Arabic phrases and vocabulary to help you have introductory conversations. You will develop essential speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as a solid understanding of the structure of the language in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Some aspects of the Arab world and culture(s) are covered.

PPLB4045B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a basic knowledge of Arabic writing and speaking may join this module.

PPLB4030B

20

BEGINNERS' ARABIC II (AUTUMN)

This is the second part of a beginners' course in Arabic following on from Beginners' Arabic I. Students with a GCSE grade C or below (or completed A1 level from CEFR - Common European Framework of Reference) may join this module.

PPLB4046A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4034A

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE I (SPRING START)

Did you know you could speak Mandarin in some way already? Try these: coffee as cah-fay, sofa as sharfah, pizza as pee-sah. Yes! Chinese people say these words pretty much as you do! Do you want to get an insight into Chinese culture? Are you planning an adventurous trip in China to explore the diversity of life and communicate with the local people? Your ears will be exposed to pinyin and you will begin to master the deceptively simple Chinese alphabet. You will open your eyes and mind to acquire meanings by drawing the characters. You will build up your vocabulary incredibly quickly, and soon learn to initiate conversations and read simple texts. You will work with your peers during grammar classes and classroom-based oral seminars which cover introduction to pinyin (pronunciation) and the common tricky sounds, word order, sentences at a basic communicative level, the spelling rules of hanzi (Chinese characters), building up your vocabulary, and topic relevant cultural norms. At the end of the module, there is a brief introduction to the Chinese daily meals and sentences you need to order food from a restaurant. By the end of the module, you will be able to recognize and pronounce pinyin confidently. You will develop knowledge of basic sentences. You will be able to understand simple linguistic rules so that you can carry on learning in the future. You will be able to greet people fluently. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4051B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4035B

20

BEGINNERS' CHINESE II (AUTUMN)

Thinking about brushing up on your Mandarin? Planning an exciting trip to China? Still struggling with pinyin and reading Chinese? Then this module is designed for you! You will explore more sentence patterns in daily life communicative situations. You will build up your character blocks rapidly. You will acquire discourse skills in these scenarios. You will stretch your linguistic ability by becoming aware of cultural norms so that you can communicate with local people freely, but without a scary amount of vocabulary. The module comprises two sessions per week: a two-hour grammar class and a one-hour oral seminar. You will participate in these to learn different ways to ask questions, tenses, reading characters, cultural norms in contexts and topics ranging from friends and family and housing to leisure and health. You will write short essays throughout the process. By the end of the module you will have established a solid foundation in Mandarin, and will have achieved a communicative level. You will be able to recognise about 200 Chinese characters. You will be able to compose messages to your friends or future colleagues. You will be able to express your needs while traveling, and to enjoy the cultural diversity of megacities like Shanghai and Beijing. NOTE: Please note that students speaking other varieties of Chinese (e.g. Cantonese) are not eligible for this module.

PPLB4052A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that students should not have a level of French which exceeds the level of this course. This module is probably not appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4013A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Bonjour, comment ca va? Do you want to understand what this means and how to say it? This module will help you to master basics of French language and communication. This module is perfect for you if you have never studied French before (or have very little experience of it). Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you will learn to communicate about yourself and your immediate environment in a set of concrete, everyday situations. You'll be taught in a very interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, leaflets#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of this module, you'll be able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions aimed at both the satisfaction of concrete needs, or those used to describe areas of most immediate relevance. You'll be able to introduce yourself and others, ask and answer questions about personal details, and interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade C or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4015B

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II (AUTUMN) - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills (70%) and the second will cover your speaking skills (30%). On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4053A

20

BEGINNERS' FRENCH II - A2 CEFR

Parlons francais ! This module will help you to further your basics of French language and communication in order to enable you to cope with concrete situations. This module is perfect for you if you have taken Beginners' French I - A1 CEFR, or if you have some experience of French language. Throughout the semester, you'll develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). This means that you'll be able to cope in a number of situations, including some you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to talk and write about yourself and your immediate surrounding environment in some detail, and you'll work on handling short social exchanges. You'll be taught in an interactive and friendly environment, and will often work in pairs or small groups. Your two-hour seminar will focus on listening, reading and writing skills, while the oral hour will help you to develop your confidence in speaking. We'll tackle some grammatical notions in class, but always as a means for you to improve your communication skills. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where French is spoken, thanks to the various documents we will use to develop your linguistic skills (songs, podcasts, short articles and videos#). You'll be assessed by two course tests: the first will cover listening, reading, and writing skills and the second will cover your speaking skills. On successful completion of the module, you'll be able to understand and use expressions related to areas of immediate relevance, or that you may encounter when travelling. You'll be able to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information. You'll be able to describe in simple terms aspects of your background, immediate environment and needs. Please note that you should not have a level of French that exceeds the level of this course. This module may not be appropriate for you if you have a recent French GCSE at grade B or above, or an equivalent qualification. Please contact the Module Organiser to check this.

PPLB4014B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I (SPRING START) - A1.1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning you will achieve within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4047B

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN I - A1 CEFR

Have you ever wished you could order your mulled wine at the Christmas market in German? How would it feel be to be able to introduce yourself in German or survive a basic conversation in the language? Or do you simply want to understand what makes the Germans, the Austrians or the Swiss tick? These questions highlight the central learning achieved within this module. Our beginners' course in German is perfect if you have very little or no prior knowledge of the language. You will gain the confidence to use German in basic conversations as you develop a first understanding of German sounds and essential grammar. You will build up a bank of key vocabulary to survive in real-life situations. You will also gain a greater awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new sounds, words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to make the first steps in German. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will discover the joy of understanding an authentic German text and to write an amazing first paragraph in German. A first course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that you should not have a level of German that exceeds the level of this course.

PPLB4018A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II (AUTUMN) - A1.2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4048A

20

BEGINNERS' GERMAN II - A2 CEFR

Do you want to refresh and further develop your basic German skills? Would you like to converse with a native speaker beyond the first introductions? Or do you simply want to understand a little more about what makes the Germans, the Swiss or Austrians tick? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Beginners 1 module or have very basic knowledge of the language. You will gain more confidence in using German in conversation as you become ever more familiar with essential German grammar. You will learn how to express opinions, wishes and requests, and how to master the skill of congratulating and complimenting other people. During this module you will also gain further awareness of German traditions and ways of thinking to help you make sense of a country that is deeply rooted in the heart of Europe. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to maintain a conversation and express yourself to a target audience in writing. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you make sense of authentic German texts. A solid beginners' course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest. Please note that your current level of German language should not exceed the level of this course.

PPLB4019B

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK I - A1 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have little or NO prior experience of Greek, then this module is for you. On this module you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following topics: Meeting people Food and drink: Eating with friends Shopping for food and drink Shopping for clothes Writing postcards/notes Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4036A

20

BEGINNERS' GREEK II - A2 CEFR

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You'll be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE grade C or below (or equivalent experience, i.e. Beginners Greek I) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. You'll be equipped with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You'll also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you'll be able to converse/read and write on the following topics: 1.Information gathering 2.Travel 3.Accommodation 4.Meeting people and talking about the past, holidays etc. 5.Offering hospitality (informal/formal) 6.Initiating/receiving phone calls/phone messages (social/business) 8.Writing letters (informal/formal) Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4037B

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN I - A1 CEFR

You already have a smattering of Italian. Think of 'latte', 'panino' and 'tiramisu'! Would you like to find out more, learn to pronounce words like 'bruschetta' and 'ciabatta' correctly? How about learning to get by on holiday or working in Italy, while sampling the abundant cultural and culinary delights? This is a beginners' course in Italian assuming no prior knowledge of the language or minimal familiarity (see above). You'll learn to communicate simply but effectively in basic conversations and understand the relevant details of announcements and notices around you. You'll master the essential grammar and vocabulary to enable you to express yourself clearly and not feel tongue tied when immersed in the hustle and bustle of Italian life. On your language journey you'll encounter the culture of different Italian regions. They all have something special to offer, from world class design to dramatic adventure terrain, and with your new language skills you'll be ready to explore and connect with people. In the classroom you'll start talking Italian straight away, often working in pairs and small groups. As you will all have different strengths you'll practise and exchange ideas in a mutually supportive environment. The course encourages success by providing thorough coverage of grammar and vocabulary via interesting and relevant contexts. A variety of writing tasks in class and for homework will help you to build up new skills and listening to a variety of recordings will build your confidence. Games, role-play and regular feedback and advice on learning strategies will lead to a very positive language experience. By the end of this module you'll be able to express yourself simply but competently in Italian. You'll no longer be afraid of unfamiliar material in real life situations and you'll be ready to give it a go. The valuable experience of learning another language will pay dividends in other areas of academic and personal life too. This module is an introduction to Italian but you can continue your Italian journey by taking the Beginners' Italian II module in the spring semester. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4038A

20

BEGINNERS' ITALIAN II - A2 CEFR

You have enough Italian to get by when in Italy, or for communicating with Italians socially or for business. Do you now want to deepen your understanding of the language and learn the tools to enable you to really connect? Do you want to get to grips with those 'little words' that really bind words into phrases, allowing you to manipulate the language and make it work for you? To take this module you will need to have completed the Beginners' Italian I module (even if it was in a previous academic year) or have reached an equivalent level. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Italian and honing your listening skills. You'll become more competent in Italian, but you'll also gain a solid foundation on which to build in the future; whether continuing with Italian or with other languages (the learning strategies are very flexible and can be applied in many other academic and creative areas). The classes will be interactive and you'll support each other and help each other while learning in a friendly stress free environment. The module will yield a lot of new vocabulary and it will also show you how the language works. You'll discover an innovative approach to extending a basic knowledge of Italian by using the widest possible variety of dialogues, such as autobiographical extracts, newspaper articles, anecdotes, jokes, advertisements and recipes (to name just a few of the materials used). You'll work in pairs and small groups and enjoyment in the classroom will lead to increased confidence when trying out your new skills. Regular feedback on your oral, listening and written work will motivate you to explore further and make the most of other resources outside of the classroom (such as the internet, phone apps and cinematic experiences). By the end of this module, you'll have added a vital skill to your CV, and you'll be very keen to get to Italy to try out your newly learnt talents (if you have not already done so)! Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment.

PPLB4039B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4040A

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE I (SPRING START)

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Would you like to enhance your career opportunities? This is a beginners' course in Japanese assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In this module, you'll learn reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. You'll gain the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Japanese is spoken. Particular emphasis will be placed on your acquisition of a sound knowledge of grammar. Please note that this is a subsidiary language module. Very occasionally, subsidiary language modules may need to be cancelled if there are low levels of enrolment. Please note that if you are found to have a level of knowledge in a language that exceeds the level for which you have enrolled, you may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4042B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4041B

20

BEGINNERS' JAPANESE II (AUTUMN)

Have you ever taken any basic Beginners' Japanese I? Then, the Beginners' Japanese II is what you really need. You will continue to study the different tenses and grammatical structures while improving your spoken Japanese and honing your listening skills. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4054A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN I - A1 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This is a beginners' course in Russian assuming little or no prior experience or knowledge of the language. In the first week you'll acquaint yourself with the Russian alphabet (it's not that different) and learn to read Russian. At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, will be able to read simple texts and to use your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion.

PPLB4043A

20

BEGINNERS' RUSSIAN II - A2 CEFR

Winston Churchill once said that 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsch! Would you like to know more about the largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? Before enrolling on this course you'll need to be acquainted with the Russian alphabet, able to read and write in Russian, and to know a few initial items of grammar and vocabulary (skills that will be learnt in the Beginners' Russian I module). At the end of the course you'll know all the basics of Russian grammar, you'll be able to read more complex texts and you'll have improved your speaking skills in real-life situations (in case you find yourself lost in Red Square)! You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You'll be able to improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discussing their content and expressing your opinion. Having a Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates, and it will also provide work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. This course will also help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB4044B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4022A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH I - A1 CEFR (SPRING START)

Do you want to learn a new language? Do you want to access the Spanish-speaking world? Are you about to travel through Spain or any Spanish-speaking country in Latin America? Then, it#s the right time to enrol to Beginners# Spanish I. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards intermediate and advanced levels. It sounds good, doesn't it? You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will have the opportunity to receive personal feedback on all your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of learning the language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Spanish is currently the main language. By the end of this module, you will have the linguistic competence necessary to understand and use common, everyday expressions and simple sentences, to address immediate needs. If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade C or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you.

PPLB4024B

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II (AUTUMN) - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken any basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this well spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners# Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? Thanks to this module, you will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. As usual, you will get the personal feedback on every single of your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or above, or an international equivalent, then this module is probably not appropriate for you - please contact the module organiser as soon as possible to be sure.

PPLB4055A

20

BEGINNERS' SPANISH II - A2 CEFR

Have you ever taken a basic Spanish course? Do you want to carry on studying this widely spoken language after taking Beginners# Spanish I? Do you feel that learning a language might be a relevant skill for your career? Then, Beginners' Spanish II is what you really need. This module will improve your academic education and will provide you with the confidence to advance towards upper intermediate and advanced levels. But, how will you make it? You will work on your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and you will get personal feedback on every single one of your efforts. You will take part in classroom-based activities, working in pairs and small groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in the process of improving this language. You will also be able to focus on real life situations as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. There will also be opportunities to explore aspects more carefully of the cultures where Spanish is the mother tongue. By the end of this module, you will be able to understand commonly used, everyday phrases and expressions related to areas of experience especially relevant to them (basic information about themselves, and their families, shopping, places of interest, work, etc.). If you have a recent Spanish GCSE grade B or below, or an international equivalent, then this module is appropriate for you. Please contact the module organiser if you wish to discuss your eligibility.

PPLB4023B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

ENGLISH ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS

Do you need help in organising your writing and expressing your thoughts clearly? Would you like to gain the tools and confidence to write more clearly and fluently, leading to better grades and greater satisfaction with your work? In this module you will learn how to structure academic essays and how best to write logically organised paragraphs. You will have practice in summarising and paraphrasing material from sources that you have read to ensure you can capture the essential points of a writer's argument and avoid any form of plagiarism. This will include help with ways to manage the referencing of sources. There will be a focus on vocabulary throughout the course and you will be set tasks to direct you to appropriate academic language; and you will have help in using a range of cohesive devices to link ideas within and between paragraphs. It is also likely that the class will need some remedial work on a specific area of grammar occasionally, and the tutor will allow time in class to deal with such issues. Naturally, you will be required to complete weekly homework assignments in addition to any reading and writing you do in the classroom, and you will receive regular feedback. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Also students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5045B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling you to select (and develop your own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment will be via seminar presentations and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic is for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. In this module you will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic I, this module offers you lively dialogues, varied texts and exercises, plus fascinating cultural insights. You will cover a wide variety of topics such as leisure, news and media, arts and cinema, as well as an end-of-unit focus on the geography, culture and dialects of major Arab countries. The course has three contact hours per week. Alternative slots may be available depending on enrolment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2.1 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Beginners II) this module is for you. This module will enable you to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. You will consolidate at a higher level, specific aspects of the language. The emphasis will lie on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst you will develop knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. You will enhance your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: discuss/read and write on the following Topics: Leisure / culture/sports Travel / Car Hire Meeting people (2) (formal-informal)/Receive a guest/visito Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Intermediate I ) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You will also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Staying with a Greek host Solving Problems Making Complaints Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you'll have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You;ll learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study, and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable for you if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Do you want to continue to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and expand your cultural knowledge of contemporary Italy? Do you want to focus on language usage rather than abstract concepts and meet Italy head on? You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and small groups; exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the Italian language. One of your main goals will be to use your language skills actively and creatively in meaningful communication. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through engaging with current topics and you will focus on different learning strategies such as using your background knowledge or doing research online. Interesting texts will help facilitate your understanding of authentic reading material and you will become familiar with different writing styles and genres as well as natural language written by and for native speakers. By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself in Italian in a more subtle way and you will understand language spoken by native speakers in a variety of different contexts, formal and informal. The simulated real-life situations will have prepared you for working, studying, or travelling in Italy or communicating with Italians whilst in this country in a social or business setting. Before starting this module you should have completed the Intermediate Italian One module or studied up to a similar level in another institution or at UEA. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or would you like to enhance your career opportunities? An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. You will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or do you want to enhance your career opportunities? You will continue to build upon what you have learnt in Intermediate Japanese I. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique, and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4031A

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE I (SPRING START)

How would you converse with someone who is deaf? At work? In school? In an emergency? How can you avoid typical faux pas due to ignorance of a different culture? Can a 'signed'/'visual' language 'convey as adequately' as a 'spoken' language? These questions highlight the central learning achieved in this module. This is a course in British Sign Language assuming no prior, or minimal knowledge of the language. Throughout the course you will discover aspects central to the Deaf World and its Culture, and how to communicate through a unique 'visual' language, a language that uses your hands and body to communicate! Teaching and learning strategies involve signed conversation (from early on), role-play, and lots of games and exercises that make a truly 'fun and enjoyable' module to take. You will learn a little about the history of the Deaf and Sign Language itself, and its long battle to be recognised. You will discover how using your body and hands can be an exciting and meaningful way of communicating. You will acquire a wide range of easily usable vocabulary, a deeper look into various features that make the language unique and very different to spoken languages. On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate with a Deaf person. You will be able to take your British Sign Language studies onto the next level, broadening your knowledge and developing further, the skill within this amazing 'Visual' language. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4033B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. You will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4032B

20

INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH SIGN LANGUAGE II (AUTUMN)

Having gained an insight in communicating using a 'visual' language, how would you relate a story, a narrative or a conversation using more than two people? How would you describe where something is in a room, the room itself or give directions involving a map? This module builds on your studies in British Sign Language giving you confidence and further skills in communicating with the deaf. Teaching and learning strategies continue to involve a more fluent signed conversation, role-play, and lots more games and exercises embedding your learning that makes this an exciting module to take! In this module you will continue to look at deaf culture, address and look at various equipment that assists the Deaf in their everyday life. For example, how do they know someone is at the door? Can they communicate over the telephone? What would happen if you were in a building on fire? On successful completion of this module you will have developed knowledge and skills that will enable you to communicate confidently with a Deaf person. Your will broaden your knowledge and understanding of a truly unique and amazing form of communication and a culture so very different than what you may have encountered before. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB4056A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/I - B1.1 CEFR

Would you like to become a more fluent German speaker who is able to deal with most situations whilst travelling? Do you need the confidence to survive a work placement abroad or a term at a German university? Or maybe you are keen to learn how to write an essay or deliver a short presentation German style. This advanced course in German is perfect if you have completed both intermediate modules or have A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this . You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you start to study grammar at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and describe and evaluate basic statistical information with confidence. During this module you will improve your understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at and evaluating conventions in the world of work and at universities in German-speaking countries. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and discuss topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. A first advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4020A

20

POST A-LEVEL GERMAN 1/II - B1.2 CEFR

Do you aim to become a more fluent and spontaneous German speaker? Are you interested in current social and political affairs in German-speaking countries and would like to find out more? Or maybe you would prefer to further develop your essay-writing and presentation skills to be able to bring your viewpoint across effectively? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Post A-level I/I module or have sound A-level experience in German. This module is also open to near-native speakers of German, who seek to develop their written skills and improve their grammar. You will become more independent in conversation and discussion with others as you study selected grammar and some specialist vocabulary at an advanced level. You will learn how to build up an argument in German and put it forward convincingly. During this module you will improve and refine your understanding of contemporary Germany through looking at and evaluating current political and social affairs. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to experiment with more advanced grammar. There will be plenty of opportunities to present and debate topics within the safety of small peer groups. Throughout the module there will be a strong emphasis on understanding more complex authentic texts and audio-visual material. We will set you regular written tasks to build up what it needs to produce a perfect essay. An advanced course in German will add a rare and therefore highly valued skill to your CV. It allows you to work and study abroad with more confidence. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB4021B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

Students must study the following modules for 40 credits:

Name Code Credits

DISSERTATION

The dissertation will provide you with an opportunity to undertake a research project on a topic within development studies in consultation with your supervisor. It is intended to complement the more conventional methods of coursework and examination assessment, allowing you to investigate and consider themes and issues of importance to you in more depth. The dissertation is not an extended essay; rather it is a (social) scientific piece of research that sets out a clear question and methods, and develops a coherent argument based on a review of existing and/or interpretation of fresh evidence, and application to theory. Please note, this module is restricted to International Development and Environmental Geography and International Development students.

DEV-6007Y

40

Students will select 60 - 80 credits from the following modules:

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their 3rd year.

Name Code Credits

COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT

What role can media and communications play within development? How can media - both 'old' and 'new' - help mobilise citizens, change policy, modify behaviours and promote democracy, good governance and economic growth? You will address these and other questions by providing a critical introduction to the field of 'Communication for Development' (C4D). Key topics will include behaviour change communication, participatory communication, press freedom, media literacy, media and conflict and access to new communication technologies. This module is accessible to International Development students who have not studied media before and to students on degrees relevant to media, with no previous experience of studying International Development.

DEV-5015A

20

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT and CONSERVATION

This module uses recent research and practical experience to analyse the challenges for development and conservation policies in the developing world. You will be examining themes such as the relationship between science and policy, and the implications of increased participation and local control in the use of natural resources through an environmental justice lens, bringing together theory and the use of case studies, in order to learn how people across the world are trying to put in to practice different types of just transformations for sustainability. Each year these themes will be explored within two selected contexts such as - African pastoralism, savannah-forest mosaics, water resources and irrigated agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, indigenous territories, fisheries and aquatic resources, environment and conservation, etc.

DEV-6005B

20

DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

This module offers you the opportunity to explore how development ideas and aims are reflected in contemporary and emerging development practice. The module content is geared towards giving you tools with which to approach working in development, exploring the process of defining and developing development projects. We explore the history of different approaches to aid enterprises, and how they have been shaped by different geo-political and ideological forces. You will learn the difference between a log frame and a theory of change, how to create both, and how they may be useful to defining your endeavours. You will work in a team to develop your own project, with a justification of the need, an evidence-based approach and a strong analysis of the social and political context in which it is going to operate. This will also need a communications strategy and a fully costed budget, all of which you will be supported to learn how to do. However we will also encourage you to think critically about these processes, looking at how these tools have been developed and why, and being aware of their limitations and benefits.

DEV-6009B

20

DEVELOPMENT WORK EXPERIENCE

This module will provide you with the opportunity to work overseas or in the UK, for example working in education, conservation, agriculture, working with vulnerable groups, administration or journalism. You are expected to fund your own project, which must be approved by the module convenor. The School has a database of projects to assist you with your project selection. The work placement can be between 2 - 5 months duration, over a period stretching from the summer (July) at the end of year two through to the end of the autumn semester of year three (November/December). You are expected to work for a minimum of two months and complete 150 hours of work as a minimum requirement. There are two pieces of assessment: an initial reflective piece of writing about the placement, and an essay related to the placement or project work.

DEV-6004A

20

EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module provides you with an understanding of key theories and current debates linking education to development and relating these to international and national education strategies, policies and educational practices. The module will begin by introducing you to some key policy themes in education and international development, and some established theories such as human capital, human development and capabilities, and theory on education as social reproduction. The module then goes into more depth with thematic content on themes such as early childhood development, conflict, gender and difference.

DEV-5003A

20

ENGAGING ANTHROPOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT

The aim is to offer students an advanced anthropology module which builds on students' engagement with development issues, to consider some of the enduring puzzles of social change, to deliver in-depth understanding of particular themes, and to support students in intensive small group development of their anthropological skills, in order to understand social change and contribute to development theory and practice. We use teaching methods based on small group work of seminars and tutorials, in order to develop skills for independent scholarship, appropriate for 3rd year DEV students.

DEV-6008Y

20

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

This module builds on the introduction to gender issues and disciplinary approaches to gender. You will begin by exploring the various approaches to understanding gender and development. You will then be introduced and explore a range of key concepts as the foundations of gender analyses. The module then applies these concepts in examining a selection of important relevant debates: gender analysis of economic growth, divisions of labour and incomes, land and property rights, environmental change, education and health policies, voice and empowerment, violence and religion.

DEV-5001A

20

GLOBALISATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The causes and consequences of globalisation are controversial and this module will present alternative theoretical perspectives that lie behind these debates. It extends the analysis of trade and international finance in Economics of Development 3 (DEV-5017B). Specific areas that are examined include global production and transnational corporations, global trade and liberalisation, global finance and debt crises, aid and migration, as well as several cross-cutting issues such as the impacts of globalisation on the environment and on poverty and inequality.

DEV-6006B

20

LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT

This is a regional studies module which covers economic, social and political aspects of development in Latin America. It situates the region in its historical and international context, and gives an overview of major development debates in the region. The module also includes country case studies of contrasting development strategies.

DEV-5005B

20

MEDIA PRODUCTION FOR DEVELOPMENT

The aim of this practical module is to provide an introduction to practical production techniques for storytelling relevant to the field of international development. The module will teach you the basic skills required to make a short film/documentary. Skills taught will include pre-planning a production, working in a team, selecting appropriate equipment, interview techniques, camera work, lighting, sound recording and editing. The module is delivered over an intensive two-week period after the end of the 2nd Year exam period, but counts as 20 credits towards the 3rd Year. The course is taught in collaboration with Duckrabbit who specialise in media training for the third sector.

DEV-6013A

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY FIELD COURSE

The main aim of the field course is to give you an opportunity to engage in guided field research, normally related but not restricted to natural resources. The course is an opportunity to employ different methods of inquiry and research that will serve you well with your dissertation, Development Work Experience, and later life. More specifically, the course has the following learning objectives: (1)Develop skills in the use of quantitative or qualitative field research methods, including natural resource surveys, geographical and social science methods such as questionnaires, `stakeholder' analysis and `participatory' research. To apply these skills to a small research project that investigates an issue relevant to Natural Resource management and/or social development. (2)Develop competence in the design and planning of a field research project in terms of identifying logical and realistic research questions, choosing and applying methods appropriate to the questions and undertaking the work within a given time frame. (3)Develop and practice skills in designing procedures for maintaining high ethical standards in field research and for risk assessment. (4)Develop the capacity to reflect critically on the research methods you have used and make recommendations for improvements and for further research. (5)Make short presentations of your preliminary research questions and rationale near the beginning of the course and present your initial results and interpretation at the end of the course. (6)Produce a written report in the form and style of a short journal article. Your contribution is GBP100 which will help cover the costs of travel to and around Galway, accommodation, breakfasts, lunches, and dinners. You will be invoiced by UEA after the event just in case there are people who drop out in the end. Therefore you can be expected to receive an invoice late June/early July.

DEV-6001A

20

POLITICS, POLICY AND PRACTICE

This module is concerned with how policy is made, how it is implemented, and how it affects developing countries. It critically analyses the role of a variety of different development actors including international organisations, national governments, Non-Governmental Organisations, social movements, trade unions and the media. It focuses in particular on how policy impacts on the conditions of less well-off and less powerful groups in society. It underlines the contested nature of policy processes and asks how policy can work better for the poor.

DEV-6011B

20

SOUTH ASIAN DEVELOPMENT

This module begins with an overview of the region's history before analysing recent and contemporary social, political and economic development processes. Topics include economic growth, social difference, democracy, land and food security, the environment, health and education. The module draws heavily on India, but also considers Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in relation to the various topics.

DEV-5007B

20

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DEVELOPMENT

On this module you'll analyse key historical, political, social and economic issues relating to development in Sub-Saharan Africa. You'll develop a historically-grounded understanding of political, social and economic change in Sub-Saharan Africa through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship from political science, sociology, anthropology, education and economics. Through an exploration of issues such as colonialism and the post-colonial experience, the state in Africa, reasons for Africa's poor economic performance and aid effectiveness, conflict and ethnicity, migration and urban development, you'll explore and examine the dynamics and agendas of change.

DEV-5006B

20

URBAN GEOGRAPHIES

This module will examine the historical and contemporary development and governance of urban centres around the globe. In order to understand these processes, we will explore both the structure of human settlements and the multiple relationships and processes that shape and reshape urban spaces. We will examine the changing environmental, political, social, and economic dynamics of cities and smaller urban centres, drawing on case studies from the global north and the global south. The module will cover a range of concepts and topics which have preoccupied urban geographers, including but not limited to: urbanisation and urban growth patterns; urban economic restructuring and neoliberalism; urban infrastructure; poverty and inequality; informality; migration; citizenship; urban nature; and race and sexuality in the city. A one-day field trip focusing on urban planning and regeneration is an integral part of the module.

DEV-6010B

20

WARS AND HUMANITARIAN CRISES

Since the late 1950s, far more wars have been fought within the boundaries of single states than between different countries. The occurrence of these violent intrastate conflicts poses significant challenges to the development agenda, as they have often devastating social, political and economic consequences that can lead to severe humanitarian crises. Grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing violent civil conflict, the aim of Wars and Humanitarian Crisis is to critically assess the (contested) causes and possible solutions of protracted civil wars. Key themes in the module include competing explanations for the incidence of civil war; the humanitarian implications of civil wars; the role of the media in reporting wars and humanitarian action; terrorism as another form of political violence that is distinct from but in many cases related to violent intrastate conflicts; strategies and challenges of peace-building; and the strengths and weaknesses of institutional design as a conflict management tool.

DEV-6003A

20

Students will select 0 - 20 credits from the following modules:

Students must not take more than 20 credits of Level 5 modules in their 3rd year.

Name Code Credits

ADVANCED ENGLISH I - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Education and Critical Thinking, Globalisation and The Environment. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5043A

20

ADVANCED ENGLISH II - B2 CEFR

Do you want more practice in speaking in English? Do you feel you lack sufficient vocabulary to express yourself well? Do you need help with your pronunciation? Do you have problems with English grammar and writing essays? As a non-native speaker, you will need to already have an upper intermediate/ advanced level of English (IELTS 6.5-7.5 or equivalent) but will want to reach a more competent level. If so, you can take both Advanced English I and II or just module I or just module II. You'll analyse and discuss articles in the media and listen to academic talks and news reports on contemporary topics; through writing tasks, you will have the opportunity to express your ideas in clear and coherent terms, and you will receive personal feedback on your efforts. You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the language. You will be able to focus on improving aspects of your pronunciation and grammar as well as expanding your vocabulary. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through topics such as Time and Sleep, World Population and Urbanisation and Tourism. You will be assessed mid-term, and in the final weeks through a seminar presentation (30%) and listening, reading and writing tasks (70%). By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself more confidently orally, be better able to understand recorded material and will have increased your vocabulary base; you will be more able to read complex texts and write more accurately with fewer grammar errors and greater range of expression. Such language support will be of immense benefit for all aspects of your UEA academic programme, will please your tutors and enable you to obtain higher grades!

PPLB5044B

20

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE AND POLICY

You will develop your skills and understanding in the integrated analysis of global climate change, using perspectives from both the natural sciences and the social sciences. You will gain a grounding in the basics of climate change science, impacts, adaptation, mitigation and their influence on and by policy decisions. This module also offers you a historical perspective on how climate policy has developed, culminating in the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Finally, it considers what will be required to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2 #C above pre-industrial levels.

ENV-5003A

20

ENERGY AND PEOPLE

Modern everyday life rests fundamentally on the availability of energy. Since the 1970s, however, serious concerns have been raised about the sustainability of current energy systems. Traditionally, these problems have been analysed (and solutions proposed) from within the engineering and physical sciences. Understanding, managing and attempting to solve energy problems, however, demands a thorough appreciation of how people, at a range of scales, engage with energy in the course of their daily lives. This is a critical challenge for the social sciences, and will be a core focus of this module. Through this module, you will discover and explore a range of social science perspectives on the inter-relationships between energy and people. You will learn how to apply these ideas to contemporary energy problems and use them to generate your own visions for a sustainable energy future. You'll also be given the chance to work as part of a team and to communicate your ideas through both written and oral presentation. You'll begin by tracing the history and development of energy intensive societies and everyday lives as a means of understanding how energy has emerged as a key sustainability problem. You'll then go into more depth around different theories of social and technical change before exploring how these can be used to critically analyse a range of people-based solutions to energy problems that are currently being tried and tested around the world. You'll learn through a combination of lectures and seminars involving interactive group projects, class debates, practical exercises and student-led learning. At the end of the module, you will have developed the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to allow you to apply theories of social and technical change to a range of real-world energy problems. You'll be able to develop and critically analyse your own (and already existing) visions of a sustainable energy future, and you'll be able to creatively communicate these ideas to a range of different audiences. Please note, this is a strongly social science based module and is not recommended for students without a strong grounding in social science thinking and principle.

ENV-6026B

20

ENGLISH ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS

Do you need help in organising your writing and expressing your thoughts clearly? Would you like to gain the tools and confidence to write more clearly and fluently, leading to better grades and greater satisfaction with your work? In this module you will learn how to structure academic essays and how best to write logically organised paragraphs. You will have practice in summarising and paraphrasing material from sources that you have read to ensure you can capture the essential points of a writer's argument and avoid any form of plagiarism. This will include help with ways to manage the referencing of sources. There will be a focus on vocabulary throughout the course and you will be set tasks to direct you to appropriate academic language; and you will have help in using a range of cohesive devices to link ideas within and between paragraphs. It is also likely that the class will need some remedial work on a specific area of grammar occasionally, and the tutor will allow time in class to deal with such issues. Naturally, you will be required to complete weekly homework assignments in addition to any reading and writing you do in the classroom, and you will receive regular feedback. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Also students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5045B

20

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING

The most significant obstacles to problem solving are often political, not scientific or technological. This module examines the emergence and processes of environmental politics. It analyses these from different theoretical perspectives, particularly theories of power and public policy making. The module is focused on contemporary examples of politics and policy making at UK, EU and international levels. The module supports student-led learning by enabling you to select (and develop your own theoretical interpretations of) 'real world' examples of politics. Assessment will be via seminar presentations and a case study essay. The module assumes no prior knowledge of politics.

ENV-5002B

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

An intermediate course in Arabic is for those students who have taken Beginners' Arabic I and II or who have a GCSE in the language. In this module you will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5035A

20

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic I, this module offers you lively dialogues, varied texts and exercises, plus fascinating cultural insights. You will cover a wide variety of topics such as leisure, news and media, arts and cinema, as well as an end-of-unit focus on the geography, culture and dialects of major Arab countries. The course has three contact hours per week. Alternative slots may be available depending on enrolment. Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5036B

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I - A2 CEFR

The four elements you will study in this intermediate French module are: Listening Comprehension, Writing, Translation and Grammar. While the emphasis is on comprehension, the speaking and writing of French are also included. You should have pre A level experience (or equivalent) of French and wish to develop this to a standard comparable to A level/Baccalaureate /B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module and should not have already studied AS or A level French/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR.

PPLB5150A

20

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II - A2/B1 CEFR

In this intermediate French module you will develop your knowledge to a standard comparable to A level/ Baccalaureate/B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). This is a continuation of Intermediate French I. There are four elements: Listening Comprehension, Translation, Writing, and Grammar. This module can be taken in any year but is not available if you already have French AS or A level/Baccalaureate/Level B1 in the CEFR. You should not have a level of French that already exceeds the level of this module.

PPLB5032B

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I - A2.1 CEFR

Would you like to take your basic German skills to a higher level? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to express a range of feelings in German? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy presenting a cultural event in your country to a native German speaker? This module is perfect if you have already completed Beginners modules or have sufficient pre-A-level experience of German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more competent and confident in conversation with others as you explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to express opinions and preferences in a more complex way and how to master the skill of agreeing and disagreeing. You will gain the confidence to present to a small audience and shine in the process of it. During this module you will develop your understanding of the German way of thinking through shining a light at cultural traditions and events. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and phrases. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in basic discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A basic intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5151A

20

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II - A2/B1 CEFR

Would you like to take your German to a higher level and start to become a more independent user? Wouldn't it be tempting to be able to describe the plot of a good film or book? Or take part in simple discussions and manage to hold your own? Fancy promoting a TV-series from to a native German speaker? This follow-on course is perfect if you have completed the Intermediate module or have basic A-level experience in German but not if you are already working at a higher level than this. You will become more independent in conversation with others as you continue to explore essential grammar and vocabulary at a higher level. You will learn how to talk about experiences, hopes and ambitions in a more complex way and how to master the skill of persuasion. During this module you will develop a deeper understanding of the German way of thinking through looking at current affairs and iconic German television programmes. In a relaxed environment you will participate in classroom-based activities, working in groups to try out and be creative with new words and grammar structures. The fun of language learning will never be far away and promises to give you the confidence to hold your own in discussions and presentations. As well as speaking and listening to each other you will apply a range of strategies to help you produce and understand longer texts. A sound intermediate course in German will enable you to add a vital and highly valued skill to your CV. At this crucial political and cultural moment in time the study of the German language and culture will without doubt make you a more attractive graduate and informed global citizen, whatever your specialism or area of interest.

PPLB5033B

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK I

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Beginners II) this module is for you. This module will enable you to build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. You will consolidate at a higher level, specific aspects of the language. The emphasis will lie on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst you will develop knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs. You will enhance your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: discuss/read and write on the following Topics: Leisure / culture/sports Travel / Car Hire Meeting people (2) (formal-informal)/Receive a guest/visito Please note that very occasionally subsidiary language modules may be cancelled due to low enrolment. Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module, at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5157A

20

INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

Greek is one of the official languages of the EU and is spoken by about 11 million people in Greece, Cyprus, and in various communities throughout the world. You will be surprised by the number of Modern Greek words that are already familiar to you, including scientific and technical vocabulary. Greek also opens the door to a unique and fascinating culture. UEA is one of the few British Universities offering Modern Greek, so stand out from the crowd and go for Greek. If you have a GCSE in Greek (or equivalent experience, i.e. Greek Intermediate I ) this module is for you. The module has three contact hours per week. You will develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The aim is to equip you with the linguistic understanding of a number of real life situations, as well as the ability to communicate effectively in those situations. You will also have opportunities to explore aspects of the cultures where Greek is spoken. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a sound knowledge of grammar. By the end of this module you will be able to: converse/read and write on the following Topics: Staying with a Greek host Solving Problems Making Complaints Please note that students who are found to have a level of knowledge that exceeds the level for which they have enrolled may be asked to withdraw from the module at the Teacher's discretion.

PPLB5037B

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

Do you want to delve further into the cultural mosaic that is Italy and discover more about 'La Dolce Vita'? Do you want to engage with the country, its language, its people, their way of life and culture, and discover what makes them tick? Take your Italian to the next level, consolidate your skills and move away from basic conversations to real debate and dialogue. In a relaxed and friendly collaborative environment you will participate in classroom activities to boost your confidence and enable you to engage with authentic Italian recordings and texts. Reading and writing texts will be more complex and take for granted references, context, and levels of understanding that are challenging but very rewarding. Regular feedback will help build your confidence and working in pairs and small groups will allow you to share your particular strengths with other students and really enjoy the process at the same time. You will be encouraged to find your own successful learning strategies and do research outside the classroom using the internet and other valuable language resources. By the end of this module you'll have covered most of the tenses and will have started studying the subjunctive mood in order to express your opinions in a more subtle way. You;ll learn the capacity for sophisticated handling of the language, improve your vocabulary through an innovative approach to self- study, and be confident enough to initiate real communication when visiting Italy for business or pleasure. You should have completed the Beginners' Italian one and two modules at UEA or have GCSE level Italian or the equivalent before starting this module. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level of this module. This is not suitable for you if you've already studied Italian for several years at another university or college.

PPLB5039A

20

INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Do you want to continue to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and expand your cultural knowledge of contemporary Italy? Do you want to focus on language usage rather than abstract concepts and meet Italy head on? You will participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and small groups; exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of the Italian language. One of your main goals will be to use your language skills actively and creatively in meaningful communication. You will also gain a greater understanding of cultural and political issues through engaging with current topics and you will focus on different learning strategies such as using your background knowledge or doing research online. Interesting texts will help facilitate your understanding of authentic reading material and you will become familiar with different writing styles and genres as well as natural language written by and for native speakers. By the end of this module you will be able to express yourself in Italian in a more subtle way and you will understand language spoken by native speakers in a variety of different contexts, formal and informal. The simulated real-life situations will have prepared you for working, studying, or travelling in Italy or communicating with Italians whilst in this country in a social or business setting. Before starting this module you should have completed the Intermediate Italian One module or studied up to a similar level in another institution or at UEA. You should not already have a level of Italian that exceeds the level taught in this module.

PPLB5040B

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or would you like to enhance your career opportunities? An intermediate course in Japanese for those students who have taken Beginners' Japanese I and II or who have a GCSE or similar qualification in the language. You will build on, and further enhance, existing reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5060A

20

INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

Do you want to explore Japanese culture or travel to Japan? Or do you want to enhance your career opportunities? You will continue to build upon what you have learnt in Intermediate Japanese I. A key component is the exploration of themes that develop interculturality. Specific aspects of language are revisited and consolidated at a higher level. The emphasis lies on enhancing essential grammar notions and vocabulary areas in meaningful contexts, whilst developing knowledge of contemporary life and society that focuses on culture and current affairs.

PPLB5061B

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5158A

20

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

Winston Churchill once said: 'Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. Russia gave the world Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Shostakovich, Chagall and borsh! Would you like to know more about this largest country in the world and unwrap some of the mysteries of its history, culture and politics through its language? This course is intended for students who completed UEA Beginners' Russian Course or who have studied Russian before, but not those who are working at a higher level in the language. You should be able to read and write in the language and should be familiar with the basics of Russian grammar. You'll participate in classroom-based activities, often working in pairs and groups, exchanging ideas and supporting each other in your exploration of Russian language, literature and history. You'll get acquainted with finer and more nuanced aspects of Russian grammar and stylistic usage. You'll be able to further improve and develop your grammar and vocabulary skills through watching Russian films, reading newspaper articles and short stories, discuss their content and express your opinion. A Russian language course on your CV will give you an advantage over other graduates; it will also help if you are interested in seeking work opportunities in Eastern Europe, Russia and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In the current political and cultural situation, the course will help you to become a more informed global citizen whatever your specialisation or area of interest.

PPLB5038B

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I - A2 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language, in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved a higher-intermediate level of Spanish.

PPLB5152A

20

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II - A2/B1 CEFR

When studying this module, you'll already have taken beginners' Spanish modules or be at GCSE level, but not exceeding this. You'll be introduced to aspects of the Spanish language in a variety of cultural contexts. It will enable you to converse with native Spanish speakers, read and understand specific information in short texts starting at intermediate level. Through Spanish, you'll learn to present information and engage in discussions. Using popular cultural forms such as film and media, you'll develop your reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Upon successfully completion of this module, you will have achieved an advanced level of Spanish.

PPLB5034B

20

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Environmental economics provides a set of tools and principles which can be useful in understanding natural resource management issues. This module introduces you to key principles and tools of environmental economics for students who have not studied the subject previously. It then explores how these principles can be applied to address a number of complex economy-environment problems including climate change, over-fishing and water resources management. In this module you will have the opportunity to practically apply cost-benefit analysis as a framework for decision-making and will gain knowledge on the key non-market valuation techniques that are used to monetarily value environmental goods and services. At the end of the module you will have gained insights into how environmental economics is used in developing natural resource management policy as well as some of the challenges in using environmental economics in policy-making.

ENV-6012B

20

POWER AND SOCIETY

This module introduces students to key perspectives in 19th and 20th century social and political theory. Central to this module is an interest in the relationship between economic, social and cultural structures and individual agency and identity. Areas explored include the following: social conflict and consensus; conceptions of power and domination; Marxism and neo-Marxism; critical theory; structuralism; poststructuralism; ideology and discourse; postmodernity; the self and consumer society.

PPLX5159B

20

POWER, WEALTH AND NATIONS: GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

What if I told you that the West was no longer the power centre of the world's economy? Could Pax Sinica provincialize the UK as political economic power settles over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta? What would Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich List have to say about global transformations underway in the global political economy? And, as Susan Strange famously put it: cui bono: Who benefits from all these transformations? Multinational corporations, nation states, financial sector, exporting economies, citizens? You'll investigate the accumulation of wealth, movement of capital, centres of power, flows of globalisation, patterns of trade, and the ubiquity of finance in a world being transformed by innovation where emerging powers challenge the status quo of North Atlantic powerhouses.

PPLI5161B

20

Disclaimer

Whilst the University will make every effort to offer the modules listed, changes may sometimes be made arising from the annual monitoring, review and update of modules and regular (five-yearly) review of course programmes. Where this activity leads to significant (but not minor) changes to programmes and their constituent modules, there will normally be prior consultation of students and others. It is also possible that the University may not be able to offer a module for reasons outside of its control, such as the illness of a member of staff or sabbatical leave. In some cases optional modules can have limited places available and so you may be asked to make additional module choices in the event you do not gain a place on your first choice. Where this is the case, the University will endeavour to inform students.

Further Reading

  • Environmental Justice

    A group of International Development Researchers at UEA are working on global environmental justice, linking in with questions of biodiversity conservation, climate change, ecosystem management, forestry, disaster risks and water.

    Read it Environmental Justice
  • Ask a Student

    This is your chance to ask UEA's students about UEA, university life, Norwich and anything else you would like an answer to.

    Read it Ask a Student
  • Annual Newsletter 2017-2018

    Students in the field, volunteers on the ground and keeping older people healthy. A year in Development.

    Read it Annual Newsletter 2017-2018
  • How DEV Students Are Making An Impact To The World

    Hear how two of our Alumni are building global careers and making a positive impact on people's lives.

    Read it How DEV Students Are Making An Impact To The World
  • Politics Matters

    Combining political science and interdisciplinary approaches to international development - find out more about why Politics Matters.

    Read it Politics Matters
  • UEA Award

    Develop your skills, build a strong CV and focus your extra-curricular activities while studying with our employer-valued UEA award.

    Read it UEA Award

Entry Requirements

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 points
  • Scottish Advanced Highers ABB
  • Irish Leaving Certificate AABBBB or 2 subjects at H1 and 4 at H2
  • Access Course An ARTS/Humanities/Social Science pathway preferred. Pass with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

You are required to have Mathematics and English Language at a minimum of Grade C or Grade 4 or above at GCSE.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading):

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)

We also accept a number of other English language tests. Please click here to see our full list.

INTO University of East Anglia

If you do not meet the academic and or English requirements for direct entry our partner, INTO University of East Anglia offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of a preparation programme. Depending on your interests, and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

International Foundation in Business, Economics, Society and Culture

International Foundation in Humanities and Law

International Foundation in General Science

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

  • A Level ABB
  • International Baccalaureate 32 If no GCSE equivalent is held, offer will include Mathematics and English requirements.
  • Scottish Advanced Highers BCC
  • Irish Leaving Certificate 3 subjects at H2, 3 subjects at H3
  • Access Course Pass the Access to HE Diploma with Distinction in 30 credits at Level 3 and Merit in 15 credits at Level 3
  • BTEC DDM BTEC Public Services is not accepted.
  • European Baccalaureate 75%

Entry Requirement

GCSE Requirements:  GCSE English Language grade 4 and GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or GCSE English Language grade C and GCSE Mathematics grade C.

UEA recognises that some students take a mixture of International Baccalaureate IB or International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme IBCP study rather than the full diploma, taking Higher levels in addition to A levels and/or BTEC qualifications. At UEA we do consider a combination of qualifications for entry, provided a minimum of three qualifications are taken at a higher Level. In addition some degree programmes require specific subjects at a higher level.

 

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including speaking, listening, reading and writing) at the following level:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in any component)

We will also accept a number of other English language qualifications. Review our English Language Equivalences here.

INTO University of East Anglia 

If you do not meet the academic and/or English language requirements for this course, our partner INTO UEA offers guaranteed progression on to this undergraduate degree upon successful completion of an International Foundation programme. Depending on your interests and your qualifications you can take a variety of routes to this degree:

INTO UEA also offer a variety of English language programmes which are designed to help you develop the English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study:

 

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview and a decision will be made via UCAS Track. However, for some students an interview will be requested. You may be called for an interview to help the School of Study, and you, understand if the course is the right choice for you.  The interview will cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.  Where an interview is required the Admissions Service will contact you directly to arrange a convenient time.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year.  We believe that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and to contact admissions@uea.ac.uk directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Fees and Funding

Undergraduate University Fees and Financial Support

Tuition Fees

Information on tuition fees can be found here:

UK students

EU Students

Overseas Students

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to ensuring that costs do not act as a barrier to those aspiring to come to a world leading university and have developed a funding package to reward those with excellent qualifications and assist those from lower income backgrounds. 

The University of East Anglia offers a range of Scholarships; please click the link for eligibility, details of how to apply and closing dates.

How to Apply

Applications need to be made via the Universities Colleges and Admissions Services (UCAS), using the UCAS Apply option.

UCAS Apply is a secure online application system that allows you to apply for full-time Undergraduate courses at universities and colleges in the United Kingdom. It is made up of different sections that you need to complete. Your application does not have to be completed all at once. The system allows you to leave a section partially completed so you can return to it later and add to or edit any information you have entered. Once your application is complete, it must be sent to UCAS so that they can process it and send it to your chosen universities and colleges.

The UCAS code name and number for the University of East Anglia is EANGL E14.

Further Information

If you would like to discuss your individual circumstances with the Admissions Office prior to applying please do contact us:

Undergraduate Admissions Office (Development)
Tel: +44 (0)1603 591515
Email: admissions@uea.ac.uk

Please click here to register your details via our Online Enquiry Form.

International candidates are also actively encouraged to access the University's International section of our website.

    Next Steps

    We can’t wait to hear from you. Just pop any questions about this course into the form below and our enquiries team will answer as soon as they can.

    Admissions enquiries:
    admissions@uea.ac.uk or
    telephone +44 (0)1603 591515